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Entertainment

    The airport hangar facade from the opening scene of 'Casablanca' has found a home a decade after being saved from the wrecking ball. The arched facade dating to the 1920s has been in a Los Angeles parking lot since it was removed during 2007 renovations at Van Nuys Airport. The hangar with 95-foot doors appeared in movies including the 1939 Laurel and Hardy comedy 'The Flying Deuces.' Most famously a plane lands in front of it in 1942's 'Casablanca,' starring Humphrey Bogart and Ingrid Bergman. Christine Dunn, who with her late husband recovered the hangar 10 years ago, told the Daily News on Sunday (http://bit.ly/2qv0Y9L ) that it'll be moved to Valley Relics Museum, home to many pop culture items. The goal is to restore it as part of a Moroccan-themed restaurant at Van Nuys Airport. ___ Information from: (Los Angeles) Daily News, http://www.dailynews.com
  • Bruce Springsteen has surprised concert-goers in New Jersey with a performance during the encore of a Steven Van Zandt show. Count Basie Theatre executive Jon Vena said Monday the crowd 'erupted' when Van Zandt introduced Springsteen during the Saturday show as 'a friend who's out of work.' Springsteen emerged on stage during the encore and played four songs, including 'Tenth Avenue Freeze-Out' and a cover of Marvin Gaye's 'Can I Get a Witness.' Van Zandt and the Disciples of Soul were playing at the theater in Red Bank to mark the release of Van Zandt's album 'SOULFIRE.' Van Zandt is a member of Springsteen's E Street Band. It's not the first time the New Jersey native Springsteen has surprised audiences. In April, he played a two-hour jam session at the Asbury Park Music & Film Festival.
  • Robert De Niro says that 'in movie terms,' the country was once 'an inspiring uplifting drama' but now has turned into 'a tragic dumbass comedy.' The two-time, Oscar-winning actor spoke to Brown University graduates Sunday at the Ivy League school's commencement ceremonies. He urged them to 'work to stop the insanity' and to strive to make the world better. De Niro received an honorary doctorate of fine arts. Actor and rapper Daveed Diggs, who won a Tony Award for his role in the phenomenon 'Hamilton,' also was among those who received honorary degrees. Diggs told the graduates that the country needs their new ideas 'because the old ones have made a mess of things.
  • A film festival on the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation aims to bolster the anti-pipeline movement that blossomed there last year while also fostering connections between the Native American community and the film industry. The inaugural Standing Rock Nation Film and Music Festival, which runs this coming Friday, Saturday and Sunday at the tribal casino near Fort Yates, will showcase the talent of Native American filmmakers and musicians. It also features films about American Indians and provides a venue for those who opposed the $3.8 billion Dakota Access oil pipeline to reminisce. 'It was the most amazing coming together of people from all over the country, all over the world,' said festival producer Tricia van Klaveren, an independent filmmaker in San Francisco who spent time in a protest camp in southern North Dakota that held hundreds and sometimes thousands of people between August and February. 'Standing Rock represents, people really came together and united. History was created.' People in the camp dubbed themselves 'water protectors,' a reference to the fear that oil and gas pipelines threaten water sources. They couldn't stop Dakota Access — the line to move North Dakota oil to a distribution point in Illinois is set to go into commercial service on Thursday — but the movement has spread to other pipeline projects around the country. Organizers hope some people will make a return trip for the festival, though the casino has a capacity of only 1,000 people. Many events and panels will be live-streamed online. 'It is our goal that this weekend festival will empower, enlighten, and entertain the Native community and all global citizens,' said Mitchell Zephier, a member of the Lower Brule tribe in South Dakota and the festival's founder and executive director. Among the films being screened are 'AWAKE, A Dream from Standing Rock,' which premiered at the Tribeca Film Festival in New York in April, and 'Rumble: The Indians Who Rocked the World,' a documentary about Native musicians. That film, which won an award at the Sundance Film Festival in Utah, is an example of another purpose of the event. 'Part of the festival is creating a bridge between the Native community and film industry,' van Klaveren said. 'Telling more of the stories that haven't been told, and telling them through the Native American lens, the Native American perspective.' The festival is free, though donations are encouraged so there's money to continue the event in future years, van Klaveren said. This year's festival is being funded by the tribe and volunteer labor, she said. ___ Follow Blake Nicholson on Twitter at: http://twitter.com/NicholsonBlake
  • Hearing the “Star Wars” theme or the song from “Indiana Jones” never gets old for some and members of Harvard’s Din and Tonics a cappella group put a new spin on the iconic instrumentals in front of the music’s creator, John Williams. >> Read more trending news Williams was at the Ivy League university for Harvard’s commencement on Thursday. He was not only given a unique performance of his music, he also received an honorary doctor of music degree, Entertainment Weekly reported. Watch the video of Din and Tonics’ performance below or click here. Mark Zuckerburg addressed the Harvard graduates during commencement ceremonies Thursday afternoon. He was granted an honorary degree Thursday morning. Zuckerberg had attended Harvard, but dropped out to start Facebook.
  • Prince William says he is sad his wife and two young children can't meet his late mother, Princess Diana. In an interview with the magazine British GQ, the heir to the throne opened up about his feelings about his mother's 1997 death in a Paris car crash. William told the magazine he would have liked having his mother's advice and for her to meet his wife, Kate, and to see her grandchildren grow up. Diana died long before 3-year-old Prince George and Princess Charlotte, who recently turned 2, were born. The interview with former Tony Blair spin doctor Alastair Campbell focuses on William's strong support for charities working on mental health issues. William says his chief goal is 'smashing' the taboo surrounding mental health discussions.
  • A piece of our childhood may be coming to the big screen. Warner Bros. has tapped director Conrad Vernon to helm its planned animated film “The Jetsons,” Variety reported. >> Read more trending news Vernon has co-directed hits like “Shrek 2” and “Monsters vs. Aliens.” He also voiced the Gingerbread Man in the “Shrek” films. “The Jetsons” has been on the planning board for years after Warner Bros. hired Matt Liberman to pen the script in 2015, Variety reported. The original “Jetsons” tv series aired for one season in prime time on ABC in 1962-63, Smithsonian reported. This isn’t the first feature film for the space-age family. Universal released an animated “Jetsons” film in 1990 which was directed by Joseph Barbera, co-founder of Hanna-Barbera studios and one of the creators of the series.
  • The mayor of Paris said Monday that a 'clear solution' has been found with organizers of a festival for black feminists, an event that had aroused her ire because four-fifths of the festival space was to be open exclusively to black women. Mayor Anne Hidalgo had strongly criticized and threatened to cancel the upcoming Nyansapo Festival a day earlier because it was 'forbidden to white people.' In a new series of tweets on the topic, Hidalgo said her 'firm' discussion with organizers had yielded a satisfactory clarification: the parts of the festival held on property would be open to everyone and 'non-mixed workshops will be held elsewhere, in a strictly private setting.' MWASI, the Afro-feminist collective sponsoring the three-day event, responded to the mayor's latest comments by saying it hadn't changed the festival program 'an inch.' 'That's what was planned from the beginning,' the collective said of how the public and private spaces would be assigned. Anti-racism associations and far-right politicians in France both had criticized the event over the weekend for scheduling workshops limited to a single gender and race. France defines itself as a country united under one common national identity, with laws against racial discrimination and to promote secularism to safeguard an ideal that began with the French Revolution. On Sunday, Hidalgo had said she would call on authorities to prohibit the cultural festival and might call for the prosecution of its organizers on grounds of discrimination. 'I firmly condemn the organization of this event in Paris (that's) 'forbidden to white people,'' Hidalgo had written. Telephone calls to MWASIwere not immediately returned Monday. The group describes itself on its website as 'an Afro-feminist collective that is part of the revolutionary liberation struggles' and is open to black and mixed-race women. The program for the first annual Nyansapo Festival, which is set to run July 28-30 partly at a Paris cultural center, stated that 80 percent of the event space only would be accessible to black women. Other sessions were designed to be open to black men and women from minority groups that experience racial discrimination, and one space was scheduled to be open to everyone regardless of race or gender. Organizers said on the event's website that 'for this first edition we have chosen to put the accent on how our resistance as an Afro-feminist movement is organized.' Prominent French rights organization SOS Racism was among civil rights groups condemning the festival, calling it 'a mistake, even an abomination, because it wallows in ethnic separation, whereas anti-racism is a movement which seeks to go beyond race.' The International League Against Racism and Anti-Semitism (LICRA), meanwhile, called the festival a 'regression' and said American civil rights icon 'Rosa Parks must be turning in her grave.' Identity politics remain a recurrent hot potato in a nation where collecting data based on religious and ethnic backgrounds is banned and the wearing of religious symbols — such as face-covering veils — in public is prohibited. This approach, known to the French as 'anti-communitarianism,' aims to celebrate all French citizens regardless of their community affiliations. Last week, several women attempting to stage a 'burkini party' were detained in Cannes after a ban against the full-body beachwear favored by some Muslim women was upheld in a fresh decree. ___ Philippe Sotto contributed to this story. Thomas Adamson can be followed at Twitter.com/ThomasAdamson_K
  • J.K. Rowling has updated fans on the status of the latest movie in the Harry Potter universe. >> Read more trending news  The author announced on Twitter that she has finished writing the sequel to “Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them,” NME reported. Rowling whet the appetites of the Potter faithful in February when she gave them a sneak peek of the script. Filming is expected to begin later this summer with Eddie Redmayne reprising his role as Newt Scamander, Screen Rant reported. Callam Turner will join the cast as Newt’s brother. Johnny Depp will continue in his role as Gellert Grindelwald following his cameo in the first film. Ezra Miller and Zoe Kravitz are also returning. Jude Law will join the cast as young Albus Dumbledore, Screen Rant reported. It is scheduled to hit theaters in November 2018.
  • Dancers from across the U.S. and Spain will gather in New Mexico for the 30th anniversary of a preeminent international flamenco festival. The event organized by the world-renowned National Institute of Flamenco will be held June 10th through the 17th in Albuquerque. Flamenco is a form of Spanish dance and folk music that developed from Romani music and dance more than two centuries ago. Festival Flamenco Internacional De Alburquerque will feature internationally known flamenco dancers, along with workshops, history lectures and events for children. Here are some things to know: ___ THE PERFORMERS Nearly 60 dancers, singers and musicians are scheduled to perform in theaters at the University of New Mexico and the National Hispanic Cultural Center. They include award-winning dancers Marco Flores and Rosario Toledo, of Spain. On some nights, the artists will finish the evening at Tablao Flamenco Albuquerque, a new venue at a hotel in the city's Old Town where dancers and musician give spontaneous performances. Workshops at the annual festival include beginner to advanced classes in repertory, costuming, castanets and guitar. ___ THE IMAGES This year's gathering also will showcase the work of the late photographer Douglas Kent Hall. He worked with the National Institute of Flamenco to document the event by capturing a number of images of dancers from some of the first festivals. On June 17, National Institute of Flamenco executive director Eva Encinias-Sandoval will give a free flamenco lecture at the National Hispanic Cultural Center encompassing the event's history. Twenty photographs by Kent Hall will be on display during the speech. ___ THE FIRE The National Institute of Flamenco is located in Albuquerque, which was founded by Spanish settlers and is considered the flamenco capital of the U.S. The institute's mission is to preserve and promote flamenco's history and culture through performance and education. In December 2013, a fire destroyed its offices, including decades of festival photos, documents and clothing. The institute then took part in many fundraisers and garnered support from Albuquerque businesses to eventually land a new home near the University of New Mexico on historic Route 66. The organization continues to operate a conservatory and now runs Tablao Flamenco Albuquerque. ___ Follow Russell Contreras on Twitter at http://twitter.com/russcontreras.