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  • We are learning more about the California home where police say 13 siblings were kept in subhuman conditions by their parents.  >> Watch the news report here Although the children in the home, ages 2 to 29, were only allowed to bathe twice a year and eat once a day, they were allowed to write in journals, authorities said. District Attorney Mike Hestrin said in a press conference that the children kept hundreds of journals, and he believes they will be “very significant” in the upcoming court case, the Desert Sun reports. Hestrin added that he thinks the journals will provide “strong evidence of what occurred in that home.” >> Parents accused of holding their 13 children captive appear in court Researchers are also interested in the journals as they detail the firsthand accounts of the alleged abuse. One academic told the Desert Sun: “There is a good chance that being able to write may have kept them sane. In an interesting way, this may have helped them come to terms with the bizarre world they lived in.” He even compared them to the journals kept by Anne Frank. >> Dogs found in perfect condition in home where 13 siblings held captive The journals could prove valuable for prosecutors as they might provide evidence that could be used to cross-examine the parents, David and Louise Turpin. The Turpins are facing life in prison for a series of charges, including torture. >> Read more trending news  The journals have not been made public, and law enforcement officials are currently in the process of reviewing them. The conditions in the home were unimaginable, authorities said. The children reportedly were beaten and chained to furniture. Neighbors recalled seeing them marching during the night. They were discovered when one girl escaped and managed to find a police officer, authorities said. Read more here.
  • John Coleman, who helped found and develop The Weather Channel, died Saturday at his home in Las Vegas. He was 83. >> Read more trending news Coleman, a longtime weatherman, innovated the position when he started at Good Morning America, according to the Washington Post.  Coleman started The Weather Channel in 1981 with Joseph D’Aleo. Coleman left the network and continued forecasting on stations in New York and Chicago. He last worked in San Diego until he retired in 2014, according to the Washington Post.  The Associated Press contributed to this report.
  • Federal employees in the Jacksonville area are preparing for the impact of the government shutdown. News 104.5 WOKV is updating a list of the agencies and impacts that are expected locally.  As we receive confirmation we will provide updates here.  Among the agencies we are working to hear from include the FAA, FBI, and Federal Court.   U.S. Navy Civilian employees who are not-exempt from a furlough would not be able to work until a short-term resolution or budget is passed.   Locally that would impact thousands of people in Navy Region Southeast. The precise number is not clear.   A spokesperson for Navy Region Southeast says they will provide guidance to impacted employees once they receive clear guidance this weekend.  Army Corps of Engineers  Should a lapse in appropriations occur, we are advising employees that they should still report to work on Monday to execute orderly shutdown activities.  Additional instructions would be given at that point in time.  “We're not going to speculate on project impacts at this time until we see exactly who is impacted by any potential lapse in appropriations”, said John Campbell, Acting Chief of Corporate Communications for the US Army Corps of Engineers Jacksonville District. National Weather Service Meteorologist in Charge Scott Cordero says the National Weather Service is considered ‘essential personnel’ so there would not be a local impact. National Park Service The Castillo de San Marcos and Fort Matanzas are preparing for the shut down. The Castillo and the Visitor’s Center at the Fort would be closed in the event of a shutdown. Unlike the last shutdown in 2013, the grounds at these facilities would not be restricted from the public. You would, therefore, be able to get on the lawn around the Castillo and the beaches at the Fort, just not in the physical structures themselves. FBI Jacksonville FBI Jacksonville says all agents and support personnel in field offices, including Jacksonville, are considered exempt from furlough, because their operations are directed toward national security and violation of federal law.

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