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    White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer told a reporter to 'stop shaking your head' during an exchange at his daily press briefing Tuesday. Spicer appeared annoyed by April Ryan, Washington bureau chief for American Urban Radio Networks, when she asked what President Trump's administration would do to revamp its image following reports of its ties to Russia. Spicer objected to the premise, saying: 'I appreciate your agenda here. At some point, report the facts.' He said there has been no proven collusion between Trump associates and Russian officials over interference in last year's election, quipping that 'if the president put Russian salad dressing on his salad tonight, somehow that's a Russian connection.' Spicer said Ryan appeared 'hell-bent' on projecting her own image of the White House when she asked what Trump might be doing to repair a relationship with former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice, who did not support his campaign and was meeting with the president later this week. 'Please stop shaking your head again,' Spicer said to Ryan. He said the president was fulfilling a promise to build bridges with both supporters and opponents. Later, in an interview on MSNBC, Ryan said that 'Sean is being the White House press secretary, talking about and trying to make this administration look better than what it does right now, and unfortunately I was roadkill today.
  • Republican President Donald Trump's lawyers say he's immune while president from defamation claims brought by a former contestant on his reality TV show 'The Apprentice' who accused him of unwanted sexual contact. The lawyers said in a state Supreme Court filing Monday they'll formally ask for a dismissal or a suspension of the January claims by Summer Zervos until he leaves office. They said the Constitution immunizes Trump from being sued in state court while president. The lawyers said their position is supported by a long line of U.S. Supreme Court cases requiring courts to show deference to the president and his schedule. Zervos was a contestant on Trump's reality show in 2006. She sued after Trump dismissed as 'fabricated and made-up charges' her claims at a news conference that he made unwanted sexual contact with her at a Beverly Hills hotel in 2007. The lawsuit sought an apology and $2,914. Trump's lawyers said in Monday's filing that the president denies 'these unfounded accusations' and was prepared to show that they were 'false, legally insufficient and made in a transparent politically-motivated attack.' They said the allegations have been disputed even by a member of Zervos' family. Zervos was among several women who made sexual allegations against Trump when he was the Republican nominee during the presidential race last year. Trump has strenuously denied their allegations. After appearing on Trump's show, Zervos said she later asked him for a job. She said they met and he kissed her on the lips and asked for her phone number. She said at a later meeting at a California hotel he became sexually aggressive, kissing her and touching her breasts. During the presidential campaign, a tape of Trump talking about fame enabling him to grope and try to have sex with women emerged. On the 2005 'Access Hollywood' tape, Trump says when he's attracted to beautiful women 'I just start kissing them. It's like a magnet.' He says when you're a star, women let you. 'Grab them by the p----,' Trump adds. 'You can do anything.' Trump later said in a presidential debate that he never did any of the actions heard on the tape, which he described as locker room talk. Trump's wife, Melania Trump, blamed 'Access Hollywood' host Billy Bush for what Trump said. She said they were involved in 'boy talk, and he was led on, like egged on, from the host to say dirty and bad stuff.' A Zervos attorney, Gloria Allred, said she doesn't believe the president of the United States enjoys legal immunity from a defamation lawsuit. She said the Supreme Court addressed the legal immunity issue in a case involving Democratic President Bill Clinton and 'determined unanimously that no man is above the law, and that includes the president of the United States.' 'We look forward,' she said, 'to arguing this issue in court.
  • Bill Cosby's lawyers want to prevent jurors at his Pennsylvania sex assault trial from hearing his lurid deposition testimony about giving pills and alcohol to a string of women before sex. The 79-year-old comedian is accused of drugging and molesting former Temple University employee Andrea Constand in 2004. He has said the sexual contact was consensual. Cosby gave the testimony more than a decade ago as part of Constand's lawsuit filed against him. Judge Steven O'Neill previously ruled that prosecutors can use Cosby's deposition about his long history of extramarital relationships as evidence. But in a separate ruling, O'Neill said most of the women Cosby talks about in the deposition won't be permitted to take the stand. Cosby's lawyers asked the judge to exclude Cosby's 2006 testimony about those women.
  • 1. '60 Minutes,' CBS, 14.7 million. 2. 'Dancing With the Stars,' ABC, 12.09 million. 3. 'NCIS: Los Angeles,' CBS, 11.71 million. 4. 'The Voice' (Tuesday), NBC, 10.84 million. 5. 'The Voice' (Monday), NBC, 10.74 million. 6. 'The Walking Dead,' AMC, 10.54 million. 7. NCAA Basketball: UCLA vs. Kentucky, CBS, 10 million. 8. 'Little Big Shots,' NBC, 9.81 million. 9. 'NCIS,' CBS, 9.36 million. 10. NCAA Basketball: Kansas vs. Oregon, TBS, 9.31 million. 11. 'Madam Secretary,' CBS, 8.77 million. 12. 'Survivor,' CBS, 8.1 million. 13. 'Empire,' Fox, 7.95 million. 14. 'Grey's Anatomy,' ABC, 7.8 million. 15. 'Criminal Minds,' CBS, 7.47 million. 16. 'Chicago Fire,' NBC, 7.21 million. 17. NCAA Basketball: Michigan vs. Oregon, CBS, 7.13 million. 18. 'Bull,' CBS, 7.02 million. 19. NCAA Basketball: Purdue vs. Kansas, CBS, 6.62 million. 20. 'NCAA Studio Show,' TBS, 6.52 million. ___ ABC is owned by The Walt Disney Co.; CBS is a division of CBS Corp.; Fox is owned by 21st Century Fox; NBC is owned by NBC Universal.
  • Elton John is teaming up with Andrew Lloyd Webber and Tim Rice to develop an animated adaptation of 'Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat.' STX Entertainment chairman Adam Fogelson announced the project Tuesday at CinemaCon, the annual gathering of theater owners and exhibitors. The musical, which Rice and Webber created in the late 1960s, is based on the 'coat of many colors' story from the Book of Genesis. The studio also announced a new animated project from Eddie Murphy about a bull named Bo who wants to be a rodeo clown.
  • The future of Hollywood movies is in the hands of young and diverse audiences. At CinemaCon Tuesday, studio executives and representatives from the National Association of Theater Owners touted the importance of both groups in growing the movie business. Higher ticket prices helped push the motion picture industry to a record box office total in North American theaters in 2016, but Walt Disney Studios distribution head Dave Hollis said attendance itself has remained nearly flat for a decade. Meanwhile, the business is getting more complicated as streaming services compete for consumer attention. Many of the major Hollywood studios are looking at the possibility of shortening the time between the theatrical release of a film and its availability on home video. But Hollis said Disney and its fellow studios 'believe deeply that films ... should be seen in a theater.' 'We have a common goal to get people to see them in your cinemas,' Hollis told people at the convention. Industry executives say the focus in the coming years will be on consumers 18 to 39, whose attendance has grown in the past two years, as has that of diverse audiences. Association President and CEO John Fithian said Hispanics constitute the most frequent moviegoers in relation to their population numbers. Attendance by Asian Americans and African Americans has also ncreased. Millennials make up 55 percent of frequent moviegoers, according to the association, meaning they have seen four movies in the past two months. Hollis challenged theater owners and exhibitors to keep aggressively competing for the attention of their young audiences through Snapchat, Facebook, Instagram and other technology and apps used by young people. 'We live in a super-competitive world,' Hollis said. 'Our consumers continue to change rapidly and have more choices than ever before.
  • Ivanka Trump and Education Secretary Betsy DeVos on Tuesday exhorted young girls to pursue careers in science, technology, engineering and math, saying those fields will provide the jobs and innovation for the future. Their tour of the National Air and Space Museum with a group of middle school students came as the Trump administration proposed further cuts to education and science, drawing harsh criticism from teachers' unions and others. Ivanka Trump, a successful entrepreneur who considers herself as a women's rights activist, lamented that women make up 48 percent of America's work force but only 24 percent of STEM professionals. 'This statistic is showing that we are sadly moving in the wrong direction. Women are increasingly underrepresented in important fields of science, technology, engineering and math,' Trump said. 'But I dare you to beat these statistics and advance the role of women in STEM fields.' She said she and her 5-year-old daughter Arabella plan to take a coding class together this summer because 'coding truly is the language of the future.' Astronaut Kay Hire and female researchers at NASA also spoke to the students and DeVos urged the children to follow in their footsteps by studying, working hard and mentoring younger peers. 'You can do your part to improve the lives of women in the future,' DeVos said. As she praised the role of women in the American space program, Ivanka Trump also said her father's administration has expanded NASA's space exploration to add Mars as a top objective. But as she spoke, the Trump administration sent Congress a series of 'options' for budget cuts, including slashing $3 billion from Education Department, as well as cuts to NASA and the National Institutes of Health. The American Federation of Teachers accused the administration of hypocrisy. 'Education Secretary Betsy DeVos and Ivanka Trump are feigning an interest in STEM careers with a photo op at the National Air and Space Museum while eliminating all funding for NASA's education programs. This takes chutzpah to a new level,' American Federation of Teachers President Randi Weingarten said in a statement. 'The next generation of astronauts, scientists, engineers and mathematicians need support, not budget cuts eliminating the very programs being promoted.' But Gerard Robinson, a resident fellow at the conservative American Enterprise Institute, said that STEM was not limited to the Education Department and that other agencies, like the Defense Department, where Trump has proposed to increase spending, also have STEM programs. Robinson added that President Donald Trump has signed two laws aimed at encouraging women to pursue STEM majors. The bills, which Trump signed into law in February, call on NASA to encourage young women to study STEM and empower the National Institutes of Health to support women in turning their scientific work into business ventures. 'Both of these are signs to me that both Trump and Betsy DeVos are committed to advancing women in stem fields,' Robinson said.
  • President Donald Trump's proposal to eliminate funds for the Corporation for Public Broadcasting would most dramatically affect rural and minority communities, eventually forcing some local television and radio stations to close, the corporation's president and chief executive officer told Congress Tuesday. The president's budget would eliminate $445 million in federal funds for the non-profit corporation, which supports programs such as Sesame Street, Frontline and documentaries from filmmaker Ken Burns. Patricia de Stacy Harrison, the president and chief executive officer for the corporation, said federal funding generally represents 10 percent to 15 percent of a public broadcasting station's budget, but can represent as much as 80 percent of the annual budget for some stations. Harrison said stations serving rural and minority communities don't have the kind of in-depth donor base that would allow them to overcome the loss of federal funding. 'There would be a domino effect and it would start with rural stations,' Harrison said. The Corporation for Public Broadcasting distributes its federal funding through grants to more than 1,400 radio and television stations around the country. The corporation is celebrating the 50th anniversary of the law that created it. Funding for the parent organization of the Public Broadcasting Service and National Public Radio has remained flat for several years. On Capitol Hill, Harrison was generally greeted with a supportive audience. Rep. Tom Cole, the Republican chairman of the panel reviewing the president's budget request, told Harrison that 'this is an agency we all admire.' 'We do have tough decision ahead of us, but I think you make your case very well,' said the Oklahoma lawmaker. Rep. Nita Lowey, D-N.Y., said in Washington, bad ideas never die. She called the effort to cut funding another effort to 'give Bert and Ernie a pink slip.' Rep. Andy Harris, R-Md., said that in a time of shrinking resources, he had questions about how the Corporation for Public Broadcasting could support programs such a Kumu Hina, a story of a transgender native Hawaiian teacher. 'I beg you, please remove the agenda from education,' Harris said. 'This has to be neutral content.' 'Maybe we don't get it right 100 percent of the time but I'm willing to bet we get it right 90 percent,' Harrison said. She said the corporation can prove it makes a difference, particularly for those families that can't afford cable. 'But 1 percent poisons the well,' Harris said.
  • Fox News personality Bill O'Reilly apologized Tuesday for saying he had a hard time concentrating on California Rep. Maxine Waters during a speech because he was distracted by her 'James Brown wig.' O'Reilly said that his jest about her hair was dumb. 'I apologize,' he said in a statement. He had made his statement during an appearance earlier on 'Fox & Friends,' after a clip was shown of the Democratic representative speaking in the House of Representatives. O'Reilly, as he watched, appeared to mouth the words 'right on' and give a clenched-fist salute. After the clip, he said, 'I didn't hear a word she said. I was looking at the James Brown wig.' Fox's Ainsley Earhardt defended Waters, saying O'Reilly shouldn't go after a woman's looks. O'Reilly also said that Waters, who is black, should have 'her own sitcom.' In his apology, O'Reilly said that 'as I have said many times, I respect Congresswoman Maxine Waters for being sincere in her beliefs.
  • The late Muhammad Ali is getting the Ken Burns treatment. The PBS documentarian announced Tuesday that he and two partners will make a two-part, four-hour film about the former heavyweight champ, who died last June. Burns, his daughter Sarah and David McMahon collaborated for a PBS documentary on Jackie Robinson that debuted last year. The tentative plan is to air the Ali film in 2021. Sarah Burns said the outpouring of good will at Ali's death made it easy to forget how divisive it was when the former Cassius Clay took the Ali name when he converted to Islam and refused to join the Army during the Vietnam War. She said filmmakers want to examine what influenced Ali's choices and how he stuck with them despite public condemnation.