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    Court documents show R&B singer R. Kelly has been evicted from two Atlanta-area homes over unpaid rent. The Atlanta Journal-Constitution reported Monday that Feb. 13 filings with the Fulton County magistrate court show Kelly owes more than $31,000 in past due payments to SB Property Management Global. Court filings show Kelly paid $3,000 a month and $11,542 a month, respectively, for two homes just 2 miles (3 kilometers) apart. Records don't show criminal filings related to the matter. Neither the property company's Edmond Green nor Kelly spokesman Trevian Kutti would comment to the newspaper. Last week, the Fulton County District Attorney's Office said it's still reviewing a file from Johns Creek police following July 2017 allegations that the Grammy winner was holding women against their will as part of a cult. ___ Information from: The Atlanta Journal-Constitution, http://www.ajc.com
  • The Home Depot Inc. on Tuesday reported fiscal fourth-quarter net income of $1.78 billion. On a per-share basis, the Atlanta-based company said it had profit of $1.52. Earnings, adjusted for pretax expenses, were $1.69 per share. The results surpassed Wall Street expectations. The average estimate of 14 analysts surveyed by Zacks Investment Research was for earnings of $1.62 per share. The home-improvement retailer posted revenue of $23.88 billion in the period, also surpassing Street forecasts. Eleven analysts surveyed by Zacks expected $23.66 billion. Home Depot shares have fallen slightly more than 1 percent since the beginning of the year, while the Standard & Poor's 500 index has increased 2 percent. The stock has climbed 31 percent in the last 12 months. _____ This story was generated by Automated Insights (http://automatedinsights.com/ap) using data from Zacks Investment Research. Access a Zacks stock report on HD at https://www.zacks.com/ap/HD
  • A teen was shot and killed in the parking lot of an Atlanta-area church. DeKalb County police Lt. Rod Bryant tells news outlets that the 19-year-old man was cutting through the parking lot of Big Miller Grove Missionary Baptist Church with three friends on Monday night when he was shot in the chest. He died at the scene. Police are looking for two people who may have got into an argument with the group. No specific motive has been released. The victim's name has not been released.
  • A man Georgia authorities say participated in forcing a goat to ingest whiskey and cocaine has been charged with aggravated cruelty to animals. The Gwinnett County Sheriff's Office said in a statement 28-year-old Sergio Palomares-Guzman was arrested Feb. 15 in connection with a videotaped incident believed to be from early January. The sheriff's office says Palomares-Guzman lived on a ranch where he worked as a horse trainer. The release says video shows him holding the goat's horns and forcing its mouth open while another man gives it substances. That man and a third suspect remain unidentified. The sheriff's office says the goat is healthy and has since been adopted. It's unclear whether Palomares-Guzman has a lawyer. Online jail records say he's being held for the Immigration and Customs Enforcement agency.
  • A 15-year-old Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School student who was shot five times during the massacre is credited with saving the lives of at least 20 other students. A fundraising site says Anthony Borges was shot in both legs and his back while attempting to close and lock a classroom door last Wednesday. Seventeen people were killed. Borges' friend Carlos Rodriguez told ABC's 'Good Morning America' that the two rushed to hide in a nearby classroom when they first heard gunshots. He says no one knew what to do, but that Borges 'took the initiative to just save his other classmates.' Borges' GoFundMe had raised nearly $356,000 as of Tuesday morning from almost 11,000 donations. The legitimacy of the fundraising page was confirmed by the Broward County Sheriff's Office.
  • Chris Grady was a theater kid counting down the days until he reported for duty in the U.S. Army this summer, when a gunman opened fire at his school. As he huddled in his classroom at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School last Wednesday listening to shots ring out nearby, what he felt wasn't fear, but anger. 'Full-on anger,' the thin, curly haired 19-year-old said. Grady's anger deepened the day after the shooting, when he heard news that the FBI had failed to follow up on a tip about the former student who police say gunned down 14 students and three staff members with an AR-15 styled rifle. News also emerged that Nikolas Cruz had legally purchased the gun despite a documented history of mental health issues. The FBI received a tip last month that Cruz had a 'desire to kill' and access to guns and could be plotting an attack, but agents failed to investigate, the agency acknowledged Friday. Others had received warnings as well: Records show the Florida Department of Children and Families investigated, but concluded Cruz wasn't a danger to himself or others. On Friday, as gun-control debates raged anew on social media, one of Grady's close friends created a Twitter account, @NeverAgainMSD, to channel the students' anger and frustration. 'The Never Again movement started formulating, and we got to work,' Grady said. Grady and his friend are among about 100 Stoneman Douglas students who are heading to Florida's capital, Tallahassee, to push lawmakers to do something to stop gun violence. They also plan to maintain the momentum by attending what they hope will be a massive march on Washington next month. The efforts have offered students a way to channel their anger and sadness into action. Grady's life was upended by the shooting. But now, as one of the organizers behind the students' call for stricter gun-control laws, he is laser-focused on planning and media interviews. On Tuesday, he will ride a bus to Tallahassee. On Wednesday, he and a small group of Never Again organizers will fly back to Parkland for a televised Town Hall meeting about the shooting. Then their focus will turn to the planned March for Life on the nation's capital on March 24. That doesn't leave a lot of time for school. 'If we've got to take some extra days off, that's fine to continue the movement,' he said. 'Academics have been put on the back burner.' Prior to the shooting, Chris' time was spent studying theater and working out to get his body in shape for the Army, where he wants to pursue a career in information technology. The second-oldest of four kids, he moved to Parkland from Massachusetts when he was 6. His mother is a property manager, and his step-father is an electrician. Given his interest in a military career, Chris said he is not anti-gun and supports the Second Amendment. But he believes assault rifles such as the AR-15 styled rifle that authorities say Cruz used should be reserved for the military. 'They're weapons of war made to kill as many people as possible in as short a time as possible,' he said. Grady said he's ready to work as much as it takes to keep the gun-control movement's momentum going until he ships out. 'The kids in Newtown were too young to understand what happened and were too young to have their own voice,' he said, referring to the 20 first-graders killed in the 2012 Connecticut school shooting. 'We want to be the voice for those kids and thousands of others who have been affected by tragedies like this.' ___ Follow Jason Dearen on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/JHDearen
  • From the confines of his golf club, President Donald Trump offered support for a limited strengthening of federal background checks on gun purchases Monday while staying largely mum in the last few days about the victims of the Florida school massacre and the escalating debate about controls on weapons. One side of that debate was represented outside the White House as dozens of teens spread their bodies across the pavement to symbolize the dead and call for stronger gun controls, a precursor to a march in Washington planned next month by survivors of the Parkland school shooting and supporters of their cause. At his Florida club just 40 miles from a community ravaged by the shooting that left 17 dead last week, Trump gave a nod toward a specific policy action, with the White House saying he had spoken Friday to Sen. John Cornyn, a Texas Republican, about a bipartisan bill designed to strengthen the FBI database of prohibited gun buyers. Spokeswoman Sarah Huckabee Sanders qualified the support, stressing that talks continue and 'revisions are being considered,' but said 'the president is supportive of efforts to improve the federal background check system.' The main action Trump has taken on guns in office has been to sign a resolution blocking an Obama-era rule designed to keep guns out of the hands of certain mentally disabled people. The president has voiced strong support for gun rights and the National Rifle Association. The bipartisan background check legislation would be aimed at ensuring that federal agencies and states accurately report relevant criminal information to the FBI. It was introduced after the Air Force failed to report the criminal history of the gunman who slaughtered more than two dozen people at a Texas church. The White House statement comes as shooting survivors and other young people press for more gun control in a rising chorus of grief and activism. Their 'March for Our Lives' is planned March 24 in Washington. Ella Fesler, 16-year-old high school student in Alexandria, Virginia, was among the students at the 'lie-in' in front of the White House. She said it was time for change, adding: 'Every day when I say 'bye' to my parents, I do acknowledge the fact that I could never see my parents again.' But previous gun tragedies have not produced action in Congress. After the Las Vegas massacre in the fall, Republicans and Democrats in Congress talked about taking a rare step to tighten the nation's gun laws. Four months later, the only gun legislation that has moved in the House or Senate instead eases restrictions for gun owners. Kristin Brown, co-president of the Brady Campaign to Prevent Gun Violence, said the measure Trump discussed with Cornyn would help to enforce existing rules but would not close loopholes permitting loose private sales on the internet and at gun shows. She's pressing for a ban on assault-type weapons and for laws enabling family members, guardians or police to ask judges to strip gun rights temporarily from people who show warning signs of violence. 'We need a comprehensive system,' Brown said. 'One of these isn't enough.' Trump, who visited first responders and some victims Friday, has focused his comments on mental health, rather than guns. The White House says the president will host a 'listening session' with students and teachers this week and will discuss school safety with state and local officials. But they have offered no further details on who will attend those sessions. Trump spent most of his weekend at his private Palm Beach estate, Mar-a-Lago. White House aides advised against golfing too soon after the shooting. But on President's Day, the avid golfer headed to his nearby golf club. The White House did not immediately answer questions about whether he was playing golf. President Barack Obama took heavy criticism in 2014 when he went golfing during a vacation just minutes after denouncing the militants who had beheaded an American journalist. He later regretted playing golf so soon after the killing. Trump watched cable television news during the weekend and groused to club members and advisers about the investigation of Russian election meddling. In a marathon series of furious weekend tweets from Mar-a-Lago, Trump vented about Russia, raging at the FBI for what he perceived to be a fixation on the Russia investigation at the cost of failing to deter the attack. ___ Associated Press writer Jonathan Lemire contributed to this report.
  • Moments after Serena Williams won her seventh Wimbledon title, she proudly raised her fist in a black power salute. It caused a bit of frenzy at the All-England Club in 2016, but Williams' action shouldn't have surprised anyone: She'd already been one of the most vocal supporters of the Black Lives Matter movement. She was one of the first major athletes to decry the failure to indict a white officer in the death of unarmed black teenager Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri — while also condemning violence against police. 'What caused me to speak out? Just life,' Williams said. 'That's just who I am. I always believe in the greater good and doing what's right.' Williams isn't alone in her activism. Female athletes — especially black women — have long been out there pushing for social change. Wilma Rudolph's victory parade celebrating her three gold medals from the 1960 Olympics in Rome was the first integrated event in Clarksville, Tennessee. But despite their efforts on the field and off, women athletes have to struggle to get the same attention as men despite having as much to say, said Harry Edwards, a scholar of race and sports who has worked as a consultant for several U.S. pro teams. 'We have this twisted, almost-demented obsession with women's second-class status with their physical inferiority,' he said. 'It prevents us from appreciating the great athletes that they are ... but it also means that it shuts down a potential forum that these great athletes would have where they're valued for their athletic prowess in the same way that Muhammad Ali was, that Bill Russell was, that Tommy Smith and John Carlos were, that Arthur Ashe was, that Curt Flood was, so that when they speak, people listen.' While Williams has long been an advocate of Black Lives Matter, it was only after former NFL quarterback Colin Kaepernick took a knee during the 2016 season that the country really began to pay attention to black athlete activism. Kaepernick added his voice to a growing national movement, enveloping the entire league and starting an ongoing conversation that ventured outside football arenas. Similarly, few people acknowledge that after the 2016 deaths of Philando Castile, Alton Sterling and the killing of Dallas police officers, dozens of WNBA players wore shirts with the men's names and kneeled for the national anthem. It was a black woman, Knox College basketball player Ariyana Smith, who started the wave of athletic protest about the deaths of black men at the hands of police. On Nov. 29, 2014, Smith made the 'hands up, don't shoot' gesture during the national anthem before a game at Fontbonne University in Clayton, Missouri, before walking toward the American flag and laying prone on the floor for 4 1/2 minutes to symbolize the 4 ½ hours Brown lay in the streets of nearby Ferguson. 'We as black women are often invisible, so we don't get that credit,' said Akilah Francique, a former athlete who cofounded the Sista to Sista program to foster a sense of connectedness among black female collegiate athletes. Williams has been a presence on and off the tennis court, not shying away from opponents en route to winning 23 Grand Slam titles or social and political issues. She spoke up in 2015, encouraging Black Lives Matter activists not to get discouraged: 'To those of you involved in equality movements like Black Lives Matter, I say this: Keep it up. Don't let those trolls stop you. We've been through so much for so many centuries, and we shall overcome this too,' she wrote in Wired magazine. Since then, Williams has become the symbol for other causes affecting people of color, including medical issues. In February, she told Vogue that she dealt with a medical scare after the birth of her daughter. She had to insist on getting extra medical tests, overruling her nurse, before her doctors discovered several small blood clots in her lungs. Women around the country related to her story, talking about similar difficulties in getting proper medical attention. Female-led activism can also look different than men's, Francique said, because of the unique positions and pressures women face in sports and in life. She pointed to the criticism black women athletes have to overcome about their body shapes, training regimens, skin color, clothing and even hair when they compete in sports — criticism that Williams has endured. 'For many of them just by merely being there and having a presence is activism,' Francique said. Williams' older sister, Venus, who has advocated for equal pay for professional tennis while winning seven Grand Slam titles, believes it is important to have a voice on these issues. 'I think more than anything, we see ourselves as Americans, and that's what we want to be able to see ourselves as, regardless of color,' said Venus Williams. 'I think that's what everyone is fighting for, that one day we don't have to see that anymore.' __ AP Sports Writer Steve Megargee contributed to this report. ___ Jesse J. Holland covers race and ethnicity for The Associated Press. Contact him at jholland@ap.org, on Twitter at http://www.twitter.com/jessejholland or on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/jessejholland. You can read his stories at AP at http://bit.ly/storiesbyjessejholland. ___ EDITOR'S NOTE: African-American athletes have used their sports platforms for more than 100 years to impact social and political change. As part of AP's coverage plans for Black History Month, we will take a multiplatform look at how many have and continue to engage in activism, from Jack Johnson, to Muhammad Ali to Colin Kaepernick. https://apnews.com/tag/GameChangers
  • The winning numbers in Monday evening's drawing of the Georgia Lottery's 'Cash 3 Night' game were: 8-9-2 (eight, nine, two)
  • The winning numbers in Monday evening's drawing of the Georgia Lottery's 'Cash 4 Night' game were: 6-9-0-8 (six, nine, zero, eight)