ON AIR NOW

LISTEN NOW

Weather

clear-night
33°
Clear
H 62° L 47°
  • clear-night
    33°
    Current Conditions
    Clear. H 62° L 47°
  • clear-night
    54°
    Evening
    Clear. H 62° L 47°
  • clear-night
    50°
    Morning
    Clear. H 68° L 38°
LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

The latest top stories

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

The latest traffic report

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

The latest forecast

00:00 | 00:00

    The Latest on the race for the Alabama Senate seat (all times local):7:10 p.m.Alabama voters are getting a recorded phone call in which President Donald Trump says he needs Republican Roy Moore in the U.S. Senate.The 90-second audio recording released Sunday by the Moore campaign includes Trump saying progress on his agenda will be 'stopped cold' if Alabama elects Democrat Doug Jones.State voters will begin receiving the call on Monday, the day before the election.Trump calls Moore a conservative who will help get the nation back on track after what he refers to as the 'Obama disaster.' The president says Republicans need Moore's vote in the Senate, where the GOP has a majority with 52 votes.Trump calls Jones a liberal who's a puppet of Democratic congressional leaders Nancy Pelosi and Chuck Schumer.___6:20 p.m.Alabama Democratic Senate nominee Doug Jones is using the words of the state's senior GOP senator in his last-minute push for votes.In a Sunday night speech at a Huntsville church, Jones repeated Sen. Richard Shelby's remark on a morning talk show that Alabama can 'do better' than electing Republican Roy Moore in Tuesday's race for US Senate.Shelby says he did not vote for Moore, but instead wrote in the name of another Republican.Jones's campaign has been emphasizing Shelby's statement through the day.Moore did not hold any public campaign events on Sunday. He has scheduled a Monday night rally with former Trump strategist Steve Bannon.___5:10 p.m.Democratic Senate candidate Doug Jones says Tuesday's election against Republican Roy Moore will send a message far beyond Alabama's borders.Jones told campaign workers during an appearance in Birmingham on Sunday that the vote will tell the world what Alabama stands for. Jones says his campaign 'is on the right side of history.'Jones was joined for a second day by New Jersey Sen. Cory Booker, one of just two African American Democrats serving in the Senate. Jones' campaign is painfully aware of their need to drive extraordinary levels of black voters and moderate Republicans to the polls.Alabama doesn't have any Democrats in statewide office. Jones' campaign has been buoyed by allegations that Moore made improper sexual advances toward teen girls decades ago.___11:30 a.m.Roy Moore's chief strategist is tying the Republican Senate candidate to President Donald Trump's star in Alabama.Dean Young said Sunday on ABC's 'This Week' that the special election is 'ground zero' for Trump and that Alabamians who want the president's agenda to be achieved should vote for Moore.He says: 'This is Donald Trump on trial in Alabama.'Trump has urged voters to back Moore over Democrat Doug Jones in Tuesday's election.Moore's candidacy has been rocked by allegations of sexual misconduct by multiple women.Young says the women aren't credible. In contrast, a number of senior Republicans in Congress say they believe the women. Trump, however, has raised doubts about the accusers and has criticized Jones as the 'liberal puppet' of Democratic leaders Chuck Schumer and Nancy Pelosi.
  • CNN had to correct a story on Friday that suggested the Trump campaign had been tipped off early about WikiLeaks documents damaging to Hillary Clinton when it later learned the alert was about material already publicly available.The new information, CNN noted, 'indicates that the communication is less significant than CNN initially reported.'It's the second mistake in a week by a major news organization on a story that initially had been damaging to the president but didn't live up to scrutiny, giving Trump ammunition for his campaign against 'fake news.' This time it was by one of Trump's favorite targets.The story, by CNN reporters Manu Raju and Jeremy Herb, was posted at 8:05 a.m. Friday and said that an email was sent to Trump and campaign officials on Sept. 4, 2016, with a link to documents from the Democratic National Committee hacked by WikiLeaks.Five hours later, the Washington Post reported that the message had actually been sent on Sept. 14 and it wasn't a tip to secret documents, since WikiLeaks had released them a day earlier.CNN corrected its story at 3:45 p.m. with the new information.CNN, quoting several sources familiar with the exchange, said Donald Trump Jr. was asked about the WikiLeaks email Wednesday during closed-door testimony before the House Intelligence Committee.At a rally in Pensacola, Florida, on Friday evening, Trump pointed to the CNN correction as well as other corrections and clarifications issued by news organizations over the last week.'Did you see all the corrections the media's been making?' Trump asked the crowd. 'They've been apologizing left and right.'Trump singled out suspended ABC reporter Brian Ross, calling him a 'fraudster' and saying he should have been fired because his error caused a dip in the stock market. 'I said to everybody: Get yourself a lawyer and sue ABC News,' Trump said.Trump also told the rowdy crowd that CNN had apologized 'just a little while ago' for its reporting error.'They apologized! Oh thank you, CNN. Thank you so much. You should have been apologizing for the last two years,' he said.Trump counselor Kellyanne Conway tweeted to CNN reporters: 'Be honest and keep explaining the much-repeated lie you let live for hours. Tell America WHY the date of the email is important. (Hint: it destroys your attempt to destroy @DonaldJTrumpJr).' She also linked to an article in the Daily Caller headlined: 'CNN Botches Major 'Bombshell' Alleging Contacts Between Don Jr. And WikiLeaks.'CNN said its original account that the email was released 10 days earlier was based on accounts from two sources who had seen the email. Trump representatives have described the email as one of many unsolicited messages the campaign received. The Post said it had obtained a copy of the email and said its sender identified himself as Michael J. Erickson, the president of an aviation management company.There's no indication that CNN plans to discipline Raju and Herb, meaning it blames the error on its sources more than its reporters.Both the CNN story and last Friday's mistake by ABC News stem from investigations into the Trump campaign and possible collusion with Russian officials.ABC suspended investigative reporter Brian Ross for four weeks without pay after he had erroneously reported that Michael Flynn, the former national security adviser, had been directed to make contact with the Russians. That would have been significant news if it happened during the campaign, but ABC later corrected the report to note that the order to Flynn came when Trump was already president-elect.Besides the suspension, ABC has already told Ross he could no longer report on Trump.Taken together, the stories are particularly damaging for journalists because polls indicate that a majority of Trump supporters believe the president's contention that the media fabricates stories about him more than once in a while.
  • Members of both parties are glum and guarded after a shocking week of resignations on Capitol Hill. But Democrats say the way they're handling the sexual misconduct issue will give them a valuable weapon for next year's congressional elections. Republicans say that's just wishful thinking.No one knows when or where the allegations that have felled lawmakers, journalists and entertainers will end. The ax could well fall again in a Congress where the culture has long tolerated behavior that would trigger departures today.For now, Democrats want voters to see a very bright line: They forced the liberal rising star Al Franken and civil rights veteran Rep. John Conyers to leave, while Donald Trump remains president and Alabama Republican Roy Moore could well be elected to the Senate next Tuesday.'Democrats are now in a better position than ever to tie Donald Trump and Roy Moore around the necks of Republicans' running for Congress next year, said Jim Manley, a Democratic operative and former Senate aide.Republicans are quick to contest that.They argue that Trump was elected last year despite the election season release of a 2005 tape in which he described sexually offensive behavior, followed by accusations by several women of aggressive sexual misconduct. And they suggest Sen. Franken's departure was more politically bearable for Democrats because his home state of Minnesota has a Democratic governor who will appoint the temporary replacement.'Do you think if Al Franken had a Republican governor they'd be doing this,' asked Tom Davis, a GOP consultant and former Virginia congressman who chaired his party's House campaign committee.While both Trump and Moore have faced and denied allegations, their political fortunes aren't likely to be damaged by the way the Democrats have handled Franken and Conyers.What's important, Democrats say, is that the contrast heightens their chances of winning over female and suburban voters, pumping up donors and party activists and even recruiting women to run for Congress next year.'Yes, we may lose some people that we liked quite a bit along the way,' said Brian Fallon, senior adviser to the liberal group Priorities USA. He added, 'In the long term, the party is better off doing right by women.'Moore has been accused of initiating sexual contact with teenage girls and pursuing dates with others when he was in his thirties during the 1970s. He has denied wrongdoing.Trump — who backs Moore — planned a Friday evening political rally in Pensacola, Florida, about 20 miles from the Alabama state line.On Thursday, in an extraordinary scene witnessed by teary-eyed colleagues and relatives, Franken told a wake-like Senate he was resigning. Two days earlier, it was the House's longest-serving member, John Conyers of Michigan, who quit. Both succumbed to pressure by leaders and colleagues after initially saying they'd fight to stay.Republicans were taking action, too. Rep. Trent Franks quit Congress Friday, a day after House Speaker Paul Ryan said he'd told the conservative Arizonan to leave. A former Franks aide told The Associated Press that he repeatedly pushed her to carry his child, at one point offering her $5 million to act as a surrogate mother.The issue of sexual misconduct is one that few lawmakers are eager to discuss. 'I'm not happy to get to it, but I will get to that,' House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., said at a press conference Thursday when reporters pressed her on it.Ryan, R-Wis., struggled Thursday to articulate a standard for forcing a lawmaker to resign over allegations of sexual impropriety.'It's a really good question,' Ryan said. He said accusations must be taken seriously and processed fairly, adding, 'I want my daughter to grow up in a country, going into the workplace, where she's empowered and respected, and not fearful for reporting harassment when it occurs against her.'Capitol Hill's culture has long erred on the side of protecting lawmakers. In Washington, alcohol can flow, lawmakers are often separated from their wives, and they wield power over staffs typically composed mostly of ambitious young people. The mix can breed and abide bad behavior.It took a lengthy investigation and an Ethics Committee expulsion vote to force Oregon Sen. Bob Packwood out for sexual harassment in 1995. More recently, the parties have self-policed.Former Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio., cracked down on Rep. Chris Lee., R-N.Y., caught in 2011 soliciting women on the Internet using a shirtless 'selfie' photograph. Lee quit Congress immediately, as did former Rep. Mark Souder, R-Ind., discovered in 2010 having an affair with an aide.Pelosi forced out Rep. Anthony Weiner, D-N.Y., for tweeting lewd photos to women.In the Internet age, the idea of a yearslong ethics process seems quaint. And social media sites can act as a de facto prosecutor, judge and jury in the span of hours.'A lot of the stuff that used to be at best gossip, if that, now is going to be pictures on Twitter,' said Michael Steel, who was a top adviser to Boehner.___AP reporters Andrew Taylor, Juliet Linderman and Kevin Freking contributed.
  • If she could spend the holidays anywhere in the world, Melania Trump says she'd take her family to a deserted, tropical island.The first lady revealed her wish Thursday during a Christmastime visit with patients and staff at Children's National hospital in the nation's capital as she continued a holiday tradition begun more than 60 years ago by first lady Bess Truman.After touring the neuroscience center and meeting privately with some patients, Mrs. Trump was escorted by Santa Claus to the atrium where she took a seat in front of a large Christmas tree and fielded a handful of questions from children and patients.Ten-year-old Andy asked the first lady where she would spend the holidays if she could go anywhere in the world. Her answer prompted laughter.'I would spend my holidays on a deserted island, tropical island with my family,' she said.Her favorite Christmas song is 'O Holy Night.' Her favorite family Christmas tradition is eating dinner on Christmas Eve before they attend midnight Mass or worship services on Christmas Day, followed by another family dinner. 'On the 25th, Santa comes. We open the presents and spend time together.'Healthy food' is her favorite thing to eat for Christmas dinner. 'You feel very good after. Not too much eating,' she said. 'The most important part is to spend time with the family.'So what does she want from Santa for Christmas?'I asked Santa for Christmas, uh, peace on the world, health love and kindness,' the first lady said.Before greeting audience members and departing, Mrs. Trump read 'The Polar Express,' a story about a doubting boy who hops a train ride to the North Pole.She later tweeted about the 'fun questions from the kids @childrenshealth.'It was not Mrs. Trump's first visit to Children National. She visited earlier in the year to help prepare a 'healing garden' for patients that she helped dedicate on a follow-up visit.___Follow Darlene Superville on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/dsupervilleap
  • President Donald Trump kibitzed with World War II veterans at the White House on Thursday as he signed a proclamation declaring it National Pearl Harbor Remembrance Day.A half dozen veterans of the attack, wearing medals and military hats, attended the ceremony and bantered with the president as he commemorated their service.'All American hearts are filled with gratitude for their service, their sacrifice and their presence here today,' Trump said.Among those attending was 98-year-old Mickey Ganitch, who was on the USS Pennsylvania's football team and getting ready for a championship game against the crew of the USS Arizona when Japan attacked.'You never got that game, huh?' asked the president.'We had a war to fight,' Ganitch responded before kneeling to mimic his best football move — and repeating the move at Trump's request.Ganitch later broke out into song, delivering a rendition of 'Remember Pearl Harbor.'You really made this very exciting,' Trump remarked, thanking him for the 'free entertainment.'Trump said he hoped the vets would join him every year to mark the occasion for the next — presuming he runs and wins re-election — seven years.'Today our entire nation pauses to remember Pearl Harbor and the brave warriors who on that day stood tall and fought for America,' he said.The president invited the men to see the Oval Office after the signing, promising them pens and autographs.Trump last month paid a visit to Hawaii's Pearl Harbor and its memorial to the USS Arizona before he departed for his first trip to Asia. The surprise attack by Japan killed more than 2,400 Americans and plunged the U.S. into World War II.
  • First lady Melania Trump, along with second lady Karen Pence, traveled to Texas on Wednesday to visit with first responders and check on Hurricane Harvey relief efforts. And if there’s anything politicians (or in this case, politicians’ spouses) love to do when they’re on a visit, it’s make a stop at a purveyor of local cuisine. Trump and Pence flew through Corpus Christi, which means Whataburger. >> Read more trending news According to social media reports (including tweets from reporters along for the trip, as well as a White House official), the first and second lady stopped by the venerable Texas burger chain and walked out with at least some of those famous fries. The rest of their order is unknown (so far), but the tweets about the pit stop are quite a journey. Reporters in the press pool said the first and second lady treated them to fries. Officials in Texas approved. The orange and the white, as ever, proved to be a unifying force. According to the San Antonio Express-News, Trump and Pence stopped at the Whataburger at 602 Padre Island Drive. 
  • Television personality Chelsea Handler, among the thousands forced to evacuate due to the raging California wildfires, called out President Donald Trump in a controversial tweet about the blaze Wednesday. “It’s like Donald Trump is setting the world on fire. Literally and figuratively,” she wrote. >> See the tweet here The infernos have caused filming to halt temporarily and threaten the famed Getty Museum. Handler’s antipathy for Trump often fuels her busy Twitter feed. >> California wildfires force thousands to evacuate: Live updates “We have got to get rid of Trump,” she posted on Nov. 22. “He is incapable of honesty or goodwill. He cares about no one. We must stay the course and not let up.” >> Read more trending news She also speaks out on national events with frequency. >> On AJC.com: Strong winds ground firefighting aircraft “Innocent people go to church on Sunday to honor their God, and while doing so, get shot in [sic] killed. What country? America. Why? Republicans,” she posted on Nov. 5, after a gunman opened fire in a church in Sutherland Springs, Texas.
  • UPDATE: Dec. 6, 2017 5:25 p.m.: Sen. Al Franken is disputing a Minnesota Public Radio report that he is resigning from office during a planned press conference Thursday afternoon. Franken, in a tweet, asked MPR to correct their story. UPDATE: Dec. 6, 2017 5:00 p.m.: Minnesota Public Radio is reporting Sen. Al Franken will resign his Senate seat on Thursday. The news outlet is citing a Democratic official and “key aides” who have talked with Franken. “The official spoke to Franken and separately to Franken's staff. A staff member told the official that Franken had gone to his Washington home to discuss his plans with family,” MPR reported. Minnesota Public Radio said it agreed to withhold the official’s name so that Franken can make the announcement himself. (Previous story) Two women came forward Wednesday to accuse Sen. Al Franken of inappropriate sexual behavior as calls for his resignation swelled.  >> Read more trending news The reports bring the number of allegations made against the Minnesota Democrat to at least eight. Many of the alleged incidents happened before Franken became a senator, although at least two, including one reported Wednesday, were alleged to have happened after he was sworn in. A former Democratic congressional aide accused Franken of trying to forcibly kiss her in 2006, three years before he was sworn in as a U.S. senator, according to Politico. >> Related: Sen. Al Franken accused of groping woman in 2010 The aide told the news site that she was getting her things together after a taping of Franken’s radio show in 2006 when she turned to find him in her face. >> Related: President Trump comments on Senator Franken's groping photo “He was between me and the door and he was coming at me to kiss me. It was very quick and I think my brain had to work really hard to be like ‘Wait, what is happening?’ But I knew whatever was happening was not right and I ducked,” the aide told Politico. “I was really startled by it and I just sort of booked it towards the door and he said, ‘It’s my right as an entertainer.’” Franken denied the allegation in a statement to Politico. >> Related: Al Franken accused of sexual misconduct by Army veteran, former elected official “This allegation is categorically not true and the idea that I would claim this as my right as an entertainer is preposterous,” he said. “I look forward to fully cooperating with the ongoing ethics committee investigation.” Freelance journalist Tina DuPuy also came forward Wednesday in an article published by The Atlantic. She said Franken groped her during a Media Matters party in 2009, after Obama’s first inauguration. DuPuy wrote she spotted Franken at the party and asked to take a photo with him because her foster mother was one of his fans. >> Related: ‘Saturday Night Live' women defend Sen. Al Franken after groping allegations “We posed for the shot. He immediately put his hand on my waist, grabbing a handful of flesh,” she wrote. “I froze. Then he squeezed. At least twice.” She wrote that the unwanted grope was demeaning. “It shrunk me. It’s like I was no longer a person, only ornamental. It said, ‘You don’t matter -- and I do,’” she wrote. “He wanted to cop a feel and he demonstrated he didn’t need my permission.” >> Related: ‘SNL' slams former cast member Al Franken on 'Weekend Update' DuPuy wrote that she thought Franken would resign when allegations first surfaced against him last month. Los Angeles news anchor Leeann Tweeden accused Franken of forcibly kissing her and groping her as she slept during a USO tour in 2006. Franken apologized for the incident, but as the number of women accusing the congressman grew, so did calls for his resignation. A group of female senators, all Democrats, called for Franken's resignation Wednesday, before DuPuy's accusations were published. >> Related: Sen. Al Franken accused of kissing, groping news anchor without consent “It is clear that Al Franken has engaged in a pattern of egregious and unacceptable behavior toward women, and he should resign,” said Sen. Maggie Hassan, D-New Hampshire. Franken is expected to address the reports at a planned news conference Thursday.
  • The Latest on Sen. Al Franken and sexual misconduct allegations (all times local):9 p.m.The head of the Democratic Party is adding his voice to the majority of Senate Democrats calling on Sen. Al Franken to resign.Chairman Tom Perez says in a statement Wednesday that sexual misconduct, harassment and assault have no place in the Democratic Party, Congress, the White House or anywhere.Franken faces multiple allegations of inappropriate sexual behavior. The Minnesota Democrat plans to make an announcement Thursday.In a swipe at the GOP, Perez highlights accusations against both President Donald Trump and Alabama Senate candidate Roy Moore.Perez says: 'The Republican Party has chosen to pursue power and push their radical far-right agenda at any cost. And they've continued to champion a president who has a long and disturbing history of misconduct with women.'__6 p.m.A tweet sent from Sen. Al Franken's verified account says he is still talking with his family and has not made a final decision on whether he'll resign.The tweet was sent Wednesday after Minnesota Public Radio News reported that Franken will resign. The report cited an unnamed Democratic official who spoke to Franken.In response, a tweet from Franken's account says the story is 'not accurate' and 'No final decision has been made.'Franken lost support in the Senate on Wednesday after a seventh woman came forward accusing him of sexual impropriety. He denied the allegation, but more than a dozen Senate Democrats, led by female lawmakers, called on him to step aside.Franken's office says he'll make an announcement Thursday, but has offered no more details.___5:06 p.m.The top Senate Democrat says Sen. Al Franken should resign as allegations of sexual misconduct against the Minnesota lawmaker multiply.In a brief statement on Wednesday, Minority Leader Chuck Schumer of New York said: 'I consider Senator Franken a dear friend and greatly respect his accomplishments, but he has a higher obligation to his constituents and the Senate, and he should step down immediately.'The statement came after a majority of Senate Democrats, led by female members, called for Franken to quit as a fresh accusation emerged about the senator.Franken plans to make an announcement on Thursday.____1:50 p.m.A top Senate Democrat says he expects Sen. Al Franken to resign Thursday over allegations of sexual misconduct. Another woman has come forward with accusations against the Minnesota Democrat of sexual misconduct.In a tweet on Wednesday, Sen. Ron Wyden of Oregon said: 'I expect that Senator Franken will announce his resignation tomorrow.' Wyden tweeted that 'It is the right thing to do given this series of serious allegations.'More than a dozen Senate Democrats, led by female lawmakers, have called on Franken to step aside. The nearly simultaneous clamor for the two-term senator to quit comes a day after Michigan Rep. John Conyers, another Democrat, announced his resignation.Franken's office said in a brief statement that he will have an announcement on Thursday, details to come.__12:38 p.m.Facing growing demands for him to resign, Minnesota Sen. Al Franken will make an announcement on Thursday.That's the word from the Democrat's office on Wednesday.Franken's support among his fellow Democrats is collapsing as a host of female Democratic senators called upon him to quit.Sens. Kirsten Gillibrand, D-N.Y., Patty Murray, D-Wash., Claire McCaskill, D-Mo., Mazie Hirono, D-Hawaii, Kamala Harris, D-Calif., and Maggie Hassan, D-N.H., all called on Franken to step down.The calls came as another woman accused Franken of sexual misconduct in an account to Politico.Franken vehemently denied a new sexual misconduct accusation that came from a former Democratic congressional aide that he tried to forcibly kiss her after a taping of his radio show in 2006.___11:44 a.m.Female senators are calling on fellow Democratic Sen. Al Franken to resign.In Facebook posts and Tweets, the women said the two-term senator should step aside after a fresh allegation that he forcibly tried to kiss a woman in 2006.Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand wrote on Facebook that while Franken is entitled to have the Ethics Committee conclude its review, 'I believe it would be better for our country if he sent a clear message that any kind of mistreatment of women in our society isn't acceptable by stepping aside to let someone else serve.'Sens. Mazie Hirono of Hawaii, Maggie Hassan of New Hampshire, Patty Murray of Washington state and Claire McCaskill of Missouri joined Gillibrand in pressing for Franken to quit.The senator is facing other allegations that he groped women.____9:43 a.m.Sen. Al Franken is denying an accusation by a former Democratic congressional aide that he tried to forcibly kiss her after a taping of his radio show in 2006.The Minnesota Democrat says in a statement that the allegation — reported by Politico — is 'categorically not true.'The woman, who's not identified by name, says Franken pursued her after her boss had left and she was collecting her belongings.She says she ducked to avoid his lips. And she says Franken told her: 'It's my right as an entertainer.'Franken says in his statement that the idea he'd claim such behavior as a right as an entertainer is 'preposterous.'The senator is facing a Senate Ethics Committee investigation into previous claims by other women that he groped them.
  • His once-promising political career in shambles, Minnesota Sen. Al Franken appeared on the verge of resigning after fellow Democrats led by female senators abandoned him Wednesday over the mounting allegations of sexual misconduct that are roiling Capitol Hill.A majority of the Senate's Democrats called on the two-term lawmaker to get out after another woman emerged Wednesday saying he forcibly tried to kiss her in 2006. That brought to at least seven the number of women accusing him of sexual impropriety.Franken, the former comedian who made his name on 'Saturday Night Live,' scheduled an announcement for Thursday. No topic was specified, but Democratic senators said they expected their liberal colleague to resign.'Enough is enough,' said Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand of New York. 'We need to draw a line in the sand and say none of it is OK, none of it is acceptable, and we, as elected leaders, should absolutely be held to a higher standard.'Gillibrand was the first to call for Franken's resignation on Wednesday, but a torrent of Democrats quickly followed.'I'm shocked and appalled by Sen. Franken's behavior,' said Sen. Patty Murray of Washington state. 'It's clear to me that this has been a deeply harmful, persistent problem and a clear pattern over a long period of time. It's time for him to step aside.'Though the writing appeared to be on the wall, Franken's departure was not certain. A tweet posted Wednesday evening on Franken's Twitter account said: 'Senator Franken is talking with his family at this time and plans to make an announcement in D.C. tomorrow. Any reports of a final decision are inaccurate.'Late in the day, Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer of New York added his voice.'I consider Senator Franken a dear friend and greatly respect his accomplishments, but he has a higher obligation to his constituents and the Senate, and he should step down immediately,' Schumer said.Schumer called Franken immediately after the latest allegation — and before the torrent of demands for Franken's resignation from Democrats — and told him he needed to resign, said a Democrat familiar with the events. Schumer met later in his apartment with Franken and Franken's wife, Franni, and repeated that message, and he did the same in additional talks with the senator throughout the day, said the Democrat, who spoke to The Associated Press on condition of anonymity to describe private conversations.Democratic National Committee Chairman Tom Perez weighed in, too, asking Franken to resign and saying, 'Sexual misconduct, harassment and assault have no place in the Democratic Party, the United States Congress, the White House or anywhere.'The resignation demands came in rapid succession even though Franken on Wednesday vehemently denied the new accusation that came from a former Democratic congressional aide, who said he tried to forcibly kiss her after a taping of his radio show in 2006.The woman, who was not identified, told Politico that Franken pursued her after her boss had left and she was collecting her belongings. She said that she ducked to avoid his lips and that Franken told her: 'It's my right as an entertainer.'Franken, in a statement, said the idea he would claim such conduct as a right was 'preposterous.'But it was soon clear that his position had become untenable, and his office later issued a statement saying, 'Senator Franken will be making an announcement tomorrow. More details to come.'Fellow Democratic Minnesota Sen. Amy Klobuchar, who spoke to Franken, wrote on Twitter, 'I am confident he will make the right decision.'Capitol Hill has long had a culture that has erred on the side of protecting lawmakers. Franken, who is generally liked and respected by his colleagues, was initially afforded deference as he battled the initial allegations against him. But as the number of accusations grew, women in the Senate, who faced pressure from the public and the media for protecting Franken, grew increasingly frustrated.The pressure only mounted Tuesday, when Rep. John Conyers, D-Mich., resigned after numerous allegations of sexual misconduct.Sen. Tammy Duckworth, D-Ill., who spoke to Franken, said, 'He's devastated. He's ashamed and he's sorry and everything that he's been saying and it's hard, but I told him, Al, at the end of the day, this was wrong and so I'm sorry, but this is what we're going to have to do.'One irony: While Franken apparently is departing, Alabama GOP Senate candidate Roy Moore could be arriving, if he prevails in a Dec. 12 special election. Multiple women have accused the 70-year-old Moore of sexual misconduct with them when they were teens and he was a deputy district attorney in his 30s. If Moore is elected, it could create a political nightmare for Republicans, who have promised an ethics probe.Perez, the DNC chair, was quick to point out the difference, saying in a statement, 'Instead of standing up for women and confronting the problems of misconduct within their own ranks, the Republican Party has chosen to pursue power and push their radical far-right agenda at any cost.'A national conversation about sexual harassment has intensified this fall after the heavily publicized case of movie mogul Harvey Weinstein, who was accused of many acts of sexual misconduct, including rape, by actresses and other women. Just on Wednesday, Time magazine named as its person of the year the 'silence breakers' — women who have come forward on sexual harassment.Punishment has been swift for leaders in entertainment, media and sports while members of Congress have tried to survive the onslaught of allegations.Franken already faced a Senate Ethics Committee investigation into previous claims by several other women that he groped them or sought to forcibly kiss them.The allegations began in mid-November when Leeann Tweeden, now a Los Angeles radio anchor, accused him of forcibly kissing her during a 2006 USO tour in Afghanistan.Other allegations followed, including a woman who says Franken put his hand on her buttocks as they posed for a photo at the Minnesota State Fair in 2010. Two women told the Huffington Post that Franken squeezed their buttocks at political events during his first campaign for the Senate in 2008. A fourth woman, an Army veteran, alleged Franken cupped her breast during a photo on a USO tour in 2003.Franken has apologized for his behavior but has also disputed some of the allegations.Franken was first elected to the Senate in 2008, defeating Republican Norm Coleman in a bitter recount that took seven months. Franken won that race despite attacks over bawdy humor and writings dating back to his days on NBC's 'Saturday Night Live,' including a proposed skit joking about rape.Franken said then that he regretted such writings, and once in the Senate, he cultivated a serious and policy-oriented image. Throughout his eight years in office, he fashioned a reputation as a populist Democrat and fueled speculation that he might run for president in 2020.___Associated Press writers Juliet Linderman in Washington and Jay Reeves in Birmingham, Alabama, contributed to this report.

The Latest News Headlines

  • An explosion has been reported near the Port Authority in New York, police said Monday morning. >> Read more trending news  >> Click here or scroll down for more
  • Another frosty morning with temps stuck in the 30's and low 40’s.   But Action News Jax Chief Meteorologist Mike Buresh says we'll be a good 8 degrees warmer than yesterday with lots of sun and calm winds. “And then a breezy and rather mild day tomorrow. We’ll approach 70 degrees but that wind is going to make it feel cooler than it actually is, and that wind will be ahead of the next cold front”.  Expect that front to roll across the area Tuesday night, it will be dry, but will usher in another shot at chilly temperatures on Wednesday and early Thursday.  Mike is tracking a possible storm system to end the week and for your upcoming weekend.  LISTEN:  Mike Buresh Podcast
  • A Texas neighborhood is shaken by the deaths of two young children, which authorities believe came at the hand of their father. According to the Star-Telegram, police responded to a North Richland Hills home over the weekend after a mother called 911. The mother was uninjured, but two children and an adult man, later found to be their father, were found dead at the residence. >> Read more trending news “Upon arrival, officers found a 5-year-old female, 9-year-old male and adult male all deceased from apparent gunshot wounds. Initial investigation revealed the father shot the children and then shot himself,” North Richland Hills police said in a statement. The department went on to explain a search into the home’s records “revealed no prior history between [the] department and the family or address.” The names of those involved have not yet been released. “There’s no history here,” said police spokesperson Carissa Katekaru. “We’re still trying to figure out why. I grew up in North Richland Hills, and I would call this a pretty quiet neighborhood.” Neighbor Denise Albino, 57, has lived in the area for about 20 years. “Oh my God, those poor babies,” she said. “I just can’t understand why people do this kind of thing.” Albino said her son told her about the news. “I didn’t know them,” she added. “I would see the kids playing basketball all the time, but I never really got a chance to speak with them.” Another neighbor, Rosa Nichols, told KTVT: “You can drive by, and they can have a perfect house, but you don’t know what’s going on inside the house. It’s so sad.” “We lived there for several years and had some happy memories and sure hate to have sad memories made there for these families. For this family, we don’t know you, but we sure feel for you,” said Mike Bentley, who once lived in the home.
  •  21-year-old Korey Richardson is in police custody after a four-hour long standoff at Southside apartment complex.  Witnesses told police they heard what sounded like a man beating a woman inside of the units. They also said they saw the woman run away from the apartment, but the man chased after her, grabbed her and dragged her back into the apartment.  A small child was also with the man and woman.  Responding officers tried to contact the two inside but they were unable to. A SWAT callout was initiated after there was a concern it was a hostage situation, and Richardson was not letting the woman leave.  The woman was eventually released along with the child. Police reported she had minor injuries but the child was okay.  Shortly after the woman and child were released, Richardson surrendered and was taken into custody.  He’s facing a Battery and False Imprisonment charge.
  • Wildfires are raging through parts of Southern California, burning thousands of acres, destroying homes and businesses and forcing thousands of residents to evacuate. >> PHOTOS: California wildfires burn thousands of acres, force evacuations >> Click here or scroll down for more >> Read more trending news 

The Latest News Videos