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Deutsche Bank possibly looking at downtown property
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Deutsche Bank possibly looking at downtown property

Deutsche Bank possibly looking at downtown property
Photo Credit: ActionNewsJax
Southbank real estate

Deutsche Bank possibly looking at downtown property

Deutsche Bank could be looking to develop its new consolidated campus in downtown Jacksonville.

The company is interested in the 30 acres of riverfront land on the Southbank that’s currently for sale by JEA, according to Karen Mathis, the managing editor with the Daily Record.

“It’s been a long time since we’ve had an office building or an office campus built in downtown Jacksonville,” Mathis says.  “So this would be the first in years.”

When asked for a comment on the matter, Mayor Brown’s spokesman Dave DeCamp sent us this statement: “One of the major efforts of the London trip by Mayor Brown and others was a discussion with Deutsche Bank leadership to encourage growth in Jacksonville.”

Mathis says this move would bring a global corporate name downtown and would speak to the “corporate level that Jacksonville is reaching.”

She says bids to develop JEA’s site are due by May 6, so it should be evident then if Deutsche Bank is interested.

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