ON AIR NOW

LISTEN NOW

Weather

Sponsored By: Two Men and a Truck
clear-night
56°
Clear
H 89° L 67°
  • clear-night
    56°
    Current Conditions
    Sunny. H 89° L 67°
  • clear-day Created with Sketch.
    83°
    Afternoon
    Sunny. H 89° L 67°
  • clear-day Created with Sketch.
    85°
    Evening
    Sunny. H 89° L 67°
LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

The latest top stories

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

The latest traffic report

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

The latest forecast

00:00 | 00:00

News

    Gunmen opened fire on a bus carrying Coptic Christians south of the Egyptian capital on Friday, killing 24 people and wounding 25, officials said. The attack happened while the bus was traveling on the road to the St. Samuel Monastery in the Minya governorate, about 220 kilometers (140 miles) south of Cairo, the health ministry said. The ministry said there were between eight and 10 attackers dressed in military uniforms, according to witnesses. No group immediately claimed responsibility for the attack, which came on the eve of the holy Muslim month of Ramadan. Egypt has been fighting Islamic State group-linked militants who have waged an insurgency, mainly focused in the volatile north of the Sinai Peninsula but there have been also attacks on the mainland. Egypt has seen a wave of attacks on its Christians, including twin suicide bombings in April and another attack in December on a Cairo church that left over 75 people dead and scores wounded. The Islamic State group in Egypt claimed responsibility for them and vowed more attacks. Late last month Pope Francis visited Egypt in part to show his support for the Christians of this Muslim majority Arab nation who have been increasingly targeted by Islamic militants. During the trip, Francis paid tribute to the victims of the December bombing at Cairo's St. Peter's church, which is located in close proximity to the St. Mark's cathedral, the seat of the Coptic Orthodox Church. Following the pope's visit, the Islamic State affiliate in Egypt vowed to escalate attacks against Christians, urging Muslims to steer clear of Christian gatherings and western embassies as they are targets of their group's militants. Egypt's Copts, the Middle East's largest Christian community, have repeatedly complained of suffering discrimination, as well as outright attacks, at hands of the country's majority Muslim population. Over the past decades, they have been the immediate targets of Islamic extremists. They rallied behind general-turned-president, Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi, in 2013 when he ousted his Islamist predecessor Mohammed Morsi, who hails from the Muslim Brotherhood group. Attacks on Christian homes, businesses and churches subsequently surged, especially in the country's south. ___ Associated Press Writer Maamoun Youssef in Cairo contributed to this report.
  • 1. WHERE WORLD LEADERS ARE MEETING Leaders of the Group of Seven wealthy democracies are holding a summit in Sicily , where President Donald Trump is cast as a potential spoiler-in-chief. 2. TRUMP DISCUSSES NORTH KOREA WITH JAPANESE LEADER President Trump is calling North Korea a 'world problem,' but he says it 'will be solved, you can bet on that.' Trump was meeting with Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe before the G-7 summit. 3. WHO WON MONTANA'S US HOUSE SEAT Republican Greg Gianforte emerged as the state's new congressman, winning a special election a day after he was charged with assault for throwing a reporter to the ground. 4. KUSHNER WILLING TO COOPERATE WITH RUSSIA PROBE A lawyer for President Trump's son-in-law and adviser says Jared Kushner is willing to cooperate with federal investigators looking into ties between Russia and the Trump campaign. 5. HOW BRITISH POLICE ARE RESPONDING TO CONCERT ATTACK Police investigating the Manchester Arena bombing have arrested a ninth man, while extra security is being added for major British sporting events this weekend. 6. WHY THE WORLD'S NEED FOR PEACEKEEPERS PUTS VULNERABLE PEOPLE AT RISK In a case that illustrates how military impunity seeps into U.N. peacekeeping missions, an AP investigation examines how a Sri Lankan general dogged by war crimes allegations was sent to Haiti to investigate a rape accusation against a countryman. He didn't interview the victim or medical staff, and cleared the soldier. 7. WHAT OLDER AMERICANS PREFER FOR LONG-TERM CARE More and more middle-age and older Americans say Medicare should cover the costs of long-term care for older adults, according to a poll conducted by the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research. 8. MAN DUBBED 'HOUDINI' OF ALABAMA DEATH ROW IS EXECUTED After escaping seven prior execution dates, 75-year-old inmate Tommy Arthur was put to death Friday, after years of litigation challenging the state's lethal injection procedure. 9. NBA, NHL FINALS ARE SET Familiar faces return: LeBron James leads the Cleveland Cavaliers to another NBA Finals showdown with the playoff-perfect Warriors , while the Pittsburgh Penguins are back in the Stanley Cup Finals . 10. WHEN 'THE SIMPSONS' HIT A HOMER 'Homer at the Bat' first aired 25 years ago, with an All-Star lineup that included Ken Griffey Jr., Darryl Strawberry and a clucking Roger Clemens. The Baseball Hall of Fame is paying tribute with an exhibit and playful ceremony.
  • The Latest on the siege of a southern Philippine city by militants linked to the Islamic State group (all times local): 5:50 p.m. Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte is telling troops fighting Muslim militants for the control of southern Marawi city to use martial law powers to defeat the Islamic State group-linked extremists. Duterte said in a Friday speech to the troops in Illigan, near Marawi on southern Mindanao island, 'you can arrest any person, search any house without warrant.' He defended his proclamation of martial law in Mindanao, saying it was necessary to root out the militants who attacked Marawi on Tuesday, burning buildings and taking some dozen hostages. At least 44 people, most of them suspected militants, have been killed. The fighting started when security forces launched a raid that failed to capture Isnilon Hapilon, one of Asia's most-wanted militants.
  • Syrian state media and an opposition monitoring group are reporting that airstrikes by the U.S.-led coalition in an eastern town held by the Islamic State group have killed at least 35 people. The Britain-based Syrian Observatory for Human Rights says 26 people were killed when a four-story building was destroyed in an airstrike. It says nine died in a strike that his a nearby market in the town of Mayadeen on Thursday night. Syria's state news agency SANA also says 35 civilians, most of them women and children, were killed in the airstrikes. Reports of deaths among civilians have been on the rise as the fighting against IS intensifies in northern and eastern Syria.
  • A New Jersey school district’s anti-bullying director was fired last week for allegedly trying to threaten a student to keep quiet about an altercation between the director and a 16-year-old girl, the New Jersey Herald reported. >> Read more trending news Ron Rivera, 55, a retired New Jersey State Police captain who also served as the security director for the Vernon Township School District, was fired following an internal investigation into the matter, the Herald reported. The matter was first publicly disclosed at the May 18 Vernon Board of Education meeting. An 18-year-old student at Vernon Township High School, who asked that his name not be published, said that he had been confronted by Rivera in the school stairwell after the alleged altercation and 'threatened' by him not to say anything about what he had witnessed. The altercation, which was confirmed by a school official requesting anonymity, involved a 16-year-old female sophomore on whom Rivera allegedly used physical force, the Herald reported. The student who witnessed it said he later reported the details of what occurred to Assistant Principal Nancy LoPresti, who contacted school district officials, the Herald reported. A retired 27-year veteran state trooper, Rivera took over in January as the Vernon Township School District's security director and anti-bullying coordinator, the Herald reported. He could not be reached for comment, the newspaper reported.    
  • The Latest on the G-7 summit in Taormina, Sicily (all times local): 12:55 p.m. Environmental activists have staged protests on a beach and at sea near the Sicilian hilltop town of Taormina, where leaders of the world's seven wealthiest democracies were meeting. Greenpeace and Oxfam members carried out stunts on the seafront of Giardini Naxo on Friday to urge the Group of Seven leaders to fight climate change, one of the most problematic issues on the agenda of the two-day meeting. Greenpeace activists on eight kayaks unfurled banners at sea with messages including 'Planet Earth first.' On shore they unveiled a 4-meter (13-foot) Statue of Liberty in a life jacket that symbolized the plight of migrants and the threat of rising seas, one effect of climate change. Oxfam activists wore masks representing the seven leaders and had a banner with the words 'Paris Agreement,' the deal to fight global warming which U.S. President Trump has threatened to abandon. ___ 12:15 p.m. French President Emmanuel Macron has detailed his top priorities at the G-7, which include climate change and trade. At a bilateral meeting with British Prime Minister Theresa May on Friday, Macron insisted on the need for 'reciprocity' on trade and said Europeans sometimes had a 'too naive' approach on trade deals. The two leaders also found common ground on terrorism, following the attack on a pop concert in Manchester that killed 22 people. Macron offered his condolences for the Manchester attack, calling for increased European cooperation against terror 'because they attack our young.' That comment also referred to the Nice truck attack last summer that killed children and young families at a fireworks display, as well as the attack on a concert at the Bataclan theater in Paris. Macron spoke fluent English, which is very unusual for a French president. ___ 11:55 p.m. Despite U.S. President Donald Trump's views, Italy's leader is pushing for the G-7 summit to issue a strong statement on both fighting climate change and on handling the vast flow of migrants and refugees in need of help around the world. Italian Premier Paolo Gentiloni, the host of this year's G-7 summit in Taormina, Sicily, spoke Friday as the two-day summit of the world's wealthy democracies began. Gentiloni says 'We will make an important declaration today here in Taormina on climate change, on great migrant flows, on free trade in the world on which so many jobs depend and the future prospects for our economy.' The Italian leader says the talks won't be easy but 'the spirit of Taormina will help push us in the right direction.' ___ 11:20 a.m. The chairman of the European Union's council says he agrees with President Donald Trump that the international community should be 'tough, even brutal' on terrorism and Islamic State. European Council President Donald Tusk said terrorism was one of the main topics between EU officials and Trump during his visit to Brussels, especially in the wake of the Manchester pop concert bombing. Tusk said that 'I totally agreed with him when he said the international community, the G7, the United States, Europe — should be tough, even brutal, with terrorism and ISIS' an acronym for the extremist group fighting in Syria and Iraq. Tusk spoke at the start of a meeting of the Group of Seven democracies in Taormina, Sicily. ___ 7 a.m. The hot-button issues of climate change, trade and migration threaten to throw a summit of the Group of Seven wealthy democracies off its consensus game, with U.S. President Donald Trump cast as the spoiler-in-chief. While Trump has met all of the leaders one on one, this will be the first time all seven are around the same table, including newcomers Emmanuel Macron of France, Theresa May of Britain and the Italian host, Paolo Gentiloni. Climate policy promises to be the real buzzkill at the G-7 party. Endorsing measures to combat terror is expected to find easy agreement, especially after the attack in Manchester on a pop music concert that left 22 people dead. Trump also going against the grain on trade, taking a more protectionist stand. His pending review of U.S. climate policies has left environmentalists bracing for the possibility of bland G-7 promises that says little after years of increasingly stronger commitments to reduce reliance on fossil fuels and cut greenhouse gas emissions.
  • A 24-hour strike by Portuguese government workers over pay and working hours is disrupting public services, especially in the national health service and the state education system. Some junior and high schools canceled classes, while hospitals postponed many non-urgent medical appointments. Doctors and nurses did not walk off the job, but auxiliary staff stayed away from work. Disruption was also expected at government departments. The National Federation of Government Workers' Unions, which represents more than 300,000 civil servants, called Friday's walkout to demand wage increases, the payment of outstanding overtime and a 35-hour work week for all staff, not just those on collective contracts. The number of strikes in Portugal has declined sharply since the current center-left Socialist government began reversing austerity measures adopted during a recent financial crisis.
  • Several residents of the Mosul neighborhood hit by a U.S. airstrike in March are denying the findings from the coalition's probe of the attack. They claim there were no IS fighters in the house struck by the U.S. bomb and that IS militants had not rigged it with explosives. The Pentagon has released the findings of an investigation into the March 17 airstrike that said it targeted two IS snipers in the building, setting off a series of explosions that killed 105 civilians. Ahmed Abdul Karim and other residents interviewed by The Associated Press on Friday say only civilians were in the house when it was hit. The bombing is the largest single instance of civilian deaths confirmed by the coalition in the nearly three-year-old campaign against IS.
  • The Latest on the concert bombing in England (all times local): 11:55 a.m. The leader of Britain's opposition Labour Party says there is a link between Britain's actions overseas and the increased extremist threat at home. Jeremy Corbyn spoke as campaigning for the June 8 general election resumed after a three-day pause following the concert hall bombing in Manchester, in which 22 people died. Corbyn says many experts including British intelligence professionals see a connection between terrorism and the wars Britain has supported, such as the one in Libya. ___ 11:10 a.m. Former Oasis frontman Liam Gallagher has announced plans for a benefit concert in Manchester to help victims of the extremist bombing that killed 22 people. The Manchester native said on Twitter he will perform a solo show Tuesday at the 02 Ritz in Manchester. Profits will go to a fund for the families of the victims. Gallagher had earlier tweeted about his love for the city and said there were 'no words' that could describe the tragedy. ___ 10:00 a.m. London police say extra security is being added for major sporting events this weekend including the FA Cup Final at Wembley Stadium. Chief Superintendent Jon Williams said Friday that extra protection measures and extra officers are being deployed throughout the capital because of the higher terrorist-threat level. He said fans coming to football and rugby matches this weekend should come earlier than usual because of added security screening. Williams said 'covert and discrete tactics' will also be employed to protect the transport network. He says police want the approach to be 'unpredictable' and to make London 'as hostile an environment as possible to terrorists.' ___ 8:00 a.m. British police investigating the Manchester Arena bombing have made a new arrest while continuing to search addresses associated with the bomber who killed 22 people. Seven other men are in custody in connection with Monday's blast, with police and security agencies working to prevent further attacks. Their ages ranged from 18 to 38. All are being held on suspicion of offenses violating the terrorism act. A 16-year-old boy who had been arrested has been released without charge, police said. Britain's security level has been upgraded to 'critical' meaning officials believe another attack may be imminent. .
  • A man once dubbed the 'Houdini' of Alabama's death row after averting seven prior execution dates was put to death Friday, capping years of litigation challenging the humaneness of lethal injection. Tommy Arthur, 75, was pronounced dead at 12:15 a.m. CDT Friday after receiving an injection at the state prison in Atmore, authorities said. Arthur was convicted of killing riverboat engineer Troy Wicker, who was fatally shot as he slept in his home. 'Thomas Arthur's protracted attempt to escape justice is finally at an end,' Alabama Attorney General Steve Marshall said in a statement. 'Most importantly, tonight, the family of Troy Wicker can begin the long-delayed process of recovery from a painful loss.' Wicker's two sons witnessed the execution but made no statement to the media. Arthur maintained his innocence in recent media interviews as his attorneys had pressed the state's governor to delay his eighth execution date to DNA test hairs collected at the crime scene. Arthur's daughter, in a news conference held an hour after her father's execution, repeated those calls saying there should be mandatory DNA testing of all evidence in all capital cases before any execution is carried out. Sherrie Stone said she vacillated over the years over whether she thought her father killed Wicker. 'At times, I was convinced he did. At times, I believed he was innocent. .... Now, I will never know the truth.' Alabama Gov. Kay Ivey had refused the request to halt the execution. Ivey's lawyer wrote in a letter to Arthur's legal team that it was 'never in dispute' that the hairs did not come from Arthur. General Counsel Bryan Taylor said jurors knew about the hairs and still convicted Arthur of capital murder. The long-running legal saga began on Feb. 1, 1982, in the north Alabama town of Muscle Shoals along the Tennessee River. Wicker's wife Judy initially told police she came home and was raped by a black man who shot and killed her husband. After her conviction, she changed her story and testified she had discussed killing her husband with Arthur, who came to the house in makeup and an Afro-style wig and shot her husband. Arthur was in a prison work-release program at the time for the 1977 slaying of his sister-in-law, a crime he admits to committing. Arthur had three trials, as his first two convictions were overturned. He escaped from jail while awaiting his second trial by shooting a jailer in the neck. Arthur purposely asked jurors to sentence him to death to open up more avenues of appeal. In his final statement, Arthur appeared to choke back tears as he apologized to his four children. 'I'm sorry I failed you as a father,' Arthur said. Prison officials said he was allowed to have a picture of his children in the lethal injection chamber, where he could see it as he lost consciousness. Both sides of the death penalty debate have pointed to Arthur's case as an example of what they see wrong in capital cases. Stone said her father was hampered in the early days of his case by inadequate legal counsel as he missed key filing deadlines. Attorneys with the state and victim' advocates disparaged Arthur as a con man who used perpetual litigation — after a pro bono legal team took his case — to avoid the death sentence for years, causing torturous delays for Wicker's remaining family. Arthur had a total of seven execution dates postponed. 'He's a Houdini,' said Janette Grantham, director of the Victims of Crime and Leniency, before the execution. Grantham said one of Wicker's sisters died not long after Arthur's previous execution date was stayed and that she believed Arthur, in a way, 'killed' her too. Arthur's lawyers had filed a flurry of appeals trying to halt the eighth execution date. They argued the state planned to use an ineffective sedative, midazolam, and said the last inmate executed in Alabama was 'awake' through the procedure because he coughed for the first 13 minutes of his execution and moved slightly after two consciousness tests. The U.S. Supreme Court allowed the execution to proceed shortly before 11 p.m. Thursday, with Justice Sonia Sotomayor dissenting. The state prison system began administering the lethal injection drugs around 11:50 p.m. Thursday, just before the death warrant was to have expired at midnight. Arthur's hands appeared to twitch a few times, but he didn't cough or lurch as some inmates have done in executions using midazolam. As the execution date neared, Arthur had acknowledged in a phone interview Monday that his chance of another stay was diminishing. 'I'm terrified, but there's nothing I can do,' Arthur told The Associated Press.