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19-month-old girl found in dog kennel
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19-month-old girl found in dog kennel

19-month-old girl found in dog kennel
19-month-old girl found in dog kennel in Brunswick.

19-month-old girl found in dog kennel

Police are investigating how a 19-month-old girl ended up in a dog kennel, down the street from her house.

Maintenance workers discovered the girl Wednesday afternoon in the backyard of a home on Promise Lane in the Caleb's Crossing subdivision.

They immediately called police.

Authorities said the girl's father fell asleep and left the door open.  Authorities believe the girl wandered out by herself, walking several houses away and into the dog kennel.

Paramedics took the 19-month old to the ER at Southeast Georgia Health System to be treated for dehydration.

Charges are pending.  The Division of Family and Children Services is also investigating.

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  • A Facebook Live video led police to a suspect in the December 2016 death of a woman in a Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, neighborhood.  >> Read more trending news Isaiah Booker, 23, of Homestead, was charged Tuesday with criminal homicide, criminal attempted homicide, aggravated assault and persons not to possess a firearm.  The charges stem from the shooting death of 25-year-old Myanne Redman, who was found Dec. 19 in her car on the 2200 block of Wilner Drive.  Redmen left behind three young children, including a 1-year-old. Booker is the father of the 1-year-old child, police said.  Investigators said they identified Booker as a suspect after he posted a Facebook Live video nearly two months after Redman was shot to death. Gunshots can be heard in the video and a police officer is heard yelling 'Stop.
  • The Duval County School board looked over more than 140 recommendations for cuts to their budget and of those only 74 were deemed feasible. Of the 74 cuts that are possible, some of those didn't sit well with members of the board.  Some of those included cuts to art programs, athletics, and even field trips.  In regards to cuts in those fields, board member Betty Burney says, 'Cutting the arts and physical education opens the door to students going to private schools.' Board Chairman W.C. Gentry, after reviewing the recommendations, admitted those weren't enough.  Even if they accepted all of the 144 cuts that would only save them $30-million, their budget deficit is close to $100-million.The chairman and other board members acknowledge they'll have to consider drastic measures for the upcoming budget year.  They're considering cutting the school week down to 4 days and adding an hour to each day.Before some changes to state law the school board used to be required to complete 180 days in a school year, now they have to complete enough hours to match 180 days so that would allow them to make the change to 4 day school weeks.They'll also look into furlough days for teachers, as many as 20.  Twenty furlough days would equal an estimated savings of $50-million according to the chairman.Because the county is so strapped for cash, the chair says they're going to have to consider everything.  Duval is looking at a 5-6% budget cut, at least.From today's meeting, they will look into how much they could save with 4 day school weeks, what's the minimum number of tests they can take some schools are taking up to a dozen tests that can cost as much as $65 per student.They'll look into cutting transportation costs for magnet school students - last year that cost the district more than $50 million.The board will also look to see how much they can save by completely eliminating athletics across all schools.In closing to the budget workshop, the chairman says they might want to consider litigation.  Right now a major problem in the district, along with the underfunding for instructional hours is the fact that they have to comply with class size requirements.  They would be able to balance the budget with larger classes through consolidation and other methods but because they can't do so without being noncompliant they might join other pending lawsuits against the state.The district is still working to submit a plan to the state on its four intervene schools. The last plan had been rejected earlier this month.
  • The jury that will sit over the federal fraud trial of now-former Congresswoman Corrine Brown has been chosen. Seven men and five women are on the panel. Four alternates have also been chosen- not two as the initial court order stated. The alternates will not be told they are alternates ahead of the trial, instead, they’ve been mixed in among the others and the group is sitting as a body of 16.  CONTINUING COVERAGE: The trial of now-former Congresswoman Corrine Brown US Magistrate Judge James Klindt, who presided over the two-and-a-half day selection process, says they sat four alternates because of the anticipated length of the trial- at three weeks.  By the observation of our reporter in the courtroom, the 12 person panel appears to be three white females, five white males, two black females, one black male, and one Hispanic male. Nine of the jurors live in Jacksonville, one in Bunnell, one in Middleburg, and one couldn’t be determined by our reporter because it was not clearly stated by the juror.  The defense was allowed to make ten strikes “without cause” and the prosecution had six, but neither side used all of those strikes before agreeing on the panel.  US District Judge Timothy Corrigan- who is presiding over the trial- took the bench for the first time just ahead of 11:15AM Wednesday, had the jury sworn in, and then issued instructions to the panel.  The instructions included reinforcing that the jurors cannot speak to anyone about the case, and that none of the parties involved in the case should be approaching them through the trial itself. The jury will not be sequestered, but has been repeatedly instructed not to seek out any news reports about this case or discuss the case with anyone.  “Our whole system depends upon the fact that this case is decided in this courtroom on the evidence in this courtroom, and nothing else,” Corrigan told the jury.  Corrigan further started to explain the prosecution’s burden to prove “beyond a reasonable doubt”, and that there is no obligation on the defense to prove anything. Jurors will be given notepads and paper during the trial, but those are taken from them at the end of the day every day.  JUROR DETAILS:  Juror 1- black male from Jacksonville, high school education, single and never married. He works in merchandising for a soda company. He served on a criminal jury in state court about ten years ago, and they were able to reach a verdict. This juror said he had some prior knowledge of this case from watching the news, but had no more details than the case statement delivered by Klindt and had not formed any opinion on guilty or innocence. Two of this juror’s cousins and two of his friends have been arrested- a cousin was arrested in the 1980s and did 27 years for drug possession, a cousin was locked up in the 1980s for a robbery, a friend was arrested for murder in 1993 and sentenced to life in prison, and another friend was arrested for molestation in the last five years. This juror says these cases wouldn’t influence him, because the people involved were guilty and he would be able to set those cases out of mind to focus on these proceedings.  Juror 2- white male from Jacksonville, high school education with some college, married with one 23-year-old child. He works in sales and his wife is a homemaker. He has been a juror on a criminal case in state court, and they did reach a verdict. This juror said he had met Brown once in the past when he got the chance to be in a luxury box his company owns, but that meeting does not influence how he views Brown.  Juror 3, who was identified in jury selection as Juror 9- black female from Jacksonville, associates degree, divorced with two children- a 4-year-old and a 9-year-old. She is recently unemployed, but previously worked as a registration analyst for a mortgage company and leasing agent at an apartment complex. This juror was a victim of a crime by her ex-husband, with the details of that crime being discussed during a private sidebar with the judge and attorneys.  Juror 4, who was identified in jury selection as Juror 12- white male from Bunnell, high school education, divorced with a 30-year-old son. He was a factory worker and previously served four years in the Army. This juror said he had some prior knowledge of this case based on a comment his sister-in-law made when he received a jury summons, but he had not otherwise paid attention to the case nor did he have an opinion about it. This juror’s brother was arrested in the 70s after drunkenly shooting up a man’s car in a retaliatory act, but he says that wouldn’t influence him because he didn’t follow the case closely since he was serving in Korea.  Juror 7, who was identified in jury selection as Juror 13- white male from Jacksonville, Bachelor’s degree in Communications, married. He is currently a hair stylist and his spouse is with an insurance group. This juror said he has some knowledge of the case because he watches the news nightly and he is active on social media, but he hasn’t formed an opinion on the case because he hasn’t looked in to it in depth.  Juror 8, who was identified in jury selection as Juror 17- white female from Jacksonville, high school education with some college, widow. She is a real estate property manager. She was a juror in a criminal case in state court in 2014, and they were able to reach a verdict.  Juror 9, who was identified in jury selection as Juror 19- black female from Jacksonville, Bachelor’s degree in Respiratory Science, married with one son. She served in the Navy for 21 years and her husband is retired Navy as well. She now works in the respiratory science field. This juror’s brother was tried and convicted of attempted manslaughter in the early 80s. She says her family doesn’t talk about it, so she hasn’t formed any opinions about it.  Juror 10, who was identified in jury selection as Juror 23- white female from Jacksonville, Bachelor’s degree in Business, married with three children. Her children as a 26-year-old waiter, a 23-year-old who works in a grocery store, and an 18-year-old graduating high school. She works in sales support for an insurance company and her husband grades essays for standardized tests. She served on a jury in a state criminal case in Indiana, and they were able to reach a verdict. This juror said she had some prior knowledge of the case because she reads the paper daily, but she stopped reading any articles about the case when she received her summons about a month ago. She did not have any opinion on the case.  Juror 13, who was identified in jury selection as Juror 26- white male from Middleburg, high school education with some college, married with three daughters- a paralegal, a waitress, and one who does financial work in the medical field. He is unemployed, but previously worked for a mortgage investor company. He has prior military experience of 13.5 years at Cecil Field.  Juror 14, who was identified in jury selection as Juror 35- white female from Jacksonville, high school education with some college, married with two kids- a 13-year-old and a 19-year-old college student. She is a service consultant for an insurance company and her spouse is self-employed in landscaping. This juror says she has some prior knowledge of the case, but only that she had heard on the news that there was a trial.  Juror 15, who was identified in jury selection as Juror 39- white male, Associates degree, single. Works for the Department of Transportation. This juror says he has some prior knowledge of the case from watching the news, but hadn’t heard many specifics. Friends had joked that he could potentially be on the jury, but it’s nothing that led him to form an opinion. This juror has a family member that worked for a county sheriff’s office, but that has no impact on how he views law enforcement.  Juror 16, who was identified in jury selection as Juror 40- Hispanic male from Jacksonville, Bachelor’s degree in Network Technology, married with three children- a 33-year-old case manager with DCF, a 31-year-old in the armed forces, and a 25-year-old in college. He works as a shift supervisor at a youth camp in Starke and his wife is a school teacher. He served 44 years in the military.  ALTERNATE JUROR DETAILS:  Juror 5, who was identified in jury selection as Juror 44- Hispanic male from Jacksonville, Bachelor’s in Communications, married with an 11-month-old daughter. He works as a Continuity Director with a media group and his wife owns a bed-and-breakfast. This juror says he knows one of the prospective witnesses, John Delaney, from having served as Vice President of UNF’s student government, but that was about seven years ago and it would not influence the weight and consideration he gave to Delaney’s testimony.  Juror 6, who was identified in jury selection as Juror 50- female of apparent East Asian descent from St. Johns County, high school education and some college, married with three children- one is a former Marine and current firefighter, one is a Marine, and one is a student. She has previously worked in account receivables, merchandising, and as a youth service worker. This juror says she has some prior knowledge of the case from watching the news daily, but she mostly consumes traffic and weather and had only heard generally about this trial. She has not formed any opinion and will weigh only the evidence presented at trial.  Juror 11, who was identified in jury selection as Juror 51- white male from Palm Coast, Masters in Business Administration, married with three children- ages 13, 11, and 6. He is a medical surgical rep and his wife is a homemaker. He served on a criminal jury in a case in Flagler County four years ago, and they reached a verdict.  Juror 12, who was identified in jury selection as Juror 52- black female from East Palatka, high school education with some college, divorced with one 41-year-old son who’s a bus driver in New York. She is a lab analyst. She has previously served on a jury on a state criminal, but the case settled. This juror says she has some prior knowledge of the case from seeing a little on the news, but she hasn’t discussed the case with anyone, nor has she formed an opinion. This juror answered affirmatively that she, a close friend, or family member had been arrested for a crime, but the specific details were discussed in a private sidebar with the judge and attorneys.
  • Was it corruption or betrayal? There is a fundamental question that’s been brought to light through opening statements at the federal fraud trial of now-former Congresswoman Corrine Brown- exactly how much did she know about her personal finances and affairs. The question becomes central, as her defense paints the picture of a Chief of Staff in over his head and acting behind Brown’s back, while prosecutors say it would be impossible for her not to know about the source of the tens of thousands of dollars she was allegedly benefiting from. CONTINUING COVERAGE: The trial of now-former Congresswoman Corrine Brown Assistant US Attorney A. Tysen Duva started his argument talking about Brown being hailed as a trailblazer for her historic election in the 90s. He spoke about the committees she served in her more than two decades with the House of Representatives, and the reputation she built to deliver for her constituents. “We wish that was the end of the story,” Duva said. “There’s another side- corruption, greed, and a significant entitlement attitude. That’s what this case is about. It’s about lying, cheating, and stealing.” Duva says Brown leveraged her position and relationships she built as a Congresswoman to solicit money for a “bogus” charity “One Door for Education”, without ever telling donors the money wasn’t being used on scholarships and other things to help disadvantaged children. Instead, prosecutors say the money was being used for parties, travel, shopping trips, and more of Brown and a few others. Duva says Brown’s Chief of Staff Ronnie Simmons would frequently drive to an ATM in his Virginia hometown and withdraw the maximum allowed in a day- $800- from the One Door account, then depositing a like sum in to one of Brown’s bank accounts or giving the cash to Brown directly.  “When we dug even further, we saw this was a way of life,” he says. Duva says Brown was driven by finances- with three properties and a shopping habit. “She simply spent way more than she took in, she became accustomed to this money coming in,” He says.  Brown would also throw “lavish” events using One Door funds, according to Duva, about $330,000 overall. The US Attorney’s Office says donations to the group funded a golf tournament at TPC Sawgrass, a luxury box at a Jaguars game in DC, a luxury box in a Beyonce concert, and more. The money would also allegedly be used for an event at an annual conference, which Duva called a party for Brown to “be celebrated”. No fundraising was done at these events, according to Duva. In his opening statement, though, Brown’s attorney James Smith III said Brown was not responsible for event planning, travel, or even much of the day-to-day operations in her office- Simmons was, and the jury needs to decide if they can trust him. “She trusted that he would always look out for her and care for her,” Smith says. Smith says Brown first offered to be Simmons’ mentor after he and her daughter broke up, but remained friends. Simmons first worked in Brown’s travel agency, then eventually her campaign for the Florida House, then Congress. Smith says Brown looked at Simmons as a son, and was unaware that many thought he was in over his head. Rather, she trusted him to run her staff, keep her schedule, plan her travel and more. Simmons also had access to Brown’s bank accounts, according to Smith. “As far as she knew, everything was running smoothly,” Smith says. Smith says Simmons was always developing “schemes”, though, to fund the lifestyle he had become accustomed to. One such scheme involved getting a House of Representatives job for his sister by telling Brown she was sick and needed money. In reality, he says Simmons took much of the money over many years, and the relative didn’t do much work. So, when Simmons met and ultimately started having a relationship with Carla Wiley, the President of One Door, the opportunity for another scheme “fell in to his lap”. “The two of them did that, on their own, without any encouragement or direction from Congresswoman Brown,” Smith says. He says Brown solicited donations for a group she had every reason to believe was credible, because Simmons had vouched for it, and she trusted him. Even when Wiley ultimately took a plea deal, Simmons maintained his innocence, so Brown still had trust that he had done the right thing, according to Smith. Then, Simmons took a plea deal as well. “She finally, finally had a chance to see clearly the betrayal that some in her inner circle feared,” Smith says. Simmons and Wiley are both going to testify. Smith reminded the jurors that they will have to consider that testimony carefully, because of the plea deals Wiley and Simmons were given in exchange for their cooperation with the prosecution. He added that Brown herself will testify, because she can tell her story best, and he wants the jury to weigh Brown’s “well-earned reputation” against that of her two alleged co-conspirators. And on the question of how Brown could have not known about the source of frequent large deposits in her accounts- the alleged One Door money Simmons would deposit- Smith says Brown traveled frequently for her work in Congress, and she would front the money and get reimbursed. Prosecutors say that’s just not the case. “The facts are going to show that Corrine Brown knew exactly what she was doing,” Duva said. He adds that there are clearly established lies which will speak to that, including that Brown is also accused of underreporting her income and overreporting her charitable giving on House financial disclosures and tax returns. If the One Door donors had known their money was not going to charitable education purposes, Duva says they wouldn’t have donated in the first place. He also says Brown using her influence and position as a Congresswoman was key toward soliciting the large donations- many ten thousand dollars or more. Smith says Brown can only be convicted of fraud if she knowingly lied to the donors when she asked for the donations. He says she didn’t, though, and had instead been fooled by Simmons. Smith says Simmons fooled investigators and prosecutors too. “Don’t let him fool you,” Smith said to the jury. The courtroom itself was full for opening statements Wednesday, despite US Magistrate Judge Timothy Corrigan adding extra chairs in anticipation of a crowd. Those who did not secure a seat- which were first come, first served- were allowed in to an overflow room where there were audio and video feeds set up.  WOKV is inside of the federal courtroom and updating you frequently through the proceedings. This is a developing story that will be updated in to the evening.
  • It caused all sorts of problems for East Arlington drivers heading home Wednesday afternoon.   A 1-acre woods fire was burning off Monument Road, near I-295, sending smoke high into the air.   The Jacksonville Sheriff's Office temporarily closed all northbound and southbound lanes of Monument, between St. Johns Bluff Road and Lee Road at the peak of the fire.   The Jacksonville Fire and Rescue Department and the Florida Forest Service teamed up to get the fire quickly contained.   We're told one vacant structure was destroyed.

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