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    Most of us probably don’t know what any of those codes mean on your boarding pass, but there’s one that you won’t want to see when you’re flying. It’s a simple series of repeated letters, SSSS, and it means that you’ll be subject to additional screenings. >> Read more trending news The SSSS is an acronym for Secondary Security Screening Selection. You and your luggage will be subject to a closer screening. You will be patted down, swabbed for explosive residue and your luggage will be opened and searched, News.com.au reported. You may have to provide extra information to prove who you are and give complete travel plans in detail to screeners. SSSS was developed by the Transportation Security Administration after 9/11 to prevent those who shouldn’t get into the U.S. from traveling here. “Secure Flight is a risk-based passenger prescreening program that enhances security by identifying low and high-risk passengers before they arrive at the airport by matching their names against trusted traveler lists and watchlists,” TSA officials told Business Insider. The list that feeds the SSSS code is a secret. The TSA said that people are added to it after a computer randomly selects travelers. One clue that could mean that you may be on the list is if you can’t use online check-in for a flight, News.com.au reported.
  • You wouldn’t think Yoda would cause such a problem, but a social studies textbook had to be pulled because of the green Jedi. It was all because of a photo mistake, and no one knows how it happened. The photo in question shows Yoda sitting next to the former king of Saudi Arabia, King Faisal, The New York Times reported. The image was created by artist Abdullah Al Shehri. He used a real photo of King Faisal attending the signing of the United Nations Charter in 1945 and added Yoda to the historic photo. Shehri said that he had nothing to do with his image being published in the book, but said that his art was inspired by a real-life event. While looking through archives of the Middle East, mingled with photos of war and refugees, he found one that showed Egyptian president Anwar Sadat meeting Mickey Mouse. Shehri said he was inspired to create other similar photos, adding pop culture icons to photographs, the paper reported. Shehri’s art has been shown in galleries in Dubai, Houston and Aspen. He said he had no idea that the Yoda photo was in the book until his mother, who is a teacher, saw the book and texted her son asking if it was his photo. The Saudi education minister took to Twitter to apologize and the books in question have been pulled. New copies are currently being printed. A committee is trying to find out who put the photo of Yoda and the king into the book in the first place, The Times reported.
  • A Brockton woman tells Boston 25 News she is living in fear knowing that the person who broke into her home is still on the loose. Renee asked to use only her first name out of fear. She says she grabbed a broom to go clean her 9-year-old son’s room, but when she went through the door she noticed something was off. >> Read more trending news “I said why is the Playstation on the bed. I'm thinking, what did my son do this morning. I looked here. I said that's weird. I saw out of the corner of my eye, someone standing like this,” Renee told Boston 25 News reporter Malini Basu. Her first reaction was to use the broom in her hand as a weapon. “I was hitting him. ‘Get out of my house, get out, get out, leave my house now,’” she said. He wasn’t leaving, so she turned and ran outside. “Screaming bloody blue murder, no cars around. I'm yelling ‘he's in my house, call the cops,’” she said. The suspect stole thousands of dollars worth of electronics and jewelry.He also stole the family’s sense of safety. “I can't sleep. I'm constantly looking over my shoulder,” Renee said. Renee lives in the home with her husband, son, 22-year-old daughter and 4-year-old granddaughter. “I hope it was worth it, he has kids scared, my mom scared. There are little kids that live here,” Renee’s daughter Erica said.
  • Today is the first day of the fall season, as the autumnal equinox signals the beginning of astronomical fall. This year, that happens across North America on Friday afternoon. So as the weather begins to cool across the country, here are some things to know about that season when the leaves change color and the temperature begins to drop. >> Read more trending news  What exactly is an equinox?Twice a year, either on March 20 or 21 and Sept. 22 or 23, the sun’s rays shine directly over the earth’s equator. March is known as the vernal equinox, or spring equinox in the Northern Hemisphere. September is known as the autumnal equinox. What occurs during the autumnal equinox?During the autumnal equinox, day and night are balanced to about 12 hours each all over the world. Earth’s axis of rotation is perpendicular to the line connecting the centers of the Earth and the sun. What is the definition of equinox?The word equinox was formed by two Latin words: 'Equi' is the Latin prefix for 'equal' and 'nox' is the Latin word for 'night.' Fall back: When does daylight saving time end?This year, daylight saving time began on March 12. It will end on Sunday, Nov. 5. What time is the official start of fall season?It depends on where you live, of course. Autumn officially arrives at 4:02 Eastern Daylight Time. Central Daylight Time is at 3:02 p.m., followed by Mountain Daylight Time (2:02) and Pacific Daylight Time (1:02).For everywhere else around the world, convert your time here.
  • Attorneys for Texas are asking a federal appeals court in New Orleans to let the state's law banning 'sanctuary cities' take effect. U.S. District Judge Orlando Garcia blocked much of the law Aug. 31 — the day before it was to take effect. On Friday, three judges of the 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals will be asked to let the law take effect ahead of a November appeal hearing. Under the law, Texas police chiefs could face removal from office and criminal charges for not complying with federal immigration officials' requests to detain people jailed on non-immigration offenses. Various local governments in Texas are fighting the law, which also allows police to inquire about people's immigration status during routine interactions like traffic stops — a provision Garcia didn't block. Municipal officials from Dallas, Houston, El Paso, San Antonio and Austin are among the opponents. The American Civil Liberties Union is fighting the law on behalf of the city of El Cenizo. The Mexican American Legal Defense fund represents other localities. Attorney General Jeff Sessions has praised the Texas law and the Department of Justice filed arguments in support of it, as did several states' attorneys general. The law's opponents argue in briefs that the law puts law enforcement officers in violation of the Fourth Amendment by requiring them to detain people suspected of illegal immigration without probable cause. They also argue that it illegally puts local police in the federal role of immigration enforcement officers, and that it is unconstitutionally vague as to exactly when a local law enforcement officer would be in violation of the law. Supporters of the state law say immigration officials have already determined probable cause when they seek to have local officials detain someone. They also argue that federal and local officials have a long history of cooperation on immigration matters and that the law is clear in its prohibition against local government's policies restricting immigration enforcement. The law, known as Senate Bill 4, would have taken effect Sept. 1 had Garcia not issued a stay last month. The measure won passage in the Republican-controlled Texas Legislature and was signed by Republican Gov. Greg Abbott despite opposition from business groups, which worried that it could cause a labor-force shortage and send a negative economic message. Judges James Dennis, Leslie Southwick and Stephen Higginson will hear the arguments. Dennis was nominated to the court by Democratic President Bill Clinton; Higginson, by Democratic President Barack Obama; Southwick, by Republican President George W. Bush.
  • The location of three Confederate memorials standing on North Carolina's old Capitol grounds for over a century could depend on a panel of professors and historic preservation boosters asked by the governor to move the monuments to a Civil War battle site. The North Carolina Historical Commission meets Friday to consider Democratic Gov. Roy Cooper's request to relocate the monuments to Bentonville Battlefield, which is about 50 miles (80 kilometers) south of Raleigh. The memorials include a 75-foot-tall (23-meter-tall) obelisk remembering all of the state's Confederate dead. There are also two smaller statutes. Cooper announced his plans in the weeks following a violent white nationalist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, and the subsequent toppling of a local monument in Durham. State and local governments across the South are debating and reconsidering the placement of Confederate symbols following last month's violence and the 2015 shootings of black parishioners at a South Carolina church. 'Our Civil War history is important, but it belongs in textbooks and museums — not a place of allegiance on our Capitol grounds,' Cooper wrote. But a 2015 state law approved by the Republican-controlled General Assembly prohibits their removal from public property without legislative approval and restricts relocation. The law says the 11-member commission can relocate a monument to a site 'of similar prominence, honor, visibility, availability and access.' A Cooper Cabinet secretary petitioning the commission says Bentonville complies with the relocation requirement and would put the monuments in historical context. Republican legislative leaders wrote to commission members Thursday, urging them not to grant Cooper's request. The Republicans say the reasons being given for the relocation and the Bentonville battle site don't meet the law's requirements. Senate leader Phil Berger told Cooper in a letter that any decision to approve the relocation would likely be overturned in court with litigation. 'The spirit and the letter of the law do not allow for the granting of the governor's request,' a memo from Speaker Tim Moore and other House Republicans reads. The March 1865 battle at Bentonville marked the last full-scale action of the Civil War in which a Confederate army mounted a tactical offensive. The monuments join others that currently stand on the city square in downtown Raleigh where the old Capitol building was completed in 1840. The legislature met there until 1963. Cooper's office is now inside. A monument on the square to honor the contributions of black North Carolina residents is being planned.
  • Roy Moore, a firebrand jurist who is close to snagging the state's Republican nomination for U.S. Senate in Alabama, once called homosexuality an 'inherent evil' and referred to ethnic groups as 'reds' and 'yellows' in a speech lamenting racial and political divisions in the country. Twice ousted from the bench, the U.S. Senate contender has a history of provocative comments that have simultaneously made him a lightning rod for controversy and propelled his popularity in the conservative Deep South state. While he is disliked among members of the Republican establishment, his penchant for shooting from the hip appeals to many voters who are drawn to his plain-spokenness and authenticity. Moore is on the eve of what could be a triumphant political resurrection: His strong showing in a party primary earlier this year forced Sen. Luther Strange into a heated Sept. 26 runoff for the Republican nomination for the U.S. Senate seat previously occupied by Attorney General Jeff Sessions. The winner will become the favorite against Democrat Doug Jones. Not surprisingly, his increased public exposure as a candidate has led to a more intense scrutiny of his words. In a speech last week about divisions in the country, Moore employed words that in contemporary society are considered ethnic slurs. Saying the nation is as divided now as it was during the Civil War, he remarked, 'We've got blacks and whites fighting, reds and yellows fighting, Democrats and Republicans fighting, men and women fighting.' Asked later about the comments, Moore's campaign responded with a quotation from the Bible song 'Jesus Loves the Little Children,' which refers to children by color. ''Red, yellow, black and white they are precious in His sight. Jesus loves the little children of the world.' This is the Gospel. If we take it seriously, America can once again be united as one nation under God.' Moore's campaign posted the same response on Twitter. In a 2002 child-custody case involving a lesbian mother, Moore wrote that homosexuality is 'an inherent evil against which children must be protected.' The Alabama Supreme Court ruled in favor of the father, and Moore authored a concurring opinion saying there was a presumption the mother was unfit because she was in a relationship with a woman. Dawn Larson, the mother in the case, said Moore's actions were painful, but that she gets satisfaction knowing her case has been used as a rallying point against him over the years. 'It absolutely boggles my mind how the citizens of Alabama can keep re-electing someone who is so blatantly biased, has no understanding of separation of church and state, and who has proven over and over that he is simply unfit for the job. I don't have to believe the way Moore does, but I will defend his right to worship as he chooses. I just wish he offered every other American the same option,' Larson told The Associated Press by email. Asked about the case, Moore told the AP his opinion supporting the court decision was based on state laws against sodomy and gay marriage. While his campaign platform focuses on a variety of issues, such as the repeal of President Barack Obama's health care overhaul and increased military spending, his signature issue through the years has always been the 'acknowledgement of God.' Moore's stump speeches, like his political career, often mingle politics, law and religion. In a February speech, he appeared to suggest that the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks were a result of the country straying from religious roots. He quoted an Old Testament verse about the 'breaking cometh suddenly at an instance' for those that have despised the word of God. 'Sounds a little bit like the Pentagon, whose breaking came suddenly at an instance, doesn't it?' Moore told the AP that the section of the speech was about how the country needed God's protection. In a campaign speech Saturday, Moore complained that political operatives supporting Strange are showing up at all of his speeches with video cameras, hoping to catch him in a misstep or twist his words with editing. Moore, a West Point graduate, was a little-known country judge when a decision to decorate his courtroom with a homemade wooden copy of the Ten Commandments set him on the path to fame. The American Civil Liberties Union sued over the display, and his habit of opening court sessions with Christian prayer. The notoriety helped propel Moore — twice— to the office of chief justice. A judicial panel removed him from the post in 2003 when he disobeyed a court order to move a Ten Commandments monument out of the state Supreme Court building. Despite the controversy, he was re-elected in 2012, although last year, the panel suspended him for the remainder of his term after he wrote a memo telling probate judges they remained under a court order to refuse marriage licenses to gay couples. National Republican groups, at the urging of Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, are spending millions on behalf of Strange. That's partly out of the routine practice of protecting incumbents; Strange was appointed to the seat by then-Gov. Robert Bentley after Sessions' promotion to the Justice Department, and Strange has proven a reliable vote for McConnell and President Donald Trump. But there's also the quiet fear that Moore is a weaker general-election candidate than Strange and would be a more unpredictable senator. Wayne Flynt, a historian who has written books about Alabama history, said voters view Moore as 'authentic' because he seems to truly believe what he says. Flynt said Moore appeals to voters who are tired of the establishment candidates on both sides of the aisle. 'How can he be a serious candidate for Senate? I can guarantee you among the Republican establishment, he's not. They are terrified of Roy Moore,' Flynt said. 'And I really think he has a very good chance of winning.
  • The eye of Hurricane Maria was nearing the Turks and Caicos early Friday as Puerto Rico sought to recover from the storm's devastation. Two days after Maria ravaged Puerto Rico, flooding towns, crushing homes and killing at least two people, millions on the island faced the dispiriting prospect of weeks and perhaps months without electricity. The storm knocked out the entire grid across the U.S. territory of 3.4 million, leaving many without power. The loss of power left residents hunting for gas canisters for cooking, collecting rainwater or steeling themselves mentally for the hardships to come in the tropical heat. Some contemplated leaving the island. 'You cannot live here without power,' said Hector Llanos, a 78-year-old retired New York police officer who planned to leave Saturday for the U.S. mainland to live there temporarily. Like many Puerto Ricans, Llanos does not have a generator or gas stove. 'The only thing I have is a flashlight,' he said, shaking his head. 'This is never going to return to normal.' Maria's death toll across the Caribbean, meanwhile, climbed to at least 19, nearly all of them on the hard-hit island of Dominica. In Puerto Rico, the government said at least two were killed but media on the island were reporting additional deaths and the actual toll appeared unlikely to be known for days. As of Friday morning, Maria was moving near the Turks and Caicos with winds of 125 mph (205 kph). The storm was expected to move near or just east of the Turks and Caicos and the southeastern Bahamas on Friday. From there, it is expected to veer into the open Atlantic, no threat to the U.S. mainland. Maria was also expected to weaken over the next two days. In Puerto Rico, the grid was in sorry shape long before Maria — and Hurricane Irma two weeks ago — struck. The territory's $73 billion debt crisis has left agencies like the state power company broke. It abandoned most basic maintenance in recent years, leaving the island subject to regular blackouts. 'We knew this was going to happen given the vulnerable infrastructure,' Gov. Ricardo Rossello said. The Federal Emergency Management Agency said it would open an air bridge from the mainland on Friday, with three to four military planes flying to the island every day carrying water, food, generators and temporary shelters. 'There's a humanitarian emergency here in Puerto Rico,' Rossello said. 'This is an event without precedent.' He said his administration was trying to open ports soon to receive shipments of food, water, generators, cots and other supplies. The government has hired 56 small contractors to clear trees and put up new power lines and poles and will be sending tanker trucks to supply neighborhoods as they run out of water. The entire island has been declared a federal disaster zone. Mike Hyland, senior vice president of engineering services for the American Public Power Association, a utility industry group that is sending repair crews into the Caribbean, refused to speculate on how long it would take to restore power in Puerto Rico. 'Let's see what the facts tell us by the end of the weekend,' he said. But he acknowledged: 'This is going to be a tall lift.' Maribel Montilla already had two large barrels filled with water but worried about how long it would last for her, her daughter, her son-in-law and six grandchildren. 'You know what I think? We're going to be without power for six months now,' she said. Cellphone and internet service collapsed in much of Puerto Rico. The only radio station that remained on the air during the hurricane — WAPA 680 AM — was relaying messages to help connect friends and families. Other concerns were more prosaic. Across the street, someone yelled at a neighbor, 'Listen, do you have Netflix?!' Jaime Rullan, a sports commentator, has a gas stove at home but tried not to think about the lack of air conditioning on an island where the heat index has surpassed 100 degrees (37 Celsius) in recent days. 'We're used to the lights going out because of storms here in Puerto Rico, but this time, we're worried,' he said. 'We should prepare ourselves mentally to be at least a month without power.' Deysi Rodriguez, a 46-year-old caretaker for elderly people, does not have a gas stove. And unlike others who have been lining up at the few fast-food restaurants that have reopened, Rodriguez is a diabetic and has to be more careful about what she eats. Rodriguez said she might temporarily move to New Jersey if the situation gets worse. Pedro Cartagena, a 57-year-old dock supervisor, said he planned to shower, eat and sleep at his company's office. He plans to buy food at the few restaurants that are open and operating on generators. 'That's going to drain my bank account,' he said, 'but if I want to eat, that's my only option.' In an upscale neighborhood in San Juan, 69-year-old retiree Annie Mattei's condominium has a generator. But she said maintenance will shut it off between 11 a.m. and 5 p.m. to save fuel. 'This has been devastating,' she said as her eyes welled with tears. In the Dominican Republican, Maria knocked down trees and power lines. But Joel Santos, president of the country's hotel association, said the hurricane did not damage the tourism infrastructure, even though it passed close to Punta Cana, the major resort area on the eastern tip of the island. In Dominica, where Maria laid waste to hundreds of homes and was blamed for at least 15 deaths, Prime Minister Roosevelt Skerrit wept as he spoke to a reporter on the nearby island of Antigua. 'It is a miracle there were not hundreds of deaths,' he said. He added: 'Dominica is going to need all the help the world has to offer.
  • Prospects are good for a public shaming in the Equifax data breach, but it's unlikely Congress will institute sweeping new regulations after hackers accessed the personal information of an estimated 143 million Americans. Since early this year, President Donald Trump and the Republican-led Congress have strived to curb government's influence on businesses, arguing that regulations stifle economic growth. Lawmakers have repealed more than a dozen Obama-era rules and the House voted in June to roll back much of Dodd-Frank, the landmark banking law created after the 2008 economic crisis that was designed to prevent future meltdowns. Several bills unveiled after Equifax are so far missing a key ingredient for success: Republican co-sponsors. And most important, there is history. Despite numerous high-profile security breaches over the past decade at companies such as Target, Yahoo, Neiman Marcus and Home Depot, legislation that would toughen standards for storing customer data has failed to gain the necessary traction. Jessica Rich, a vice president at Consumer Reports, said she has questioned over the years what event it would take for lawmakers to impose tougher data security regulations. 'I'm hoping this is the final wake-up call for Congress,' Rich said. Advocacy groups seek legislation that would enhance the standards for companies that store consumer data and require prompt notification to affected Americans when breaches do occur. But, so far, Congress has opted to let states handle the issue. 'Lawmakers have got to plug the loopholes in current law, and we need tough civil penalties for those who break the law,' Rich said. Senate and House Republicans say they are in fact-gathering mode before moving on any legislation. Separate hearings are scheduled the first week in October, with Equifax Chairman and CEO Richard Smith slated to testify — and likely to get a public thrashing from lawmakers. Rep. Greg Walden, the Republican chairman of the House Energy and Commerce Committee, said he's not ruling out new regulations as a result of the data breach at the credit agency, 'but first we've got to get the facts.' Democrats will be watching closely. Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., described the Equifax breach as a test, asking on the Senate floor will 'we act quickly to protect American consumers, or are we going to cave in to firms like Equifax who have spent millions of dollars lobbying to Congress for weaker rules?' Democrats have introduced several bills. One would require credit reporting companies to place a freeze on a consumer's credit report without charge if that company is hacked. Currently, all 50 states have laws allowing consumers to place a security freeze on their credit report, but the freeze often comes with a fee. Chi Chi Wu, an attorney at the National Consumer Law Center, said such freezes are the single most important step consumers can take to prevent new accounts from being opened in their name. Democrats are also using the Equifax breach to reprise more longstanding concerns about the work of credit reporting companies like Equifax, Experian and TransUnion. Rep. Steve Cohen of Tennessee and 30 Democratic co-sponsors are backing legislation that would protect prospective employees from being forced to disclose their credit history as part of a job application process. Wu said credit checks are used as warning flags about potential employees. 'A lot of people have impaired credit, black marks on their credit report because something bad happened to them,' Wu said. 'It was not because they were bad or irresponsible people. They were unlucky.' Meanwhile, Rep. Maxine Waters, D-Calif., is taking another crack at legislation designed to help consumers correct entries in their credit report. Under her bill, creditors who send negative information to a reporting agency must also give a heads-up to the consumer. Credit reporting companies would also have to dedicate sufficient resources to handling consumers' appeals. The appeals staff would have to meet minimum training and certification requirements. Waters' bill would also reduce the time that most adverse credit information may remain on reports. The time period would drop from seven to four years. The bill reflects consumer angst about the information on their credit report. Last year, Americans submitted about 54,000 complaints with the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau about credit reporting issues. Three-quarters of those complaints alleged incorrect information in credit reports. Even if the Equifax breach fails to bring about the passage of new legislation, it has scuttled one bill in the works. On the day of Equifax's announcement, a House subcommittee examined legislation that would have decreased the potential consequences when consumer reporting agencies falsely malign someone. Such mistakes can haunt consumers for years. The bill would have eliminated punitive damages for violations of the Fair Credit Reporting Act. The bill's sponsor, Rep Barry Loudermilk, R-Ga., said the legislation was aimed at curbing frivolous lawsuits and would not have granted any immunity to Equifax for the data breach. 'Nevertheless, given the unfounded attacks on me and the rampant misinformation circulating about this legislation, the Financial Services Committee has not scheduled further action on any bill at this time.' Wu, who testified against Loudermilk's bill, said she believes that legislation providing for the free credit freeze probably has the best chance of passage. 'I'm skeptical this particular Congress will be up for wholesale reform,' Wu said. ___ On Twitter, reach Kevin Freking at https://twitter.com/APkfreking
  • The busiest border crossing in the United States will close this weekend to the more than 40,000 cars that pass through it daily to Mexico. The closure between San Diego and Tijuana for work on a $741 million expansion project presents a monumental headache for border businesses, workers, tourists and Christopher Enjambre. His band, Minor Gems, plays gigs in Tijuana. 'It's already hectic now, so ... damn,' he said, shaking his head in disbelief. 'It's going to be crazy.' Travelers have been enduring hours-long waits on the Mexican side of the border to enter the U.S. with the constant addition of security measures since the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks. Frequent crossers, like Enjambre, 28, of Chula Vista, south of downtown San Diego, worry they will now face long lines on both sides, making trips through the San Ysidro crossing intolerable. The expansion is believed to be the largest renovation of a crossing along the nearly 2,000-mile-long U.S.-Mexico border. It has been in the works for years to ease congestion and boost cross-border commerce. U.S. officials are warning people to avoid driving to Baja California from 3 a.m. Saturday until noon Monday, hoping to ease what is feared will be a massive traffic jam on the U.S. side as Mexico-bound cars are detoured to the much smaller Otay Mesa crossing to the east. 'Don't even think about going across in a vehicle,' said Jason M-B Wells, executive director of the San Ysidro Chamber of Commerce. 'It's going to be a standstill.' Wells and other business leaders want people to cross on foot and are planning a festival with live music and food trucks to greet those who do. San Ysidro's pedestrian crossing, where 22 inspection lanes into the U.S. were added this summer, will be open in both directions. Vehicles from Mexico into the U.S. also can cross. Leaders in Baja California's tourism industry are concerned about the disruption that could continue well past the weekend as some lanes stay closed until November. They already were working to get word out that their tourist spots are safe after the U.S. State Department issued a travel advisory last month that included the region because of violent crime. Ricardo Argiles, CEO of the Rosarito Beach Group, which owns the landmark Rosarito Beach Hotel, said the border closure is a second blow. Reservations for his hotel this weekend are down 30 percent from last year at this time, and he fears tourism will keep lagging during the construction. Hotels are cutting rates to convince people to still venture south of the border. Rooms at the Rosarito Beach Hotel, once frequented by Hollywood stars like Marilyn Monroe, are going for as low as $60 a night, a 25 percent drop from last year. The hotel also offers instructions and a Google map on its website that details how to get there after crossing through Otay Mesa. 'We hope people still come and once they relax, they forget about the lines,' said Argiles, president of the Hotel and Motel Association of Rosarito Beach. Baja California has been drawing more visitors with growing interest in its picturesque wine country, chic boutique hotels, and booming culinary scene from Tijuana to Ensenada, where restaurants offer Baja-Med cuisine, a blend of Mexican and Mediterranean flavors. The weekend border closure is to allow for the removal of a large metal canopy spanning over all the southbound lanes into Mexico. The crossing will reopen Monday with three southbound lanes while California's Interstate 5 is realigned to feed into the renovated crossing. U.S. officials expect traffic flows to go back to normal by Thanksgiving, when four of the five lanes at the Western Hemisphere's largest land crossing will be open. Anthony Kleppe of the U.S. General Services Administration said he is 'cautiously optimistic' that the government's efforts to get the word out about the closure will minimize the hassle. He expects the renovation's biggest impact to be on the thousands who cross to work and study in San Diego and return each day to their homes in Tijuana. Once complete in summer 2019, 10 southbound lanes will handle the estimated 40,000 vehicles that pass through San Ysidro on weekends and 50,000 on weekdays. The expansion also added eight more lanes from Mexico to the United States.