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    A 59-year-old woman is dead after she tried crossing the street on I-95 North near Forsyth Street.  According to the Florida Highway Patrol, Courtney Lynn Richard was driving in the outside lane of I-95 Northbound and her Toyota Corolla hit Deborah Tompkins on her left side.   Richard continued to drive on I-95 to her home where he car was later found. Charges are currently pending. 
  • Nearly seven months ago Hurricane Matthew gutted Donna Wright’s Davis Shores house in St. Augustine, she’s still rebuilding so she has a place to call home again.“I didn’t have any insurance, flood insurance,” Wright said. “I’m staying with friends and living in my car.”Mom Kira Anderson and her family spent the last six months living in a fifth-wheel camper in their own driveway. TRENDING: 'Firefighters saved my life,' Florida rattlesnake victim says They’re slowly moving back into their Davis Shores home as they rebuild.“Living in a camper with your husband, kids and 110 pound dog (for six months) is awful,” Anderson said.Monday, the St. Augustine City Commission approved the first steps to change a city ordinance to allow hurricane victims to temporarily live on their private property while repairing their home.Neighbors would have until the city issues them a certificate of completion, or their building permit expires to stay. The city’s current ordinance does not allow this.“We are not doing anything to move people or displace people,” St. Augustine Mayor Nancy Shaver said.St. Augustine leaders say 12 families still live in RVs and campers in their own driveways in Davis Shores, nearly seven months after Hurricane Matthew. LOCAL NEWS: Brawl at Orange Park Mall involved up to 60 people, Clay County Sheriff's Office says The city does not have a hard count of how many victims left after the storm, or are rebuilding. Now the city is working with different organizations to get an official head count.Neighbors say at least 50 individual hurricane victims total in Davis Shores are still living in their driveways.“We will do everything in our power to identify them and get them on the right road,” Shaver said.City leaders say the proposed change to the RV and camper ordinance for Hurricane Matthew victims must to go through a few more steps before coming official.
  • A Brunswick man is under fire after neighbors say his dog attacked a little boy Monday afternoon.It happened in Brunswick off Ogg Avenue.According to the Brunswick News, the pit bull mix dog was chained in the backyard of a duplex home on Ogg Avenue, where the 4-year-old was being watched by a babysitter. TRENDING: 'Firefighters saved my life,' Florida rattlesnake victim says The child was playing in the front yard, when the babysitter went inside briefly, according to published reports. Glynn County Police Chief Matt Doering told the Brunswick News that the child walked to the backyard, where he was attacked by the dog.Action News Jax asked a neighbor if the dog has ever attacked before.“No, no, he always keeps his dog tied up, always. His dog never runs,” neighbor Derrick Preston said.The child was taken to Wolfson Children's Hospital in Jacksonville, according to the Brunswick News.The dog is with Animal Services, which will monitor the dog for 10 days before taking any action.  LOCAL NEWS: Brawl at Orange Park Mall involved up to 60 people, Clay County Sheriff's Office says
  • On Monday, six law enforcement officers who lost their lives in the line of duty were recognized in Tallahassee. One of those six was Deputy Eric Oliver. Deputy Oliver, who worked for the Nassau County Sheriff's Office, died in November 2016 while chasing a suspect. TRENDING: 'Firefighters saved my life,' Florida rattlesnake victim says Oliver's supervisor Sgt. Charles Lucas said he met Oliver when they both went from the detention center to the sheriff's office. 'We would chit chat on a regular basis and we both have little girls and that was a big topic,' Sgt. Lucas said. Lucas said Oliver was great at his job and deserved to be honored in Tallahassee. 'He always did his job and provided the community with the best service he could,' Lucas said. LOCAL NEWS: Brawl at Orange Park Mall involved up to 60 people, Clay County Sheriff's Office says Nassau Sheriff Bill Leeper and members of Oliver's family were at the ceremony as he was remembered. 'Him being honored today is the ultimate sacrifice,' Lucas said.
  • It's been a long road, but the Jacksonville City Council has unanimously voted to pass Mayor Lenny Curry's pension reform plan.   The bills include using a half-cent sales tax approved by voters back in the 2016 election to help pay down the $2.8 billion dollar pension debt.   But just moments after the plan was passed, some on the council were already talking about tweaks.   Councilman Danny Becton announced he's working on a bill that would make extra payments toward paying down the debt, comparing it to a 30-year mortgage.   'After a number of years, as your income grows, maybe you've gotten some promotions, that mortgage you took out many years ago, isn't as bad as it seemed that first day. Your like, 'Oh, I can pay more', and your accountant tells you that you can save hundreds of thousands of dollars by putting a little bit more and making this a 15-year mortgage,' explains Becton.   Mayor Curry is set to sign the pension reform bills Tuesday, April 25, outside City Hall. He'll be joined by members of City Council, Sheriff Williams, union leaders, and business representatives.
  • When the federal courthouse doors opened in Downtown Jacksonville Monday morning, prospective jurors crowded around and quietly filed in. By 8:54 a.m., former Congresswoman Corrine Brown was sitting in a courtroom next to her attorney, with a small notepad and pens in front of her, waiting for the people who would decide her future to file in to the courtroom to be screened. While a court order indicated 39 prospective jurors had been summoned for the fraud trial, the instructions laid out Monday morning by Magistrate Judge James R. Klindt put the pool at 65 people. By the time the day was done, 21 of those prospective jurors had been excused. The number will be whittled down to twelve jurors and two alternates, and the court aims to have that done by the end of the day Tuesday. Brown and two others are accused of collecting more than $800,000 in donations for a group they claimed was a non-profit - One Door For Education - and using the money for personal expenses instead, including travel, car repairs, and events hosted by or held in honor of Brown, who was in Congress at the time. Her two alleged co-conspirators - her former Chief of Staff Ronnie Simmons and the head of One Door Carla Wiley- have both taken plea deals. Brown faces twenty-two charges including conspiracy to commit mail and wire fraud, mail fraud, wire fraud, filing false tax returns, and more. If convicted, she faces more than 350 years in prison. A jury must issue a unanimous verdict to convict. After the list of prospective jurors was passed out to the attorneys, there was a brief break so either side could sort through the information. Brown was actively engaged with her attorney James Smith III during this break, including pointing to different items on the papers that were handed out. Prospective jurors then filed in one-by-one, seated in the order of their randomly assigned number, to face the initial group questioning. For this jury selection process, Klindt told the courtroom he had studied high profile and high publicity cases from the Middle District of Florida and the 11th Circuit to determine the best practices. Even before the standard questions, he asked jurors about any familiarity with Brown, whether they’ve supported her in the past, whether they have any bias toward or against her, whether they know the witnesses who will be called, and similar areas. While there were only a few people who said they knew Brown or had any feelings about her, more than half of the pool- 39 people- had some level of personal knowledge about this case because of conversations, social media, or what they’ve consumed through the news. These questions were laid out in the group setting, with jurors raising their hands, for an affirmative answer. Individual questioning then followed, where the court got a better idea of the range of knowledge about the case and, more importantly, whether that information has led the prospective jurors to form an opinion on guilt or innocence, and if that opinion could be set aside to consider only the evidence presented as trial and the instructions provided by the court. The court also probed deeper in to any “extreme hardship” that would prevent a juror from committing to this trial, with most of those relating to medical or financial issues. The extended questioning was done individually, with Klindt specifically saying he wanted to be careful that anything a prospective juror had to say would not influence others. In all, 45 prospective jurors in the 65 person pool were questioned through Monday, specifically about this case. 21 were excused “for cause”- nine of those were based solely on prior knowledge of the case or feelings toward Brown that couldn’t be set aside, while another six were excused for multiple factors that included pre-trial publicity. The remaining strikes “for cause” were because of hardship or familiarity with people involved in the process. Two strikes “for cause” were denied by Klindt. The 24 prospective jurors who were questioned and retained, along with the 20 people who didn’t face questioning Monday, will return Tuesday for the second phase of screening. That will involve the standard questioning, like personal information of the prospective jurors, whether they’ve served on a jury before and other areas. Before that second phase, though, Klindt has decided to add another ten or so prospective jurors to the pool. They’ll be individually questioned to start the day, and any remaining after that will join the group of 44 rolled over from Monday. In addition to strikes “for cause”, attorneys have a set number of “peremptory” strikes they can exercise when questioning is done. The attorneys for both sides have been allowed to ask questions of the prospective jurors as well, through the process so far. WOKV is inside the federal courthouse as these proceedings move forward. Check back frequently at WOKV.com for updates.
  • A Jacksonville man is charged with murdering his pregnant girlfriend, which also resulted in the loss of the unborn child.  The Jacksonville Sheriff’s Office arrested 38-year-old Armanuel Cummings after they said he stabbed 29-year-old D’Anna Thorn to death.  Police responded to the home on W. 21st Street Saturday evening.  According to JSO, Cummings kicked Thorn out of the house after an argument.  JSO said Thorn was attempting to climb back into the home through a window when Cummings stabbed her repeatedly.  Thorn was transported to the hospital where she and the unborn child passed away.  Cummings was charged with murder. Police said they continue to investigate and more charges could follow pending the completion of an autopsy.
  • Five people, including several juveniles, were arrested after a fight in the Orange Park Mall, the Clay County Sheriff's Office said. The fight was captured on video that has circulated on social media since Saturday. Clay County officials said about 30 juveniles were involved in the fight. A 20-year-old was arrested for resisting an officer without violence and trespassing after warning. A juvenile female was arrested for battery on a law enforcement officer and trespassing without warning, the sheriff's office reported. Three other juveniles were arrested and released to parents. They were charged with trespassing after warning and resisting an officer without violence, the sheriff's office said. The Orange Park Mall said it is working closely with law enforcement officials after the video surfaced on social media. The video, which has been shared on Facebook over 5,000 times, shows a group of girls striking a person who was lying on a couch. The fight happened in front a rue21 clothing store. A representative from the mall said the safety of shoppers, retailers and employees is its top priority. The mall is working with the Clay County Sheriff's Office while the department investigates the incident.
  • Firefighters have contained a large wildfire at 80 percent Saturday in a Southside Jacksonville neighborhood, the Florida Forest Service said. The wildfire burned 14 acres in the area of Atlantic Boulevard and Leon Road, said area fire supervisor for Duval County Victor Taylor. No homes have been damaged but up to fifteen homes were threatened by the fire. Five bulldozers were dispatched, the Florida Forest Service said. A Florida Forest Service helicopter poured 11 buckets of water on top of the fire. All lanes of Anniston Road between Atlantic Boulevard and Fraser Road were closed due to the wildfire, the Jacksonville Sheriff's Office said. The lanes are now reopened. Jacksonville fire rescue said eight engines, five tankers, three brush tanks, three chiefs and one rescue chief were at the scene
  • Twelve jurors will decide the future of former Congresswoman Corrine Brown- and they’ll be selected from a group of 65 in a two-day process starting Monday.  Last July, Brown and her Chief of Staff Ronnie Simmons were indicted in a federal fraud case centered on the group “One Door For Education”- which prosecutors say Brown and others represented as a non-profit to solicit donations, but used the more than $800,000 they collected for personal expenses instead. Prosecutors say the trio used Brown’s position as a Congresswoman to promote the group and solicit donations, without One Door having ever been registered as a charity.  Simmons and third alleged co-conspirator, Carla Wiley, have previously pleaded guilty. Brown faces a total of 22 charges including mail fraud, wire fraud, conspiracy to commit fraud, and more. The jury must reach a unanimous decision in order to convict.  WOKV will be in the federal courthouse through the proceedings, which start Monday for two days of jury selection. The trial is slated to start Wednesday and expected to last two weeks.  Court records show the 65 people who have been summoned as prospective jurors have already been initially screened by the court for hardship. They have been randomly numbered, and that randomized list of names- and the corresponding juror number- has already been distributed to the attorneys for both sides.  Jury selection will begin with the judge outlining the nature of the case and questioning the prospective jurors. That process can include questions which have been submitted by the attorneys, at the judge’s discretion.  Federal court records show the US Attorney’s Office has submitted proposed instructions and questions for jury selection. The instructions include reinforcing that their decision should be based on evidence alone and not sympathy or prejudice for the defendant, explaining the burden to prove beyond a reasonable doubt and not all possible doubt, how to consider the credibility of a witness, and the meaning of the various charges. The questions include whether the prospective jurors know anyone involved, have any issue with the nature of the charges, have ever been involved in legal proceedings in any capacity, have any impression of the federal government, have any bias against plea agreements, have any political views that could influence the verdict, and more.  After questioning, the panel will be excused while attorneys first raise any challenges “for cause”, and then issue “peremptory” strikes, which don’t have to have a cause. The defense has ten peremptory strikes, while the US Attorney’s Office has six, according to the court records.  Ultimately, twelve jurors will be seated through this process, which works down the list based on the randomly assigned juror numbers. The next two jurors on the list who weren’t seated on the panel will be slated as the alternates- with each side getting one peremptory challenge to exercise on the alternates.  WOKV will have comprehensive coverage through jury selection and the trial proceedings. Check back frequently at WOKV.com for updates.

The Latest News Headlines

  • North Korea conducted large-scale artillery exercises on Tuesday to coincide with the 85th anniversary of its army’s foundation, South Korea's Yonhap News Agency reported. >> Read more trending news  Citing an unidentified South Korean government source, Yonhap reported that there were signs North Korea's military was carrying out large-scale, live-fire drills in areas around the east coast city of Wonsan. South Korea's defense ministry could not immediately confirm the report, according to Reuters. North Korea warned that the United States will have to choose between political and military surrender, according to the Yonhap report. 'If the U.S. and warmongers run amok with a reckless preemptive strike, we will stage the most brutal punishment of a preemptive attack in the sky and land as well as at sea and from underwater without any warning or prior notice,' according to Rodong Sinmun, spokesman of the ruling Workers' Party of Korea.
  • A Brunswick man is under fire after neighbors say his dog attacked a little boy Monday afternoon.It happened in Brunswick off Ogg Avenue.According to the Brunswick News, the pit bull mix dog was chained in the backyard of a duplex home on Ogg Avenue, where the 4-year-old was being watched by a babysitter. TRENDING: 'Firefighters saved my life,' Florida rattlesnake victim says The child was playing in the front yard, when the babysitter went inside briefly, according to published reports. Glynn County Police Chief Matt Doering told the Brunswick News that the child walked to the backyard, where he was attacked by the dog.Action News Jax asked a neighbor if the dog has ever attacked before.“No, no, he always keeps his dog tied up, always. His dog never runs,” neighbor Derrick Preston said.The child was taken to Wolfson Children's Hospital in Jacksonville, according to the Brunswick News.The dog is with Animal Services, which will monitor the dog for 10 days before taking any action.  LOCAL NEWS: Brawl at Orange Park Mall involved up to 60 people, Clay County Sheriff's Office says
  • Nearly seven months ago Hurricane Matthew gutted Donna Wright’s Davis Shores house in St. Augustine, she’s still rebuilding so she has a place to call home again.“I didn’t have any insurance, flood insurance,” Wright said. “I’m staying with friends and living in my car.”Mom Kira Anderson and her family spent the last six months living in a fifth-wheel camper in their own driveway. TRENDING: 'Firefighters saved my life,' Florida rattlesnake victim says They’re slowly moving back into their Davis Shores home as they rebuild.“Living in a camper with your husband, kids and 110 pound dog (for six months) is awful,” Anderson said.Monday, the St. Augustine City Commission approved the first steps to change a city ordinance to allow hurricane victims to temporarily live on their private property while repairing their home.Neighbors would have until the city issues them a certificate of completion, or their building permit expires to stay. The city’s current ordinance does not allow this.“We are not doing anything to move people or displace people,” St. Augustine Mayor Nancy Shaver said.St. Augustine leaders say 12 families still live in RVs and campers in their own driveways in Davis Shores, nearly seven months after Hurricane Matthew. LOCAL NEWS: Brawl at Orange Park Mall involved up to 60 people, Clay County Sheriff's Office says The city does not have a hard count of how many victims left after the storm, or are rebuilding. Now the city is working with different organizations to get an official head count.Neighbors say at least 50 individual hurricane victims total in Davis Shores are still living in their driveways.“We will do everything in our power to identify them and get them on the right road,” Shaver said.City leaders say the proposed change to the RV and camper ordinance for Hurricane Matthew victims must to go through a few more steps before coming official.
  • A 59-year-old woman is dead after she tried crossing the street on I-95 North near Forsyth Street.  According to the Florida Highway Patrol, Courtney Lynn Richard was driving in the outside lane of I-95 Northbound and her Toyota Corolla hit Deborah Tompkins on her left side.   Richard continued to drive on I-95 to her home where he car was later found. Charges are currently pending. 
  • On Monday, six law enforcement officers who lost their lives in the line of duty were recognized in Tallahassee. One of those six was Deputy Eric Oliver. Deputy Oliver, who worked for the Nassau County Sheriff's Office, died in November 2016 while chasing a suspect. TRENDING: 'Firefighters saved my life,' Florida rattlesnake victim says Oliver's supervisor Sgt. Charles Lucas said he met Oliver when they both went from the detention center to the sheriff's office. 'We would chit chat on a regular basis and we both have little girls and that was a big topic,' Sgt. Lucas said. Lucas said Oliver was great at his job and deserved to be honored in Tallahassee. 'He always did his job and provided the community with the best service he could,' Lucas said. LOCAL NEWS: Brawl at Orange Park Mall involved up to 60 people, Clay County Sheriff's Office says Nassau Sheriff Bill Leeper and members of Oliver's family were at the ceremony as he was remembered. 'Him being honored today is the ultimate sacrifice,' Lucas said.

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