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    UPDATE: JSO says Amy Beverly has been found safe. They are still trying to locate and speak with Joaquin Gonzalez as part of the ongoing investigation. ===== The Jacksonville Sheriff’s Office is investigating the possible abduction of a woman from Attleboro Street, near Lake Shore and Normandy. JSO says officers responded to the area early this morning in reference to a dispute between 30-year-old Amy Dugger Beverly and her ex-boyfriend 30-year-old Joaquin Javier Gonzalez. JSO says Gonzalez came to Beverly’s home and confronted her and her new boyfriend. The two men fought inside the home and then went outside, where Gonzalez vandalized the boyfriend’s motorcycle and Beverly’s home with a bat, according to police. Beverly then came outside and started arguing with Gonzalez. Witnesses report Gonzalez then led Beverly to his vehicle and the two drove away, but there are conflicting reports on whether Beverly was dragged or went to the vehicle on her own volition. Attempted to contact the two have not been successful, and Beverly has not returned home. Beverly is described as a white felame, 5’3”, 130 lbs. Gonzalez is a white male, 5’6”, 150 lbs who was last seen wearing a white shirt and jeans. The two are believed to be in a 2004 white Dodge Ram pickup with Florida tag GWUR16. If you have any information on the location of Beverly or Gonzalez, you’re asked to contact JSO at 904-630-0500 or JSOCrimeTips@jaxsheriff.org.
  • The St. Johns County Sheriff’s Office is searching for a suspect, after a shooting in West Augustine. Deputies have responded to 15th Street, where they found a man who had been shot. The injuries don’t appear to be life threatening. SJSO says- from their very early investigation so far- they believe two men were in an argument, which escalated to one shooting the other. They believe they know who the shooter is, although he remains on the loose at this time. SJSO believes this is an isolated incident. This is a developing story that will be updated in to the evening.
  • While the Jacksonville Jaguars compete this weekend to potentially clinch a spot in the playoffs for the first time in years, the post-game meal habits of the Head Coach has grabbed a lot of the attention instead. But it’s all for a good cause. Coach Doug Marrone recently said his go-to post-game meal is a bologna and cheese sandwich. The Beef Checkoff and National Hot Dog and Sausage Council responded earlier this week by sending 100 logs of beef bologna to the team, hoping it would fuel the team in their run for the playoffs. In all, the deli meat haul came to about 350 pounds. During a Wednesday press conference at EverBank Field, Marrone confirmed he would be donating the bologna to those in need in the Jacksonville area. The donation went to Feeding Northeast Florida’s warehouse Wednesday and was picked up Thursday by the Daily Manna Serving Center Food Pantry, one of Feeding Northeast Florida’s partner hunger-relief organizations. Daily Manna distributed the bologna donation along with other food today during their weekly food distribution event. Feeding Northeast Florida says Daily Manna is their largest food distributor, serving the North Riverside community, which they say has some of the highest poverty rates in the city. The Jaguars themselves are putting Marrone’s taste to good use. “Marroney Bologna” sandwhiches will be sold at several locations in the stadium on Sunday’s game, while supplies last. A portion of the sales will benefit the Jaguars Foundation. The Jaguars play the Seattle Seahawks at 4:25PM Sunday at EverBank Field. You can watch the game on our partner Fox 30 Action News Jax.
  • As you finalize those holiday travel plans, the TSA wants to remind you that you must check any firearm you plan to fly with. The TSA says 86 firearms were found in carry-on bags at airports across the country between November 27th and December 3rd. Two loaded guns were caught at JIA, one on November 27th and one on November 30th. The TSA says travelers who bring guns to security checkpoints could face arrest and a fine of up to $11,000. In addition to the guns, the TSA found a live signal flare in Anchorage, sword canes in Chicago and Baltimore, and replica firearms and knives at Raleigh Durham and Cleveland. Even replicas are not allowed in carry-ons, and must be checked instead. You can get more information on how to safely travel with your firearm on the TSA’s website.
  • An Orange Park apartment complex has reopened and residents are being allowed to return, with a SWAT situation now over.  CCSO says a Civil Deputy was serving paperwork at an apartment in The Parkland at Orange Park Apartments at 1863 Wells Road when that deputy heard a shot being fired inside.  CCSO initially said they heard movement inside of the unit, but nobody exited or communicated from inside. SWAT has since made entry in to the apartment and found a person dead inside.  The investigation is still ongoing, but CCSO says the scene is secure and people can return to their apartments safely. CCSO says there is no confirmation at this time the nature of the paperwork that was being served. The person involved has not been identified.
  • He was just 21-years-old when the USS West Virginia was hit with eight torpedoes, ultimately sinking. Now, at 98-years-old, Robert Beaudreau says he’s proud to be a Pearl Harbor survivor. “I was very lucky to survive the attack, I’m very thankful,” he says. Beaudreau lives in Jacksonville and has attended Pearl Harbor commemorations at Naval Station Mayport in the past, but he says Thursday’s event on the USS Milwaukee was the best he’s been involved with yet. For those who hosted, they were honored just to be able to honor those who sacrificed so much. “Give a little bit of tribute to the guys that went through so much during the attack, and just to give them a little bit of credit for younger guys like us, and the future of the military. It was a great honor and I couldn’t be happier to be a part of it,” says Atlantic Beach Fleet Reserve Association Pearl Harbor Day ceremony Chairman Chad Burg. FRA has been doing this type of ceremony since 1966, according to Burg. He says it’s important for current sailors and the public at large to get a sense of the heritage and importance of the event in American history. In part of the ceremony, Beaudreau and others were invited to throw a bouquet over the side of the ship as a tribute to those lost during the Pearl Harbor attack. He says it was an emotional moment. “I was thinking of all my friends that had passed on,” he says. The attack happened just months in to Beaudreau’s 20-year Navy career. He then worked with the Post Office and as an umpire, ultimately settling in Jacksonville.  He says he plans to be involved in the commemorations for as long as he can. The USS Milwaukee, one of Mayport’s new Littoral Combat Ships, volunteered to host the ceremony. Commanding Officer Commander Ken Lieberman says they were honored to step forward, and did so because they believe it’s important for the ship’s sailors to understand and remember what happened.
  • Naval Station Mayport is on the rise, 75 years after it was first established in Jacksonville.  “Now, we’re on the positive glideslope again. In the next two to three years, Mayport is going to grow and have a very, very big presence of brand new Navy warships, more sailors, more families, and be back to what I consider the good old days,” says US 4th Fleet Commander Rear Admiral Sean Buck.  WOKV was on the USS Milwaukee Thursday to mark the base’s anniversary. This ship is one of two new Littoral Combat Ships that have already come to Mayport, with a third expected next month and more after that.  “We’re seeing a lot more technologically advanced warships,” says USS Milwaukee Commanding Officer Commander Ken Lieberman, who also served at Mayport in 2005-06. INTERVIEW: Mayport’s command Master Chief talks about modern-day sailors Mayport Command Master Chief Bill Houlihan says the community has been a big part of making the base what it is.  “I have been to many different naval stations, and every one you go to, every city claims to be a Navy town- San Diego, Norfolk, all over the country. But nothing compares to Jacksonville,” he says.  Lieberman says the size of the base makes it ideal for fostering that feeling. “It’s a tight knit community that supports its sailors, and you’re not going to see a bigger family that is dedicated to ensuring the Navy is well-prepared to conduct its mission sets,” Lieberman says. Houilhan says there is a real affection from the community toward the Navy that they all feel, and it’s especially important for the young sailors.  “About 90% of our force right now joined our Navy after 9/11, and that says a lot, because they knew what they were getting in to,” he says.  And- from the other side of the coin- the Navy is a valuable asset. The Navy is a substantial employer in Jacksonville that also provides for related industry, like shipyard work. Jacksonville Mayor Lenny Curry says sailors themselves are an asset, as companies look to hire veterans. He tells WOKV he is speaking with a company looking to open a high-tech manufacturing plant, and one of the most appealing points is the available workforce, which includes veterans. Bob Reeder has been at Mayport for around 45 years, serving most of those as the Port Master. He says the base has grown, the types of ships have changed, the demands on modern day Sailors have increased- but it’s an atmosphere that he still loves to be a part of. “People say ‘when are you going to quit, give it up’. As my wife so sweetly says, ‘he’ll quit, retire when they take him out on a stretcher’,” Reeders says. WOKV is honoring Mayport’s history through Thursday. Tune in for frequent updates on 104.5 FM/AM 690.
  • When every second counts, they want to provide the care that’s needed. The Florida Department of Health has granted Wolfson Children’s Hospital provisional status as a pediatric trauma referral center, meaning they can take in trauma alert patients directly from Jacksonville Fire and Rescue. “These are the sickest of the sick children,  in our case, and they need immediate treatment,” says Wolfson Children’s Hospital President Dr. Michael Aubin. Until now, pediatric trauma alert patients would have to go first to UF Health Jacksonville, which is a Level 1 Trauma Center. Aubin says many patients are eventually transferred to Wolfson, where they have 240 pediatric specialists on staff, but they had to go through a recognized trauma center first. Over the last several years, Wolfson Children’s has been working on enhancements to earn this designation. Aubin says they’ve made their trauma bays larger and added technology, they’ve built another operating room designated specifically for urgent care, and they’ve increased physician, anesthesiologist, and nursing staff coverage for traumas to 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. “We want to be able to provide the absolute best possible care to the children of North Florida and South Georgia,” he says. Aubin says the state is notifying JFRD and ambulance companies, and they expect to start directly taking in trauma patients Thursday. The designation is provisional right now, but Aubin says they’re working to get permanent recognition. He says the state is reviewing their processes and policies on paper for the next few months, and will then do an on-site survey of their compliance with and operation of the program. He says the final decision will come by July 1, 2018. Wolfson Children’s Hospital says the pediatric trauma referral center designation also means that they provide injury prevention efforts, rehabilitation services, and field triage, among other things. They now have a surgeon, pediatric neurosurgeon, anesthesiologist, and credentialed ICU or ER physician on call or promptly available at all hours. A range of specialists will also be promptly available, and they’ll have staffing in key departments, no matter the time or day.
  • The three people involved in a fraud scheme that involved a sham education charity sat within feet of each other in front of a federal judge, but didn’t exchange any words or even looks as the federal judge sentenced each to time in prison. Former Northeast Florida Democratic Congresswoman Corrine Brown will serve five years, after  being convicted on 18 charges connected to the fraud, which involved soliciting hundreds of thousands of dollars to a sham charity organization and using the money for personal expenses and lavish events instead.  Her two co-defendants both pleaded guilty and testified against Brown. Her former Chief of Staff Ronnie Simmons has been sentenced to four years, and the President of “One Door For Education”- the organization they funneled money through- Carla Wiley, will serve one year and nine months. All three had been hoping to avoid any time in prison outright. The judge is allowing the co-defendants to voluntarily surrender for their prison term at a date to be determined by the Bureau of Prisons, but no earlier than January 8th. Until then, the travel of Simmons and Wiley is restricted to Virginia, Maryland, and Washington DC, and Brown is restricted to the Middle District of Florida, unless they get approval from pre-trial officers. They will also surrender their passports and will report to pre-trial services. The government did not object to any of these terms. All three additionall will face supervised release after their prison terms, as well as forfeiture and restitution totaling hundreds of thousands of dollars- which the Judge ordered be paid in $250 per month installments upon release from prison. FULL COVERAGE:  The federal fraud case of former Congresswoman Corrine Brown WOKV has been following this case since early last year, when Wiley pleaded guilty to conspiracy to commit wire fraud and agreed to cooperated with the government as they continued to build their case. In July, Brown and Simmons were indicted- Brown on 22 charges and Simmons on 19.  Earlier this year, Simmons pleaded guilty to conspiracy to commit mail and wire fraud and theft of government funds, and also agreed to cooperate with the prosecution. Brown then faced trial in May, and was convicted on 18 charges, including conspiracy to commit mail and wire fraud, aiding and abetting mail fraud, aiding and abetting wire fraud, scheme to conceal material facts, corrupt endeavor to obstruct and impede the due administration of internal revenue law, and filing false tax returns. Wiley founded One Door with good intentions, but it was essentially dormant until Simmons- her boyfriend at the time- took control. Judge Timothy Corrigan says one of the victims in this case is One Door itself, because financial records show more than $800,000 moved through the organization, but it didn’t go to the charitable purpose donors expected. “Just think of the good that could have been done with that money,” says Corrigan, adding that the defendants “systematically looted” the funds. Wiley’s theft came through online transfers from One Door’s bank account, which were conducted separately from the scheme involving Brown and Simmons. Corrigan says there  were no indications Wiley would have stopped had she not been caught, and she was also aware of the theft by Brown and Simmons and did nothing to stop it. “A sentence of probation would not be sufficient to account for such audacious and long-term misconduct,” he says. Simmons would withdraw money from One Door’s account and deposit it in to Brown’s account or give her cash, according to the case that was presented. He would also sometimes give Brown blank, signed One Door checks, and took One Door money for his own use as well. Simmons and others testified that the transactions involving One Door’s account were performed at Brown’s direction, and prosecutors say Brown abused the public’s trust and duped donors. Corrigan, with his sentencing, agreed. “One Door For Education was operated as a criminal enterprise by Carla Wiley, Ronnie Simmons, and Corrine Brown,” Corrigan says. Simmons additionally admitted to getting his sister a salary from the House of Representatives, even though she did little to no actual work. Simmons further took some of the money that his sister was receiving through the ghost job. All these factors considered, the judge actually recommended Simmons for a sentence above what his advisory guidelines called for. Brown was separately found guilty of lying on her financial disclosure forms and tax returns by underreporting income she received from One Door and overreporting her donations to charity, including claiming donations to One Door. “Having routinely converted One Door money for her own personal use, Ms. Brown turned around and falsely state on her tax returns that she had actually donated money to One Door for which she claimed a substantial charitable deduction. Brazen barely describes it,” Corrigan says. Brown continues to maintain her innocence, saying she was duped by Simmons and mismanaged her office and personal finances but never intended to engage in criminal acts. During her sentencing hearing a few weeks ago, she asked for “mercy and compassion” from the Judge. Her defense asked the Judge to consider her history of public service, age, lack of criminal history, and other factors in his sentencing. But Corrigan found Brown and Simmons abused their positions and traded on Brown’s position and the trust people had in her, for their own financial benefit. “The public had a right to expect that Ms. Brown, as an elected member of Congress, and Mr. Simmons, her longtime Chief of Staff, would not abuse their positions of public trust and responsibility,” Corrigan says. Simmons and Wiley both accepted responsibility in front of the Judge and apologized for their actions. The government recommended leniency as a result of their substantial cooperation and other factors. While the judge noted that as significant, he did not think justice would be achieved with any of the defendants avoiding prison outright. He did also find it notable that Brown continued to not accept responsibility. “While Ms. Brown is of course free to maintain her innocence, because she stands before the Court at sentencing unrepentant, she cannot be accorded the same sentencing considerations as someone who accepts responsibility for her wrongful action, expresses remorse, and promises to make amends,” he says. Brown’s attorney says they plan to not only appeal, but ask that she remain out on bond pending that appeal. Simmons and Wiley both have the right to appeal their sentences, but neither have indicated if they will do that. Despite these ongoing legal problems, Brown has continued to draw in supporters. Corrigan says he has received “hundreds” of letters in support of Brown, and that he read every one in his consideration of her sentence.  When the courtroom doors opened Monday for the sentencing pronouncement, there were dozens of people waiting to get in, and the courtroom itself filled up within minutes. An overflow courtroom was also open, as it has been through the trial and many of the proceedings. The US Attorney’s Office declined to comment about today’s sentencing pronouncement. The FBI Jacksonville has issued a statement  Special Agent in Charge Charles P. Spencer. 'It is incredibly disappointing that an elected official, who took an oath year after year to serve others, would exploit the needs of children and abuse the charitable hearts of constituents to advance her own personal and political agendas, and deliver them with virtually nothing. I am proud of the exceptional work of the special agents, analysts and support personnel who spent countless hours following the money trail in this case. Their work is some of the most complex, tedious, and significant work we do for the American public. It is an exceptionally difficult task, but rooting out public corruption is a priority for which the FBI will continue to dedicate the resources necessary to investigate, because the impact on everyday people is real. We thank our law enforcement partners at the IRS-CI and U.S. Attorney’s Office for their efforts to hold Brown and her associates accountable for their inexcusable actions.” This is a developing story that will be updated through the day. Get frequent updates on 104.5FM/AM 690 and on Twitter.
  • The Jacksonville Jaguars are showcasing more than just football skills on the gridiron Sunday.  More than 40 players are participating in the NFL’s “My Cause, My Cleats” campaign, wearing customized cleats to call attention to various causes.  The team says players worked with national and local artists to put together the designs. Many of the cleats will be donated to NFL Auction to raise money for the organizations that are being showcased.  The Jaguars play the Colts at Everbank Field at 1PM Sunday. You can watch the game on our partner CBS 47 Action News Jax. GALLERY: Jaguars “My Cause, My Cleats” designs Many of the Jaguars participating in this campaign explain their connection to their causes, through comments provided by the team.  Eli Ankou, Veteran’s Appreciation: “I want to show appreciation for the vets that sacrificed such a huge part of their lives to serve. I want to stay behind our veterans and to support them any way I can.”  Arrelious Benn, EVERFI: “During my career as an NFL player, I’ve seen all the hard work players put in. However, there is a significant amount of players that suffer from not having enough money when they are done.”  Tommy Bohanon, Jacksonville Humane Society: “Too many animals are euthanized every day from overpopulation, so this is something that needs attention.”  Blake Bortles, Blake Bortles Foundation: “I have an extreme passion to help first responders and the mentally disabled. I have been around both my entire life and always said if I had the chance, those are the two areas I would help.”  A.J. Bouye, American Cancer Society: “I chose the American Cancer Society because I lost my mom to cancer. This cause empowers me to bring awareness and support to those that have been impacted by cancer.”  Blair Brown, American Diabetes Association and American Cancer Society: “My girlfriend has been a type 1 diabetic since age nine, and my grandmother passed away from breast cancer.”  Calais Campbell, The CRC Foundation: “My foundation is named after my late father, Charles Richard Campbell. I try to honor his legacy daily by giving back to those who don’t have the resources to excel in education and financial literacy.”  Barry Church, Fuel Up to Play 60: “Being an athlete, physical fitness is of the utmost importance. With all the technological advances we have in 2017, there are fewer kids just going outside to play, I have joined the NFL and the Fuel Up to Play 60 initiative to encourage everyone to go outside and exercise because it is great for your health and mental well-being.”  Keelan Cole, Boys & Girls Club of Northeast Florida: “I grew up going to Boys and Girls Clubs as a child. I would like to bring awareness to the great kids who attend Boys & Girls Clubs over the years and to let them know how important they all are to helping the younger generation.”  Aaron Colvin, Alzheimer’s Awareness: “My grandmother has Alzheimer’s and it has affected my family a lot. I want to use my platform to raise awareness to a cause that I care for.”  Marcell Dareus, Hope for Haiti: “My father is Haitian and I had a chance to visit Haiti last offseason, and I knew right away that I wanted to do anything I could to be able to help the community. The My Cause, My Cleats initiative is a fun way to help raise awareness for a community that needs our help.”  Leonard Fournette, Crime Prevention and The Jaguars Foundation” “Where I’m from in New Orleans, crime is too common. It hurts so many innocent families on a daily basis. Seeing the youth affected by it is the hardest part for me. The kids are our future and it is our duty to educate and inspire them early so they can make the right decisions later to lessen the street crime mentality.”  Dante Fowler, Jr., American Cancer Society: “My grandmother passed away from breast cancer. I want to support my grandmother’s legacy by having her on the field with me on Sunday.”  Tashaun Gipson, Alzheimer’s Awareness: “My grandmother passed away from Alzheimer’s. I want to shed light on this horrible disease and hope to bring some much-needed attention in hopes of finding a cure.”  Corey Grant, Child health education: “This cause is dear to my heart because it focuses on improving the quality of life of kids in my hometown of Opelika, AL.”  David Grinnage, JDRF: “My nephew has type 1 diabetes, and JDRF played a big part in helping him move forward. I want to encourage others to push as hard as possible day in and day out and show them that all things are possible with a little hard work.”  Chad Henne, GH Community Fund: “I want to improve our community and the lives of children through the revitalization of parks and recreational facilities.”  Allen Hurns, 88 Blessings, Inc.: “My mom raised me and my brother as a single mother, and seeing the way we struggled, I want to make sure that single mothers and their children are given hope, love, and resources to succeed. I want to enrich the lives of single mothers and their families.”  Myles Jack, Jacksonville Humane Society: “I’ve always had a love for animals. I see my dogs as my brothers and sisters, even with other pets we had as a child. Owning a dog is a great responsibility. All dogs should be loved and cared for.”  Malik Jackson, Malik’s Gifts: “I believe it’s important to give back to the community in many ways. We have a great platform as NFL players and ass role models. It’s important that we use that platform to enrich the lives in our communities. Malik’s Gifts empowers me to make the world a better place- one community at a time.”  Abry Jones, Wounded Warrior Project: “Both of my parents served 20+ years in the military. I want to honor the military and what they’ve done for our country.”  Ben Koyack, American Diabetes Association: “My father, brother, and sister all developed diabetes, as well as grandparents and great grandparents.”  Marquise Lee, Family Support Services: “I’ve been in foster care for most of my life and understand the ins and outs of what’s going on in many of those children’s minds. I feel I can relate to others who have been in foster care as well. I want to do more for people so I can help them create a better situation for themselves and other children.”  Marcedes Lewis, The Marcedes Lewis Foundation: “I’ve always wanted to give back as a kid, and once I got the platform to do so, I wanted to give back to my community and to help empower inner city kids in the community that I grew up in.”  Lerentee McCray, Big Play McCray Foundation: “It has become my mission as a leader of the community and role model for our youth to seek ways to impact those at-risk in Ocala, Florida.”  Jalen Myrick, Alzhheimer’s Awareness: “My grandmother passed away last year from the disease. I want to support and continue to help anyone else who has a family member with Alzheimer’s Disease.”  Yannick Ngakoue, Jacksonville Humane Society: “I have a soft spot for dogs. Since I was a child, I visited animals at the Humane Society frequently. I want to use my platform to raise awareness for animals.”  James O’Shaughnessy, Prostate cancer: “Prostate cancer has personally affected my family. I want to shed light on the severity of prostate cancer and encourage others to have ‘faith over fear’ when dealing with it.”  Tyler Patmon, Light Into Darkness: “I believe a child has a special gift that sometimes gets lost in our society. I want to get out and help kids find what they are good at and to help them realize they are important. God has something special for them to do on this earth. They just have to find it.”  Donald Payne, Colon cancer awareness: “My grandfather and father passed away from colon cancer, and many men don’t know to get checked once they reach a certain age. I never got to meet my grandfather and colon cancer left me fatherless at the age of 13. I want to encourage others to fight the good fight. God gives his hardest battles to his toughest warriors.”  Carroll Phillips, Sulzbacher Center Jacksonville: “The reason I got involved with this cause is because I was once homeless. I want to raise awareness to the cause of homeless people and to encourage them to stay strong and to let them know that I know what they are going through.”  William Poehls, Wounded Warrior Project: “My grandpa was in WWII and the Korean War. I want to honor those that fought for our freedom.”  Paul Posluszny, Pat Tillman Foundation: “I want to continue to honor the legacy of Pat Tillman and always remember to truly appreciate and thank all who serve our great country.”  Cam Robinson, Prostate cancer awareness: “The first family loss I ever dealt with was the loss of my cousin from prostate cancer. I want to use my platform in a creative way to encourage others to pay attention and be aware of prostate cancer. I hope it informs them and makes them want to be examined more often.”  Allen Robinson, Within Reach Foundation: “I choose my foundation efforts to help the city of Jacksonville because I’m from a similar type of city. I understand that growing up needs a lot of guidance and some of the kids in our inner cities don’t have that. I believe I can help provide some guidance.”  Dawuane Smoot, Jacksonville Humane Society: “I have a strong love for animals. I own a dog of my own. Her name is Lily. I want to spread awareness about animal cruelty.”  Jaelen Strong, At-risk youth: “Growing up in Philadelphia, there were plenty of children that were less fortunate than others. Now that I have this platform, I want to be able to raise awareness for the kids that are in a tough spot so that their lives may become a little easier, especially during the holiday season.”  Peyton Thompson, National Multiple Sclerosis Society: “My mother has Multiple Sclerosis. I want to encourage others to fight through things because she’s doing it and feeling much worse than I have ever felt.”  Dede Westbrook, Domestic violence awareness: “I want to use my platform and personal experience to raise awareness and stop domestic violence. It’s important to think before you act.”
  • Stephanie Brown

    Assistant News Director

    Stephanie Brown is the WOKV Assistant Director of News and Afternoon Reporter. She guides the direction of WOKV’s news content, frequently contributes to social and digital platforms, and is a leading voice on-air. Stephanie has been with the team full-time since May 2012, which is when she graduated from the University of Florida with degrees in telecommunication and political science. When she’s not enterprising story ideas or digging in to an investigation, she’s likely cooking or enjoying downtime with her dog.

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The Latest News Headlines

  • An explosion has been reported near the Port Authority in New York, police said Monday morning. >> Read more trending news  >> Click here or scroll down for more
  • Another frosty morning with temps stuck in the 30's and low 40’s.   But Action News Jax Chief Meteorologist Mike Buresh says we'll be a good 8 degrees warmer than yesterday with lots of sun and calm winds. “And then a breezy and rather mild day tomorrow. We’ll approach 70 degrees but that wind is going to make it feel cooler than it actually is, and that wind will be ahead of the next cold front”.  Expect that front to roll across the area Tuesday night, it will be dry, but will usher in another shot at chilly temperatures on Wednesday and early Thursday.  Mike is tracking a possible storm system to end the week and for your upcoming weekend.  LISTEN:  Mike Buresh Podcast
  • A Texas neighborhood is shaken by the deaths of two young children, which authorities believe came at the hand of their father. According to the Star-Telegram, police responded to a North Richland Hills home over the weekend after a mother called 911. The mother was uninjured, but two children and an adult man, later found to be their father, were found dead at the residence. >> Read more trending news “Upon arrival, officers found a 5-year-old female, 9-year-old male and adult male all deceased from apparent gunshot wounds. Initial investigation revealed the father shot the children and then shot himself,” North Richland Hills police said in a statement. The department went on to explain a search into the home’s records “revealed no prior history between [the] department and the family or address.” The names of those involved have not yet been released. “There’s no history here,” said police spokesperson Carissa Katekaru. “We’re still trying to figure out why. I grew up in North Richland Hills, and I would call this a pretty quiet neighborhood.” Neighbor Denise Albino, 57, has lived in the area for about 20 years. “Oh my God, those poor babies,” she said. “I just can’t understand why people do this kind of thing.” Albino said her son told her about the news. “I didn’t know them,” she added. “I would see the kids playing basketball all the time, but I never really got a chance to speak with them.” Another neighbor, Rosa Nichols, told KTVT: “You can drive by, and they can have a perfect house, but you don’t know what’s going on inside the house. It’s so sad.” “We lived there for several years and had some happy memories and sure hate to have sad memories made there for these families. For this family, we don’t know you, but we sure feel for you,” said Mike Bentley, who once lived in the home.
  •  21-year-old Korey Richardson is in police custody after a four-hour long standoff at Southside apartment complex.  Witnesses told police they heard what sounded like a man beating a woman inside of the units. They also said they saw the woman run away from the apartment, but the man chased after her, grabbed her and dragged her back into the apartment.  A small child was also with the man and woman.  Responding officers tried to contact the two inside but they were unable to. A SWAT callout was initiated after there was a concern it was a hostage situation, and Richardson was not letting the woman leave.  The woman was eventually released along with the child. Police reported she had minor injuries but the child was okay.  Shortly after the woman and child were released, Richardson surrendered and was taken into custody.  He’s facing a Battery and False Imprisonment charge.
  • Wildfires are raging through parts of Southern California, burning thousands of acres, destroying homes and businesses and forcing thousands of residents to evacuate. >> PHOTOS: California wildfires burn thousands of acres, force evacuations >> Click here or scroll down for more >> Read more trending news 

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