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    Sure enough, the big trans-Pacific trade deal is toast, climate change action is on the ropes and various regulations from the Obama era have been scrapped. It's also a safe bet President Donald Trump hasn't raced a bicycle since Jan. 20, keeping that vow. Add a Supreme Court justice — no small feat — and call these promises kept. But where's that wall? Or the promised trade punishment against China — will the Chinese get off scot-free from 'the greatest theft in the history of the world'? What about that 'easy' replacement for Obamacare? How about the trillion-dollar infrastructure plan and huge tax cut that were supposed to be in motion by now? Trump's road to the White House, paved in big, sometimes impossible pledges, has detoured onto a byway of promises deferred or left behind, an AP analysis found. Of 38 specific promises Trump made in his 100-day 'contract' with voters — 'This is my pledge to you' — he's accomplished 10, mostly through executive orders that don't require legislation, such as withdrawing the U.S. from the Trans-Pacific Partnership trade deal. He's abandoned several and failed to deliver quickly on others, stymied at times by a divided Republican Party and resistant federal judges. Of 10 promises that require Congress to act, none has been achieved and most have not been introduced. 'I've done more than any other president in the first 100 days,' the president bragged in a recent interview with AP, even as he criticized the marker as an 'artificial barrier.' In truth, his 100-day plan remains mostly a to-do list that will spill over well beyond Saturday, his 100th day. Some of Trump's promises were obviously hyperbole to begin with. Don't hold your breath waiting for alleged Army deserter Bowe Bergdahl to be dropped out of an airplane without a parachute, as Trump vowed he'd do at many of his campaign rallies. China's leader got a fancy dinner, complete with 'beautiful' chocolate cake at Mar-a-Lago this month, not the promised 'McDonald's hamburger' and humble pie. But many promises were meant to be taken seriously. Trump clearly owes his supporters a Mexico border wall, even if it doesn't end up being a foot taller than the Great Wall of China. One page of his 100-day manifesto is devoted to legislation he would fight to pass in 100 days. None of it has been achieved. The other page lists 18 executive actions and intentions he promised to pursue — many on Day One. He has followed through on fewer than a dozen, largely through the use of executive orders, and the White House is boasting that he will set a post-World War II record when he signs more this week. That's a change in tune. 'We need people in Washington that don't go around signing executive orders because they can't get people into a room and get some kind of a deal that's negotiated,' he declared in New Hampshire in March 2015. 'We need people that know how to lead, and we don't have that. We have amateurs.' Efforts to provide affordable child care and paid maternity leave, to make college more affordable and to invest in urban areas have been all but forgotten. That's despite the advantage of a Republican-controlled Congress, which the White House failed to pull together behind Trump's first attempt to repeal and replace 'Obamacare.' An AP reporter who followed Trump throughout the presidential campaign collected scores of promises he made along the way, from the consequential to the fanciful. Here are some of them, and his progress so far: ___ ENERGY and the ENVIRONMENT: — Lift President Barack Obama's roadblocks on the Keystone XL and Dakota Access pipelines. Done. Keystone XL is revived and construction of the Dakota Access is completed. — Lift restrictions on mining coal and drilling for oil and natural gas. Done. Trump has unraveled a number of Obama-era restrictions and initiated a review of the Clean Power Plan, which aimed to restrict greenhouse gas emissions at coal-fired power plants. — Cancel payments to U.N. climate change programs and pull out of the Paris climate accord Nope. Trump has yet to make a decision on Paris. His aides are torn. ___ ECONOMY and TRADE: — Pass a tax overhaul. 'Just think about what can be accomplished in the first 100 days of a Trump administration,' he told his supporters again and again in the final weeks of the campaign. 'We are going to have the biggest tax cut since Ronald Reagan.' He promised a plan that would reduce rates dramatically both for corporations and the middle class. Nowhere close. Trump has scrapped the tax plan he campaigned on, and his administration's new package is in its early stages, not only missing the first 100 days but likely to miss a new August deadline set by Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin. Some details may emerge this week. —Designate China a currency manipulator, setting the stage for possible trade penalties because 'we're like the piggy bank that's being robbed. We can't continue to allow China to rape our country, and that's what they're doing.' Abandoned. Trump says he doesn't want to punish China when it is cooperating in a response to North Korean provocations. He also says China has stopped manipulating its currency for unfair trade advantage. But China was moving away from that behavior well before he took office. Also set aside: repeated vows to slap high tariffs on Chinese imports. —Announce his intention to renegotiate or withdraw from the North American Free Trade Agreement. Backtracked, in essence. A draft of his administration's plan for NAFTA proposes only a mild rewrite. But in his AP interview, he threatened anew to terminate the deal if his goals are not met in a renegotiation. — Direct his commerce secretary and trade representative to identify all foreign trading abuses that unfairly hurt American workers. Done. Trump has initiated plenty of studies over the past 100 days. — Slap a 35 percent tariff on goods from companies that ship production abroad. Force companies like Apple and Nabisco to make their products in the U.S. Nope. —Embark on a massive $1 trillion effort to rebuild the country's infrastructure, including airports, roads and bridges. Not yet. __ SECURITY, DEFENSE and IMMIGRATION: — Immediately suspend the Syrian refugee program. Trump tried, but the first version of his travel ban was blocked by the courts. A revised version dropped references to Syrian refugees entirely. That was blocked, too. And he has yet to mention another campaign pledge: to deport Syrian refugees already settled in the U.S. — Inform his generals they have 30 days to submit a new plan for defeating the Islamic State group. Trump did indeed order up a plan. It's unclear what it is since it has yet to be made public. — Suspend immigration from 'terror-prone regions' where he says vetting is too difficult. Trump's effort to bar immigration temporarily from some Muslim-majority countries has been stymied by courts. — Implement 'extreme' immigration vetting techniques. In progress. The Homeland Security Department is considering a number of measures, like asking for visitors' phone contacts and social media passwords. —Build an 'impenetrable physical wall' along the length of the southern border, and make Mexico pay for it. The government has been soliciting bids and test sections could be built as soon as this summer. Mexico is not paying for this work. —End federal funding to 'sanctuary cities' — places where local officials are considered by Washington to be insufficiently cooperative in arresting or detaining people in the country illegally. The Justice Department has threatened to do so, but there are legal limits. — Immediately deport the estimated 2 million 'criminal aliens' living in the country, including gang members, in joint operations with local, state, and federal law enforcement. Deportations have not increased. Arrests of people in the U.S. illegally are up and illegal border crossings are significantly down. —Cancel visas for foreign countries that won't take back criminals deported by the U.S. There's been no discussion of this yet. —'Immediately terminate President Obama's two illegal executive amnesties,' one of which allows young people brought into the country as children to stay and work. Trump has made no effort to end the program, even though it would take a single phone call. In fact, he told AP these young people can 'rest easy' and not fear deportation. ___ GOVERNMENT and the SWAMP: — Ask agency and department heads to identify job-killing regulations for elimination. Done. — Propose a constitutional amendment to impose term limits on all members of Congress. Nope. — 'Drain the swamp.' On his pledge to curb the power of special interests, Trump has so far used an executive order to prohibit political appointees from lobbying the government for five years after serving in his administration and to ban outgoing officials from representing foreign governments. But he's discontinuing the Obama-era practice of releasing White House visitor logs, restoring a shroud over what special interests are getting in his gates. He's also issued at least one waiver to his lobbying ban, allowing a White House budget adviser to go advocate for a business trade group — Impose a hiring freeze on federal employees, excluding military and public safety staffers. This was one of Trump's first actions. But the freeze has since been lifted. —Require that two regulations be eliminated for each new one imposed. Trump signed an order requiring agencies to identify two existing regulations for every new one imposed — though there is nothing in the order that requires the two to be eliminated. ___ FOREIGN AFFAIRS: — End the strategy of nation-building and regime change. Trump's foreign policy posture is still in its early stages, though he has already intervened in Syria and has escalated rhetoric against North Korea. — Move the U.S. Embassy in Israel to Jerusalem. The administration says it is studying the issue. — Negotiate the release of all U.S. prisoners held in Iran, even before taking office. Renegotiate or leave the Iran nuclear deal. No prisoners have been released. The administration is studying the nuclear deal and Trump told AP 'it's possible' the U.S. will withdraw. — Create a safe zone in Syria for refugees, paid for by the Gulf states. Not yet. ___ HEALTH CARE, COURTS and GUNS: —'My first day in office, I'm going to ask Congress to put a bill on my desk getting rid of this disastrous law and replacing it with reforms that expand choice, freedom, affordability. You're going to have such great health care at a tiny fraction of the cost. It's going to be so easy.' The bill to replace 'Obamacare' was pulled from Congress because it lacked enough support. He will try again with a revised plan. — Begin selecting a new Supreme Court judge to fill the court's vacancy. Done. Trump nominated Neil Gorsuch and the Senate approved him. — Eliminate gun-free zones in schools and on military bases. Nope. ___ REALLY? — 'I promise I will never be in a bicycle race.' So far, so good. Trump's vow came after John Kerry, then secretary of state, broke his femur in May 2015 while riding a bicycle. He was not in a bicycle race. —Bar his generals from being interviewed on television. Never mind that. Army Lt. Gen. H. R. McMaster, as Trump's national security adviser, recently appeared on a Sunday news show. Several senior military officers have done Pentagon news conferences in the past few months that are taped by the networks. Gen. John Nicholson, the top general in Afghanistan, appeared at a news conference Monday. —No time for play. Most weekends as president, Trump has broken his pledge to avoid the golf course, after years of criticizing his predecessor for playing the game. 'Because I'm going to be working for you, I'm not going to have time to go play golf,' he told a Virginia rally in August. 'Believe me.' —Season's greetings. 'If I become president, we're gonna be saying Merry Christmas at every store. ... You can leave 'happy holidays' at the corner.' As president-elect over the holidays, he sent a 'Merry Christmas' tweet. So did President Obama. And both sent Happy Hanukkah wishes. ___ Associated Press writers Alicia A. Caldwell, Lolita C. Baldor and Julie Bykowicz contributed to this report.
  • Here's a roundup of news trending across the nation and world today. What to know now: 1. Monuments removed: Workers in New Orleans began removing Confederate monuments around the city early Monday. Trucks arrived around 1:30 a.m. at the first of four monuments the city is taking down. City officials say some protesting the removal of the statues have made death threats. According to The Associated Press, workers inspecting one of the monuments before it was to be removed were wearing flak jackets and helmets. 2. Arkansas executions: Arkansas plans to execute two people on Monday night, the first double execution to take place in the United States in more than 16 years. If the executions take place, Jack Jones and Marcel Williams, both convicted of murder, would be the second and third inmates put to death in the state this month. Arkansas officials say they intend to execute eight inmates before the end of the month when one of the drugs it uses for lethal injections expires. 3. O’Reilly’s podcast: Bill O’Reilly, the ousted Fox News commentator, will resume his “No Spin News” podcast on Monday, according to an announcement on his personal website. The podcast is set for 7 p.m. and is available to premium subscribers of his website. Fox dropped O’Reilly last week after he was accused of sexual harassment by a number of women. 4. A busy week: Saturday marks President Donald Trump’s first 100 days in office, and this week could be one of the toughest for the administration. The president has promised to unveil an outline of proposed tax cuts, to work to push along a new health care bill and to manage a budget deadline that could shut down the government on Friday. Trump is also expected to sign an executive order on energy this week. 5. Moran dies: Erin Moran, who played Joanie Cunningham on the 1970’s show “Happy Days,” died over the weekend. Moran was found dead on Saturday in Corydon, Indiana. No cause of death was given, and an autopsy is planned. Moran was 56. And one more Former President Barack Obama will make his first public appearance since leaving office in January when he speaks to university students Monday in Chicago. According to a spokesman for Obama, he plans to begin a series of speeches across the United States and in Europe.  In case you missed it   
  • The Latest on the March for Science, with events around the world intended to promote the understanding of science and defend science from attacks such as proposed U.S. government budget cuts (all times EDT): 5:40 p.m. Scientists, students and research advocates are marking Earth Day by conveying a global message about scientific freedom without political interference. Those participating in science marches around the world are also arguing for adequate spending for future breakthroughs and the value of scientific pursuits. President Donald Trump issued an Earth Day statement, saying that 'rigorous science depends not on ideology, but on a spirit of honest inquiry and robust debate.' One of the organizers of the first Earth Day, Denis Hayes, says the crowd he saw on the National Mall in Washington appeared energized and 'magical,' almost like what he saw that first day 47 years ago. ___ 2:31 p.m. Kathryn Oakes Hall pinned a sign to the back of her T-shirt as she made her way to the march in Santa Fe, New Mexico: 'Nine months pregnant, so mad I'm here.' 'I'd rather be sitting on the couch,' she said. But she marched anyway because she worried about her baby's future in a world that seems to consider science disposable. Her husband is an engineer at Los Alamos National Laboratory, she studied anthropology, she even has a dog named rocket. So they joined thousands marching in Santa Fe, many of whom stopped her to remark on her pregnancy, with a mix of administration and concern. She wore a white T-shirt, with a drawing of the earth stretched over her belly, and carried a sign that read 'evidence-based policy and not policy-based evidence.' ___ 1:45 p.m. Ice photographer and filmmaker James Balog, who says he was watched trillions of tons of ice melt, told the Washington crowd that talking about the science of climate change in the face of the Trump administration and climate change deniers is 'a battle between objective reality and ideological fiction.' Pennsylvania State University's Michael Mann got a loud cheer just for his sentence 'I am a climate scientist.' Mann, who first created the hockey stick that showed a spike in recent global temperatures after thousands of years said, 'there was no more noble pursuit than seeking to insure that policy is informed by the objective assessment of scientific evidence.' Software engineer Bill Wood of Rockville, Maryland, had a plastic protected sign that read 'things are so bad even the introverts had to come out.' ___ 1:28 p.m. President Donald Trump says in an Earth Day statement that his administration is 'committed to keeping our air and water clean, to preserving our forests, lakes and open spaces and to protecting endangered species.' But that won't be done, he says, in a way that harms 'working families' and says the government is 'reducing unnecessary burdens on American workers and American companies, while being mindful that our actions must also protect the environment.' His comments come as thousands of people around the world participate in science rallies. ___ 1:10 p.m. Hundreds turned out in light rain for a pro-science rally on the Vermont statehouse lawn in Montpelier. One of the speakers, Rose Paul, director of conservation science for The Nature Conservancy of Vermont, told the crowd that 'Science is not a partisan issue.' She said 'climate change is happening' and scientists are needed to help understand how shifting weather patterns are affecting the world. ___ 12:43 p.m. Denis Hayes, who co-organized the first Earth Day 47 years ago, said the crowd he saw from the speaker's platform on the National Mall in Washington was energized in a rare way, similar to what he saw in the first Earth Day. That's unusual for an odd numbered anniversary, he said. 'This magical thing that sometimes happens, sometimes doesn't happen,' Hayes said. 'The reason that it happens is that you've got a clear enemy. For this kind of weather this is an amazing crowd. You're not out there today unless you really care.' ___ 12:36 p.m. Lara Stephens-Brown, a graduate student studying veterinary medicine at the University of Minnesota, joined thousands marching in St. Paul. They chanted 'hey hey, ho ho, we won't let this planet go.' There are cancer survivors and doctors with signs that say 'science saves lives,' she said, and estimated that 90 percent of the signs are not political. 'Science is not a partisan issue,' she said. 'Science is for everyone, and should be supported by everyone in our government.' ___ 11:45 a.m. Thousands of people stood outside the Washington Monument amid bouts of downpours, listening to a mix of speeches and music. Speakers noted that President Trump was in the White House nearby, having cancelled a weekend in New Jersey. This was the first protest for Jeannette Villabon and her son Nikko Chey of Stanhope, New Jersey. So Villabon went all out, donning a Tyrannosaurus rex costume and holding a sign that said: 'Hey tiny hands fund EPA study. Quit being cretaceous.' Trump's 'archaic thinking is going to ruin us all,' Villabon said. Other signs were only slightly less pointed, such as 'edit genes not the truth,' ''data not dogma' and 'global warming is real. Trump is the hoax.' ___ 11:37 a.m. More than a thousand people stretched for miles through the streets of Gainesville, Florida. It was a peaceful demonstration, said Pati Vitt, a plant scientist at the Chicago Botanic Garden in town for work at the university. 'We're scientists, so we're orderly,' she said with a laugh. 'We let the signs do the talking.' She said her favorite featured a drawing of DNA, with the note 'checks itself before it wrecks itself.' And she hopes the crowds at hundreds of cities across the country draw attention to the perils of ignoring science funding. ___ 11:30 a.m. Hundreds of people have braved pouring rain in Nashville, Tennessee, as they march through city streets and chant 'science, not silence.' It's just one of the locations across the United States and the world on Saturday's March for Science events. Lawyer Jatin Shah brought his young sons — a 5-year-old who wants to be a dentist when he grows up and a 6-year-old who plans to be a doctor. Marchers are waving signs that say 'there is no planet B,' ''make America think again' and 'climate change is real, ask any polar bear.' Shah worries about his sons' futures if science spending is cut. ___ 8:50 a.m. The March for Science has attracted several thousand people in Berlin, and those supporters of sciences have walked from one of the city's universities to the Brandenburg Gate. Meike Weltin is a doctorate student at an environmental institute near Berlin. She says she's participating because — in her words — 'I think that politics need to listen to sciences.' Germany's foreign minister, Sigmar Gabriel, has endorsed March for Science events across Germany. Gabriel says 'free research and teaching are the supporting pillars of an open and modern society.' ___ 5:10 a.m. Thousands of people are expected to attend March for Science events around the world to promote the understanding of science and defend it from various attacks, including U.S. government budget cuts. The March for Science was dreamed up at the Women's March on Washington, a day after President Donald Trump's inauguration in January. Saturday is also Earth Day. The march puts scientists — who generally shy away from advocacy and whose work depends on objective experimentation — into a more public position. Scientists involved in the march say they're anxious about political and public rejection of established science such as climate change and the safety of vaccines. ___ This story corrects the location of an event described at 1:10 p.m. It was held in Vermont.
  • President Donald Trump has hosted former Alaska governor Sarah Palin at a White House dinner with musicians Ted Nugent and Kid Rock. Palin posted photos on social media and her website. They showed the group with Trump, and also posing in front of a painting of Hillary Clinton in the White House. In a post on her website, the former vice presidential candidate said she brought the musicians because Trump told her to bring some friends. The Wednesday dinner was not on the president's public schedule. The White House said it was a private dinner and provided no further details. Palin said the 'dinner was beyond superb.' She thanked 'the outstanding White House staff, chefs, Secret Service, and of course the President for making it such a special evening.
  • What do President Donald Trump, John Legend, Emma Stone, LeBron James and U.S. Rep. John Lewis have in common? They're all on Time magazine's annual list of the 100 most influential people of 2017. >> Check out the complete list here This year's list includes 'the titans, pioneers, artists, leaders and icons who are changing the world today,' the publication said on its website. >> Read more trending news >> Click here or scroll down for more
  • The Latest on the New England Patriots' visit to the White House to celebrate their 2017 Super Bowl championship (all times local): 2:25 p.m. President Donald Trump is saluting the Super Bowl champion New England Patriots at the White House. Trump says 'no team has been good this long.' The Patriots rallied from 25 points down to defeat the Atlanta Falcons in February. It was the team's fifth Super Bowl title since February 2002. The celebration at the White House was tempered by the apparent suicide of former Patriot Aaron Hernandez in prison earlier Wednesday. Trump has saluted Patriots owner Bob Kraft, a longtime friend, and says the longtime coach, Bill Belichick, has 'built a culture dedicated to winning.' The president isn't mentioning quarterback Tom Brady. Trump frequently describes Brady as a friend. The star has cited a 'personal family matter' as the reason he's not attending the White House ceremony. ___ 12:55 p.m. The New England Patriot's Rob Gronkowski paid a surprise visit to the White House briefing room during Wednesday's televised briefing. The tight end popped his head into the briefing room and jokingly asked Press Secretary Sean Spicer whether he needed any help, drawing laughs. 'I think I got this. But thank you,' Spicer responded. The Super Bowl champions are visiting the White House to accept congratulations from President Donald Trump for another NFL title. Spicer, a Patriots fan, seemed to appreciate the interruption, saying: 'that was cool.' __ 10:17 a.m. Star quarterback Tom Brady will not join his New England Patriots teammates Wednesday when the Super Bowl champions visit the White House to accept congratulations from President Donald Trump for another NFL title. The White House said it was notified that Brady was dealing with a 'personal family matter' and will not attend the ceremony. Trump's welcome to the team was coming hours after the news from Massachusetts prisons officials that ex-Patriot tight end Aaron Hernandez hanged himself in his prison cell. Hernandez, who played for the Patriots from 2010 to 2012, was serving a life sentence for a murder conviction. Days ago, the 27-year-old former tight end was acquitted of a double murder.
  • President Donald Trump welcomed the New England Patriots to the White House Wednesday, noting the parallels between his own upset victory and their stunning Super Bowl win — but avoiding discussion of the apparent prison suicide of their former teammate Aaron Hernandez earlier in the day. As he extolled the team's virtues and saluted individual players, the president did not name star quarterback Tom Brady, who notified the White House that he was dealing with a 'personal family matter' and would not attend the ceremony. Trump hosted the five-time champions on the South Lawn and declared that 'no team has been good this long.' 'It was a complete team effort. That's the beauty of what they do, they win as a team,' said Trump, who compared the team's 25-point comeback against the Atlanta Falcons in February to his own political upset. 'Pundits, boy, are they wrong a lot, aren't they? They said you couldn't do it.' More than two dozen Patriots skipped the ceremony. Several had said beforehand that they would not show for political reasons. Shortly before the event, Brady posted a photo of his parents on Instagram, wishing them a happy anniversary. Casting a pall over the ceremony was the news about Hernandez, who hanged himself in a prison cell hours before the White House visit, according to Massachusetts prison officials. Hernandez, who played for the Patriots from 2010 to 2012, was serving a life sentence for a murder conviction. Days ago, the 27-year-old former tight end was acquitted of a double murder. A team spokesman said the Patriots were aware of the reports of Hernandez's death but the club wasn't expected to comment. Two players were brought to speak to reporters after the White House ceremony, but both said they had not known Hernandez. Wide receiver Malcolm Mitchell said he was moved by the White House ceremony, saying it 'almost brought me to tears. As a child growing up, I never would have thought a president would have said my name by any means.' One player made an impromptu appearance at a White House press before the official ceremony. Tight end Rob Gronkowski stuck his head in the door of the briefing room as Press Secretary Sean Spicer was holding a televised briefing. Gronkowski jokingly asked Spicer whether he needed any help. Spicer — an avid Patriots fan — responded: 'I think I got this. But thank you.' Trump has particularly close ties to the Patriots, counting owner Bob Kraft and head coach Bill Belichick as friends. One of Trump's signature 'Make America Great Again' hats was spotted in Brady's locker in 2015. During the South Lawn ceremony, Trump recounted reading a supportive letter from Belichick on the eve of the election, while Kraft saluted the president as a friend for decades. 'It is a distinct honor for us to celebrate what was unequivocally our sweetest championship with a very good friend and somebody whose mental toughness and strength I greatly admire,' said Kraft. The team presented the president with a personalized 'Trump' No. 45 jersey and a helmet from February's Super Bowl, the first such game to go to overtime. Kraft was one of at least seven NFL team owners who gave $1 million each to Trump's inaugural committee, a new fundraising report shows. Others include the owners of the Houston Texans, the Washington Redskins, the Jacksonville Jaguars and the Los Angeles Rams. Kraft gave the money via his Kraft Group LLC. After the victory in February, tight end Martellus Bennett quickly made it clear he was not coming to the White House, and other teammates followed. Some noted their differences with the Republican administration, though others did not an issue a reason for their absence. Defensive back Devin McCourty told Time Magazine: 'I don't feel accepted in the White House. With the president having so many strong opinions and prejudices I believe certain people might feel accepted there while others won't.' Players have turned down White House invites ever since such events began to take off under President Ronald Reagan. That includes Brady in 2015. He cited a 'family commitment' at the time, but there was speculation he declined because of some unflattering comments a spokesman for President Barack Obama made about the 'Deflategate' scandal. __ Associated Press writers Julie Bykowicz and Jill Colvin contributed to this report.
  • It was huge. Big money from billionaires, corporations and a roster of NFL owners poured into Donald Trump's inaugural committee in record-shattering amounts — to pull off an event that was considerably lower-key than previous inaugural celebrations. That leaves a bit of a mystery: What the $107 million was spent for and how much was left over — the excess, if any, to go to charity. It also raises a new round of questions about the influence of money in politics, this time for a president who promised to 'drain the swamp' of Washington. Contribution records from Trump's inaugural committee, released Wednesday by the Federal Election Commission, show the president who railed as a candidate against the corrupting influence of big-money donors was only too willing to accept top-dollar checks for his swearing-in festivities. Trump's total take was about double the previous record set by Barack Obama, who collected $53 million in contributions in 2009, and had money left over to spend on the annual Easter egg roll and other White House events. Trump's top inaugural donor was Las Vegas gambling billionaire Sheldon Adelson, who gave $5 million. He and his wife came away with prime seats for Trump's swearing-in ceremony on Jan. 20 and gained access to a private lunch with the new president and lawmakers at the Capitol. Phil Ruffin, another casino mogul and close friend of Trump, was among dozens of donors who gave $1 million each. At least eight NFL team owners kicked in big money for the inauguration. Seven of them, including Patriots owner Bob Kraft, whose team won the Super Bowl and visited the White House on Wednesday, gave $1 million apiece. Kraft's donation came via his limited liability company. Trump plans to name the New York Jets' Woody Johnson, one of those million-dollar donors, to be the country's ambassador to the United Kingdom. Asked whether the president feels conflicted about his committee accepting so much corporate and wealthy donor money, spokesman Sean Spicer said Wednesday that financing the inaugural is 'a time-honored tradition' and there are 'a lot of people who really take pride in helping us show the world a peaceful transformation of power.' Brendan Fischer of the Campaign Legal Center, a nonprofit pro-transparency group, countered: 'If you take Trump at his word that when political figures accept large amounts of money from corporate interests or special interests that they're indebted to those big donors, there's certainly reason to question what donors to Trump's inaugural committee might expect in return.' As is often the case with campaigns and inaugurations, some of the donations came from people doing business with the federal government. Billionaire Texan Kelcy Warren, whose company is building the Dakota Access Pipeline, gave the inaugural committee $250,000. Christopher Cline, a billionaire coal magnate who owns Foresight Energy Partners, gave $1 million. Trump has vowed to bring back coal jobs, and his administration quickly approved the Dakota pipeline. Businesses that donated at the $1 million level included Bank of America, Boeing, Dow Chemical, Pfizer and Qualcomm. Companies also gave big in-kind contributions of goods and services, including nearly $500,000 in 'vehicle expenses' from General Motors. AT&T made combined in-kind and cash donations of $2.1 million, and Microsoft's combined total was $500,000. Casino mogul Steve Wynn donated entertainers and production work valued at $729,000 for the Chairman's Ball, where the band Alabama and Wynn's ShowStoppers performed, according to Wynn spokesman Michael Weaver. Russian-America businessman Alexander Shustorovich also was among the $1 million donors to Trump's inauguration committee. The Republican National Committee refused a contribution from the U.S. citizen in 2000, citing news reports at the time that cautioned about his ties to Russian business. In more recent years, he's given money to the party, to 2012 candidate Mitt Romney, and to Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, FEC records show. Donations from foreign nationals are banned. But the socialist administration of Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro made a $500,000 donation through Citgo Petroleum, a U.S. affiliate of Venezuela's state oil company PDVSA. PDVSA recently offered up a nearly 50 percent stake in Citgo as collateral for a $1.5 billion loan from Russian firm Rosneft. The deal drew criticism from Republicans who worry it sets the stage for Vladimir Putin to take control of American oil. The inauguration offered donors who had held back during the presidential campaign a chance to show belated support for the incoming president. Billionaire investor Paul Singer gave $1 million after long expressing skepticism about Trump. Like Singer, Chicago hedge fund manager Ken Griffin, conspicuously avoided giving money to Trump's campaign during the general election. Griffin gave the Trump inaugural $100,000. While the government sets strict contribution limits on political campaigns, the only federal restrictions on donations to inaugural committees are a ban on foreign nationals, according to Fischer, of the Campaign Legal Center. Past presidents-elect have tended to set voluntary limits on their inaugural fundraising, but Trump's only restriction was to ban money from lobbyists, he said. Obama in 2009 set a $50,000 cap on individual contributions and banned money from corporations, political action committees and lobbyists. He lifted those caps in 2013, when he raised about $43 million for a lower-key event. Inaugural committees have broad leeway in how they spend their money and what they do with the leftovers, although some limitations apply, according to Fischer. As a 501(c)(4) organization, for example, the committee could use some of the money to give bonuses to staff, but IRS rules say the committee couldn't operate primarily to benefit a small group of individuals. Federal campaigns wouldn't be able receive the money because it was raised outside contribution limits, he said. Trump's inaugural committee has promised to 'identify and evaluate charities that will receive contributions left from the excess monies raised.' ___ On Twitter follow Nancy Benac at: http://twitter.com/nbenac and Julie Bykowicz at http://twitter.com/bykowicz
  • A federal judge has rejected efforts to reinstall a painting in the Capitol that some lawmakers and police groups found offensive because it depicts police officers with animal heads. David Pulphus, a student artist from Missouri, and Rep. William Clay, his Democratic congressman, had sued Architect of the Capitol Stephen Ayers for removing the painting in January. They sought a preliminary injunction to have the painting restored as the lawsuit proceeds, but the judge denied their motion. On Tuesday, Clay and Pulphus said they would appeal the judge's ruling. 'We believe our Constitution simply cannot tolerate a situation where artwork can be removed from the Capitol for the first time ever as a result of a series of ideologically and politically driven complaints,' they said in a statement. The painting depicts events in Ferguson, Missouri, after a white police officer shot and killed unarmed black teenager Michael Brown in 2014. The painting shows two police officers with guns drawn facing a young man as protesters look on. The officers are shown with the heads of pigs. The young man has the head of a wolf and a long tail. The protesters hold signs saying 'Racism Kills,' ''Stop Killing' and 'History.' In a ruling dated last Friday, U.S. District Judge John D. Bates said the government used its editorial discretion in the selection and presentation of the art. As a result, it was engaging in 'government speech' and the plaintiffs have no First Amendment right to display the painting at the Capitol. The First Amendment limits government regulation of private speech, but it does not restrict the government when it speaks for itself. Bates said he was 'sympathetic' to Pulphus and Clay given how the artwork was treated, but he concluded that they were unlikely to succeed on the merits of their arguments. He also noted that all of the paintings in this year's arts competition are to be taken down May 1, less than two weeks away. Clay and Pulphus had sought a preliminary injunction to have the painting restored to the tunnel that connects the Capitol to a House office building. That's where hundreds of winning paintings in an annual Congressional Art Competition are hung. Ayers had determined that the artwork didn't comply with the House Office Building Commission's prohibitions for the Congressional Arts Competition. The rules of the competition prohibit artworks 'depicting subjects of contemporary political controversy' or those of a 'sensationalistic or gruesome nature.' Ayers made the determination after Rep. Dave Reichert, R-Wash., a former sheriff, asked him to remove the artwork, calling it a 'slap in the face' to those officers who put their lives on the line to provide safety and freedom. The painting had hung from early June to late December before conservative media outlets and lawmakers began to weigh in. Soon, Rep. Duncan Hunter, R-Calif., removed it on his own. Clay put it back up, and the scenario was repeated when two other lawmakers also removed the painting.
  • New York filmmaker Laura Poitras endured extra screening at airports for years. Between 2006 and 2012, she was stopped more than 50 times when she tried to set foot back in the U.S. Only now, after suing the government, she's learned that her travel nightmare stemmed from a movie she filmed in Iraq in 2004. U.S. troops alleged she had gotten a heads-up about a deadly ambush but didn't alert the military. That would have been a crime. But she was never charged. The Homeland Security Department says the government determined in 2012 she was no longer 'high-risk,' allowing Customs to stop its enhanced screenings. Poitras has made films on National Security Agency leaker Edward Snowden and WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange. She worries the robust security screenings might start again.

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  • North Korea conducted large-scale artillery exercises on Tuesday to coincide with the 85th anniversary of its army’s foundation, South Korea's Yonhap News Agency reported. >> Read more trending news  Citing an unidentified South Korean government source, Yonhap reported that there were signs North Korea's military was carrying out large-scale, live-fire drills in areas around the east coast city of Wonsan. South Korea's defense ministry could not immediately confirm the report, according to Reuters. North Korea warned that the United States will have to choose between political and military surrender, according to the Yonhap report. 'If the U.S. and warmongers run amok with a reckless preemptive strike, we will stage the most brutal punishment of a preemptive attack in the sky and land as well as at sea and from underwater without any warning or prior notice,' according to Rodong Sinmun, spokesman of the ruling Workers' Party of Korea.
  • A Brunswick man is under fire after neighbors say his dog attacked a little boy Monday afternoon.It happened in Brunswick off Ogg Avenue.According to the Brunswick News, the pit bull mix dog was chained in the backyard of a duplex home on Ogg Avenue, where the 4-year-old was being watched by a babysitter. TRENDING: 'Firefighters saved my life,' Florida rattlesnake victim says The child was playing in the front yard, when the babysitter went inside briefly, according to published reports. Glynn County Police Chief Matt Doering told the Brunswick News that the child walked to the backyard, where he was attacked by the dog.Action News Jax asked a neighbor if the dog has ever attacked before.“No, no, he always keeps his dog tied up, always. His dog never runs,” neighbor Derrick Preston said.The child was taken to Wolfson Children's Hospital in Jacksonville, according to the Brunswick News.The dog is with Animal Services, which will monitor the dog for 10 days before taking any action.  LOCAL NEWS: Brawl at Orange Park Mall involved up to 60 people, Clay County Sheriff's Office says
  • Nearly seven months ago Hurricane Matthew gutted Donna Wright’s Davis Shores house in St. Augustine, she’s still rebuilding so she has a place to call home again.“I didn’t have any insurance, flood insurance,” Wright said. “I’m staying with friends and living in my car.”Mom Kira Anderson and her family spent the last six months living in a fifth-wheel camper in their own driveway. TRENDING: 'Firefighters saved my life,' Florida rattlesnake victim says They’re slowly moving back into their Davis Shores home as they rebuild.“Living in a camper with your husband, kids and 110 pound dog (for six months) is awful,” Anderson said.Monday, the St. Augustine City Commission approved the first steps to change a city ordinance to allow hurricane victims to temporarily live on their private property while repairing their home.Neighbors would have until the city issues them a certificate of completion, or their building permit expires to stay. The city’s current ordinance does not allow this.“We are not doing anything to move people or displace people,” St. Augustine Mayor Nancy Shaver said.St. Augustine leaders say 12 families still live in RVs and campers in their own driveways in Davis Shores, nearly seven months after Hurricane Matthew. LOCAL NEWS: Brawl at Orange Park Mall involved up to 60 people, Clay County Sheriff's Office says The city does not have a hard count of how many victims left after the storm, or are rebuilding. Now the city is working with different organizations to get an official head count.Neighbors say at least 50 individual hurricane victims total in Davis Shores are still living in their driveways.“We will do everything in our power to identify them and get them on the right road,” Shaver said.City leaders say the proposed change to the RV and camper ordinance for Hurricane Matthew victims must to go through a few more steps before coming official.
  • A 59-year-old woman is dead after she tried crossing the street on I-95 North near Forsyth Street.  According to the Florida Highway Patrol, Courtney Lynn Richard was driving in the outside lane of I-95 Northbound and her Toyota Corolla hit Deborah Tompkins on her left side.   Richard continued to drive on I-95 to her home where he car was later found. Charges are currently pending. 
  • On Monday, six law enforcement officers who lost their lives in the line of duty were recognized in Tallahassee. One of those six was Deputy Eric Oliver. Deputy Oliver, who worked for the Nassau County Sheriff's Office, died in November 2016 while chasing a suspect. TRENDING: 'Firefighters saved my life,' Florida rattlesnake victim says Oliver's supervisor Sgt. Charles Lucas said he met Oliver when they both went from the detention center to the sheriff's office. 'We would chit chat on a regular basis and we both have little girls and that was a big topic,' Sgt. Lucas said. Lucas said Oliver was great at his job and deserved to be honored in Tallahassee. 'He always did his job and provided the community with the best service he could,' Lucas said. LOCAL NEWS: Brawl at Orange Park Mall involved up to 60 people, Clay County Sheriff's Office says Nassau Sheriff Bill Leeper and members of Oliver's family were at the ceremony as he was remembered. 'Him being honored today is the ultimate sacrifice,' Lucas said.

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