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Entertainment

    Stars of the small and big screen are finding out who could be taking home a Golden Globes award as the nominations are announced for the Golden Globes Awards. >> Read more trending news  According to Vanity Fair, Expected nominees include “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri” and “Dunkirk” for Best Motion Picture, Drama.  For Best Motion Picture, Musical or Comedy, the nominations may include “The Greatest Showman” and “I, Tonya.” On the television drama side, “This Is Us” and “The Handmaid’s Tale” may go up against the likes of “Game of Thrones” and “Stranger Things 2,” while comedy nominations could go to “Curb Your Enthusiasm” and “Will & Grace.” Check back for live updates as the announcements of nominees are made.
  • Clashes have erupted between police and protesters in Spain's northeastern Catalan city of Lleida after a judicial ruling ordered the city's museum to return 44 pieces of religious art to the neighboring regional government of Aragon.Regional police cordoned off the area around Lleida Museum early Monday as technicians prepared to remove the disputed artwork.Several hundred people turned up to protest the transfer and there were brief scuffles and police baton charges as officers tried to move them further away from the museum.An Aragon provincial court had given till Monday for the museum to hand over the art — which was originally housed in the region's Sijena monastery — following a 2015 court ruling.Catalonia bought the art from nuns in 1983 but the court ruled the sale illegal.
  • Saudi Arabia announced on Monday it will allow movie theaters to open in the conservative kingdom next year, for the first time in more than 35 years, in the latest social push by the country's young crown prince.It's a stark reversal in a county where movie theaters were shut down in the 1980's during a wave of ultraconservatism in the country. Many of Saudi Arabia's clerics view Western movies and even Arabic films made in Egypt and Lebanon as sinful.Despite decades of ultraconservative dogma, Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman has sought to ram through a number of major social reforms with support from his father, King Salman.The crown prince is behind measures such as lifting a ban on women driving next year and bringing back concerts and other forms of entertainment to satiate the desires of the country's majority young population. The 32-year-old heir to the throne's social push is part of his so-called Vision 2030, a blueprint for the country that aims to boost local spending and create jobs amid sustained lower oil prices.The Saudi government said a resolution was passed Monday paving the way for licenses to be granted to commercial movie theaters, with the first cinemas expected to open in March 2018.Many Saudis took to Twitter to express their joy at the news, posting images of buckets of movie theater popcorn and moving graphics of people dancing, fainting and crying.'It's spectacular news. We are in a state of shock,' said Saudi actor and producer, Hisham Fageeh.Fageeh starred in and co-produced the Saudi film 'Barakah Meets Barakah' by director Mahmoud Sabbagh, which premiered at the Berlin International Film Festival in February. The movie, which has been called the kingdom's first romantic comedy, tells the story of a civil servant who falls for a Saudi girl whose Instagram posts have made her a local celebrity.'We are essentially pioneers because we all took risks to work in this industry,' he said. 'We were super lucky, because luck is always a factor of whether we make it or not.'Even with the decades-long ban on movie theaters, Saudi filmmakers and movie buffs were able to circumvent traditional censors by streaming movies online and watching films on satellite TV. Many also traveled to neighboring countries like Bahrain and the United Arab Emirates to go to movie theaters.One Saudi Twitter on Monday user posted a picture of the causeway linking Saudi Arabia with Bahrain, writing 'Good bye'.It was not immediately clear if movie theaters would have family-only sections, segregating women and families from male-only audiences. Another unknown was whether most major Hollywood, Bollywood and Arabic movie releases would be shown in theaters and how heavily edited the content will be.In a statement carried on the state-run Saudi Press Agency, the Ministry of Culture and Information said that movie content 'will be subject to censorship' to ensure films do not contradict Islamic law, or Shariah, and the kingdom's moral values.The government said it will announce additional regulations in the coming weeks.Fageeh said that while he's concerned with the censorship rules that might be in place, he's also concerned that scenes of violence are typically permitted on screens across the Arab world, but 'any kind of intimacy and love is considered taboo and a moral violation.'It's a global conversation we need to have,' he said.Despite there being no movie theaters in Saudi Arabia, young Saudi filmmakers have received government support and recognition in recent years. The government has backed a Saudi film festival that's taken place for the past few years in the eastern city of Dhahran. This year, some 60 Saudi films were screened.The film 'Wadjda' made history in 2013 by becoming the first Academy Award entry for Saudi Arabia, though it wasn't nominated for the Oscars. The movie follows the story of a 10-year-old girl who dreams of having a bicycle, just like boys have in her ultraconservative neighborhood where men and women are strictly segregated and where boys and girls attend separate schools. The film was written and directed by Saudi female director Haifaa al-Mansour, who shot the film entirely in the kingdom.That film and 'Barakah meets Barakah', though four years apart, tackle the issue of gender segregation in Saudi Arabia, which remains largely enforced.The Saudi government projects that the opening of movie theaters will contribute more than 90 billion riyals ($24 billion) to the economy and create more than 30,000 jobs by 2030. The kingdom says there will be 300 cinemas with around 2,000 screens built in the country by 2030.Fageeh said it's important the government provides even greater support to local filmmakers now that international films will dominate theaters.'There needs to be an effort to be cognizant and inclusive for this element of local films or we will be completely flushed out because of the nature of capitalism and will be operating in the margins,' he said.___Batrawy reported from Dubai, United Arab Emirates.
  • An American scientist who shared this year's Nobel Prize for medicine bluntly criticized political developments at home in his address at the awards' gala banquet, saying that U.S. scientists are facing funding cutbacks that will hurt research.Michael Rosbash, who was honored for his work on circadian rhythms — commonly called the body clock — expressed concern that U.S. government funding such as that received by him and Nobel colleagues Jeffrey Hall and Michael Young is endangered.'We benefited from an enlightened period in the postwar United States. Our National Institutes of Health have enthusiastically and generously supported basic research ... (but) the current climate in the U.S. is a warning that continued support cannot be taken for granted,' Rosbash said in a short speech Sunday night at Stockholm's ornate city hall.The 2018 federal budget proposed by President Donald Trump calls for cutting science funding by billions of dollars.'Also in danger is the pluralistic America into which all three of us of born were born and raised after World War II,' Rosbash said. 'Immigrants and foreigners have always been an indispensable part of our country, including its great record in scientific research.'Literature laureate Kazuo Ishiguro of Britain expressed concern about increasing tensions between social factions.'We live today in a time of growing tribal enmities of communities fracturing into bitterly opposed groups,' said Ishiguro, who was born in Japan.He said Nobel prizes can counterbalance such animosity.'The pride we feel when someone from our nation wins a Nobel prize is different from the one we feel witnessing one of our athletes winning an Olympic medal. We don't feel the pride of our tribe demonstrating superiority over other tribes. Rather it's the pride that from knowing that one of us has made a significant contribution to our common human endeavor,' he said.In the Norwegian capital of Oslo, a survivor of the atomic bombing of Hiroshima compared her struggle to survive in 1945 to the objectives of the group awarded this year's Nobel's Peace Prize.Setsuko Thurlow, who was 13 when the U.S. bomb devastated her Japanese city during the final weeks of World War II, spoke as a leading activist with the Nobel-winning International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons.Thurlow said the Hiroshima blast left her buried under the rubble, but she was able to see light and crawl to safety. In the same way, the campaign to which she belongs is a driving force behind an international treaty to ban nuclear weapons, she said after ICAN received the Nobel prize it won in October.'Our light now is the ban treaty,' Thurlow said. 'I repeat those words that I heard called to me in the ruins of Hiroshima: 'Don't give up. Keep pushing. See the light? Crawl toward it.''The treaty has been signed by 56 countries — none of them nuclear powers — and ratified by only three. To become binding it requires ratification by 50 countries.ICAN Executive Director Beatrice Fihn, who accepted the prize along with Thurlow, said that while the treaty is far from ratification 'now, at long last, we have an unequivocal norm against nuclear weapons.'This is the way forward. There is only one way to prevent the use of nuclear weapons — prohibit and eliminate them,' Fihn said.The prize winners were announced in October. All except the peace prize were awarded in Sweden on Sunday.The other laureates were American Richard Thaler for his work in behavioral economics; American physicists Kip Thorne, Rainer Weiss and Barry Barish for confirming the existence of gravity waves; and Jacques Dubochet of Switzerland, American Joachim Frank and Richard Henderson of the United Kingdom for advances in electron microscopy.___Heintz reported from Moscow.
  • When nominations for the 75th annual Golden Globe Awards are announced Monday morning, the shadow of sexual misconduct scandals will be hard to avoid.The nominations will begin at 8:15 a.m. EST. A second batch of nominees will follow live on NBC's 'Today' show, where less than two weeks earlier, longtime host Matt Lauer was fired following multiple allegations of sexual misconduct.Lauer was just the latest media figure to be toppled by the ongoing revelations that have followed the ouster of former Weinstein Co. co-chairman Harvey Weinstein, along with many others, including Kevin Spacey. As a co-star in Ridley Scott's upcoming 'All the Money in the World,' Spacey — whose performance has been removed in reshoots — might have once expected to hear his named among Monday's best supporting actor nominees.Amazon's 'Transparent' and star Jeffrey Tambor have also been regular Globes nominees, and could be again Monday for the show's fourth season. Two women have come forward in the past month to accuse Tambor of sexual harassment, including 'Transparent' actress Trace Lysette and his former assistant. Tambor has said 'the idea that I would deliberately harass anyone is simply and utterly untrue.'The Globes will be the most prominent platform yet in Hollywood's awards season to confront the post-Weinstein landscape. Presented and chosen by the Hollywood Foreign Press Association, their deliberations aren't representative of the larger industry. The HFPA is composed of approximately 90 largely unknown international journalists.But the Globes, which this year will be hosted by Seth Meyers on January 7, have long characterized themselves as one of the frothiest stops on the awards season circuit. Many will be watching to see how the Globes weigh the likes of 'Transparent' and 'All the Money in the World.' A rough cut of the latter was reportedly screened for the HFPA shortly after Scott finished reshooting the film with Christopher Plummer stepping in for Spacey.Among the favorites at the Globes this year are Steven Spielberg's Pentagon Papers drama 'The Post' and Christopher Nolan's World War II tale 'Dunkirk.' In the television categories, Hulu's 'The Handmaid's Tale' and HBO's 'Big Little Lies' could be in for a big morning.___Follow AP Film Writer Jake Coyle on Twitter at: http://twitter.com/jakecoyleAP
  • Queens of the Stone Age frontman Joshua Homme has apologized after a photographer claimed the singer kicked her camera while she photographed the band's concert in Southern California.Photographer Chelsea Lauren said on Instagram that she sought medical treatment after the camera smashed into her face from the kick Saturday night at a radio station's annual Christmas event. Video posted to social media shows Homme swinging his leg and connecting with the camera while playing guitar at the Forum near Los Angeles.Homme said on Twitter Sunday that he was 'in a state of being lost in performance' and thought he was kicking lighting equipment on state. He says it was unintentional and he hopes Lauren accepts his apology.Emails seeking further comment from Homme's representatives were not immediately returned.
  • Grammy Award-winning musician Sting performed Saturday night during the Florida Orchestra’s 50th Anniversary Gala in St. Petersburg, The Tampa Bay Times reported. >> Read more trending news Sting, 66, who has won 16 Grammys as a solo artist and as a member of The Police, sang some of his notable hits, including “Every Little Thing She Does Is Magic,” “Roxanne” and “Englishman in New York,” the Times reported. Born Gordon Matthew Thomas Sumner in 1951, Sting earned his first Grammy in 1980 with The Police. He was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame with The Police in 2003.
  • A professional wrestler was arrested in Florida early Sunday after police said he put his wife in a headlock and dragged her into his car. >> Read more trending news Richard A. Swann, 26, of Orlando, was booked into the Alachua County Jail just after midnight on charges of simple battery and false imprisonment. World Wrestling Entertainment suspended him indefinitely following the arrest.  Gainesville Police officers stated that Swann and Vannarah Riggs, also a professional wrestler, were in the car when Riggs started to critique his performance earlier that night at 8 Seconds in downtown Gainesville.  At some point, according to the arrest report, she got out of the car saying she was getting scared because Swann was becoming more angry at her.  Swann then got out too and chased her, yelling at her to get back inside. When she did not, he grabbed her, put her in a headlock and dragged her back inside the car while she was screaming for help, according to the arrest report.  Swann denied the allegations.
  • The animated family film 'Coco' has topped the box office for a third time on a quiet, pre 'Star Wars: The Last Jedi' weekend in theaters.Disney estimated Sunday that 'Coco' added $18.3 million, which would bring its domestic total to $135.5 million.The weekend's sole new wide release was the Morgan Freeman film 'Just Getting Started,' which launched to a meager $3.2 million from 2,161 theaters and barely made the top 10.Most studios have chosen to avoid competing against 'The Last Jedi,' which is expected to dominate theaters and moviegoer attention when it opens on Dec. 15.Thus, most of the charts have looked quite similar for the past few weeks. Warner Bros. and DC's 'Justice League' took second place with $9.6 million and Lionsgate's sleeper hit 'Wonder,' which has now passed $100 million, placed third with $8.5 million. Warner Bros. also crossed the $2 billion benchmark domestically Saturday — the first studio to do so in 2017.This quiet period before 'Star Wars' has allowed some of the indie and prestige titles to thrive in limited releases and expansions, like James Franco's 'The Disaster Artist.' The film, about the making of one of the worst films of all time, 'The Room,' expanded to 840 locations in its second weekend in theaters. It managed to bring in $6.4 million, landing it in fourth place.Greta Gerwig's coming-of-age film 'Lady Bird' also added 363 locations and placed 9th in its sixth weekend in theaters. With the $3.5 million from this weekend, 'Lady Bird' has netted $22.3 million.The Guillermo del Toro-directed romantic fantasy 'The Shape of Water' expanded to 41 theaters in its second weekend and earned $1.1 million.The Tonya Harding biopic 'I, Tonya' launched in four locations in New York and Los Angeles and brought in a solid $245,602.The Winston Churchill film 'The Darkest Hour' and the summer romance film 'Call Me By Your Name' also continue to thrive in more limited releases as well. 'The Darkest Hour,' which stars Gary Oldman as Churchill, earned $777,000 from 53 locations, and 'Call Me By Your Name,' with Armie Hammer and Timothee Chalamet, took in $291,101 from nine theaters.'This is the best time to be a moviegoer if you're an indie fan,' said comScore senior media analyst Paul Dergarabedian. 'The last few weeks have enabled films like 'The Shape of Water,' 'Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri' and now 'I, Tonya' to really find an audience.'He added: 'It's great time for those films ahead of the box office death star that is 'Star Wars.''The year is still down 4 percent from last year, though, which is a pit that even a juggernaut like 'Star Wars' might struggle to fill. The cash influx from 'The Last Jedi' will be significant, nonetheless, and if the precedent of 'Rogue One' and 'The Force Awakens' holds, it could range from $400 million to over $600 million of additional domestic revenue before the books close on 2017.Estimated ticket sales for Friday through Sunday at U.S. and Canadian theaters, according to comScore. Where available, the latest international numbers for Friday through Sunday are also included. Final domestic figures will be released Monday.1.'Coco,' $18.3 million ($55.3 million international).2.'Justice League,' $9.6 million ($15.4 million international).3.'Wonder,' $8.5 million ($11.4 million international).4.'The Disaster Artist,' $6.4 million ($1 million).5.'Thor: Ragnarok,' $6.3 million ($3.1 million international).6.'Daddy's Home 2,' $6 million ($11.6 million international).7.'Murder on the Orient Express,' $5.1 million ($20.1 million international).8.'The Star,' $3.7 million.9.'Lady Bird,' $3.5 million.10.'Just Getting Started,' $3.2 million.___Estimated ticket sales for Friday through Sunday at international theaters (excluding the U.S. and Canada), according to comScore:1. 'Coco,' $55.3 million.2. 'Paddington 2,' $21.5 million.3. 'Murder on the Orient Express,' $20.1 million.4. 'Justice League,' $15.4 million.5. 'Daddy's Home 2,' $11.6 million.6. 'Wonder,' $11.4 million.7. 'A Bad Moms Christmas,' $6 million.8. 'The Big Call,' $5.1 million.9. 'Loving Vincent,' $4.5 million.10. '47 Meters Down,' $3.8 million.___Universal and Focus are owned by NBC Universal, a unit of Comcast Corp.; Sony, Columbia, Sony Screen Gems and Sony Pictures Classics are units of Sony Corp.; Paramount is owned by Viacom Inc.; Disney, Pixar and Marvel are owned by The Walt Disney Co.; Miramax is owned by Filmyard Holdings LLC; 20th Century Fox and Fox Searchlight are owned by 21st Century Fox; Warner Bros. and New Line are units of Time Warner Inc.; MGM is owned by a group of former creditors including Highland Capital, Anchorage Advisors and Carl Icahn; Lionsgate is owned by Lions Gate Entertainment Corp.; IFC is owned by AMC Networks Inc.; Rogue is owned by Relativity Media LLC.___Follow AP Film Writer Lindsey Bahr on Twitter at: http://twitter.com/ldbahr
  • A popular stand-up comedian was handcuffed early Sunday in Miami and video of his arrest is going viral. >> Read more trending news “Explain what I’m detained for,” Hannibal Buress asks Miami police officers repeatedly as he leans against a police car while handcuffed. Buress, 34, was booked into Miami-Dade Jail just before 2 a.m. and released around four hours later after posting bond, according to the Miami Herald. The details of what he specifically did to be charged have yet to be released.  In addition to his appearances on stage, the comedian has starred as an actor in “Neighbors,” “Baywatch” and “Spider-Man: Homecoming.”