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Jax Beach PD response to brawl, staffing
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Jax Beach PD response to brawl, staffing

Jax Beach PD response to brawl, staffing
Photo Credit: Action News
Jacksonville Beach police were called to the beach after a fight broke out.

Jax Beach PD response to brawl, staffing

For the first time since the night of the brawl in Jacksonville Beach Monday, we are hearing from police.  In a statement delivered to WOKV, Sgt. Thomas Crumley says a crowd of several thousand people came off the beach around 7:30pm and began to cause disturbances.

He does not say anything about arrests.

Here is the entire statement:

On May 27, 2013, the City of Jacksonville Beach did have large crowds for the Memorial Day Celebration, of which 99% were well behaved. A crowd of several thousand people came off the beach around 7:30 p.m. and began to cause disturbances in the area. Several fights started and our officers were there in force to handle the situation. They broke up the fights, and dispersed the crowd, even following the crowd to their cars to ensure public safety.

The Jacksonville Beach downtown has come a long way and looks great. We are always reviewing our crowd control efforts and in the past few years have developed special police teams that concentrate in the downtown area. Infrequently, waves of upwards to a thousand people can appear at the beach in a very short period of time. Thus requiring the Police Department to bring every officer to the downtown, and also request assistance from other agencies. We try to anticipate when this may happen so we can ensure maximum public safety, as we did on Memorial Day.

We understand your concerns and are making every effort to ensure Jacksonville Beach is a great place to live and work. There have been reports of a "Town Hall" meeting on Monday June 3rd, 2013 at 6:30 p.m. This is misinformation, there is no such meeting scheduled.

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