ON AIR NOW

LISTEN NOW

Weather

Sponsored By: Two Men and a Truck
cloudy-day
81°
Cloudy
H 87° L 77°
  • cloudy-day
    81°
    Current Conditions
    Cloudy. H 87° L 77°
  • cloudy-day
    82°
    Evening
    Cloudy. H 87° L 77°
  • cloudy-day
    79°
    Morning
    Mostly Cloudy. H 90° L 77°
LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

The latest top stories

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

The latest traffic report

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

The latest forecast

00:00 | 00:00

National Govt & Politics
Clinton emails: State official accused of offering FBI 'quid pro quo' to unclassify email
Close

Clinton emails: State official accused of offering FBI 'quid pro quo' to unclassify email

Clinton emails: State official accused of offering FBI 'quid pro quo' to unclassify email
Photo Credit: Mark Wilson
Secretary of State Hillary Clinton (L) and Patrick Kennedy (R) under secretary for managment State Department, participate in a town hall meeting at the State Department July 10, 2009 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

Clinton emails: State official accused of offering FBI 'quid pro quo' to unclassify email

A top State Department official offered the FBI a "quid pro quo" in exchange for unclassifying one of Hillary Clinton's emails amid a probe into the former secretary of state's use of a private email server, according to documents released Monday by federal investigators.

>> Read more trending stories

The allegation was detailed in notes from an interview that took place in July 2015 with an unnamed official in the FBI's Records Management Division.

"(Redacted) received a call from (redacted) of the International Operations Division (IOD) of the FBI, who 'pressured' him to change the classified email to unclassified. (Redacted) indicated he had been contacted by PATRICK KENNEDY, Undersecretary of State, who had asked his assistance in altering the email's classification in exchange for a 'quid pro quo,'" according to the interview notes.

"(Redacted) advised that, in exchange for marking the email unclassified, STATE would reciprocate by allowing the FBI to place more Agents in countries where they were presently forbidden."

>> Related: WikiLeaks emails: Trump questions whether DOJ, Clinton 'colluded' on email probe

The call was allegedly made as authorities reviewed five of Clinton's emails in response to a Freedom of Information Act request.

At a later all-agency meeting, "a participant specifically asked whether any of the emails in question were classified. Making eye contact with (redacted) KENNEDY remarked 'Well, we'll see,'" according to the interview notes.

The interviewee believed the comment was in reference to the email Kennedy, who is not related to the late Sen. Ted Kennedy, was attempting to get unclassified.

Kennedy argued for unclassifying the email during a 15-minute exchange at the meeting, although authorities declined to change its status. Kennedy asked to speak with someone else about the classification and was referred to Michael Steinbach, assistant director of the Counter-Terrorism Division.

>> Related: WikiLeaks emails: Apologies Clinton's 'Achilles' heel,' adviser says

During a subsequent conference call, "KENNEDY continued to pressure the FBI to change the classified markings on the email to unclassified. STEINBACH refused to do so," the interview notes state.

The interview subject told investigators that he "believes STATE has an agenda which involves minimizing the classified nature of the CLINTON emails in order to protect STATE interests and those of CLINTON."

In a statement released to Politico, State Department deputy spokesman Mark Toner denied that State officials requested a "quid pro quo" from federal investigators.

"This allegation is inaccurate and does not align with the facts," he said.

"To be clear: the State Department did upgrade the document at the request of the FBI when we released it back in May 2015. Under Secretary Kennedy sought to understand the FBI's process for withholding certain information from public release. As has been reported, there have been discussions within the interagency on issues of classification. Classification is an art, not a science, and individuals with classification authority sometimes have different views."

However, another interviewee appeared to corroborate the initial report in an interview with the FBI in September 2015.

The unnamed official, who works for the FBI's International Operations Division, said he found a note on his desk in late May or early June that asked him to contact Kennedy. The official said he was surprised, because his colleagues had been trying to get in touch of Kennedy for months, without success.

>> Related: FBI: No charges recommended in Clinton email investigation, Clinton responds

"When (redacted) returned KENNEDY's call, KENNEDY asked (redacted's) assistance in changing a classification of FBI information contained in an e-mail," according to interview notes.

"KENNEDY told (redacted) that the FBI's classification of the e-mail in question caused problems for KENNEDY and KENNEDY wanted to classify the document as 'B9.' KENNEDY further stated that the 'B9' classification would allow him to archive the document in the basement of DoS never to be seen again. (Redacted) was not sure of what KENNEDY meant by a 'B9' classification."

The interviewee told investigators that the email was classified by the FBI's Counter-Terrorism Division and related to the 2012 attacks on the U.S. Consulate in Benghazi.

He initially agreed to look into the email's classification "if KENNEDY would provide authority concerning the FBI's request to increase its personnel in Iraq." It was later determined that the email could not be declassified.

>> Related: Fact-checking Hillary Clinton: Did FBI director say Clinton was 'truthful' about emails?

House Speaker Paul Ryan pointed to the newly released documents as evidence of Clinton's "complete disregard for properly handling classified information."

"A senior State Department official's attempt to pressure the FBI to hide the extent of this mishandling bears all the signs of a cover-up," he said.

In a Tweet, Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump called the allegation "unbelievable."

The documents released Monday comprise the fourth batch of documents released by the FBI in relation to its investigation into Clinton's private email server. In all, authorities have released more than 250 pages of documents related to the email probe.

>> Related: Donald Trump to Hillary Clinton: If I were president, 'you'd be in jail'

Clinton, the Democratic nominee for president, served as secretary of state from 2009 to 2013. Her use of a private email server has been a recurring campaign issue; critics point to her use of an unsecured server as evidence of her questionable judgment.

In July, FBI director James Comey said no charges should be filed against Clinton because, despite her "extremely careless" handling of potentially sensitive information, no "clear evidence" existed to show Clinton intended to break the law.

Trump has promised that, if elected, he will appoint a special prosecutor to investigate Clinton's emails.

Read More
VIEW COMMENTS

There are no comments yet. Be the first to post your thoughts. or Register.

The Latest News Headlines

  • Amazon is promising “amazing deals” this year in advance of its annual Prime Day. Prime Day, a day of shopping for deeply discounted items, takes place over a 30-hour period this year. Beginning at 9 p.m. ET on July 10, the sale will run until 3 a.m. ET on July 12. However, dedicated shoppers can get a jump on some bargains as Amazon is starting sales related to Prime Day on July 5. Here’s a schedule of pre-sale days and what’s being offered:July 5: Alexa voice shopping July 6: Amazon MusicJuly 7: Amazon VideoJuly 8: Everyday EssentialsJuly 9: Amazon Reading How do you shop the sale? You need to be a member of Amazon Prime. Or, if you are not a member, you can sign up for a 30-day free trial and use that trial membership to shop.  How do you keep up with the sales? Download the free Amazon App. Once you download it, you can go to “Today’s Deals,” then click “Upcoming” and you will be able to see all the deals 24 hours before they are offered. If you click “Watch this deal,” the app will send an alert when that deal is starting. Amazon is encouraging shoppers to create a shopping list of items they are interested in. Should those items go on sale during the event, Prime members will be notified.  If you’re feeling a bit guilty during your shopping spree, Amazon has something for that, too. The company will donate a percentage of the price of all eligible purchases to the charitable organization of your choice. What will be on sale? According to Amazon, more than 100,000 items will be on sale during the event.  Televisions will be a popular buy as in the past, according to the company. “Prime Day will include amazing TV deals, with a variety of great brands including the all new Element 4K Ultra HD Smart LED TV - Amazon Fire TV Edition. Amazon is planning one of its largest total volume TV deals in history with a record level of inventory but once again, the TV deals will likely sell out.” You will also be able to find deals on unlocked phones from Alcatel, BLU, Moto and Nokia.  You can also get four months of Amazon’s streaming music service for .99 cents  The company is offering up to 40 percent off book titles with a Kindle Unlimited subscription. The subscription offers access to more than a million book titles. The books can be read on any smart device.Anything new? Here’s what’s new for this Prime Day sale, according to Amazon: Explore deals you’re into - Find deals organized by more than 20 of the most-shopped-for themes. From pet lovers to gardeners and techies to artists – find your deals even faster. Voice shopping - There will be even more Alexa-exclusive deals for members with an Amazon Echo, Echo Dot, Echo Show, Amazon Tap, compatible Fire TV or Fire tablet. Watch a deal - The Amazon App allows early deal watching in every country. Preview, track, and shop deals while at home or on the go with deal alerts on the Amazon App. Learn more at amazon.com/watched. Amazon global store - Prime members in China and Mexico will be able to shop both local deals as well as select deals from other countries from the Amazon Global Store.  “Our members love Prime Day and we have been thrilled by the response over the last two years. It is inspiring us to make it even better this year for Prime members,” said Amazon Prime vice president Greg Greeley. For more information, click on the Amazon Prime Day 2017 Insider’s Guide.  
  • A McDonald’s employee in Daytona Beach, Florida, was attacked by three customers over a broken ice cream machine, according to police. WKMG reported that three females, including two teens, were in the drive-thru of the restaurant Sunday night and wanted to order ice cream. >> Read more trending news The incident report said that the employee told the customers the ice cream machine was down for maintenance and could not be used, according to WKMG. Related: Police: Woman pulls gun after being shorted one chicken nugget Police said the upset customers went into the restaurant and argued with the employee when they saw another customer with ice cream. Related: Pregnant Taco Bell employee choked by woman upset over hot sauce packets, report says According to the report, the employee told police one of the teens threatened to hit her before the women went behind the counter, hitting the worker and pulling her hair.  A restaurant manager called 911 after the upset customers left the area. Police said they exited in a red sedan, WKMG reported. “The safety of our customers and employees is one of our top priorities,” McDonald’s said in a statement. “As this is an ongoing investigation, all inquiries are being directed to the Daytona Beach Police Department.” Police said the employee was not injured in the fight.
  • A Pennsylvania woman is facing charges after police said she overdosed while seven months pregnant. >> Read more trending news Kasey Dischman, 30, overdosed in her East Butler home on Friday, days after getting out of jail for retail theft, authorities said. In order to try to save her baby, doctors had to deliver the girl by performing an emergency cesarean section. Pennsylvania State Police said they are charging Dischman, who is recovering in a hospital, with aggravated assault on an unborn child. Dischman’s baby is in critical condition and on life support. If the baby does not survive, police said they plan to charge Dischman with homicide.
  • Northeast Florida's favorite son Tim Tebow had a big day at the plate on Wednesday.Tebow got his first home run during his second game with the St. Lucie Mets, the second game of a doubleheader. BREAKING: Tim Tebow has hit his first Class A Advanced home run in his second game with @stluciemets. Box: https://t.co/c6GoN3KMXl #Mets pic.twitter.com/X5xjoTPSqx— MiLB.com (@MiLB) June 28, 2017 Tim Tebow homered in his first day with the St. Lucie Mets because of course he did https://t.co/canqDDj0Vc (📹: @jkot09) pic.twitter.com/ruoHfBUxdN— Sports Illustrated (@SInow) June 28, 2017 Tebow with a 2-run HOMER in the second to give the Mets the lead! #STLMets pic.twitter.com/ie7S8Ycihy— St. Lucie Mets (@stluciemets) June 28, 2017 This comes just days after Tebow was promoted to the St. Lucie Mets from the Mets' South Atlantic League affiliate, the Columbia Fireflies.He got off to a good start in his debut with the Fireflies as well, hitting a home run in his first at-bat in April.

The Latest News Videos