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    The Trump administration is asking for more money to protect President Donald Trump's signature New York skyscraper, add hundreds of new Secret Service agents and strengthen security at the White House, according to new budget documents presented to Congress. The request is for $25.7 million in security-related expenses at Trump Tower, including 'personnel travel costs assigned to the protective details for the children and grandchildren of President Trump, as well as other functions supporting these details.' Those services, the request said, will be maintained 'throughout the incumbent's presidency.' The budget numbers offer the first look into the administration's request for a full year's worth of extra protective resources under Trump, who frequently has stayed at his namesake properties outside of the White House since he took office Jan. 20. The figures also underscore the taxpayer costs that benefit Trump, with $6.3 million allocated toward 'rent and utilities' at Trump Tower. The biggest increase includes $1.3 billion in new staffing, including $75 million for 453 special agents and uniformed officers as part of a multiyear personnel plan. The administration said the money helps it 'keep pace with mission requirements' by getting 7,150 positions filled by the end of the next budget year. Also requested is nearly $86 million in 'protective infrastructure and technology,' including more money for physical protection of the White House. Earlier this year, a man jumped the White House fence and spent 15 minutes roaming the grounds. The Secret Service faces a more complicated job than it did under Trump's immediate predecessor, Barack Obama, because Trump has family living beyond Washington and traveling extensively. They include First lady Melania Trump and their son, Barron, who currently live in Trump Tower. Barron plans to attend school in suburban Washington this fall. Trump's jaunts beyond Washington have proved expensive, with a pair of his recent trips to his Mar-a-Lago resort in Florida costing more than $1.2 million. The documents, made public by the conservative group Judicial Watch, reflect only the costs associated with the president's plane, Air Force One, and not expenses for Secret Service protection or support vehicles provided by the Department of Defense. A Trump trip in early February cost about $670,000, and a second trip in March cost about $612,000, according to the Air Force, which operates and maintains Air Force One. He's visited seven times as president. Trump has used Mar-a-Lago, which not only is a vacation home but also a for-profit resort that charges $200,000 for memberships, to entertain foreign dignitaries and to meet with members of his Cabinet and senior leadership team. Based on other travel reports for other presidents, Defense Department costs far exceed all other expenses related to such trips. Cuts to next year's Secret Service budget include $12 million to the National Computer Forensics Institute, which trains state and local law enforcement, as well as $30 million related to an agency panel's recommendations. The Secret Service reported a savings of about $140 million with the end of the 2016 presidential campaign. All told, the budget request for the Secret Service is less than a percent increase from this year.
  • To cover up or not to cover up? Melania Trump wore a veil to the Vatican on Wednesday to meet the pope, but no head covering a few days earlier to meet the king of Saudi Arabia, a religiously conservative country where most women cover themselves up from head to toe. Why the difference? The answer is a complicated mix of personal preference, diplomatic protocol and religious dictates. Stephanie Grisham, a spokeswoman for the first lady, said Mrs. Trump's decision to wear a black lace veil known as a mantilla followed Vatican protocol that women who have an audience with the pope must wear long sleeves, formal black clothing and a veil to cover their head. In Saudi Arabia, however, the government did not request that Mrs. Trump wear a head covering known as a hijab, or a headscarf, Grisham said. The Vatican's rules of attire are not strictly enforced. Many women, including high-ranking dignitaries, have visited the pontiff with their heads uncovered, including German Chancellor Angela Merkel in 2015 and Aung San Suu Kyi, Myanmar's top civilian leader, this month. Many women wear veils out of respect. Mrs. Trump is Catholic, which likely made accompanying President Donald Trump for a meeting with the leader of the world's more than 1 billion Roman Catholics all the more meaningful to her. When a Vatican official handed her a rosary, the first lady immediately gave it to the pope to bless. She spent time in front of a statue of the Madonna at the Vatican's children's hospital and laid flowers at its feet. She also prayed in the hospital chapel. Every woman in the U.S. delegation wore a veil, including Ivanka Trump, the president's daughter who converted to Judaism before marriage. In Saudi Arabia, the first lady dressed conservatively for her arrival Saturday in the capital of Riyadh. She wore a long-sleeved, high-necked, black pantsuit that mimicked the loose, black robes, or abayas, that Saudi women and female residents wear. Her attire during the two-day visit hewed to the protocol for high-level female visitors: modest dress, longer sleeves, higher necklines, pants and long dresses. Ivanka Trump also dressed modestly, and left her head uncovered. Most Western VIP women who visit Saudi Arabia don't cover their heads, including British Prime Minister Theresa May and Merkel. Laura Bush and Michelle Obama also left their heads bare when they visited as first ladies. Then-citizen Donald Trump criticized Mrs. Obama for doing so in 2015. In Riyadh, Mrs. Trump didn't visit any Muslim holy sites or mosques where head coverings and other steps such as removing one's shoes would have been required. In Israel, the Trumps visited the Western Wall, the holiest site where Jews can pray. Donald Trump, who became the first U.S. president to visit the wall while in office, donned a yarmulke — a skullcap — which is customary; the site keeps stacks of them for visitors to wear. The president also wore a yarmulke at Yad Vashem, Israel's Holocaust memorial, where it is not required. Trump likely wore one out of respect. In keeping with Orthodox Jewish tradition, men and women pray separately at the wall. Ivanka Trump wore a black head covering to the wall, while Melania Trump wore no head covering. Many Orthodox Jewish women cover their hair as a sign of modesty. At the Vatican, while Mrs. Trump strictly followed tradition and protocol by wearing black and a mantilla, other high-profile visitors have taken liberties with their attire. In 2006, Cherie Blair, a practicing Catholic and wife of then-British Prime Minister Tony Blair, violated protocol outright when she wore white for a meeting with Pope Benedict XVI. Only royals are allowed the 'privilege du blanc' — the so-called white privilege that dictates white outfits and white head coverings for queens and other royals when meeting the pontiff. In 1989, during the landmark audience between Mikhail Gorbachev and Pope John Paul II following the fall of the Berlin Wall, it was the Soviet leader's wife, Raisa Gorbachev, who stole headlines: She wore a bright red dress. ___ Associated Press writers Nicole Winfield in Rome, Josef Federman in Jerusalem and Aya Batrawy in Dubai, United Arab Emirates contributed to this report. ___ Follow Darlene Superville on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/dsupervilleap
  • The Latest on President Donald Trump's budget (all times local): 5 p.m. Members of a House appropriations subcommittee are skeptical about President Donald Trump's plan to cut hundreds of millions of dollars from security grant programs managed by the Homeland Security Department. Rep. John Carter, a Texas Republican who chairs the homeland security subcommittee, says the proposed cuts of $767 million to state and local grant programs are 'worrisome.' Rep. Nita Lowey, a New York Democrat, says the cuts simply don't make sense given the current terror threat. She says Monday's bombing at a concert in Manchester, England, is proof of the ongoing threats. Homeland Security John Kelly says the Trump administration had to make cuts as part of President Donald Trump's $4.1 trillion budget proposal, and says the grants are no longer as necessary as they once were. ___ 3:50 p.m. Democratic lawmakers are pressing Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin (mih-NOO'-shin) on the administration's forthcoming tax overhaul proposal. They want to know whether it would meet a pledge he made shortly after the election that there would be 'no absolute tax cut' for the rich. Mnuchin says the president's objective is to simplify the tax code and to pass a middle-income tax cut. Mnuchin says that's consistent with his earlier comments. Mnuchin says the tax plan is being crafted in a way that would cut taxes on the 'high end' and eliminate all deductions other than those for mortgage interest payments and charitable donations. Mnuchin is pushing tax cuts as necessary to enhance economic growth as he appears before a House panel reviewing the president's budget. Democrats say they're worried that corporate and individual income tax cuts will increase the national debt. __ 2:40 p.m. Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin (mih-NOO'-shin) is urging lawmakers to pass legislation to increase the government's borrowing limit before leaving on their August recess. Mnuchin also urged the House Ways and Means Committee members to pass the debt limit legislation as a 'clean' bill without controversial add-ons that could complicate its passage. He had previously said the deadline to act was sometime in the fall, in line with other analysts. Congress must act to increase the debt limit to avert a first-ever, economy-rattling default on U.S. obligations like bond payments. Mnuchin's comments came shortly after White House budget director Mick Mulvaney said that government 'receipts currently are coming a little bit slower than expected.' __ 2:30 p.m. Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin is defending the aggressive spending cuts in President Donald Trump's budget. He says the 'costs of excessive government commitments' has 'forced us into hard choices.' Mnuchin was appearing Wednesday before a House panel one day after the White House released Trump's $4.1 trillion budget recommendation. Mnuchin emphasized the need for tax cuts, and says his top priority is creating sustainable economic growth. He says the best way to achieve that is through tax reform and regulatory relief. Republican Rep. Kevin Brady calls Trump's proposals a 'welcome change' because the budget envisions a balanced budget over the next decade. Democratic Rep. Richard Neal says the budget 'cuts program after program that middle class families rely on every day.' __ 1:35 p.m. White House budget director Mick Mulvaney says the administration is likely to tell lawmakers they'll need to act earlier than expected to increase the government's borrowing cap. Mulvaney told the House Budget Committee that 'receipts currently are coming a little bit slower than expected.' He says Congress may soon hear from Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin (mih-NOO'-shin) about a change in the deadline to raise the debt ceiling. Mnuchin had previously advised that the deadline to for Congress to act — and avert a first-ever default on U.S. obligations — was sometime in the fall. The administration has privately informed GOP leaders that it would like Congress to act before the annual August recess. The debt vote is sure to be difficult for Republicans controlling Congress, most of whom voted against debt limit increases during former President Barack Obama's tenure. __ 1:25 p.m. A fellow Republican is lacing into President Donald Trump's budget, saying his promises to balance it are based on fanciful economic projections. South Carolina Rep. Mark Sanford told White House budget director Mick Mulvaney that Trump's budget 'presumes a Goldilocks economy' that never goes into recession. Sanford told Mulvaney that the budget 'assumes that the stars perfectly align' by promising an economic growth rate of 3 percent but that such an economic surge wouldn't increase inflation and bond yields. __ 1 p.m. Education Secretary Betsy DeVos is defending the Trump administration's proposal to slash funding for key K-12 and higher education programs while promoting school choice. DeVos is getting some pointed questions from Democrats on a House committee about using public money to help students pay for private school tuition. Rep. Katherine Clark of Massachusetts asked whether a private school should be allowed to receive public money if it rejects LGBT students, DeVos says that decision is best left for states to make. Clark replied, 'I am shocked.' DeVos also says states, not the federal government, should make decisions about special education and academic and other standards for private schools that use vouchers. DeVos says school choice gives parents and children education opportunities regardless of their income, zip code and race. __ 11:45 a.m. Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue is defending the Trump administration's proposal to cut $191 billion from food stamps over the next 10 years. At a House hearing Wednesday, Democratic Rep. Rosa DeLauro told Perdue that the budget turns the nation's back on the hungry. She said that's 'cruel,' ''heartless' and 'inhumane.' Perdue said the budget would fully pay for food stamp benefits in the coming year, but suggests policy changes to Congress. Trump's proposal would shift some cost to states, target benefits to the poorest people, increase work requirements and limit some eligibility. Perdue says the best way to help poverty and hunger is 'to turn the economy around, and job dignity.' __ 10:18 a.m. Donald Trump's budget chief is defending the president's plans to cut social programs as a means to increase economic growth to 3 percent and put 'taxpayers first.' Budget director Mick Mulvaney told the House Budget Committee on Wednesday that he went 'line by line' through the federal budget and asked 'Can we justify this to the folks who are actually paying for it?' But Democratic Rep. Pramila Jayapal of Washington told Mulvaney that cuts to food stamps, payments to the disabled, and other programs are 'astonishing and frankly immoral.' Mulvaney also told the panel it will take cuts to Social Security and Medicare to balance the budget in the future. Trump left those big retirement programs alone in this year's effort. __ 2:55 a.m. Top officials in President Donald Trump's Cabinet are heading to Capitol Hill to defend his plans to cut domestic programs and parry Democratic criticism of his tax plans. Budget Director Mick Mulvaney appears Wednesday before the House Budget panel while Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin will testify at the tax-writing House Ways and Means Committee. Trump on Tuesday released a 10-year budget plan containing jarring, politically unrealistic cuts to the social safety net and a broad swath of domestic programs. The plan, Trump's first as president, combines $4.1 trillion for the upcoming 2018 fiscal year with a promise to bring the budget back into balance in 10 years, relying on aggressive spending cuts, a surge in economic growth — and a $2 trillion-plus accounting gimmick.
  • Democratic National Committee staffer Seth Rich was shot and killed in 2016 in what authorities have said was an attempted robbery. Since his death, some conservative media outlets have suggested that Rich had been in contact with WikiLeaks – a claim Rich's family said it had 'seen no evidence' of – and may have been killed for political purposes, CNN reported. Recent developments regarding former FBI Director James Comey’s firing and the investigation into any potential collusion between President Donald Trump’s administration and the Russian government also were met with stories suggesting a cover-up in Rich’s death. >> Read more trending news The slain DNC staffer’s family has since asked outlets to stop touting the conspiracy theory, according to CNN. On Tuesday, Fox News retracted one of its stories about Rich. Many wondered how Fox News anchor Sean Hannity would react, as he has spent a great deal of time discussing the conspiracy theory. On Tuesday, Hannity told his radio audience that he would stay the course. “I feel so badly for this family and what they have been through and what they are going through,” he said, mentioning the family’s desire to “find the truth.” Hannity also said he sent his “thoughts and prayers.” >> Listen here From there, Hannity said finding a connection between WikiLeaks and a whistleblower in the DNC – “take Seth out of it” – was important as “the Russia collusion narrative is hanging by a thread.” Hannity suggested that the existence of the whistleblower would show that the source of the WikiLeaks revelation came from an internal source, not Russia. “These are questions that I have a moral obligation to ask,” he said, promising to “do the mainstream media’s job.” “And all you in the liberal media, I am not FoxNews.com. I retracted nothing,” he added. Audio from Hannity’s show was shared by several sources, including liberal watchdog group Media Matters for America. The Fox News anchor accused the organization of trying to get him fired, referencing its published list of his advertisers: But later Tuesday evening, Hannity appeared to soften his tone during his television show. 'Out of respect for the family's wishes for now, I am not discussing this matter at this time,' Hannity said. He added, “To the extent to my ability, I am not going to stop trying to find the truth. ... And at the proper time, we shall continue and talk a lot more.'  >> Watch the clip here
  • The Latest on President Donald Trump's first trip abroad (all times local): 7:30 p.m. Donald Trump will be returning to the campaign trail just a few days after he wraps up his first trip abroad as president. Trump's campaign team says he will be holding a rally in Cedar Rapids, Iowa, on June 1. It's the latest campaign-style rally Trump has mounted since his inauguration. At the end of April he marked his first 100 days in office with a rally In Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. Trump is set to attend the NATO summit in Brussels Thursday before continuing on to Sicily for meetings with leaders of the seven major industrialized nations. He is scheduled to fly back to Washington Saturday. ___ 6:28 p.m. President Donald Trump has retired for the evening to the U.S. ambassador's residence in Brussels. He's in Belgium as part of a five-stop journey through Middle Eastern and European countries — his first foreign trip. Trump is set to attend the NATO summit Thursday before continuing on to Sicily for meetings with leaders of the seven major industrialized nations. ___ 6 p.m. Melania Trump turned to one of her favorite fashion houses, Dolce & Gabbana, for her audience with the pope and her arrival in Italy. Stefano Gabbana celebrated on Instagram with an all caps THANK YOU addressed to @flotus and #melaniatrump. The designer also spiritedly chided the anti-Trump camp with a hashtag boycottdolceandgabbanaplease followed by laughing emojis — a swipe at designers who said they wouldn't dress the first lady. Mrs. Trump has a penchant for the Milan fashion house, especially its trademark black dresses. She raised some eyebrows by choosing a black tuxedo jacket by the Italians for her official portrait. She wore a demure black lace dress with a mantilla to meet with Pope Francis and stepped off Air Force One in a dark coat with military-style trim. ___ 5:35 p.m. President Donald Trump is meeting with Belgian Prime Minister Charles Michel in Brussels. Trump says they will work together on 'various problems. Number one is terrorism.' Trump says that when you see something like the bombing this week in Manchester, England, you remember how important it is to win the fight. He says 'we will win. 100 percent.' Trump is meeting with the prime minister before talks this week with NATO and European Union officials. ___ 5.30 p.m. Thousands of protesters are gathering for a major anti-Trump demonstration in Brussels, a few hours after President Donald Trump arrived in the Belgian capital for talks with NATO, European Union and Belgian officials. The march was set to start in the early evening, just as Trump was ending talks with Belgian government officials. The demonstrators centered their protests on Trump's environmental and immigration policies. The early arrivals at the Brussels North Station were shouting 'We don't want Trump! We don't want Trump!' The road of the marchers was set to stay away from the U.S. Embassy and Royal Palace where Trump was holding meetings upon his arrival from Rome. ___ 4:12 p.m. President Donald Trump arrived in Brussels Wednesday afternoon ahead of meetings with NATO leaders. Trump was harshly critical of NATO as a candidate, declaring the military alliance 'obsolete.' He's also criticized member countries for not following NATO guidelines to spend at least 2 percent of their gross domestic product on defense. The president has been similarly critical of Brussels, the Belgian capital that is home to both the NATO and European Union headquarters. After the city's recent struggles with terrorism, Trump called Brussels a 'hellhole.' Brussels is Trump's fourth stop on his maiden overseas tour. His fifth and final stop will be Sicily, where he'll meet with the leaders of the Group of 7 wealthy nations. ___ 3:16 p.m. Thanks to the Pope and the U.S. first lady, a traditional Slovenian dish is hitting the headlines. As Melania Trump approached and shook hands with Pope Francis on Wednesday, Pope asked in Spanish through his interpreter pointing toward Trump: 'What do you give him to eat? Potica?' She looked puzzled at first. 'Potica, ah yes,' the Slovenian-born first lady smiled before stepping aside. Potica (pronounced paw-tee'-tzah) is a typical highly nutritious Slovenian festive strudel with nut, poppy seed, cottage cheese, hazelnut, chocolate, tarragon, leek or honey fillings. It also sounds a lot like 'pizza,' which is what reporters originally thought the pope had said. The dish has been prepared for more than 200 years in earthenware baking-dishes or directly in ovens. Potica remains the pride of each Slovenian housewife. Born Melanija Knavs, Melania Trump left Slovenia in her 20s to pursue an international modeling career. ___ 2:23 p.m. President Donald Trump says meeting with Pope Francis was the 'honor of a lifetime.' Trump tweeted Wednesday that a private meeting with the pontiff at the Vatican leaves him 'more determined than ever to pursue PEACE in our world.' Trump met with Francis Wednesday for a half hour. The president and pope have a contentious history, but appeared on good terms after their conversation. Trump will soon be leaving Rome, en route to Brussels for meetings with NATO leaders. The president has spent the week traveling to holy Muslim, Jewish and Christian sites during his first official trip abroad. ___ 1.45 p.m. The European Union is hoping that Thursday's talks with U.S. President Donald Trump will stress continuity in their relations after the early months of his administration increased fears that the trans-Atlantic friendship was on the wane. EU foreign policy chief Federica Mogherini says that even if Trump's policies diverge greatly from his predecessors on many points, continued close contact must avoid fundamental disagreements on climate change and other global issues. She says, 'What I am expecting tomorrow is a message of continuity.' Mogherini adds that, 'We do realize there are points of difference where we have different points of view and where we will need to discuss things further, but it is vital to work on climate change' and the role of international organizations like the United Nations. Mogherini will join EU Council President Donald Tusk and Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker for a short meeting with Trump at EU headquarters early Thursday. ___ 1 p.m. First lady Melania Trump has visited the Vatican's children's hospital, meeting with patients, painting pictures with them and taking selfies. Mrs. Trump went to the Bambino Gesu (Baby Jesus) pediatric hospital after she and President Donald Trump met with Pope Francis earlier at the Vatican. She toured the cardiac intensive unit as well as the recreation room, where she painted with the children from nine different countries and took selfies with them. She ended the visit by praying in the hospital chapel. Before leaving, Mrs. Trump wrote in the guest book that she was praying for the children: 'Great visiting you. Stay strong and positive. Much love, Melania Trump.' With a red pen, she drew a small flower and heart. ___ 12:39 p.m. President Donald Trump says he had 'a fantastic meeting' with Pope Francis earlier Wednesday. The president offered brief remarks as he sat down with Italian Prime Minister Paolo Gentiloni in Rome. Trump tells reporters, 'It was an honor to be with the pope.' He adds of the pope: 'He is something.' Trump ignored a question about whether they discussed climate change. The president arrived at the Villa Taverna shortly after noon, following a meeting with the country's president at Quirinale Palace. He'll be departing Rome for Brussels later today. ___ 12:05 p.m. The Vatican says after a visit by President Donald Trump that it is hoping for 'serene collaboration' with the United States to help immigrants and provide health care and education in the U.S. Trump met for about 30 minutes Wednesday morning with Pope Francis and afterward with the Vatican secretary of state, Cardinal Pietro Parolin. In a statement, the Vatican said the two sides agreed on their 'joint commitment in favor of life and freedom of worship and conscience.' The statement continued: 'It is hoped that there may be serene collaboration between the state and the Catholic Church in the United States, engaged in service to the people in the fields of healthcare, education and assistance to immigrants.' It said talks also covered promoting peace through dialogue with people of other faiths. ___ 11:58 a.m. Ivanka Trump says she came to a Catholic charity in Rome to meet with several women who have been freed from human traffickers so she can hear about 'their struggles and how they will build their lives.' Still dressed in black after her earlier visit at the Vatican to meet Pope Francis, President Donald Trump's daughter spoke briefly to reporters as she stood under a grape arbor in the courtyard of the Rome headquarters of the Sant'Egidio Community. She said the liberated African women she was going inside to meet were testament to 'strength, faith, perseverance in the face of unspeakable adversity.' Community officials said she would be chatting with several women from Nigeria who had been trafficked into prostitution before becoming free in Rome. At least one Eritrean woman was also invited to the closed-door conversation sitting around a square table. Ivanka Trump has had meetings about the subject at the White House. ___ 11:26 a.m. President Donald Trump is meeting with Italian President Sergio Mattarella. Trump was greeted by Mattarella at the Quirinale Palace in Rome on Wednesday morning. The meeting follows a private audience with Pope Francis at the Vatican. Trump is expected to next meet with Prime Minister Paolo Gentiloni. Trump is in the middle of his first international trip — a nine-day journey through the middle east and Europe. He will leave for Belgium later on Wednesday. ___ 11:01 a.m. President Donald Trump has arrived at Quirinale Palace for his meeting with the Italian president. Trump and first lady Melania Trump had been scheduled to have private tour of the Sistine Chapel before the meeting. The intimate chapel features Michelangelo's masterpiece, 'The Last Judgment,' behind the altar as well as the iconic 'Creation of Adam' on the ceiling. Works of other Renaissance greats, including Botticelli and Perugino, line the walls. The Sistine Chapel is the highlight of tours of the Vatican Museums as well as a functioning part of the Vatican. Trump also met with the Vatican secretary of state Wednesday following his meeting with the pope. ___ 10:40 a.m. Ivanka Trump plans to meet with human trafficking victims in Rome. Trump will meet Wednesday with African women who have been freed in Italy from human traffickers. The encounter was arranged by the Rome-based Catholic charity Sant'Egidio Community, which has ties with the Vatican and which has helped Syrian refugees arrive safely in Italy via 'humanitarian corridors.' The president's daughter and adviser has held meetings at the White House on human trafficking. Community officials said several women will chat with Trump. She was expected to make a brief statement to the media after the closed-door meeting at the charity's headquarters. Ivanka Trump was part of the delegation that met Pope Francis with President Donald Trump Wednesday. ___ 10:30 a.m. Pope Francis shared a light moment with First Lady Melania Trump. After Francis met with President Donald Trump he was introduced to members of Trump's delegation, including Mrs. Trump. Smiling for the staff, Francis asked via translator, 'What do you give him to eat, Potica?' He was referring to a local pastry, pronounced paw-tee'-tzah — though some thought he'd said 'pizza.' When it comes to food, the president is known for his traditional American palette. When he traveled in Saudi Arabia, caterers ensured that his favorite meal - steak with a side of ketchup - would be offered alongside the traditional local cuisine. ___ 9:50 a.m. President Donald Trump has gifted Pope Francis a first-edition set of writings from Martin Luther King Jr. Trump presented Francis with the books after a private meeting at the Vatican Wednesday. The White House notes that Francis spoke about King and his civil rights legacy during his address to Congress in 2015. The White House said the set includes the five books King wrote in his lifetime. Each one is custom bound and the books are in a custom display case. A piece of granite from the Martin Luther King. Jr. Memorial in Washington is also included. The White House says the gift 'honors Dr. King's hope, vision, and inspiration for generations to come.' Trump also gave Francis a bronze sculpture. Named 'Rising Above,' the White House says it 'represents hope for a peaceful tomorrow.' ___ 9:45 p.m. President Donald Trump appeared moved by his private meeting with Pope Francis, telling the pope that he 'won't forget what you said.' The president and pope have a contentious history and disagree on a host of issues, including environmental protection. The White House did not immediately provide details about what was discussed during their 30-minute private conversation. But the two men appeared on good terms Wednesday, including during a traditional gift exchange. The pope's gifts to Trump included a medal by a Roman artist depicting an olive branch, which is a symbol of peace. The president responded, 'We can use peace.' The pope also gave the president a signed message of peace along with copies of his three main teaching documents. The president told the pope he'd be reading them. ___ 9:28 a.m. Rome police say Greenpeace activists briefly projected the message 'Planet Earth First' on the dome of St. Peter's Basilica on the eve of the pope's meeting with President Trump. Police said in a statement Wednesday that the officers allowed the action to proceed for 'a few moments' given the peaceable nature of the protest. They then identified all of the activists participating, eight total. Trump met early Wednesday with the pope, and the environment is one key area of difference. Pope Francis has made protection of the environment a keystone of his papacy, issuing a major encyclical on climate change. Trump's administration, meanwhile, is reviewing policies related to climate change and the reduction of green gasses. ___ 9:09 a.m. President Donald Trump and Pope Francis are exchanging gifts after a private meeting. Trump and Francis met privately for about 30 minutes Wednesday morning at the Vatican. Pope Francis gave the president copies of his three main teaching documents as parting gifts, as he typically does for visiting heads of state. The red leather-bound booklets to some degree define his papacy and priorities. Some of the main themes contained in them contrast sharply with President Donald Trump's policies and campaign promises, particularly concerning approaches to the environment and income inequality. Trump's gift for Francis was wrapped in a big blue box. The president said he was delivering 'books from Martin Luther King. I think you'll enjoy them. I hope you do.' ___ 9:03 a.m. Pope Francis is meeting first lady Melania Trump, Trump's oldest daughter Ivanka, and other members of the U.S. delegation. Mrs. Trump smiled and chatted with Francis after the two warmly shook hands. Francis also shook hands with other members of the president's team, including former bodyguard Keith Schiller and social media director Dan Scavino. The greetings happened after Trump and Pope Francis held a nearly 30 minute private meeting. ___ 8:31 a.m. President Donald Trump is meeting Pope Francis for the first time. Trump greeted Francis in Sala del Tronetto, the room of the little throne, on the second floor of Apostolic Palace Wednesday morning. The men shook hands and Trump could be heard saying it was a 'very great honor' to be there. They then posed for photographs and took a seat at the pope's desk to continue their conversation. They will now meet in private Prior to the handshake, Trump walked toward the Saint Ambrose room, led by Gentlemen of his Holiness, which is a sort of honor guard of nobility. He was joined by his wife Melania Trump, who had a veil on her head, in adherence to Vatican tradition. ___ 8:20 a.m. President Donald Trump has arrived at the Vatican to meet with Pope Francis. Trump arrived Wednesday morning at the Apostolic Palace for an audience with the pontiff. The meeting comes midway through his 9-day international trip. The president and pope have not always seen eye to eye. The two men's often opposite worldviews collided head-on early last year, when Francis was sharply critical of Trump's campaign pledge to build an impenetrable wall on the Mexican border and his declaration that the United States should turn away Muslim immigrants and refugees. Papal audiences usually last for about 20-30 minutes of private talks, followed by introductions of delegations, a photo and exchange of gifts. ___ 6:10 a.m. President Donald Trump is poised to call on Pope Francis, the famously humble pontiff with whom he has publicly clashed. Trump is midway through his grueling nine-day maiden international journey. He will meet the pontiff at the Vatican early Wednesday where the two will have a private audience laden with religious symbolism and ancient protocol. The meeting will last scarcely more than an hour. But it could provide powerful imagery to Catholic voters back in the United States as well as the possibility for conflict between a president and a pope who have not often seen eye-to-eye. The two men's often opposite worldviews collided head-on early last year, when Francis was sharply critical of Trump's campaign pledge to build an impenetrable border wall. ___ This story corrects the food the pope referred to in his conversation with U.S. first lady Melania Trump.
  • Monica Lewinsky penned an op-ed piece in the New York Times ripping former Fox News chairman Roger Ailes, who died last week. She opened her piece by saying her words are not meant to be another obituary for Ailes, but 'I hope, instead, an obituary for the culture he purveyed — a culture that affected me profoundly and personally,” she wrote. >> Former Fox News CEO Roger Ailes dead at 77 She continued, “Just two years after Rupert Murdoch appointed Mr. Ailes to head the new cable news network, my relationship with President Bill Clinton became public. Mr. Ailes, a former Republican political operative, took the story of the affair and the trial that followed and made certain his anchors hammered it ceaselessly, 24 hours a day.” >> Medical examiner: Roger Ailes' death was accidental She emphasized that their tactic worked like a charm. The Clinton-Lewinsky scandal hooked viewers as it unraveled, turning casual viewers into Fox loyalists. Fox cemented itself as the No. 1 news station, where it has remained for the last 15 years. Lewinsky also said that last year, the network made about $2.3 billion. Lewinsky called it “a culture of exploitation,” and she railed on the environment fostered at Fox News and other cable news networks that use titillating stories to drive ratings. 'Their dream was my nightmare. My character, my looks and my life were picked apart mercilessly,” Lewinsky wrote. “Truth and fiction mixed at random in the service of higher ratings. My family and I huddled at home, worried about my going to jail — I was the original target of Kenneth Starr’s investigation, threatened with 27 years for having been accused of signing a false affidavit and other alleged crimes — or worse, me taking my own life. Meantime, Mr. Ailes huddled with his employees at Fox News, dictating a lineup of talking heads to best exploit this personal and national tragedy.' >> Read more trending news Lewinsky said the firing of Ailes after sexual harassment allegations, and more recently the firing of disgraced former Fox News ratings king Bill O’Reilly following multiple sexual harassment allegations and some $13 million in settlements paid to women, shows that Fox News’ culture extended beyond the ratings game. “The irony of Mr. Ailes’s career at Fox — that he harnessed a sex scandal to build a cable juggernaut and then was brought down by his own — was not lost on anyone who has been paying attention,” Lewinsky wrote.
  • President Donald Trump on Tuesday condemned a deadly attack at a pop concert in Manchester, England as the act of 'evil losers' and called on nations to band together to fight terrorism. 'The terrorists and extremists, and those who give them aid and comfort, must be driven out from our society forever,' said Trump, speaking after a meeting with Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas. 'This wicked ideology must be obliterated, and I mean completely obliterated and innocent life must be protected.' Trump spoke from Bethlehem in the West Bank, the morning after a blast that killed more than 20 people at an Ariana Grande concert. British officials have said they are treating the blast as an act of terrorism. There was no immediate claim of responsibility. Trump stressed his support for the United Kingdom and mourned the loss of 'beautiful young people.' Relying on one of his preferred insults, Trump said he would call the perpetrators 'losers, because that's what they are.' The president has used the stops in Saudi Arabia, Israel and the West Bank to call for the end of such violence. In a speech in Riyadh on Sunday, he urged Muslim leaders to eradicate what he called 'Islamic extremism' and cast the effort as a 'battle between good and evil.' On Tuesday, he added: 'All civilized nations must join together to protect human life and the sacred right of our citizens to live in safety and in peace.' Trump also expressed optimism that he can help facilitate peace between Israel and Palestinians. He said he was 'truly hopeful that America can help Israel and the Palestinians forge peace and bringing new hope the region and its people.' Trump heads next to Europe, where planned meetings with world leaders on the economy and trade could be overtaken with discussion of terrorism and security.
  • The Latest on President Donald Trump's first trip abroad (all times local): 2 a.m. Israel offered President Donald Trump a warm and smooth welcome in his first visit as president, but the day's events were still shadowed even here by reminders of his tumult back home. Trump solemnly placed a note in the ancient stones of Jerusalem's Western Wall, sending a signal of solidarity to an ally he's pushing to work harder toward peace with the Palestinians. And he was enthusiastically embraced by Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu. But Trump unexpectedly offered a new defense of his disclosure of classified information to Russian diplomats in a recent Oval Office meeting. He argued he 'never mentioned the word or the name Israel,' which various officials say was the source of the classified intelligence — something he has not been accused of doing. ___ 8:50 p.m. President Donald Trump says there's a 'lot of love out there' that will help to bring peace between Israelis and Palestinians. Trump says people from all nations, 'even nations that you would be surprised to hear,' want to stop the killing. He says they've had enough of needless bloodshed. He did not name any of the countries. Trump says the United States is ready to assist the peace process 'in every way we can.' Speaking before attending a dinner with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, Trump says he believes a new level of partnership in the region is possible — and that it will happen. Trump is on his first visit to Israel as president. ___ 8:45 p.m. A radio host in Israel got a taste of fake news when a prankster posing as Donald Trump called into the show ahead of the presidential visit. Erel Segal on Israel's Army Radio was led to believe Trump had called the station from Air Force One as he was en route to Tel Aviv. The fake 'Trump' said America stands behind Israel '100 percent' when Segal asked if he had a message for the Israeli people. The caller sounded somewhat similar to Trump and was copying his style of speech. He said he would 'love to make a deal' to end the conflict with the Palestinians. After the short interview, Segal wrote on Twitter that that he had been duped. ___ 8:45 p.m. Israel's prime minister says he sees a 'real hope for change' in the Middle East now that Donald Trump is president. At a joint news conference Monday with the president in Jerusalem, Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu praised Trump's tough stance against Israel's archenemy Iran. Netanyahu frequently clashed with former President Barack Obama. Netanyahu says he appreciates the 'reassertion' of American leadership. He believes the two allies can work together to stop what he called Iran's 'march of aggression' and also advance peace in the region. The Israeli leader said that 'for the first time in my lifetime, I see a real hope for change.' ___ 6:45 p.m. U.S. first lady Melania Trump has visited a leading Israeli hospital that is known as a center of coexistence between Arabs and Jews. Sara Netanyahu, the wife of Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, took her guest to meet a group of young Jewish and Arab patients at Jerusalem's Hadassah Medical Organization. The children, some wearing hospital pajamas, sat around a table and presented the women with pictures they had drawn. Mrs. Trump held up a drawing and asked who did it. She turned to a boy with a Mickey Mouse balloon and said 'I like your Mickey Mouse.' The first lady also handed out White House backpacks stuffed with puzzles, games and toys. The hospital dedicated a bench bearing both women's names in honor of their visit. ___ 6:30 p.m. Questions are swirling over whether President Donald Trump's administration intends to change U.S. policy by declaring the hallowed Western Wall's location to be Israel, versus Jerusalem. U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson said Monday, 'The wall is part of Jerusalem' — an undeniable fact accepted by all sides. He didn't elaborate on the more delicate question: whether the administration would change U.S. policy over the status of Jerusalem. Last week, Trump's ambassador to the U.N. said she believes the wall is in Israel. Trump became the first sitting U.S. president to visit the Western Wall on Monday. ___ 6 p.m. President Donald Trump says he never 'mentioned the word or the name Israel' during a recent conversation with top Russian diplomats. Speaking alongside Israel's Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, Trump was referencing revelations that he divulged classified information about an Islamic State threat in a recent meeting with Russia's foreign minister and ambassador. U.S. officials said the information originated from Israel. Trump says, 'I never mentioned the word or the name Israel in that conversation.' But it was never alleged that Trump told the Russians that Israel was the source of the intelligence, just that he shared the information with the Russians. Netanyahu added that U.S.-Israeli intelligence cooperation is 'terrific.' ___ 5:45 p.m. Israeli police say a Palestinian was killed after he tried to stab officers near Jerusalem as President Donald Trump visited the city. Spokeswoman Luba Samri says the man was shot after running with a knife at officers near Abu Dis, a Palestinian town on the outskirts of Jerusalem. The incident occurred as Trump visited Jerusalem's Old City a few miles away. Since 2015, Palestinians have killed 42 Israelis, two visiting Americans and a British student in scores of attacks. In that time, Israel says some 246 Palestinians died by Israeli fire, mostly attackers. Israel blames the violence on incitement by Palestinian leaders compounded on social media sites that glorify and encourage attacks. Palestinians say it stems from anger over decades of Israeli rule in territory they claim for a future state. ___ 4:30 p.m. President Donald Trump has paid his respects at the Western Wall, the holiest place where Jews can pray. Wearing a black skullcap, Trump walked slowly toward the wall and pressed his right hand flat against the stone for about 30 seconds. He then tucked a prayer note into a deep crevice. His wife and daughter Ivanka, who converted to Judaism, visited the women's section of the wall. The site in Jerusalem's Old City in east Jerusalem was at the center of a recent spat between the two allies following the U.S refusal to say it is part of Israel. Before visiting the Wall, Trump visited the Church of the Holy Supulchre. It's believed to be where Jesus was crucified, and where his tomb is located. Trump is on his first visit to Israel as president. ___ 4:15 p.m. U.S. Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross is touting President Donald Trump's visit to Saudi Arabia, partly because of the lack of protesters in Riyadh, the capital. Ross seemed unaware that dissent is swiftly punished in Saudi Arabia. The kingdom has also increased its public beheadings. Ross said during an interview with CNBC on Monday that he believed there was some 'liberalizing' in the theocracy, a repressive society in which women have far fewer rights than men. He illustrated that point by saying he saw 'not a single hint of a protester' during the president's two-day stay. In a speech Sunday on combatting extremism, Trump suggested that the U.S. would no longer emphasize human rights in its dealings with the Middle East. ___ 3:15 p.m. President Donald Trump has signed the guestbook at the official residence of Israeli President Reuven Rivlin. In a short inscription, Trump wrote: 'It is such a great honor to be in Israel and be with all of my great friends!' Following tradition, a tree was planted in Trump's honor in the presidential garden, as has been done for other visiting dignitaries, including the pope and former President Barack Obama. Rivlin showed Trump the almond tree, whose plaque quotes a Psalm saying, 'Pray for the peace of Jerusalem.' Rivlin told Trump on the way out that 'indeed we pray for peace in Jerusalem.' ___ 3 p.m. President Donald Trump says Israel's Arab neighbors are realizing they share a 'common cause' with Israel in the threat from Iran. Trump is urging the U.S. and Israel to boost cooperation against common threats, and declaring that Iran never be allowed to have a nuclear weapon. He says Iran — Israel's chief enemy in the Middle East — must also cease funding, training and supplying weapons to terrorist groups and militias. Speaking during his first visit to Israel as president, Trump says there is strong consensus on these issues among the world's nations, including many in the Muslim world. Trump also thanked Israel's leaders for being committed to achieving peace between Israelis and Palestinians. He meets Tuesday with Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas (mahk-MOOD' ah-BAHS'). ___ 2:30 p.m. President Donald Trump says in Israel that there's a 'great feeling for peace throughout the Middle East,' expressing optimism at the start of his visit. Trump says alongside Israeli President Reuven Rivlin that people have had 'enough of the bloodshed and the killing.' Rivlin tells Trump that 'we are praying for peace and we are pushing for peace for the last 100 years and with god's help somebody will bring us peace.' The White House has downplayed the prospects of a breakthrough on jumpstarting the Middle East peace process but Trump has been bullish on the potential for peace during his presidency. Trump is meeting Tuesday with Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas (mahk-MOOD' ah-BAHS'). ___ 1:30 p.m. As President Donald Trump shook hands with Israeli Cabinet ministers and dignitaries, it didn't take long for Mideast politics to make their way into the presidential visit. Israel Education Minister Naftali Bennett, leader of the nationalist Jewish Home Party, told the president that the time has come for the U.S. to recognize Jerusalem as part of Israel. On the campaign trail, Trump promised to move the U.S. Embassy from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem. He has backed away from that promise since taking office, saying the issue needs more study. Israel captured east Jerusalem 50 years ago and claims the area — home to sensitive Jewish, Christian and Muslim holy sites — as part of its capital. The Palestinians also claim east Jerusalem as their capital. It was not immediately clear how Trump responded to Bennett. ___ 1:25 p.m. A lawmaker from Benjamin Netanyahu's ruling Likud party whipped out his cellphone and pushed himself into a selfie with President Donald Trump. Backbencher Oren Hazan nudged himself into the line of Israeli dignitaries greeting Trump upon his arrival at the airport in Tel Aviv. After shaking Trump's hand, Hazan said 'I wish I could do a selfie with you.' Trump responded 'What?' but an undeterred Hazan took out his phone and posed alongside an unamused Trump. Netanyahu was unsuccessful at pushing aside the wayward lawmaker's arm. In his two years in office, Hazan has generated much outrage for his antics. He's faced accusations of assaulting a public official, sexually harassing women, pimping prostitutes and providing drugs to tourists at a Bulgarian casino. ___ 1:05 p.m. President Donald Trump says peace in the Middle East can be achieved only by working together. He says, 'there is no other way.' Trump spoke during a brief airport ceremony after he arrived in Israel on his first visit as president. Since taking office in January, Trump has been bullish about wanting to help Israelis and Palestinians achieve a peace that so far has been elusive. Trump meets later in the day with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu. On Tuesday, Trump sits down with Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas (mahk-MOOD' ah-BAHS'). At the airport, Trump urged both sides to take advantage of the 'rare opportunity' that he says currently exists under his administration to bring security, stability and peace to the region and its people. ___ 1 p.m. Israel's prime minister has praised President Donald Trump's 'clarity and conviction' in his speech in Saudi Arabia on Sunday. In the speech, Trump laid out a call to combat Islamic radicalism. At an airport greeting ceremony, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu says Israel has been at the front line of the fight against terrorism for decades. At the same time, he says Israel welcomes Trump's push for peace, and its hand is extended in peace 'to all neighbors, including the Palestinians.' ___ 12:55 p.m. Trump's visit to Israel began with a lighthearted moment. Trump landed at Israel's international airport in Tel Aviv and was greeted by Israel's president, prime minister and their wives after descending the stairs from Air Force One. Walking along a red carpet before the national anthems were played, Trump asked Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, 'What is the protocol?' Throwing up his hands, Netanyahu replied: 'Who knows?' ___ 12:50 p.m. Iran's foreign minister has accused President Donald Trump of using foreign policy as an excuse for selling billions of dollars' worth of weapons to Saudi Arabia. Mohammad Javad Zarif tweeted 'Iran-fresh from real elections-attacked by US President Donald Trump in that bastion of democracy and moderation. Foreign policy or milking KSA of $480B?' KSA is an abbreviation for Kingdom of Saudia Arabia. Meanwhile, official IRNA news agency said the foreign ministry spokesman, Bahram Ghasemi, strongly condemned the promotion of Iran-phobia by the U.S. 'Washington stops policies such warmongering, interventions, Iran-phobia and selling dangerous and useless weapons to main terrorists supporters.' Trump and Saudi King Salman signed agreements Saturday cementing their countries' military and economic partnerships. The agreements include a military sales deal of about $110 billion, effective immediately, plus another $350 billion over the next 10 years. ___ 12:10 p.m. President Donald Trump is opening his first visit to Israel as president. Air Force One touched down in Tel Aviv Monday morning. Israel is the second leg of Trump's first foreign trip, an ambitious five-stop swing through the Middle East and Europe. The president will meet Monday with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu. He'll also visit the Church of the Holy Sepulchre and the Western Wall, an important Jewish holy site. On Tuesday, Trump will meet Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas. White House advisers have downplayed the prospects of a breakthrough on the jumpstarting the Middle East peace process during the president's trip. From Israel, Trump will head to the Vatican for an audience with Pope Francis. He'll close his trip with summit meetings in Brussels and Sicily. ___ 10:30 a.m. President Donald Trump's flight from Riyadh to Tel Aviv may make history as the first direct flight between Saudi Arabia and Israel. The president is set to land at Ben Gurion International Airport on Monday for a visit to Israel and the Palestinian territories. Saudi Arabia doesn't recognize Israel and the two states don't have diplomatic relations. There are no direct flights between the two countries and flights from either country bypass the other's airspace. An Israel Airport Authority spokesman says that he was not aware of any direct flights ever having landed in Israel from the kingdom. __ 10:15 a.m. President Donald Trump is closing the first leg of his maiden overseas trip. Trump departed Saudi Arabia on Monday morning after two days of meetings in the ultra-conservative desert kingdom. The president next heads to Israel, where he'll meet with Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas. Trump will be testing the waters for jumpstarting the dormant Middle East peace process, though White House officials have tamped down prospects for a breakthrough on the trip. Trump's trip will also take him to the Vatican, Brussels and Sicily. __ 7:15 a.m. President Donald Trump has declared in the past that finding a solution to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict is 'maybe not as difficult as people have thought.' And now he will make his first visit to Israel full of promises but with few concrete ideas of solving the problem that has vexed presidents for decades. Trump, fresh off two days in Saudi Arabia, will journey to Jerusalem on Monday and his stay will include separate meetings with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas. Trump also planned to visit the Holocaust memorial Yad Vashem and the Western Wall, an important Jewish holy site. Despite the president's claim, White House aides have tried to play down expectations for significant progress on the peace process during Trump's stop.
  • It’s been almost seven months, and Billy Bush is ready to talk. Bush opened up to The Hollywood Reporter about the infamous “locker room talk” tape involving President Donald Trump that resulted in Bush losing his job at NBC. In the column, he said that he’s seen the tape only three times, once just before it was leaked and twice ahead of the interview with THR. He admitted that seeing the tape left him feeling “totally and completely gutted.” >> Read more trending news “Looking back upon what was said on that bus, I wish I had changed the topic,” he said. “(Trump) liked TV and competition. I could’ve said, ‘Can you believe the ratings on whatever?’ But I didn’t have the strength of character to do it.” Bush also claimed that “plenty of people” knew about the tapes at NBC. “I was kind of bopping along, and I don’t know if it was God or what that said, ‘OK, you’ve developed. You’re a pretty good guy. Let’s see how you handle this.’ And ka-boom!” he said. “It all comes apart.” Despite being fired, Bush said he remains in contact with 'Today” show co-hosts Matt Lauer and Hoda Kotb. As for his plans for the future, Bush said he is still hoping to get back into TV. He has been pitching a new series to focus on pop culture, sports and celebrity interviews and said he hopes to show fans his softer, more empathetic side.
  • Ignoring President Donald Trump's past admonition, U.S. first lady Melania Trump did not cover her head Saturday when they arrived in Saudi Arabia on the opening leg of his first international tour since taking office. Two years ago, then-citizen Trump criticized then-first lady Michelle Obama's decision to go bare-headed on a January 2015 visit with her husband. 'Many people are saying it was wonderful that Mrs. Obama refused to wear a scarf in Saudi Arabia, but they were insulted. We have enuf enemies,' Trump tweeted at the time, including a short-hand spelling for 'enough.' Under the kingdom's strict dress code for women, Saudi women and most female visitors are required to wear a loose, black robe known as an abaya, in public. Most women in Saudi Arabia also cover their hair and face with a veil known as the niqab. But head coverings aren't required for foreigners and most Western women go without. While Mrs. Trump dressed conservatively Saturday in a long-sleeved, black pantsuit accented with a wide, gold-colored belt, her below-the-shoulder brown hair blew in the breeze at King Khalid International Airport in the capital city of Riyadh. She followed the example set by other, high-profile Western women, including Mrs. Obama. On visits earlier this year, British Prime Minister Theresa May and German Chancellor Angela Merkel also shunned head coverings. Then-first lady Laura Bush generally went without covering her head, though she once briefly donned a headscarf that she received as a gift. Hillary Clinton, on trips to Saudi Arabia as Obama's secretary of state, also did not cover her head. Trump's daughter, Ivanka, a senior White House adviser who is also accompanying her father, also left her head uncovered. Saudi Arabia adheres to an ultraconservative interpretation of Islamic Shariah law where unrelated men and women are segregated in most public places. Women are banned from driving, although rights advocates have campaigned to lift that ban. Guardianship laws also require a male relative's consent before a woman can obtain a passport, travel or marry. Often that relative is a father or husband, but in the absence of both can be the woman's own son.

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  • ***UPDATE: JSO says the suspect has been identified and is in custody. WOKV is working to learn more details.*** Jacksonville police are asking for your help finding a man accused of exposing himself to a child.  The Sheriff’s Office says an incident occurred around 8:30AM on May 18th, where a man pulled up near the victim around the intersection of Cedar Hills Boulevard and Blanding Boulevard. The suspect reportedly provided a picture of a cat and asked if the victim had seen the cat. We’re told the suspect had his pants down and was fondling himself.   The suspect is described as a white man in his 40s, balding with dark hair around the sides and back. His vehicle is described as a silver or gray 2000-2005 Ford Focus station wagon.  Police say it’s possible there have been other incidents involving this suspect, although none have been reported at this time.  If you have any information on the suspect or his vehicle, you’re asked to contact JSO at 904-630-0500 or JSOCrimeTips@jaxsheriff.org. You can also submit an anonymous tip and be eligible for a possible reward by calling Crime Stoppers at 1-866-845-TIPS.
  • It marks Florida Governor Rick Scott's first veto of the year.   Scott has vetoed a bill, commonly called 'Whiskey and Wheaties', that would have allowed grocery stores, retailers, and certain gas stations to sell liquors alongside other products.   Instead, with this veto, there will be no changes. That means the 'liquor wall' requiring spirits to be sold in a location with a separate entrance will stay in place.   In a letter to the Florida Secretary of State, Kenneth Detzner, Scott says both sides of the bill had good points, but that ultimately he had to side with small businesses.   Scott says small business owners told him they were concerned about this bill's impact on their families and their ability to create jobs.
  • Dog bites man. Man sues dog. Dog wins. The dog was Draco, a prized member of the Gwinnett County Police Department’s K-9 unit. But on July 6, 2013, Draco bit the arm of burglary suspect Randall Kevin Jones, who later claimed the dog clamped down for what “seemed like a lifetime.” >> Read more trending news Jones was taken to Gwinnett Medical Center and given stitches for the dog bite before being jailed and charged with burglary and obstruction. Two years later, he filed a highly unusual lawsuit, in that he not only sued the officers involved but also “Officer K-9 Draco of the Gwinnett County Police Department in his individual capacity.” The lawsuit, alleging excessive use of force, said Draco “viciously mauled” Jones, “tearing his flesh and permanently injuring and disfiguring him, while … officers stood by and failed to intervene.” When a federal judge rejected Gwinnett’s initial attempt to dismiss the lawsuit, the county appealed. On Friday, the 11th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Atlanta threw out the case against Draco. >> Related: Dog saves family with 9 children from house fire “We hold that a dog may not be sued individually for negligence since a dog is not a ‘person,’” Judge Robin Rosenbaum wrote for a unanimous three-judge panel. Georgia law, she noted, does not allow such claims to be litigated against dogs. The mere notion of allowing a lawsuit against a dog raises abundant practical issues, Rosenbaum added. How would you formally serve the lawsuit on a dog? What about the dog’s retention of legal representation? How can a dog be expected to pay damages? >> Related: Why is there a dog on the roof in a Texas neighborhood? Draco, a Belgian Malinois, retired from the K-9 unit in mid-2014 after seven years on the force, helping officers track down suspects and find stashes of illegal drugs. Read more here.
  • A Texas teenager and cancer survivor is thanking a new friend for giving him a college scholarship. Chase Bradley, 17, of Hyde Park High School in Austin knows what a cancer battle is like. His older sister was diagnosed with cancer five years ago and beat it. >> Read more trending news The experience made him an advocate for cancer research. “I remember being in her hospital room, trying to keep a straight face and not cry in front of her. It was a very heartbreaking setting. I gave my sister a hug and it was very overwhelming.' Bradley told ABC News. Bradley and earned a scholarship after raising $57,000 for cancer research. But instead of keeping the $2,500 prize for himself, he gave it to Sergio Garcia, a senior at nearby Anderson High School, who beat leukemia. 'It was something really nice that he did for me and I didn't even know him,' Garcia said in an interview with ABC News. 'We've became really good friends after that. [I plan] to pay some of my tuition for college.' >> Related: 11-year-old cancer survivor commits suicide after relentless bullying, family says Garcia, now cancer-free, says he’s grateful for friends like Bradley. He plans on attending Austin Community College before transferring to a larger school.
  • A Baltimore defense attorney was arrested Tuesday after he was recorded telling an alleged rape victim the Trump administration would deport her if she testified against his client, court documents said.  Christos Vasiliades, 38, was arrested Tuesday at the courthouse as his client’s rape trial was set to start, according to the Baltimore Sun. He is charged with multiple counts that include witness intimidation and obstruction of justice.  Vasiliades’ interpreter, Edgar Ivan Rodriguez, was also arrested, the Sun reported. A 12-court indictment in the case alleges that Vasiliades was recorded trying to dissuade the woman who accused his client of rape from testifying at trial. He and Rodriguez are also accused of trying to bribe her with $3,000. The recording allegedly captured the lawyer talking about the “current environment” for immigrants in the United States since President Trump’s inauguration.  “You know how things are with Trump’s laws now,” he told the woman’s husband in the recorded conversation. “Someone goes to court, and boom, they get taken away.” According to court documents, Vasiliades also offered an alternative solution that he said would go over well in his native Greece: beat the defendant up. “He’s an (expletive). I think you should find him and kick his (expletive), personally,” Vasiliades said, according to court documents obtained by the Sun. Maryland Attorney General Brian Frosh, who obtained the indictment against Vasiliades and Rodriguez, commented on the indictment on Facebook.  'Threatening a victim of crime with deportation could have a chilling effect on our criminal justice system,' Frosh said.  >> Read more trending news The indictment, which was filed Tuesday, stated that the case against Vasiliades and Rodriguez began on April 11, when the men called the woman and her husband and asked to meet them, stating that her case had become “more complicated.” The meeting took place at a Baltimore restaurant.  During the meeting, they pointed out that U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) agents would be in the courtroom for their client, Mario Aguilar-Delossantos, the indictment said. They told the couple that due to new federal laws and policies enacted by the Trump administration, there was a high risk that they would be deported if they showed up in court.   Vasiliades and Rodriguez are accused of telling the couple that Aguilar-Delossantos was “very sorry and could offer compensation if they did not come to court and testify against him,” the indictment said. The men claimed that the money could help ensure that the couple remained in the country. Instead of taking the lawyer up on his offer, the couple went to law enforcement. Police investigators had them call Vasiliades on May 15, but that call was closely monitored and recorded.  Over the span of a couple of days, and multiple phone calls with Vasiliades, a face-to-face meeting was set up for May 18. When everyone arrived at the meeting place, an office space in Baltimore, Vasiliades made everyone leave their cellphones in the lobby.  Unknown to him or Rodriguez, however, the couple still had a recording device with them. The device recorded the lawyer reiterating the risk of deportation for the victim if she testified, the indictment said. “Because she’s there (in court), you know, my guy’s going to be, like, ‘I’m here, but she is, too,’” Vasiliades told them, according to the document. Rodriguez told the woman ICE officials would ask for her immigration documents. At that point, Vasiliades allegedly said, “Then everybody’s (expletive).”  Read the entire indictment here.  It was during the May 18 meeting that Vasiliades and Rodriguez told the victim she and her husband would receive $3,000 if they failed to show up and the case got thrown out of court, the indictment said. The court document detailed the plan the men came up with.  “On the upcoming trial date, (the couple) should not show up to court and should instead wait outside the courthouse with Rodriguez, who would be holding the cash, while Vasiliades would appear in court,” the indictment said. “If the case was then ‘thrown out’ due to the fact that (the couple) did not show up, Vasiliades would come out of the courthouse, give a ‘thumbs up’ to Rodriguez and Rodriguez would hand (the couple) the cash.” After pointing out that, in Greece, the punishment for an alleged rapist would be a beating, Vasiliades told the couple that all he wanted was for them to not show up at the trial, court documents said.  “I did my job, I did very good, and I can go home and go to sleep OK,” Vasiliades said, according to the indictment. “And then you get something, and then you find him outside, brother, and you (expletive) him up, that’s it.” The Sun reported that Aguilar-Delossantos’s trial was pushed back to August because of his lawyer’s arrest. Aguilar-Delossantos is charged with second-degree rape and second-degree assault, as well as third- and fourth-degree sexual offenses. 

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