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    The ferocious female-led tragi-comedy 'Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri' was the big winner at the British Academy Film Awards in London, where women demanding an end to harassment, abuse and inequality dominated the ceremony. Martin McDonagh's film about a bereaved mother seeking justice won five trophies Sunday including best film, outstanding British film and best actress, for Frances McDormand. Producer Graham Broadbent said the movie is 'the story of a woman taking on the establishment and status quo.' 'It seems more timely now than we could ever have imagined,' he said. Writer-director McDonagh said it was fitting, in the year of the 'Time's Up' campaign against sexual harassment, that 'Three Billboards' is 'a film about a woman who refuses to take any s(asterisk)(asterisk)(asterisk) anymore.' 'Our film is a hopeful one in lots of ways, but it's also an angry one,' McDonagh said. 'As we've seen this year, sometimes anger is the only way to get people to listen and to change.' McDonagh won the original screenplay prize for 'Three Billboards,' which also netted Sam Rockwell the supporting actor trophy. Allison Janney was named best supporting actress for playing ice skater Tonya Harding's domineering mother in 'I, Tonya.' Guillermo del Toro won the directing prize for the monster fantasy 'The Shape of Water,' which also took trophies for music and production design. Gary Oldman, the favorite among bookies, won the best actor prize for playing wartime British Prime Minister Winston Churchill in 'Darkest Hour.' The British prizes, known as BAFTAs, are considered a key indicator of likely success at Hollywood's Oscars in two weeks' time. The film awards season in the United States and elsewhere has been overshadowed by the allegations of sexual harassment and abuse leveled at scores of entertainment figures since women began coming forward to accuse Hollywood producer Harvey Weinstein last year. London's Old Vic Theatre has been rocked by allegations against former artistic director Kevin Spacey. London police are also investigating nine claims of sexual assault by Weinstein. The red carpet and the auditorium at London's Royal Albert Hall were a sea of black, as actresses such as Lupita Nyong'o, Angelina Jolie, Jennifer Lawrence and Margot Robbie eschewed color as a statement against sexual misconduct and gender inequality. Several actresses brought feminist activists as guests, and men showed solidarity with 'Time's Up' lapel pins. McDormand opted to wear black and red rather than all black, and noted: 'I have a little trouble with compliance.' 'But I want you to know that I stand in full solidarity with my sisters tonight in black,' she said. On the red carpet, actress Andrea Riseborough, who brought U.K. Black Pride founder Phyll Opoku-Gyimah as her guest, said she also hoped the film industry was on the road to greater equality and diversity. 'It's more likely we'll see an alien onscreen than we'll see an Asian woman at the moment, which is disgraceful,' Riseborough said. Prince William — the British Academy's president — and the Duchess of Cambridge were guests of honor at Sunday's ceremony, hosted by 'Absolutely Fabulous' star Joanna Lumley. Kate acknowledged the evening's muted fashion by wearing a dark green Jenny Packham dress with black belt. The call to wear black put Kate in a delicate position, because the royal family is careful to avoid political statements. Ahead of the ceremony, almost 200 British women in entertainment called Sunday for an international movement to end sexual misconduct. Kate Winslet, Emma Thompson, Naomie Harris, Emma Watson and Gemma Arterton were among signatories to a letter saying that 2018 should be 'the year that time was up on sexual harassment and abuse.' The stars called for an end to impunity for abusers and announced a fund to support women and men battling workplace abuse, modeled on the 'Time's Up' movement in the U.S. Former 'Harry Potter' star Watson has given the fund 1 million pounds ($1.4 million), according to its page on the Go Fund Me website. The BAFTA ceremony honored several generations of talent. Filmmaker James Ivory, 89, took the adapted screenplay prize for 'Call Me By Your Name.' The 80-year-old director Ridley Scott, whose films include 'Blade Runner,' ''Alien,' ''Thelma and Louise' and 'Gladiator,' received the academy's highest honor, the BAFTA Fellowship. Daniel Kaluuya, the 28-year-old British star of 'Get Out,' won the rising star award and made a plea for public arts funding, which helped him get his start. Kaluuya, who is also Oscar-nominated, joked that success to him meant taking Ubers rather than the subway. 'I get that Prius everywhere,' he said. ___ For full coverage of awards season: https://apnews.com/tag/AwardsSeason
  • Check out which films, stars and directors won big Sunday at the 2018 British Academy Film Awards in London.  >> PHOTOS: BAFTA Film Awards 2018 red carpet Best film: 'Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri' Outstanding British film: 'Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri' Outstanding debut by a British writer, director or producer: 'I Am Not a Witch,' Rungano Nyoni (writer/director), Emily Morgan (producer) Film not in the English language: 'The Handmaiden' Documentary: 'I Am Not Your Negro' Animated film: 'Coco' Director: 'The Shape of Water,' Guillermo del Toro Original screenplay: 'Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri,' Martin McDonagh Adapted screenplay: 'Call Me by Your Name,' James Ivory Leading actress: Frances McDormand, 'Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri' Leading actor: Gary Oldman, 'Darkest Hour' Supporting actress: Allison Janney, 'I, Tonya' Supporting actor: Sam Rockwell, 'Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri' Original music: 'The Shape of Water,' Alexandre Desplat Cinematography: 'Blade Runner 2049,' Roger Deakins Editing: 'Baby Driver,' Jonathan Amos, Paul Machliss Production design: 'The Shape of Water,' Paul Austerberry, Jeff Melvin, Shane Vieau Costume design: 'Phantom Thread,' Mark Bridges Makeup and hair: 'Darkest Hour,' David Malinowski, Ivana Primorac, Lucy Sibbick, Kazuhiro Tsuji Sound: 'Dunkirk,' Alex Gibson, Richard King, Gregg Landaker, Gary A. Rizzo, Mark Weingarten Special visual effects: 'Blade Runner 2049,' Richard R. Hoover, Paul Lambert, Gerd Nefzer, John Nelson British short animation: 'Poles apart,' Paloma Baeza, Ser En Low British short film: 'Cowboy Dave,' Colin O’Toole, Jonas Mortensen EE rising star award (voted for by the public): Daniel Kaluuya Fellowship: Sir Ridley Scott Outstanding British contribution to cinema: National Film and Television School (NFTS) >> Read more trending news 
  • Fergie tried something different with her national anthem at the NBA All-Star Game, and not everybody was cheering. The Black Eyed Peas singer's slow, bluesy rendition of 'The Star-Spangled Banner' on Sunday night wasn't particularly well received at Staples Center or on social media before the 67th edition of the NBA's annual showcase. A low chuckle rumbled through the sold-out arena after Fergie finished the first line of the song with a throaty growl on 'the dawn's early light.' Fans throughout the star-studded crowd reacted with varying levels of bemusement and enthusiasm while her languid, 2 ½-minute version of the song continued. Although Fergie was on pitch, her tempo, musical accompaniment and sexy delivery were not exactly typical for a sporting event or a patriotic song. Golden State All-Star Draymond Green captured the mood — and became an instant GIF — when he was shown open-mouthed on the scoreboard and the television broadcast in apparent confusion over the unique vocal stylings. Green then chuckled to himself after realizing he was on TV. After a forceful finish, Fergie finally got big cheers when she shouted, 'Let's play some basketball!' The Grammy Award-winning singer, born Stacy Ann Ferguson, is from nearby Hacienda Heights, California. Famed basketball commentator Charles Barkley joked that he 'needed a cigarette' after Fergie's performance during the TNT halftime show. Former Lakers star Shaquille O'Neal leaped to Fergie's defense, saying: 'Fergie, I love you. It was different. It was sexy. I liked it. Leave her alone.' Others on social media weren't as kind, with criticism of the performance outpacing the positive reviews. The Forum in nearby Inglewood, California, was the site of arguably the most famous national anthem in sports history during another NBA All-Star Game 35 years ago. Marvin Gaye's touching rhythm-and-blues version of 'The Star-Spangled Banner' at the 1983 game was initially criticized, but has since gained widespread acceptance as a groundbreaking musical performance. Instead, Fergie is more likely to join the long list of curious versions of the anthem, even though she showed far more impressive vocal chops than the likes of Roseanne Barr or Carl Lewis. ___ More AP basketball: www.apnews.com/tags/NBAbasketball
  • Grammy award-winning recording artist Fergie was tasked with the pre-game national anthem for the NBA All-Star Game on Sunday night. On paper, that sounds like a great choice, but many viewers thought it could have gone better. >> Click here to watch >> Pink nails national anthem at Super Bowl LII, spits out throat lozenge beforehand Critics pointed out that Fergie’s voice was oddly erratic during the anthem. One sequence even led Warriors forward Draymond Green to burst out in laughter after Fergie strung together the vocal performance. >> See the moment here Here's what social media users were saying:  >> Read more trending news  Obviously, not every anthem is going to be perfect; not everyone can just bust out a Whitney Houston-type of anthem at will. If you need to refresh your ears, here’s Whitney: – The Cox Media Group National Content Desk contributed to this report.
  • Highlights from media coverage of the Pyeongchang Olympics: WARDROBE MALFUNCTION: The Pyeongchang Olympics have had more wardrobe malfunctions than a Super Bowl halftime show, the latest on live television Sunday night when French ice dancer Gabriella Papadakis' costume became unhooked, briefly exposing her left breast. It was obvious to NBC announcers Terry Gannon and Tanitha White that Papadakis and partner Guillaume Cizeron directed much of the energy during their routine at trying to keep her costume from flying open. 'I'm just heartbroken that this had to be part of their Olympic program,' White said. NBC's subsequent online and television replays blurred out portions of the dance where the malfunction was evident. Earlier in the Olympics, South Korean figure skater Yura Min had a similar issue. NO RIPPON: American figure skater Adam Rippon agreed to become an NBC correspondent for the duration of the Olympics, but then changed his mind overnight. He told NBCSN on Sunday he was flattered by the offer, 'but if I took this opportunity, I would have to leave the Olympic team and I would have to leave the (Olympic) Village.' He said his friends on the Olympic team were there for him during his events and he wanted to return the favor. Rippon later echoed those sentiments on Twitter , which is where he said he initially found out about the opportunity. Rippon attracted attention for his colorful and candid interviews, and apparent ease with the medium. SEALED WITH A KISS: It was a small moment with a big impact. Kudos to NBC for showing American skier Gus Kensworthy getting a kiss from his boyfriend Matt Wilkas. Kenworthy knows what it meant. 'I never saw a gay athlete kissing their boyfriend at the Olympics,' he said. 'I think if I had, it would've made it easier for me.' TRAINING RUN: Devoting extended prime-time coverage to downhill skiing training runs was a snooze-inducing miscalculation. Even worse, people involved told you it was meaningless. When NBC's Dan Hicks prompted partner Bode Miller to discuss how the training runs give a glimpse into a skier's race strategy, Miller said that wasn't necessarily so. And Lindsey Vonn admitted she plays mind games with her opponents, intentionally holding back on her speed. Shortly after, NBC's Mike Tirico showed a brief clip of the biathlon photo finish between France's Martin Fourcade and Germany's Simon Schempp, noting it was a 9.3-mile race decided by 5 inches. 'Quite a story,' he said. Yes, and giving it time to unfold would have been welcome. TWIZZLE STICKS: Pro move by Gannon, early in his ice dancing work with White. When White said that twizzle elements would be crucial to the routines, Gannon instantly recognized that 95 percent of the audience wouldn't have a clue what that was and asked her to explain. JUMP THE BRIDGE: NBC's Paul Burmeister reached way back to Burt Reynolds' 1978 movie 'Hooper' in comparing an aerial skier's move to when Reynolds jumped over a gorge in a souped-up Trans Am. QUOTE: 'I hope my grandmother watching on TV is OK' — German bobsled driver Nico Walther, on how folks back home would react to his nasty spill. He was fine. REGIONAL POPULARITY: Halfway through the Olympics, Salt Lake City has a keener interest in the games than any other U.S. market, the Nielsen company said. The Utah city hosted the 2002 Winter Olympics. Denver, Milwaukee and Seattle follow as cities with the top ratings for NBC's coverage. GENDER BREAKDOWN: By a roughly 60 percent to 40 percent margin, NBC's prime-time Olympics coverage has featured men's events more than women's during the first half of the games, according to a study by three professors. The numbers don't include mixed-gender events. The study said the gap is wider than it was during the first half of the 2014 Games. The gap is expected to narrow during the second half of the games when women's figure skating is featured. Weather postponements of Alpine skiing events may have influenced the ratio, said Andrew Billings of the University of Alabama, who is studying the issue with James Angelini of the University of Delaware and Paul MacArthur of Utica College. RATINGS: Because of the holiday weekend, NBC did not immediately have ratings for its Saturday night coverage. ___ AP National Writer Eddie Pells in Pyeongchang, South Korea, contributed to this report. ___ More AP Olympic coverage: https://wintergames.ap.org
  • Moviegoers have been flocking to theaters this weekend to see Black Panther, shattering records with $192 million for the three-day weekend and a possible gross of $218 million for the four-day Presidents Day weekend, according to The Hollywood Reporter. >> Read more trending news The film by Marvel and Disney clinched the fifth-largest domestic opening of all time, Variety reported. With estimates of $169 million from international markets, the film, which stars Chadwick Boseman and was directed by Ryan Coogler, has an estimated global debut grossing more than $361 million through Sunday, Variety reported. >> 2 kids dressed as ‘tall man’ unable to gain admission to ‘Black Panther’ “Black Panther” is unprecedented among movies since it features a nearly all-black cast in a big-budget movie, according to the Reporter. It also earned a 97 rating on the Rotten Tomatoes website. The movie also broke the record for the largest Presidents Day weekend, cruising past the $152 million set in 2016 by “Deadpool,” Variety reported.
  • The Latest on the British Academy Film Awards (all times local): 9:25 p.m. 'Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri' has capped a winning evening at the British Academy Film Awards by taking the trophy for best picture. The tragicomic tale of a bereaved mother in search of justice beat rivals including 'The Shape of Water' and 'Darkest Hour.' Writer-director Martin McDonagh said a film about an angry woman who decides to act is appropriate in an awards season dominated by the campaign against sexual misconduct and bullying. He said at Sunday's awards ceremony in London that 'our film is a hopeful one in lots of ways, but it's also an angry one. As we've seen this year, sometimes anger is the only way to get people to listen and to change.' The British Academy Film Awards are Britain's equivalent of the Oscars. ___ 9:15 p.m. Frances McDormand has won the best actress prize at the British Academy Film Awards for her performance as a bereaved mother in 'Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri.' Critics and viewers have called McDormand riveting as a mother seeking justice for her murdered daughter in Martin McDonagh's tragicomic film. Unlike most women in attendance, McDormand did not dress all in black in a gesture against sexual harassment. She opted for a red and black dress. McDormand acknowledged her attire, noting 'I have a little problem with compliance. But I want you to know that I stand in full solidarity with my sisters tonight in black.' ___ 9:10 p.m. Gary Oldman has won the best actor prize at the British Academy Film Awards for his portrayal of Winston Churchill in 'Darkest Hour.' Oldman said the prize is 'all the more special because I can share it with my family,' including his three sons in the London audience. He also thanked the makeup team that rendered him unrecognizable in the biopic. And he hailed the late prime minister himself, saying Churchill helped maintain Britain's honor and freedom 'in those dark uncertain days' at the start of World War II. The win cements Oldman's place as the favorite to win the best-actor Academy Award at the Hollywood ceremony on March 4. ___ 8:45 p.m. Allison Janney has won the best supporting actress prize at the British Academy Film Awards for playing ice skater Tonya Harding's ferocious mother in 'I, Tonya.' Janney praised her co-stars and the team behind the 'beautiful movie,' which stars Margot Robbie as the champion skater from the 1990s caught up in a tragicomic rivalry with competitor Nancy Kerrigan. Janney is also up for an Academy Award at the Oscars on March 4. ___ 8:25 p.m. Sam Rockwell has won the best supporting actor prize at the British Academy Film Awards for his performance as a brutal, racist police officer in 'Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri.' At a ceremony dominated by the movement against sexual misconduct, Rockwell said he stood on the shoulders of 'strong, intelligent, righteous women.' He praised the film's star, actress Frances McDormand. Rockwell also praised the film's writer- director, Martin McDonagh, saying 'there are no great actors, only great roles.' The awards are Britain's equivalent of the Oscars. ___ 7:25 p.m. Revenge comedy 'Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri' has been named outstanding British film at the British Academy Film Awards. The film — which has a U.S cast, but a British producer and director — took the trophy at a ceremony dominated by the movement against sexual misconduct and inequality in the entertainment industry. Producer Graham Broadbent said the movie about a bereaved mother seeking justice is 'the story of a woman taking on the establishment and status quo. It seems more timely now than we could ever have imagined.' 'Three Billboards' is also nominated in the separate best picture category at Britain's equivalent of the Oscars. ___ 6:55 p.m. The Duchess of Cambridge has joined in with the muted palette on the BAFTA red carpet, wearing a dark green Jenny Packham dress with a black belt. Kate, who is expecting her third child in April, is attending the British Academy Film Awards with her husband, Prince William, who is president of the U.K. movie academy. Most female guests are wearing black to the ceremony as a statement of support for the 'Time's Up' movement against sexual harassment and abuse. Kate's choice found a middle way between making a political statement — something the royal family scrupulously avoids — and ignoring the gesture by wearing a bright color. ___ 5:25 p.m. Stars are starting to arrive for the British Academy Film Awards at London's Royal Albert Hall. Apart from some brightly clad Cirque du Soleil entertainers, the dress code on the red carpet is black. Many female guests are eschewing color to show support for the 'Time's Up' movement against sexual harassment and bullying. Kristin Scott Thomas, a supporting actress nominee for 'Darkest Hour,' says she is pleased by the conversation the entertainment industry is having about misconduct, but thinks a tougher task will be 'moving it from conversation to action.' Actress Andrea Riseborough, who brought U.K. Black Pride co-founder Phyll Opoku-Gyimah as her guest, says the film industry sorely needs greater diversity. She said: 'It's more likely we'll see an alien onscreen than we'll see an Asian woman at the moment, which is disgraceful.' ___ 7:50 a.m. Many of Britain's most prominent female entertainment stars have signed an open letter demanding an end to sexual harassment ahead of Britain's major film awards. A letter published Sunday has been signed by Academy Award winner Emma Thompson, Naomie Harris, Emma Watson, Gemma Arterton and many others. The letter in The Observer calls for an end to impunity and says 'this movement is bigger than just a change in our industry alone.' Backed by more than 190 entertainers, academics and activists, the letter aligns British film stars with the fight against sexual harassment set off by the allegations against U.S. movie producer Harvey Weinstein. It comes ahead of Sunday night's British Academy Film Awards, where many women attending plan to wear monochromatic black in solidarity with victims of abuse. ___ For full coverage of awards season: https://apnews.com/tag/AwardsSeason
  • It’s hard to believe that the joyous voice of the Chicago Cubs was silenced 20 years ago today. >> Read more trending news Broadcaster Harry Caray, who was the play-by-play man for the Cubs from 1982 to 1997, died on Feb. 18, 1998, in Rancho Mirage, California. He was 83, although at the time of his death, he was believed to be 78. Caray had collapsed at his restaurant in Palm Springs four days earlier. Before joining the Cubs. Caray called games for the St. Louis Cardinals (1945-1969), Oakland Athletics (1970) and Chicago White Sox (1971-1981). In addition to his signature call of “Holy, Cow!” Caray was famous for his off-key, passionate rendition of “Take Me Out to the Ball Game” during the seventh-inning stretch. Since baseball players are returning to Florida and Arizona for spring training, it’s only appropriate to hear Caray singing one more time. Here is a video from the last Cubs home game of 1997, which was his final appearance at Wrigley Field:
  • A wave of feverish anticipation, fawning critical acclaim and groundbreaking cultural meaning pushed 'Black Panther' to a record-setting $192 million debut in U.S. and Canada theaters, firmly establishing the superhero sensation as a box-office landmark. The Marvel film from the Walt Disney Co. blew past expectations to become the fifth-highest-grossing debut ever, not adjusting for inflation, following only 'Star Wars: The Force Awakens,' ''Star Wars: The Last Jedi,' ''Jurassic World' and 'The Avengers.' In estimates Sunday, Disney predicted a four-day holiday weekend of $218 million domestically and a global debut of $361 million. Though the film's international footprint doesn't include several of the largest markets — China, Russia and Japan — it still ranks among the top 15 global debuts ever. It's also the highest-grossing February opening weekend. 'All hail the King of Wakanda!' Disney declared, referring to the movie's mythical and highly advanced African nation. Ryan Coogler's film, which cost about $200 million to make, is the most expensive movie with a largely black ensemble and among the few to be centered on a black superhero. The strong opening suggests 'Black Panther' will easily set a box-office record for films directed by a black filmmaker. The previous best is Sidney Poitier's 1980 comedy 'Stir Crazy,' which took in $322 million domestically, when inflation is calculated. 'Black Panther' set pre-sale records and saw lines around theaters over the weekend, including some who came costumed for the event. 'This is the very definition of a blockbuster: People lining up around the block to see a great movie,' said Paul Dergarabedian, senior media analyst for comScore. 'A movie like 'Black Panther' is a cultural event that nothing on the small screen can really match in that way.' Chadwick Boseman stars as T'Challa/Black Panther in the first stand-alone film for the superhero created by Stan Lee and Jack Kirby in 1966. The cast also features Michael B. Jordan, Lupita Nyong'o, Daniel Kaluuya and Letitia Wright. The movie has been hugely acclaimed, with a 97 percent fresh rating from Rotten Tomatoes. Audiences agreed, giving it an A-plus CinemaScore. The film especially resonated among African-Americans, who made up 37 percent of moviegoers, according to comScore. Dave Hollis, distribution chief for Disney, called the film's success 'a real source of pride' for Disney. 'Inclusion and representation matters,' Hollis said. 'We know that great stories can come from anywhere, and our goal is to make films that reflect the wonderful diversity of our world and resonate with audiences everywhere — no matter who they are, no matter where they come from.' Coming at one of the slower periods of the year, 'Black Panther' benefited from little competition, and it can be expected to dominate the marketplace for weeks. Last week's top film, the erotic romance sequel 'Fifty Shades Freed,' slid to third place, with $16.9 million in its second week for Universal. Sony's children's book adaptation 'Peter Rabbit' held much stronger, taking the No. 2 spot with $17.3 million in its second week. But moviegoers — and Hollywood — were focused on 'Black Panther,' including how it would fare overseas. Though considered by most to be an outdated myth, some have claimed that foreign audiences have less appetite for films with largely black casts. 'Black Panther' vanquished those notions with $169 million in ticket sales. It was No. 1 in most international markets, though 'Fifty Shades Freed' bested it in Germany. Its release in China will come later. This weekend, the Chinese New Year holiday, local productions led by 'Detective Chinatown 2' and 'Monster Hunt 2' dominated Chinese theaters, with more than $140 million in ticket sales each. 'Black Panther' also performed especially well on large-format screens. Imax reported $30 million in ticket sales for the three-day weekend. 'There was a groundswell of wanting this movie to work, and then when it actually did as a film, itself, it just kicked it up a notch to a level no one could have ever predicted,' said Greg Foster, Imax Entertainment's chief executive. 'That makes me feel really good about the movie business.' Estimated ticket sales for Friday through Sunday at U.S. and Canadian theaters, according to comScore. Where available, the latest international numbers for Friday through Sunday also are included. Final four-day domestic figures will be released Tuesday. 1. 'Black Panther,' $192 million ($169 million international). 2. 'Peter Rabbit,' $17.3 million. 3. 'Fifty Shades Freed,' $16.9 million ($47.7 million international). 4. 'Jumanji Welcome to the Jungle,' $7.9 million ($4.8 million international). 5. 'The 15:17 to Paris,' $7.7 million ($2.8 million international). 6. 'The Greatest Showman,' $5.1 million ($9.6 million international). 7. 'Early Man,' $3.2 million ($3.7 million international). 8. 'Maze Runner: The Death Cure,' $2.5 million ($11 million international). 9. 'Winchester,' $2.2 million. 10. 'Samson,' $2 million. ___ Estimated ticket sales for Friday through Sunday at international theaters (excluding the U.S. and Canada), according to comScore: 1. 'Black Panther,' $169 million. 2. 'Detective Chinatown 2,' $155 million. 3. 'Monster Hunt 2,' $141 million. 4. 'Operation Red Sea,' $70.3 million. 5. 'The Monkey King 3: Kingdom of Women,' $52.3 million. 6. 'Fifty Shades Freed,' $47.7 million. 7. 'Boonie Bears: The Big Shrink,' $32.6 million. 8. 'The Shape of Water,' $12.3 million. 9. 'Maze Runner: The Death Cure,' $11 million. 10. 'The Greatest Showman,' $9.6 million. ___ Follow AP Film Writer Jake Coyle on Twitter at: http://twitter.com/jakecoyleAP
  • Where does one shop for a wedding gown set to be the dress of the year — an outfit chic enough for a fashion-loving bride but suitable for a church so regal it's the burial place of monarchs? Everyone at London Fashion Week — and elsewhere — is dying to know. With only three months to go before Prince Harry and Meghan Markle's May 19 wedding at Windsor Castle, both the fashion and bridal worlds are abuzz with talk of who the bride will pick to design her dress and what kind of look she would go for. It's no wonder: There's not been a bigger royal wedding since Harry's brother Prince William married Kate Middleton in 2011 in an extravaganza broadcast around the world. Seven years later, Kate's lacey, long-sleeved Alexander McQueen gown is still influencing bridal designs today. 'It's going to be the greatest fashion commission of 2018. There'll be millions of eyeballs on it,' said Jade Beer, editor at the British edition of Brides magazine. 'It's her major fashion moment.' 'She'll definitely need an upgrade from the dress she wore for her first wedding,' Beer added, referring to the simple strapless white gown the American actress wore at her 2011 Jamaica beach wedding to film producer Trevor Engelson. The couple divorced in 2013. While the design — as well as the designer — of the dress is a closely guarded secret, many are positive that Markle will choose a British designer. Kate wasn't the only bride in Britain's extended royal family sticking with a British designer. Zara Phillips, Queen Elizabeth II's second-eldest grandchild, wore royal couturier Stewart Parvin. In 1981, then-Lady Diana Spencer — the late mother of groom Harry — surprised many when she chose David and Elizabeth Emanuel, a pair of designers fresh out of college. Front-runners for Markle's choice include British-Canadian Erdem Moralioglu, known for his elegant, feminine styles; Ralph & Russo, the couture designers Markle chose for her engagement dress; heritage fashion powerhouse Burberry; as well as McQueen and Giles Deacon, who designed the wedding gown for Kate's sister Pippa Middleton. Victoria Beckham has denied rumors that she's been asked. French designer Roland Mouret has also been cited as a possible pick. 'I mean, she could surprise us all and choose a Canadian brand — she was so loyal to them while she was filming up there,' said Miles Socha, editor-in-chief at Women's Wear Daily, referring to the time Markle spent in Toronto filming the TV series 'Suits.' ''But probably we would have to place our bets on a British designer.' Some are hoping Markle will pick something less traditional because she has more leeway. After all, Harry is only fifth in line to the throne — and will be sixth after Kate, the Duchess of Cambridge, gives birth to her third child in April. In addition, their wedding venue, St. George's Chapel at Windsor Castle, is less imposing than St. Paul's Cathedral or Westminster Abbey in London. 'I really expect something different from her. Her style is so clean, really modern, and bridal has been so traditional in the past few years,' said London-based bridal designer Naomi Neoh. 'I think — I hope — it would be clean, simple with beautiful detailing.' Neoh hopes Markle will choose a dress that celebrates her individuality. 'Meghan's very different from the English tradition. She's got her career, she's half-black,' she said. 'She's not going to be queen. It has to be respectful and appropriate of course, but it can be a bit more exciting with the cut and the lines. I think maybe a high neck, low back — that'd be demure enough.' Still, it's a dress that needs to live up to the grandeur of its surroundings. St. George's Chapel is intimate only by royal proportions. It seats 800 guests and has a very important place in British history as the resting place of scores of kings and queens — including both of the queen's parents. 'She's going to be walking over dead monarchs on the way up the aisle,' said Beer. 'There's a huge sense of occasion.' Markle has already signaled a break from the conservative styles that dominate British royal wardrobes, ditching stuffy frock coats for sleek trousers. Many admired the sharp trouser suit she wore to match Harry's outfit at a recent official event. The actress herself has offered some clues about her dream wedding dress. In March 2016, before she met Harry, she told Glamour magazine that she favored 'classic and simple' styles with 'a modern twist,' and that she preferred 'wedding dresses that are whimsical or subtly romantic.' She named Ellie Saab and J. Mendel among her favorite designers, and said her favorite celebrity wedding dress was the simple slip of a gown that Carolyn Besette Kennedy wore in 1996. Circumstances have changed since then — but whatever style she picks, Markle's choice will soon be seen in bridal salons everywhere. Referring to Kate's gown, Neoh said: 'Literally the next day, everyone wanted long lace sleeves — the year after getting lace was impossible. It was bananas.' Many say with Markle's looks and the young royals' popularity, she could get away with nearly anything. 'I think everybody here loves her so dearly,' said designer Jasper Conran. 'She can wear a dishcloth and people won't mind.' ___ Hilary Fox and Gregory Katz in London contributed to this story.