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Malaysia says it has agreed to release the body of Kim Jong Nam to North Korea in exchange for the return of nine Malaysians held in the North's capital. Relations between Malaysia and North Korea have been badly frayed by the murder of the North Korean leader's half brother at Kuala Lumpur's airport. Both countries withdrew their ambassadors and North Korea blocked nine Malaysians from leaving the country. Malaysia responded in kind, barring North Koreans from exiting its soil. Following negotiations that he described as 'very sensitive,' Prime Minister Najib Razak said Thursday that North Korea had allowed the nine Malaysians to leave, and that Malaysia had agreed to release Kim's remains to North Korea. He didn't say if Kim's body had left Malaysia. Kim was poisoned at the airport on Feb. 13 by two women using a banned nerve agent, according to Malaysian officials. North Korea, which is widely suspected to be behind the attack, has rejected the autopsy findings.
1. TRUMP'S REVISED TRAVEL BAN BLOCK EXTENDED A federal judge in Hawaii disagreed with a government lawyer's contention that the state hasn't shown how it is harmed by a suspension in the nation's refugee program. 2. WHAT RUSSIA PROBE WILL FOCUS ON A Senate hearing will address how the Kremlin allegedly uses paid internet trolls to spread disinformation in the U.S. and Europe. 3. 'BATHROOM BILL' MAKING PROGRESS IN NORTH CAROLINA Lawmakers and the governor hope an end to the legislation would remove any obstacles to expanding businesses and attracting sporting events, but gay rights groups are not happy with the proposal. 4. NTSB TO BEGIN PROBE OF TEXAS BUS-TRUCK CRASH Federal investigators will examine the scene of a head-on collision involving a small church bus and a pickup truck west of San Antonio that killed 13 senior adult church members. 5. WHO IS PAYING A VISIT TO AN OLD FRIEND AP talks to casino billionaire Phil Ruffin, who is visiting Trump at a time when the U.S. president likely needs support after a rough couple of weeks in Washington. 6. WHY IT HAS TAKEN SO LONG TO LIBERATE MOSUL Islamic State militants are mingled among tens of thousands of civilians in the northern Iraqi city and are willing to take the population down with them, laying bare the challenge of asymmetric warfare. 7. POST-BREXIT EUROPE SINKING IN FOR SOME Poles, who have settled in large numbers in Britain in recent years, express confusion and apprehension as the U.K. triggers the process to leave the EU. 8. PEDESTRIAN DEATHS CLIMBING FASTER THAN MOTORIST FATALITIES They've reached nearly 6,000 deaths last year — the highest total in more than two decades, an analysis of preliminary state data finds. 9. IN LAB SIMULATING MARS CLIMATE, A POTATO GROWS Experts believe the initial results are a promising indicator that the spuds might one day be grown in terrains as dry and salty as the Martian soil. 10. WHERE TERPS WERE NEVER NO. 1 An AP analysis of more than 1,100 polls shows Maryland, despite winning a national championship, was ranked more times than any other program without ever being No. 1.
Britain's chief negotiator in the country's divorce from the European Union on Thursday rejected suggestions the U.K. has threatened to end security cooperation unless it gets a good trade deal, as the U.K. announced plans for the huge task of replacing thousands of EU laws and regulations with domestic law. Brexit Secretary David Davis said Prime Minister Theresa May's letter triggering talks on Britain's departure made clear Britain wants to continue to work with the EU on a range of issues, including security, for both sides. 'We want a deal, and she was making the point that it's bad for both of us if we don't have a deal,' Davis told the BBC. 'Now that, I think, is a perfectly reasonable point to make and not in any sense a threat.' May's six-page letter triggering two years of divorce negotiations makes 11 references to security, and said that without a good deal, 'our cooperation in the fight against crime and terrorism would be weakened.' The tabloid Sun was in no doubt about what May meant: 'Your money or your lives,' was its front-page headline Thursday, along with the words 'PM's Brexit threat to EU.' Britain is a European security powerhouse — one of only two nuclear powers in the bloc and with some of the world's most capable intelligence services. May said Wednesday that Britain will probably have to leave the EU police agency, Europol, after Brexit but wants to 'maintain the degree of cooperation on these matters that we have currently.' Home Secretary Amber Rudd, whose responsibilities include intelligence and security, also denied there was a threat, but told Sky News: 'If we left Europol, then we would take our information ... with us. The fact is, the European partners want to keep our information.' Senior European leaders responded positively to the warm overall tone of May's letter — but they could not miss the steely undertone. 'I find the letter of Mrs. May very constructive generally, but there is also one threat in it,' said European Parliament Brexit coordinator Guy Verhoftstadt, saying May seemed to be demanding a good trade deal in exchange for continued security cooperation. 'It doesn't work like that,' he told Sky News. 'You cannot abuse the security of citizens to have then a good deal on something else.' A day after triggering its EU exit process, the British government began outlining Thursday how it intends to convert thousands of EU rules into British law when it leaves the bloc in 2019. The government published plans for a Great Repeal Bill that will transform more than 12,000 EU laws in force in Britain into U.K. statute so that 'the same rules will apply after exit day' as before. The bill is designed to prevent Britain plunging into a legislative black hole once it extricates itself from the EU. Davis told lawmakers it would ensure that British laws are made not in Brussels but 'in London, Edinburgh, Cardiff and Belfast.' But opposition lawmakers are unhappy at plans to give government ministers power to change some laws without votes in Parliament. They fear the Conservative government will use it as a chance to water down workers' rights and environmental protections introduced in Britain during four decades of EU membership. Labour Party Brexit spokesman Keir Starmer said the proposed bill 'gives sweeping powers to the executive' and lacks 'rigorous safeguards' on their abuse. The government insists executive powers will be time-limited and will only be used to make 'mechanical changes' so laws can be applied smoothly. It says it is trying to balance 'the need for scrutiny and the need for speed.' The government says Parliament will be able to scrutinize all 'substantive policy changes,' including new customs and immigration laws, and that environmental, workplace and human rights standards will stay in force.
Republican legislative leaders in North Carolina and Democratic Gov. Roy Cooper say they have an agreement to end the state's so-called 'bathroom bill' that they hope will drive away negative national attention and remove obstacles to expanding businesses and attracting sporting events. But they'll have to get enough votes in the House and Senate for a proposal set for debate Thursday so the replacement measure for the March 2016 law known as House Bill 2 can reach Cooper's desk. Social conservatives in the General Assembly would prefer to have HB2 stay on the books. Gay rights groups oppose the replacement measure because it would still restrict LGBT protections from discrimination. Political repercussions exist for legislators and Cooper. Cooper, who was elected governor last November with support from LGBT forces and on a platform that included a complete repeal of HB2, said in a release that he supported the compromise unveiled Wednesday shortly before midnight by GOP lawmakers. 'It's not a perfect deal, but it repeals House Bill 2 and begins to repair our reputation,' Cooper said. The late-night announcement came as the NCAA had said North Carolina sites won't be considered for championship events from 2018 to 2022 'absent any change' in House Bill 2, which it views as discrimination. The NCAA said decisions would be made starting this week on events. North Carolina cities, schools and other groups have offered more than 130 bids for such events. The NCAA already removed championship events from the state this year because of the law, which limits LGBT nondiscrimination protections and requires transgender people to use restrooms in schools and government buildings corresponding to the sex on their birth certificate. HB2 has prompted some businesses to halt expansions and entertainers and sports organizations to cancel or move events, including the NBA All-Star game in Charlotte. An Associated Press analysis this week found that HB2 already will cost the state more than $3.76 billion in lost business over a dozen years. The new proposal would repeal HB2 but would leave state legislators in charge of policy on public multi-stall restrooms. Local governments also couldn't pass ordinances extending nondiscrimination protections in private employment and in places such as hotels and restaurants covering categories like sexual orientation and gender identity until December 2020. That temporary moratorium, according to GOP House Speaker Tim Moore and Senate leader Phil Berger, would allow time for pending federal litigation over transgender issues to play out. 'Compromise requires give and take from all sides, and we are pleased this proposal fully protects bathroom safety and privacy,' Berger and Moore said in a statement. It's not clear whether the NCAA would be satisfied by the changes. Responding before Wednesday night's announcement to anticipated provisions in the legislation, top national and state gay rights activists blasted the proposal and said those who back Thursday's measure aren't allies of the LGBT community. Only a complete repeal, with nothing else, will do, they say. 'At its core, it's a statewide prohibition on equality,' Human Rights Campaign President Chad Griffin told reporters, adding that consequences could fall on Cooper, whom gay rights activists backed in the election, for backing a 'dirty deal.' 'It would be a failure of leadership for Cooper' and for Democratic legislative leaders to back this agreement 'instead of standing up for civil rights,' Equality North Carolina Executive Director Chris Sgro said. The Republican-controlled legislature passed HB2 in response to a Charlotte ordinance that allowed transgender people to use restroom aligned with their gender identity. Cooper narrowly defeated GOP Gov. Pat McCrory, who signed the law. HB2 supporters say ordinances like the one in Charlotte make it easy for sexual predators to enter public restrooms designated for the opposite sex. Several potential compromises have failed over the past year, including one during a special session in December that collapsed amid partisan finger-pointing. GOP and Democratic legislators have been in a seemingly endless chase during the past several weeks to cobble together enough votes on various drafts of legislation.

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  • Technically, Clay County is considered a sanctuary for illegal immigrants. In reality, that's not the case, and the newly elected sheriff wants it made clear that his county won't be among those who risk losing millions of dollars in federal funds because of the Trump Administration's crackdown efforts on sanctuary cities. That's the word from Darryl Daniels as he works to increase cooperation with Immigration and Customs Enforcement in getting any illegal immigrants who end up in the county jail out of the country. Within weeks of his taking office in January, the Clay County Sheriff's Office applied for the 287(g) program run by ICE, one which trains officers and deputies across the country to enforce immigration laws. 'I have an obligation to this constituency to ensure that, if folks were coming to my county illegally and committing crimes, that I did all that I could to get those people out of my county,' Daniels added. One of the Sheriff's campaign promises was to get CCSO into that program, saying it ensures there's no legal liability when deputies turn illegal immigrants over to ICE once they're eligible to leave the county jail. 'If [getting criminals] out of the county means they have to get deported back to another country, then so be it,' Daniels noted. 'I have no issues there.' CCSO plans to send deputies to South Carolina for four weeks of specialized training once ICE makes space available. Daniels says that could be arranged as soon as next month. ICE also provides a one-week refresher training course on 287(g) every two years at its Charleston academy. Sheriff Daniels says he was surprised when he found out that the Center for Immigration Studies listed Clay as a sanctuary county, something he says was based on a 2014 policy that CCSO no longer runs by. 'To date, this year, the Clay County Sheriff's Office has processed 3 different people who met the criteria for deportation through ICE,' Daniels stated. 'Through collaboration with ICE, [we] have turned those people over to ICE custody.' He's since worked through ICE to get Clay off that list. No other First Coast counties are on that list. The Jacksonville Sheriff's Office is currently the only local law enforcement agency under a 287(g) agreement with ICE. The city of Seattle has filed a lawsuit over the new crackdown threats from Attorney General Jeff Sessions, saying the federal government has no constitutional right to impose such a ruling on any cities who won't cooperate with ICE by turning over illegal immigrants. The city of San Francisco filed a similar lawsuit 2 months ago and the leaders of other large American cities have also spoken out. Bills have also been filed in the Florida House and Senate this year which would put in place stiff penalties for any sanctuary cities. The Senate version was filed by Jacksonville area Republican Aaron Bean.
  • A man being interviewed by a BBC documentary film crew was mauled to death by his own dog earlier this month.  The Guardian reported that Mario Perivoitos, 41, was working with the film crew in his north London home March 20 when his Staffordshire bull terrier attacked him. The crew called an ambulance, which took Perivoitos to a hospital.  Perivoitos, who had severe neck wounds, died a couple of hours later.  Neighbors, who said Perivoitos had lived in the building for about 20 years, told the Guardian that they heard the attack. “I heard shouting. ‘Get him off! Get him off me!’” Geoff Morgan said. “He was shouting really loudly. He was bleeding from his neck. There was a lot of blood.” An autopsy showed that Perivoitos died of hypovolemic shock, a condition that occurs when a person loses more than a fifth of their blood volume. The lack of blood or fluid causes inadequate blood circulation and, subsequently, organ failure.  The medical examiner also cited damage to his airway in the autopsy, the Guardian reported.  >> Read more trending stories Perivoitos’ dog was seized by police and is being kept in a secure kennel, the paper reported. Staffordshire bull terriers are not one of the breeds banned under the UK’s Dangerous Dogs Act of 1991.  According to the BBC, the Dangerous Dogs Act puts restrictions on ownership of four breeds -- the pit bull terrier, the Japanese tosa, the fila brasileiro and the dogo argentino -- which were traditionally bred for fighting. The law requires owners of those breeds to obtain an exemption from the courts. They must register and insure their dogs and keep them muzzled and leashed when in public. The dogs must also be spayed or neutered and must be tattooed and microchipped for identification purposes if they get loose.  A BBC report last year indicated that, of the 30 dog-related deaths in the UK since the ban, 21 involved dog breeds that did not fall under the ban’s restrictions. National Health Service data also showed a 76 percent increase in hospital admissions for dog bites over the span of a decade.  It was not clear for what documentary the BBC film crew was interviewing Perivoitos, the Guardian said. The network released a brief statement following the attack.  “A crew making a BBC documentary were present -- but not filming -- at the time of the incident and called an ambulance,” the statement read. “Given the ongoing inquiries, it would not be appropriate to comment further.”
  • Ford has issued a recall covering 441,000 2013 through 2015 model year vehicles over problems related to engine fires and faulty door latches. The company is alerting 230,000 owners of four 2013 through 2015 models, including Fusion mid-size cars, Escape SUVs, Fiesta ST subcompacts and Transit Connect vans with 1.6-Liter turbocharged engines. >> Read more trending news The engines can overheat, causing a crack in the cylinder head, according to Ford. Oil could leak through the crack possibly catching fire, if it comes in contact with a hot surface. Ford has reported 29 fires related to the problem, but no injuries, The Associated Press reported.    The auto giant is also recalling another 211,000 2013 and 2014 model year vehicles as part of a previous recall over faulty door latches that cause doors to open while the car is being driven. The vehicles include the 2013 and 2014 Fusion and Lincoln MKZ, and the 2014 Fiesta. >> Got a question about the news? See our explainers here Ford will contact owners about the recalls and provide information on how to fix the problems. The Associated Press contributed to this story.
  • A shark bit a 58-year-old surfer Monday at Florida’s New Smyrna Beach. >> Read more trending news The Stuart man was surfing about 30 to 40 yards from the shoreline when he was bitten on the foot, Volusia County Beach Safety Ocean Rescue spokesperson Tamra Marris said. The injury was minor and the surfer was able to get out of the water on his own. He was not taken to the hospital, Marris said. Marris called it 'a typical case of mistaken identity' and said that the surfer did not see the shark. This is the first shark bite in Volusia County this year.
  • A principal at a Christian school in Tulsa, Oklahoma, is facing child porn charges. Jeff Goss is the principal at the Christian Education Alliance in west Tulsa. Goss was arrested Tuesday morning by federal officials after they reportedly caught Goss using an online application to view child pornography. >> Watch the news report here Authorities said the application lets people enter chat rooms and share videos, pictures and more. Agents from Phoenix said Goss showed his face in the chat room, and they were able to track his IP address. Goss reportedly confessed to using the app at least five times. >> Read more trending news Agents said he preferred children ages 10 to 12 and did not care if they were girls or boys. Goss allegedly told officers that he primarily teaches children ages 12 and 13. School officials said they did not find out about the allegations against Goss until FOX23.com called them. They said he did not show up to work Wednesday. The station confirmed that he is in the Tulsa County Jail. The school's website says that it has served home-school families for more than 20 years.

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