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  • Sen. John McCain, (R-Arizona), returned to the Senate for the first time since he was diagnosed with an aggressive form of brain cancer to cast a vote to start the debate on a bill that could repeal Obamacare. McCain received a standing ovation when he entered the chamber to vote, and after he delivered his speech. Here is the speech as prepared for delivery: “Mr. President: “I’ve stood in this place many times and addressed as president many presiding officers. I have been so addressed when I have sat in that chair, as close as I will ever be to a presidency. “It is an honorific we’re almost indifferent to, isn’t it. In truth, presiding over the Senate can be a nuisance, a bit of a ceremonial bore, and it is usually relegated to the more junior members of the majority. “But as I stand here today – looking a little worse for wear I’m sure – I have a refreshed appreciation for the protocols and customs of this body, and for the other ninety-nine privileged souls who have been elected to this Senate. “I have been a member of the United States Senate for thirty years. I had another long, if not as long, career before I arrived here, another profession that was profoundly rewarding, and in which I had experiences and friendships that I revere. But make no mistake, my service here is the most important job I have had in my life. And I am so grateful to the people of Arizona for the privilege – for the honor – of serving here and the opportunities it gives me to play a small role in the history of the country I love. “I’ve known and admired men and women in the Senate who played much more than a small role in our history, true statesmen, giants of American politics. They came from both parties, and from various backgrounds. Their ambitions were frequently in conflict. They held different views on the issues of the day. And they often had very serious disagreements about how best to serve the national interest. “But they knew that however sharp and heartfelt their disputes, however keen their ambitions, they had an obligation to work collaboratively to ensure the Senate discharged its constitutional responsibilities effectively. Our responsibilities are important, vitally important, to the continued success of our Republic. And our arcane rules and customs are deliberately intended to require broad cooperation to function well at all. The most revered members of this institution accepted the necessity of compromise in order to make incremental progress on solving America’s problems and to defend her from her adversaries. “That principled mindset, and the service of our predecessors who possessed it, come to mind when I hear the Senate referred to as the world’s greatest deliberative body. I’m not sure we can claim that distinction with a straight face today. “I’m sure it wasn’t always deserved in previous eras either. But I’m sure there have been times when it was, and I was privileged to witness some of those occasions. “Our deliberations today – not just our debates, but the exercise of all our responsibilities – authorizing government policies, appropriating the funds to implement them, exercising our advice and consent role – are often lively and interesting. They can be sincere and principled. But they are more partisan, more tribal more of the time than any other time I remember. Our deliberations can still be important and useful, but I think we’d all agree they haven’t been overburdened by greatness lately. And right now they aren’t producing much for the American people. “Both sides have let this happen. Let’s leave the history of who shot first to the historians. I suspect they’ll find we all conspired in our decline – either by deliberate actions or neglect. We’ve all played some role in it. Certainly I have. Sometimes, I’ve let my passion rule my reason. Sometimes, I made it harder to find common ground because of something harsh I said to a colleague. Sometimes, I wanted to win more for the sake of winning than to achieve a contested policy. “Incremental progress, compromises that each side criticize but also accept, just plain muddling through to chip away at problems and keep our enemies from doing their worst isn’t glamorous or exciting. It doesn’t feel like a political triumph. But it’s usually the most we can expect from our system of government, operating in a country as diverse and quarrelsome and free as ours.  “Considering the injustice and cruelties inflicted by autocratic governments, and how corruptible human nature can be, the problem solving our system does make possible, the fitful progress it produces, and the liberty and justice it preserves, is a magnificent achievement. “Our system doesn’t depend on our nobility. It accounts for our imperfections, and gives an order to our individual strivings that has helped make ours the most powerful and prosperous society on earth. It is our responsibility to preserve that, even when it requires us to do something less satisfying than ‘winning.’ Even when we must give a little to get a little. Even when our efforts manage just three yards and a cloud of dust, while critics on both sides denounce us for timidity, for our failure to ‘triumph.’  “I hope we can again rely on humility, on our need to cooperate, on our dependence on each other to learn how to trust each other again and by so doing better serve the people who elected us. Stop listening to the bombastic loudmouths on the radio and television and the Internet. To hell with them. They don’t want anything done for the public good. Our incapacity is their livelihood. “Let’s trust each other. Let’s return to regular order. We’ve been spinning our wheels on too many important issues because we keep trying to find a way to win without help from across the aisle. That’s an approach that’s been employed by both sides, mandating legislation from the top down, without any support from the other side, with all the parliamentary maneuvers that requires. “We’re getting nothing done. All we’ve really done this year is confirm Neil Gorsuch to the Supreme Court. Our healthcare insurance system is a mess. We all know it, those who support Obamacare and those who oppose it. Something has to be done. We Republicans have looked for a way to end it and replace it with something else without paying a terrible political price. We haven’t found it yet, and I’m not sure we will. All we’ve managed to do is make more popular a policy that wasn’t very popular when we started trying to get rid of it. “I voted for the motion to proceed to allow debate to continue and amendments to be offered. I will not vote for the bill as it is today. It’s a shell of a bill right now. We all know that. I have changes urged by my state’s governor that will have to be included to earn my support for final passage of any bill. I know many of you will have to see the bill changed substantially for you to support it. “We’ve tried to do this by coming up with a proposal behind closed doors in consultation with the administration, then springing it on skeptical members, trying to convince them it’s better than nothing, asking us to swallow our doubts and force it past a unified opposition. I don’t think that is going to work in the end. And it probably shouldn’t. “The Obama administration and congressional Democrats shouldn’t have forced through Congress without any opposition support a social and economic change as massive as Obamacare. And we shouldn’t do the same with ours. “Why don’t we try the old way of legislating in the Senate, the way our rules and customs encourage us to act. If this process ends in failure, which seem likely, then let’s return to regular order.  “Let the Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions Committee under Chairman Alexander and Ranking Member Murray hold hearings, try to report a bill out of committee with contributions from both sides. Then bring it to the floor for amendment and debate, and see if we can pass something that will be imperfect, full of compromises, and not very pleasing to implacable partisans on either side, but that might provide workable solutions to problems Americans are struggling with today. “What have we to lose by trying to work together to find those solutions? We’re not getting much done apart. I don’t think any of us feels very proud of our incapacity. Merely preventing your political opponents from doing what they want isn’t the most inspiring work. There’s greater satisfaction in respecting our differences, but not letting them prevent agreements that don’t require abandonment of core principles, agreements made in good faith that help improve lives and protect the American people. “The Senate is capable of that. We know that. We’ve seen it before. I’ve seen it happen many times. And the times when I was involved even in a modest way with working out a bipartisan response to a national problem or threat are the proudest moments of my career, and by far the most satisfying. “This place is important. The work we do is important. Our strange rules and seemingly eccentric practices that slow our proceedings and insist on our cooperation are important. Our founders envisioned the Senate as the more deliberative, careful body that operates at a greater distance than the other body from the public passions of the hour. “We are an important check on the powers of the Executive. Our consent is necessary for the President to appoint jurists and powerful government officials and in many respects to conduct foreign policy. Whether or not we are of the same party, we are not the President’s subordinates. We are his equal! “As his responsibilities are onerous, many and powerful, so are ours. And we play a vital role in shaping and directing the judiciary, the military, and the cabinet, in planning and supporting foreign and domestic policies. Our success in meeting all these awesome constitutional obligations depends on cooperation among ourselves.  “The success of the Senate is important to the continued success of America. This country – this big, boisterous, brawling, intemperate, restless, striving, daring, beautiful, bountiful, brave, good and magnificent country – needs us to help it thrive. That responsibility is more important than any of our personal interests or political affiliations. “We are the servants of a great nation, ‘a nation conceived in liberty and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal.’ More people have lived free and prosperous lives here than in any other nation. We have acquired unprecedented wealth and power because of our governing principles, and because our government defended those principles. “America has made a greater contribution than any other nation to an international order that has liberated more people from tyranny and poverty than ever before in history. We have been the greatest example, the greatest supporter and the greatest defender of that order. We aren’t afraid. “We don’t covet other people’s land and wealth. We don’t hide behind walls. We breach them. We are a blessing to humanity. “What greater cause could we hope to serve than helping keep America the strong, aspiring, inspirational beacon of liberty and defender of the dignity of all human beings and their right to freedom and equal justice? That is the cause that binds us and is so much more powerful and worthy than the small differences that divide us. “What a great honor and extraordinary opportunity it is to serve in this body. “It’s a privilege to serve with all of you. I mean it. Many of you have reached out in the last few days with your concern and your prayers, and it means a lot to me. It really does. I’ve had so many people say such nice things about me recently that I think some of you must have me confused with someone else. I appreciate it though, every word, even if much of it isn’t deserved.  “I’ll be here for a few days, I hope managing the floor debate on the defense authorization bill, which, I’m proud to say is again a product of bipartisan cooperation and trust among the members of the Senate Armed Services Committee. “After that, I’m going home for a while to treat my illness. I have every intention of returning here and giving many of you cause to regret all the nice things you said about me. And, I hope, to impress on you again that it is an honor to serve the American people in your company. “Thank you, fellow senators. “Mr. President, I yield the floor.”
  • Former House Speaker John Boehner assailed GOP House arch conservatives led by Rep. Jim Jordan (R-OH) as the “knucklehead caucus,” calling them “anarchists” who stand “for nothing.” >> Read more trending news During a speech in Las Vegas, Boehner took aim at the conservatives who pushed him from office at the end of 2015. Jordan was among those who revolted against Boehner, even though Boehner was the first speaker from Ohio since Republican Nicholas Longworth in 1931. The former speaker was asked to explain why House Republicans did not support House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-CA) to succeed Boehner as speaker. “The knucklehead caucus decided they weren’t going to vote for him,” Boehner said. “Now these are the guys in the Republican Party you could call right of right. They are anarachists. They’re for nothing,” he said. >> Related: Boehner says Congress won’t repeal, replace Obamacare The video of Boehner was obtained by the Washington Post. Although he did not mention Jordan by name, it was clear Boehner was referring to him.
  • >>3:10 p.m. EDT: The motion passed with Vice President Mike Pence casting a vote to break the tie. The Senate is expected to hold a vote Tuesday on a motion to proceed to debate the House version of the health care bill. The vote, a procedural one, is the first step in a Republican effort to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act. (See live updates below) Here’s what you need to know about the bill and the vote expected for Tuesday afternoon. What time is the vote? The vote is expected around 2:30 p.m. ET. It is set for after Republican senators meet for their weekly lunch. The lunch begins at 12:45 p.m. What are they voting on? The vote is on a motion to proceed with debate on the House health care bill.   What happens if the motion passes? If the procedural motion passes, debate, along with an amendment process would begin. The amendment process would allow an amendment that agrees with budget reconciliation rules. What happens if the motion fails? Never say never in Washington. If the vote fails, the Senate may move on to tax reform or could take another stab at the bill, negotiating with the GOP senators who have opposed various parts of the legislation. Is there a Republican who is solid on a no vote? Maine Sen. Susan Collins says she will not vote on the motion to proceed. Anyone on the fence about voting yes? These Republican senators have expressed doubt on the bill. Sen. Shelley Moore Capito Sen. Dean Heller Sen. Ron Johnson Sen. Mike Lee Sen. Jerry Moran Sen. Lisa Murkowski Sen. Rand Paul Sen. Rob Portman What are the chances it passes? Probably pretty good or you wouldn’t see two things that are happening today: One, there likely wouldn’t be a vote if GOP leaders didn’t feel they would win, and, two, Sen. John McCain, (R-Arizona) is returning to Washington in time to cast a vote. McCain was diagnosed with an aggressive type of brain cancer a couple of weeks ago. It would be unlikely he would come back to Washington to vote on a bill that party leaders don’t feel will pass.  How many votes will it take to pass? Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell can lose only two Republican senators and see the motion pass. That is assuming that every Democrat votes no on the motion. There are 52 Republican senators. If two of them vote no, the bill can still pass with the help of Vice President Mike Pence. The vice president is the tie-breaker if a vote in the Senate ends up in a tie. Live updates
  • David Garcia-Mendoza was drunk and high and wanted something for nothing on Oct. 1, 2016, when he climbed into a cab on Buford Highway. Luz Mariana Matheu, 43, was behind the wheel for OK Taxi that night in Chamblee. Garcia-Mendoza, 21 at the time, said he would pay her with drugs, which Matheu refused. >> Read more trending news As they argued, the young man placed a gun to the woman’s head and forced her to drive, according to authorities. In a few moments, he pulled the trigger and ran away when the car crashed. But police found him hiding in a kudzu patch, and he’s now pleaded guilty to felony murder, kidnapping and aggravated assault, the DeKalb County District Attorney’s Office announced Tuesday. RELATED: Officials knew of no red flags before baby’s DeKalb hot car death RELATED: Cops: Before DeKalb killing, suspect said ‘You know what time it is’ RELATED: With everyone else, father of baby killed in hot car seeks answers “During a police interrogation,” DA’s spokeswoman Yvette Jones said, “the Defendant admitted being under the influence of drugs and alcohol and shooting the victim because she would not accept drugs as payment for his taxi ride.” Now 22, Garcia-Mendoza was sentenced to life plus five years in prison by Judge Gregory A. Adams.
  • President Trump spoke to a group of Boy Scouts Monday evening in West Virginia. Here is the transcript of that speech. TRUMP: Thank you, everybody. Thank you very much. I am thrilled to be here. Thrilled. (APPLAUSE) And if you think that was an easy trip, you're wrong. But I am thrilled. (LAUGHTER) 19th Boy Scout Jamboree, wow, and to address such a tremendous group. Boy, you have a lot of people here. The press will say it's about 200 people. (LAUGHTER) It looks like about 45,000 people. You set a record today. (APPLAUSE) You set a record. That's a great honor, believe me. Tonight we put aside all of the policy fights in Washington, D.C. you've been hearing about with the fake news and all of that. We're going to put that... (APPLAUSE) We're going to put that aside. And instead we're going to talk about success, about how all of you amazing young Scouts can achieve your dreams, what to think of, what I've been thinking about. You want to achieve your dreams, I said, who the hell wants to speak about politics when I'm in front of the Boy Scouts? Right? (APPLAUSE) There are many great honors that come with the job of being president of the United States. But looking out at this incredible gathering of mostly young patriots. Mostly young. I'm especially proud to speak to you as the honorary president of the Boy Scouts of America. (APPLAUSE) CROWD: USA! USA! USA! TRUMP: You are the young people of character, integrity who will serve as leaders of our communities and uphold the sacred values of our nation. I want to thank Boy Scouts President Randall Stephenson, chief Scout executive Michael Surbaugh, Jamboree Chairman Ralph de la Vega and the thousands of volunteers who made this a life-changing experience for all of you. And when they asked me to be here, I said absolutely yes. (APPLAUSE) Finally -- and we can't forgot these people -- I especially want to salute the moms and the dads and troop leaders who are here tonight. (APPLAUSE) Thank you for making scouting possible. Thank you, mom and dad, troop leaders. When you volunteer for the Boy Scouts you are not only shaping young lives, you are shaping the future of America. (APPLAUSE) The United States has no better citizens than its Boy Scouts. (APPLAUSE) No better. (APPLAUSE) The values, traditions and skills you learn here will serve you throughout your lives. And just as importantly, they will serve your families, your cities, and in the future and in the present will serve your country. (APPLAUSE) The Scouts believe in putting America first. (APPLAUSE) You know, I go to Washington and I see all these politicians, and I see the swamp, and it's not a good place. In fact, today, I said we ought to change it from the word 'swamp' to the word 'cesspool' or perhaps to the word 'sewer.' (APPLAUSE) But it's not good. Not good. And I see what's going on. And believe me, I'd much rather be with you, that I can tell you. (APPLAUSE) I'll tell you the reason that I love this, and the reason that I really wanted to be here, is because as president, I rely on former Boy Scouts every single day. And so do the American people. It's amazing how many Boy Scouts we have at the highest level of our great government. Many of my top advisers in the White House were Scouts. Ten members of my cabinet were Scouts. Can you believe that? Ten. (APPLAUSE) Secretary of State Rex Tillerson is not only a Boy Scout, he is your former national president. (APPLAUSE) The vice president of the United States, Mike Pence -- a good guy -- was a Scout, and it meant so much to him. (APPLAUSE) Some of you here tonight might even have camped out in this yard when Mike was the governor of Indiana, but the scouting was very, very important. And by the way, where are our Indiana scouts tonight? (APPLAUSE) I wonder if the television cameras will follow you? They don't doing that when they see these massive crowds. They don't like doing that. Hi, folks. (APPLAUSE) There's a lot of love in this big, beautiful place. A lot of love. And a lot of love for our country. And a lot of love for our country. Secretary of the Interior Ryan Zinke is here tonight. Come here, Ryan. (APPLAUSE) Ryan is an Eagle Scout from Big Sky Country in Montana. (APPLAUSE) Pretty good. And by the way, he is doing a fantastic job. He makes sure that we leave our national parks and federal lands better than we found them in the best scouting tradition. So thank you very much, Ryan. (APPLAUSE) Secretary of Energy Rick Perry of Texas, an Eagle Scout from the great state. (APPLAUSE) The first time he came to the National Jamboree was in 1964. He was very young then. And Rick told me just a little while ago, it totally changed his life. So, Rick, thank you very much for being here. And we're doing -- we're doing a lot with energy. (APPLAUSE) And very soon, Rick, we will be an energy exporter. Isn't that nice? An energy exporter. (APPLAUSE) In other words, we'll be selling our energy instead of buying it from everybody all over the globe. So that's good. (APPLAUSE) We will be energy dominant. And I'll tell you what, the folks in West Virginia who were so nice to me, boy, have we kept our promise. We are going on and on. So we love West Virginia. We want to thank you. Where's West Virginia by the way? (APPLAUSE) Thank you. Secretary Tom Price is also here today. Dr. Price still lives the Scout oath, helping to keep millions of Americans strong and healthy as our secretary of Health and Human Services. And he's doing a great job. And hopefully he's going to gets the votes tomorrow to start our path toward killing this horrible thing known as Obamacare that's really hurting us. (APPLAUSE) CROWD: USA! USA! USA! TRUMP: By the way, are you going to get the votes? He better get them. He better get them. Oh, he better. Otherwise I'll say, 'Tom, you're fired.' I'll get somebody. (APPLAUSE) He better get Senator Capito to vote for it. He better get the other senators to vote for it. It's time. You know, after seven years of saying repeal and replace Obamacare we have a chance to now do it. They better do it. Hopefully they'll do it. As we can see just by looking at our government, in America, Scouts lead the way. And another thing I've noticed -- and I've noticed it all my life -- there is a tremendous spirit with being a Scout, more so than almost anything I can think of. So whatever is going on, keep doing it. It's incredible to watch, believe me. (APPLAUSE) Each of these leaders will tell that you their road to American success -- and you have to understand -- their American success, and they are a great, great story, was paved with the patriotic American values and traditions they learned in the Boy Scouts. And some day, many years from now, when you look back on all of the adventures in your lives you will be able to say the same, I got my start as a Scout, just like these incredibly great people that are doing such a good job for our country. So that's going to happen. (APPLAUSE) Boy Scout values are American values. And great Boy Scouts become great, great Americans. (APPLAUSE) As the Scout law says, a scout is trustworthy, loyal -- we could use some more loyalty I will tell that you that. (CROWD CHANTING) That was very impressive. You've heard that before. But here you learn the rewards of hard work and perseverance, never, ever give up. Never quit. Persevere. Never, ever quit. You learn the satisfaction of building a roaring campfire, reaching a mountain summit or earning a merit badge after mastering a certain skill. There's no better feeling than an achievement that you've earned with your own sweat, tears, resolve, hard work. There's nothing like it. Do you agree with that? (APPLAUSE) I'm waving to people back there so small I can't even see them. Man, this is a lot of people. Turn those cameras back there, please. That is so incredible. By the way, what do you think the chances are that this incredible massive crowd, record setting, is going to be shown on television tonight? One percent or zero? (APPLAUSE) The fake media will say, 'President Trump spoke' -- you know what is -- 'President Trump spoke before a small crowd of Boy Scouts today.' That's some -- that is some crowd. Fake media. Fake news. Thank you. And I'm honored by that. By the way, all of you people that can't even see you, so thank you. I hope you can hear. Through scouting you also learned to believe in yourself -- so important -- to have confidence in your ability and to take responsibility for your own life. When you face down new challenges -- and you will have plenty of them -- develop talents you never thought possible, and lead your teammates through daring trials, you discover that you can handle anything. And you learn it by being a Scout. It's great. (APPLAUSE) You can do anything. You can be anything you want to be. But in order to succeed, you must find out what you love to do. You have to find your passion, no matter what they tell you. If you don't -- I love you too. I don't know. Nice guy. (APPLAUSE) Hey, what am I going to do? He sounds like a nice person. He -- he, he, he. I do. I do love you. (CROWD CHANTING) By the way, just a question, did President Obama ever come to a Jamboree? (APPLAUSE) And we'll be back. We'll be back. The answer is no. But we'll be back. In life, in order to be successful -- and you people are well on the road to success -- you have to find out what makes you excited, what makes you want to get up each morning and go to work? You have to find it. If you love what you do and dedicate yourself to your work, then you will gain momentum? And look, you have to. You need the word 'momentum.' You will gain that momentum. And each success will create another success. The word 'momentum.' I'll tell you a story that's very interesting for me. When I was young there was a man named William Levitt. You have some here. You have some in different states. Anybody ever hear of Levittown? (APPLAUSE) And he was a very successful man, became unbelievable -- he was a home builder, became an unbelievable success, and got more and more successful. And he'd build homes, and at night he'd go to these major sites with teams of people, and he'd scour the sites for nails, and sawdust and small pieces of wood, and they cleaned the site, so when the workers came in the next morning, the sites would be spotless and clean, and he did it properly. And he did this for 20 years, and then he was offered a lot of money for his company, and he sold his company, for a tremendous amount of money, at the time especially. This is a long time ago. Sold his company for a tremendous amount of money. And he went out and bought a big yacht, and he had a very interesting life. I won't go any more than that, because you're Boy Scouts so I'm not going to tell you what he did. (CROWD CHANTING) Should I tell you? Should I tell you? (APPLAUSE) You're Boy Scouts, but you know life. You know life. So look at you. Who would think this is the Boy Scouts, right? So he had a very, very interesting life, and the company that bought his company was a big conglomerate, and they didn't know anything about building homes, and they didn't know anything about picking up the nails and the sawdust and selling it, and the scraps of wood. This was a big conglomerate based in New York City. And after about a 10-year period, there were losing a lot with it. It didn't mean anything to them. And they couldn't sell it. So they called William Levitt up, and they said, would you like to buy back your company, and he said, yes, I would. He so badly wanted it. He got bored with this life of yachts, and sailing, and all of the things he did in the south of France and other places. You won't get bored, right? You know, truthfully, you're workers. You'll get bored too, believe me. Of course having a few good years like that isn't so bad. But what happened is he bought back his company, and he bought back a lot of empty land, and he worked hard at getting zoning, and he worked hard on starting to develop, and in the end he failed, and he failed badly, lost all of his money. He went personally bankrupt, and he was now much older. And I saw him at a cocktail party. And it was very sad because the hottest people in New York were at this party. It was the party of Steve Ross -- Steve Ross, who was one of the great people. He came up and discovered, really founded Time Warner, and he was a great guy. He had a lot of successful people at the party. And I was doing well, so I got invited to the party. I was very young. And I go in, but I'm in the real estate business, and I see a hundred people, some of whom I recognize, and they're big in the entertainment business. And I see sitting in the corner was a little old man who was all by himself. Nobody was talking to him. I immediately recognized that that man was the once great William Levitt, of Levittown, and I immediately went over. I wanted to talk to him more than the Hollywood, show business, communications people. So I went over and talked to him, and I said, 'Mr. Levitt, I'm Donald Trump.' He said, 'I know.' I said, 'Mr. Levitt, how are you doing?' He goes, 'Not well, not well at all.' And I knew that. But he said, 'Not well at all.' And he explained what was happening and how bad it's been and how hard it's been. And I said, 'What exactly happened? Why did this happen to you? You're one of the greats ever in our industry. Why did this happen to you?' And he said, 'Donald, I lost my momentum. I lost my momentum.' A word you never hear when you're talking about success when some of these guys that never made 10 cents, they're on television giving you things about how you're going to be successful, and the only thing they ever did was a book and a tape. But I tell you -- I'll tell you, it was very sad, and I never forgot that moment. And I thought about it, and it's exactly true. He lost his momentum, meaning he took this period of time off, long, years, and then when he got back, he didn't have that same momentum. In life, I always tell this to people, you have to know whether or not you continue to have the momentum. And if you don't have it, that's OK. Because you're going to go on, and you're going to learn and you're going to do things that are great. But you have to know about the word 'momentum.' But the big thing, never quit, never give up; do something you love. When you do something you love as a Scout, I see that you love it. But when you do something that you love, you'll never fail. What you're going to do is give it a shot again and again and again. You're ultimately going to be successful. And remember this, you're not working. Because when you're doing something that you love, like I do -- of course I love my business, but this is a little bit different. Who thought this was going to happen. We're, you know, having a good time. We're doing a good job. (APPLAUSE) Doing a good job. But when you do something that you love, remember this, it's not work. So you'll work 24/7. You're going to work all the time. And at the end of the year you're not really working. You don't think of it as work. When you're not doing something that you like or when you're forced into do something that you really don't like, that's called work, and it's hard work, and tedious work. So as much as you can do something that you love, work hard and never ever give up, and you're going to be tremendously successful, tremendously successful. (APPLAUSE) Now, with that, I have to tell you our economy is doing great. Our stock market has picked up since the election, November 8th -- do we remember that day? Was that a beautiful day? (APPLAUSE) What a day. Do you remember that famous night on television, November 8th where they said, these dishonest people, where they said, there is no path to victory for Donald Trump. They forgot about the forgotten people. By the way, they're not forgetting about the forgotten people anymore. They're going crazy trying to figure it out, but I told them, far too late; it's far too late. But you remember that incredible night with the maps, and the Republicans are red and the Democrats are blue, and that map was so red it was unbelievable. And they didn't know what to say. (APPLAUSE) And you know, we have a tremendous disadvantage in the Electoral College. Popular vote is much easier. We have -- because New York, California, Illinois, you have to practically run the East Coast. And we did. We won Florida. We won South Carolina. We won North Carolina. We won Pennsylvania. (APPLAUSE) We won and won. So when they said, there is no way to victory; there is no way to 270. You know I went to Maine four times because it's one vote, and we won. We won. One vote. I went there because I kept hearing we're at 269. But then Wisconsin came in. Many, many years. Michigan came in. (APPLAUSE) So -- and we worked hard there. You know, my opponent didn't work hard there, because she was told... (BOOING) She was told she was going to win Michigan, and I said, well, wait a minute. The car industry is moving to Mexico. Why is she going to move -- she's there. Why are they allowing it to move? And by the way, do you see those car industry -- do you see what's happening? They're coming back to Michigan. They're coming back to Ohio. They're starting to peel back in. (APPLAUSE) And we go to Wisconsin, now, Wisconsin hadn't been won in many, many years by a Republican. But we go to Wisconsin, and we had tremendous crowds. And I'd leave these massive crowds, I'd say, why are we going to lose this state? The polls, that's also fake news. They're fake polls. But the polls are saying -- but we won Wisconsin. (APPLAUSE) So I have to tell you, what we did, in all fairness, is an unbelievable tribute to you and all of the other millions and millions of people that came out and voted for make America great again. (APPLAUSE) And I'll tell you what, we are indeed making America great again. CROWD: USA! USA! USA! TRUMP: And I'll tell you what, we are indeed making America great again. What's going on is incredible. (APPLAUSE) We had the best jobs report in 16 years. The stock market on a daily basis is hitting an all-time high. We're going to be bringing back very soon trillions of dollars from companies that can't get their money back into this country, and that money is going to be used to help rebuild America. We're doing things that nobody ever thought was possible, and we've just started. It's just the beginning, believe me. (APPLAUSE) You know, in the Boy Scouts you learn right from wrong, correct? You learn to contribute to your communities, to take pride in your nation, and to seek out opportunities to serve. You pledge to help other people at all times. (APPLAUSE) In the Scout oath, you pledge on your honor to do your best and to do your duty to God and your country. (APPLAUSE) And by the way, under the Trump administration you'll be saying 'Merry Christmas' again when you go shopping, believe me. (APPLAUSE) Merry Christmas. They've been downplaying that little beautiful phrase. You're going to be saying 'Merry Christmas' again, folks. (APPLAUSE) But the words 'duty,' 'country' and 'God' are beautiful words. In other words, basically what you're doing is you're pledging to be a great American patriot. (APPLAUSE) For more than a century that is exactly what our Boy Scouts have been. Last year you gave more than 15 million hours of service to helping people in your communities. Incredible. That's an incredible stat. (APPLAUSE) All of you here tonight will contribute more than 100,000 hours of service by the end of this Jamboree -- 100,000. (APPLAUSE) When natural disaster strikes, when people face hardship, when the beauty and glory of our outdoor spaces must be restored and taken care of, America turns to the Boy Scouts because we know that the Boy Scouts never ever, ever let us down. (APPLAUSE) Just like you know you can count on me, we know we can count on you, because we know the values that you live by. (APPLAUSE) Your values are the same values that have always kept America strong, proud and free. And by the way, do you see the billions and billions and billions of additional money that we're putting back into our military? Billions of dollars. (APPLAUSE) New planes, new ships, great equipment for our people that are so great to us. We love our vets. We love our soldiers. And we love our police, by the way. (APPLAUSE) Firemen, police. We love our police. Those are all special people. Uniformed services. Two days ago I traveled to Norfolk, Virginia to commission an American aircraft carrier into the fleet of the United States Navy. (APPLAUSE) It's the newest, largest and most advanced aircraft carrier anywhere in the world, and it's named for an Eagle Scout -- the USS Gerald R. Ford. (APPLAUSE) Everywhere it sails that great Scout's name will be feared and revered, because that ship will be a symbol of American power, prestige and strength. (APPLAUSE) Our nation honors President Gerald R. Ford today because he lived his life the scouting way. Boy Scouts celebrate American patriots, especially the brave members of our Armed Forces. Thank you very much. (APPLAUSE) Thank you. Thank you. (APPLAUSE) American hearts are warmed every year when we read about Boy Scouts placing thousands and thousands of flags next to veterans' grave sites all across the country. By honoring our heroes, you help to ensure that their memory never, ever dies. You should take great pride in the example you set for every citizen of our country to follow. (APPLAUSE) Generations of American Boy Scouts have sworn the same oath and lived according to the same law. You inherit a noble American tradition. And as you embark on your lives, never cease to be proud of you who you are and the principles you hold dear and stand by. Wear your values as your badge of honor. What you've done few have done before you. What you've done is incredible. What you've done is admired by all. So I want to congratulate you, Boy Scouts. (APPLAUSE) Let your scouting oath guide your path from this day forward. Remember your duty, honor your history, take care of the people God put into your life, and love and cherish your great country. (APPLAUSE) You are very special people. You're special in the lives of America. You're special to me. But if you do what we say, I promise you that you will live scouting's adventure every single day of your life, and you will win, win, win, and help people in doing so. (APPLAUSE) Your lives will have meaning, and purpose and joy. You will become leaders, and you will inspire others to achieve the dreams they once thought were totally impossible. Things that you said could never, ever happen are already happening for you. And if you do these things, and if you refuse to give in to doubt or to fear, then you will help to make America great again, you will be proud of yourself, be proud of the uniform you wear, and be proud of the country you love. (APPLAUSE) CROWD: USA! USA! USA! TRUMP: And never, ever forget, America is proud of you. (APPLAUSE) This is a very, very special occasion for me. I've known so many Scouts over the years. Winners. I've known so many great people. They've been taught so well, and they love the heritage. But this is very special for me. And I just want to end by saying, very importantly, God bless you. God bless the Boy Scouts. God Bless the United States of America. Go out, have a great time in life, compete, and go out and show me that there is nobody, nobody like a Boy Scout. (APPLAUSE) Thank you very much, everybody. (APPLAUSE) Thank you very much. (APPLAUSE) Thank you. (APPLAUSE) Thank you very much (APPLAUSE)

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