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Latest shooting death in NW Jax under investigation
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Latest shooting death in NW Jax under investigation

Latest shooting death in NW Jax under investigation
Photo Credit: Action News
Police responded to a call of shots fired around 2:30 a.m. on Detaille Drive, a couple blocks south of Moncrief Road and just west of Cleveland Road.

Latest shooting death in NW Jax under investigation

The Jacksonville Sheriff's Office found a body lying at the end of the driveway early Thursday morning.

Police responded to a call of shots fired around 2:30 a.m. on Detaille Drive, a couple blocks south of Moncrief Road and  just west of Cleveland Road. 

The unidentified man was shot and killed, JSO said. 

Police do not have a vehicle or suspect description in this ongoing investigation.

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  • Not only did Donald Smith have abnormally small and large portions of his brain, but he suffered brain trauma, according to an expert witness for the defense, who’s arguing that some of those abnormalities affect Smith’s behavior. He’s one of several expert witnesses the defense has called so far, to try to make their case that Smith cannot control his impulses, and acts without regard for the consequences despite knowing right from wrong.  FULL COVERAGE: The trial of Donald Smith Geoff Colino testified as an expert in forensic neurology for the penalty phase of this trial, where Smith could be sentenced to death for the 2013 murder of 8-year-old Cherish Perrywinkle. Colino told the jury Smith told him that in the weeks leading up to Cherish’s kidnapping, rape, and murder, he was feeling like he was “skating on thin ice” and knew we “was going to fall through”. Smith reported not sleeping, smoking crack virtually non-stop, taking other pills, hallucinating, and experiencing other effects.  Colino ordered several brain scans in order to get a more complete picture, and they were shown to the jury. Colino highlighted areas where Smith’s brain is larger than normal, all formed during development ahead of puberty.  “I can’t tell you what caused it, but I can’t see how there would be a choice in these things happening to him,” he said, in response to a defense question about the theme to the State’s case- that Smith was making choices.  Among the areas affected is the thalamus, which Colino says deals with a wide range of important tasks like regulating aggression, making decisions, maintaining a sleep cycle, and other areas. He says Smith’s poor decision making was in clear, as evidenced by his using crack cocaine and other drugs within a couple of weeks of having a heart attack.  Other areas of Smith’s brain were abnormally small, according to Colino. Among the areas affected are those dealing with memory, inhibition, and learning from undesirable experiences. Defense Attorney Charles Fletcher asked if that could explain how Smith could face criminal punishments for sex crimes, but continue to offend.  “If he does not learn from that, this explains why,” he said.  Colino also noted areas where he believes there was trauma to the brain, although he could not say what caused the trauma or when it happened. Based on Smith’s history and the symptoms, Colino believes it’s “clinically probable” Smith is suffering from CTE- which has gained attention in recent years through concussion awareness, especially among football athletes. To understand the impact of CTE, Colino told jurors to think of Smith’s ability to not act on an impulse, as a bicycle break.  “The cable is so frayed and stretched as to be nearly non-existent, non-functional. He can’t control his behaviors,” Colino said.  During cross examination, State Attorney Melissa Nelson pointed out that the same decision making area in question also governs the decision to deceive- with the state arguing Smith clearly planned and carried out a ruse as part of this crime. She then questioned Colino further about the cause of the brain trauma specifically, pointing to an area in his deposition where he said that could have been caused by a cardiac event. It led to a heated line of questioning, with Colino now saying that’s not the case, and that if he misspoke in the deposition, it’s because he only had two days to prepare and he was “sick as a dog” with the flu.  “You are making a very big deal about my saying yes,” Colino said.  “No sir, I’m making a big deal about the fact that you’re an expert witness offering an opinion to this jury,” Nelson said.  “I’m saying that, as a human being, I may have said yes, either not fully processing the question or because I had the flu, yes,” Colino said.  As highlighted by Fletcher, Nelson did not question the brain scans themselves. Multiple witnesses testified that the EEGs and information they had studied connected to Smith- dating back to the 1970s- do not show any evidence of brain trauma.  Looking beyond the physiology, a psychologist and pharmacologist also testified to try to round out the defense’s picture.   Forensic Psychologist Dr. Heather Holmes, who testified with an expertise in sex offender evaluation and treatment within the incarceration setting, diagnosed Smith with several personality disorders, including major depressive disorder, severe cocaine use disorder, pedophilic disorder, antisocial personality, and borderline personality features.  With the pedophilia, Holmes says there’s still no clear idea what causes it in any given offender.  “I can’t pin the tail on the donkey. I wish to God I could, but we just don’t know,” she said.  She says Smith had an “inappropriate” relationship with his mother, who was “enmeshed” with him and overprotective, including paying his drug debts and funding prison protection. Despite that, Holmes says Smith had a “privileged” upbringing, and there was no clear incident she could see as being any trigger or explanation.  But because Smith had not been receiving regular treatment, Holmes says it’s safe to assume his pedophilia was getting worse as he reinforced it over time with action. The same is true of Smith’s drug use, with him having a tendency toward smoking crack cocaine.  “Due to the combined effects of chronic substance abuse and use disorder that was from childhood through current, multiple major psychiatric disorders, chronic cocaine binge use or crack cocaine binge use, including the recent addition of the psychiatric medication- that Mr. Smith would have been impaired to the degree that his normal judgement, skills, and ability were profoundly diminished,” says Dr. Daniel Buffington, a clinical pharmacologist who testified as an expert in pharmacology.  Buffington says records showed him that, over time, there was an increase in the intensity of medication needed to manage Smith. At the time of Cherish’s murder, Smith reported not only using crack cocaine, but also a drug under the generic name Quetiapine or brand name Seroquel- which he got illicitly through his drug dealer’s sister. He says that combination could have created a “dangerous storm”.  Severe cocaine use alone, according to Buffington, could lead to paranoia, delirium, psychoses, and homicidal and suicidal thoughts, among other things. He says it also means the drug user will have problems with hygiene, communication, planning, judgement, and similar areas.  On cross examination, Assistant State Attorney Mark Caliel confirmed that Buffington’s opinions on Smith’s state were based essentially only on what Smith reported to him, because there was minimal documentation of his drug activity, since most was not legal. Buffington said Smith appeared to be honest and forthcoming through their conversation, and he’s trained to look for exaggerations or withholdings in his conversations, although Caliel says other witnesses have classified Smith as deceptive and manipulative.  Smith’s drug use started young, with Holmes testifying that his step-father was a psychiatrist, who gave Smith prescriptions during his pre-teen years. From there, testimony has said Smith used marijuana, alcohol, LSD, and cocaine.  Holmes says Smith’s personality disorders don’t prevent him from being able to control his impulses, but drug use lowers inhibition.  Holmes says Smith admitted to her what he did, but that he showed no acceptance of responsibility at any time before then, sometimes blaming his lawyers and sometimes blaming his victims.  “He told you he blamed Cherish Perrywinkle for having had to kill her, didn’t he?” asked Nelson.  “Yes,” Holmes responded.  “He told you that he looked back, she got in the van, and he thought, quote-‘F***, I’m a convicted sex offender, how am I going to explain this’,” Nelson followed.  “Yes,” Holmes said.  She further confirmed Smith showed no signs of remorse while speaking about what he did.  While the defense has presented that, in the days ahead of Cherish’s murder, Smith tried to get himself committed under the Baker Act- saying that shows he couldn’t control himself and wanted to get help- the state says there are several other incidents in his past where Smith rejected treatment. That includes failing to abide by a treatment program that he agreed to when he was released from civil commitment.  All of this medical and psychological information about Smith was released in open court with his consent, as part of the defense strategy.  WOKV and Action News Jax continue to follow every development in this penalty phase. Stay with us for continuing coverage.
  • The Rev. Billy Graham was anxious about his 1954 appearance at the London School of Economics. The school was left-leaning and openly dismissive of religion, and Graham was insecure — he had no advanced theology degree. After he was introduced, something happened that could have derailed the already nervous evangelist. A student leapt into the room through a window and started scratching himself like an ape, clearly mocking the fundamentalist rejection of evolution. The preacher didn't miss a beat. He laughed and joked, 'He reminds me of my ancestors,' then paused and added, 'Of course, all my ancestors came from Britain.' The crowd roared, then listened respectfully to his speech. Graham, who died Wednesday at age 99, would be the first to say that his message was not complex or unique. 'The Bible says,' was his catch phrase. But he won over audiences worldwide with his friendliness, openness, humility and unyielding religious conviction. A tall, striking man with thick hair, stark blue eyes and a firm jaw, Graham was a commanding presence at his crusades. He would make the altar call in his powerful baritone, asking the multitudes to stand, come down the aisles and publicly make 'decisions for Christ,' as a choir crooned the hymn 'Just As I Am.' By his final crusade in 2005 in New York City, he had preached in person to more than 210 million people worldwide. Graham wasn't always so skilled. After World War II, as an evangelist in the U.S. and Europe with Youth for Christ, he was dubbed 'the Preaching Windmill' for his arm-swinging and rapid-fire speech. His first meeting with a U.S. president, Harry Truman, was a disaster. Wearing a pastel suit and loud tie that Graham would later say made him look like a vaudeville performer, the preacher, unfamiliar with protocol, told reporters what he had discussed with Truman, then posed for photos. But these were early stumbles on his path to renown. A 1949 Los Angeles revival in a tent dubbed the 'Canvas Cathedral' turned Graham into evangelism's rising star. Legendary publisher William Randolph Hearst had ordered his papers to hype Graham, though the evangelist said he never learned why. Expectation-defying crusades soon followed in London and New York that made the preacher a global voice for Christianity. No evangelist is expected to have his level of influence again. Graham became a confidant to U.S. presidents from both major political parties. His first White House visit with Democrat Lyndon Johnson, scheduled to last only minutes, stretched instead to several hours. He stayed at the White House with Republican George H.W. Bush on the eve of the first Persian Gulf War. Graham's relationships with presidents were a source of pride for conservative Christians who were so often caricatured as backward. They were also a boon for Graham's ministry. But those ties proved problematic when his close friend Richard Nixon resigned in the Watergate scandal, leaving Graham devastated, embarrassed and baffled. Tapes newly released in 2002 caught the preacher telling Nixon that Jews 'don't know how I really feel about what they're doing to this country.' Graham apologized, saying he didn't recall ever having such feelings. He asked the Jewish community to consider his actions above his words on that recording. Graham's path to becoming 'America's pastor' began taking shape at age 16, when the Presbyterian-reared farm boy committed himself to Christ at a tent revival around Charlotte, North Carolina. 'I did not feel any special emotion,' he wrote in his 1997 autobiography, 'Just As I Am.' ''I simply felt at peace.' After high school, he enrolled at the fundamentalist Bob Jones College, but found the school stifling, and transferred to Florida Bible Institute in Tampa. There, he practiced sermonizing in a swamp, preaching to birds and alligators before tryouts with small churches. He still wasn't convinced he should be a preacher until a soul-searching, late-night ramble on a golf course. 'I finally gave in while pacing at midnight on the 18th hole,' he said. ''All right, Lord,' I said, 'If you want me, you've got me.'' He went on to earn a bachelor's degree from Wheaton College, a prominent Christian liberal arts school in Illinois. There, he met fellow student Ruth Bell, who he would marry in 1943. Graham was ordained as a Southern Baptist and came from a fundamentalist background that expected true Bible-believers to stay clear of Christians with even the most minor differences over Scripture. But as his crusades drew support from a widening array of Christian churches, he came to reject that view. He joined in a then-emerging movement called New Evangelicalism that abandoned the narrowness of fundamentalism to engage broader society. Fundamentalists excoriated the preacher for his new direction, but Graham stood fast. More than anyone else, Graham built evangelicalism into a force that rivaled liberal Protestantism and Roman Catholicism in the United States and beyond. 'The ecumenical movement has broadened my viewpoint and I recognize now that God has his people in all churches,' Graham said in the early 1950s. In 1957, he said, 'I intend to go anywhere, sponsored by anybody, to preach the Gospel of Christ.' At the height of his career, he would be on the road for months at a time. The strain of so much preaching caused the already trim Graham to lose as much as 30 pounds by the time one of his crusades ended. Ruth mostly stayed behind at their mountainside home in Montreat, North Carolina, to raise their five children: Franklin, Virginia ('Gigi'), Anne, Ruth and Nelson ('Ned'). Ruth sometimes grew so lonely when Billy was traveling that she slept with his tweed jacket for comfort. But she said, 'I'd rather have a little of Bill than a lot of any other man.' Beyond Graham's public appearances, he reached untold millions through his pioneering use of prime-time telecasts, network radio including 'The Hour of Decision,' daily newspaper columns, evangelistic feature films and satellite TV hookups. One of Graham's breakthrough films was 'The Restless Ones,' made in the 1960s, about morally adrift teens in Southern California who found the strength to withstand temptation after attending a Billy Graham crusade. The preacher received so many requests for personal advice that in the 1950s he created a syndicated newspaper column, 'My Answer,' which at its height reached tens of millions of readers. As Graham's public influence grew, the preacher's stands on the social issues of his day were closely watched and dissected. He early on took up the cause of anti-Communism, making preaching against the atheist regime part of his sermons for years. He was much less robust in his support for civil rights, a position he later said he regretted. Graham was no social activist and never joined marches, which led prominent Christians such as theologian Reinhold Niebuhr to publicly condemn Graham as too moderate. Still, Graham ended racially segregated seating at his Southern crusades in 1953, a year before the Supreme Court's school integration ruling, and long refused to visit South Africa while its white regime insisted on separating the races at meetings. In a 2005 interview with The Associated Press, before his final crusade in New York, Graham said he lamented that he didn't battle for civil rights more forcefully. 'I think I made a mistake when I didn't go to Selma' with many clergy who joined the historic Alabama march led by the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. 'I would like to have done more.' Graham's integrity lifted him through the dark days of the late 1980s, after scandals befell TV preachers Jimmy Swaggart and Jim Bakker. Graham had resolved early on never to be alone with a woman other than his wife. Instead of taking a share of the 'love offerings' at his crusades, as was the custom, he earned a modest salary from the Billy Graham Evangelistic Association, which was governed by an independent board, instead of by friends and relatives. 'Why, I could make a quarter of a million dollars a year in this field or in Hollywood if I wanted to,' Graham once said. 'The offers I've had from Hollywood studios are amazing. But I just laughed. I told them I was staying with God.' Later in his career, Graham visited communist Eastern Europe. Increasingly, he appealed for world peace. The preacher opened a 1983 convention of evangelists from 140 nations by urging the elimination of nuclear and biological weapons. He told audiences in Czechoslovakia that 'we must do all we can to preserve life and avoid war,' although he opposed unilateral disarmament. Health problems gradually slowed Graham, but he did not cease preaching, and for years deflected questions about a successor. Finally, in 1995 his Evangelistic Association designated his son, William Franklin Graham III, then 43, as the ministry's leader — a position the younger Graham still holds. Ruth died in June 2007 at age 87. Graham will be buried by her at the Billy Graham Museum and Library. 'I have been asked, 'What is the secret?'' Graham had said of his preaching. 'Is it showmanship, organization or what? 'The secret of my work is God. I would be nothing without him.' ___ Online: Billy Graham Evangelistic Association: http://www.billygraham.org Billy Graham Center archives: http://www.wheaton.edu/bgc/archives/archhp1.html ___ Retired Associated Press Religion Writer Richard N. Ostling contributed to this report.
  • As several hundred high school students rallied at the U.S. Capitol on Wednesday, asking lawmakers to press for gun controls, there were more calls in the halls of Congress for action on gun violence, with both parties waiting to see what the President might do on guns, as the White House did not immediately reject some of the ideas, like age limits for people buying high-powered weapons like an AR-15. “I think that’s certainly something that’s on the table for us to discuss and that we expect to come up in the next couple of weeks,” White House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders told reporters on Tuesday, when asked about the age limit idea. That plan is already drawing bipartisan support, as Sen. Jeff Flake (R-AZ) announced that he is working with Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-CA) on a measure to raise the minimum purchase age to 21, from 18. A kid too young buy a handgun should be too young to buy an #AR15. Working with @SenFeinstein on a bipartisan bill that will raise the minimum purchase age for non-military buyers from 18 to 21 – the same age you currently have to be to purchase a handgun. — Jeff Flake (@JeffFlake) February 21, 2018 Feinstein has also advocated a return of something that was put into law on a temporary basis in 1994, a ban on certain semi-automatic weapons. “When the assault weapons ban was in place, the number of gun massacres fell by 37% and the number of people dying from gun massacres fell by 43%,” Feinstein argues. But while that might sell with a number of Democrats in Congress today, you don’t have to go back too far – only to the aftermath of the school shooting in Newtown, Connecticut in December 2012 – to see that a number of Democrats voted against such a plan back then. Some Democrats argue that 2018 – and the Parkland, Florida school shooting – will be different, as a growing number of students have demanded action on gun control. While students from Florida were rallying at their state capitol in Tallahassee, several hundred students from the Washington, D.C. area marched to the Capitol to voice their demands. “Keep guns out of schools,” read one sign. “Ban Assault Weapons,” was another, as the students urged action in the Congress. “I came out of my office to say, I am with you 100 percent,” said Rep. Jamie Raskin (D-MD), one of many more liberal Democrats who would like to see action on gun control. But despite the enthusiasm, the path forward for almost any gun measure is cloudy at best in the Congress, as GOP leaders have given no hint that they will suddenly bring gun bills backed by Democrats to a vote in the House and Senate. The one wild card may be President Trump, who has held more liberal views on guns in the past, including support for an assault weapons ban. On Tuesday night, the President tweeted his support for stricter background checks on gun buyers – but that type of statement can mean many different things. Was the President saying he would back plans from Democrats to require private gun sales to have a background check – what’s been referred to for many years as the ‘gun show loophole?’ Or is this tweet from the President something less sweeping – simply about insuring that more information gets into the instant check database system? Like lawmakers, reporters weren’t getting much in the way of detailed answers on some of the more controversial items of gun control legislation – for example, does Mr. Trump still favor an assault weapons ban? “I don’t have any specific announcements, but we haven’t closed the door on any front,” Mr. Trump’s Press Secretary said in response. It was a reminder that the President could roil the gun debate in Congress, depending on how he deals with some of these post-Parkland issues.
  • Paul Manafort, President Donald Trump's former campaign manager, and Rick Gates, who served as a campaign aide, are facing new charges in special counsel Robert Mueller's criminal case against the pair, Politico reported Wednesday. READ MORE: Mueller investigation: Lawyer pleads guilty to lying to investigators in Russia probe | Who is Rick Gates and why was he indicted by Robert Mueller? | Who is Paul Manafort, the man indicted in Robert Mueller’s Russian investigation? | What are Paul Manafort and Rick Gates charged with? | MORE
  • The U.S. Women's National Soccer Team is coming to Jacksonville for a match with Mexico at EverBank Field on Thursday, April 5th, at 7 PM.  Tickets go on sale to the public Friday, February 23, at 10 AM online here and by phone at 1-800-745-3000.  The match, the first of two April friendlies between the teams, marks the third visit to Jacksonville for the U.S. Women's National Team. The first time they played here was back when the stadium was named Jacksonville Municipal Stadium, resulting in a 2-1 loss to Norway in 1996. The last time the U.S. Men’s team was here, over 19,000 were in attendance to see them win a U.S. World Cup qualifier match at EverBank Field.

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