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National
Elizabeth Smart slams Donald Trump's 'locker room talk'
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Elizabeth Smart slams Donald Trump's 'locker room talk'

Trump's Lawyers Take Action Against The New York Times

Elizabeth Smart slams Donald Trump's 'locker room talk'

Former abductee and activist Elizabeth Smart openly slammed Donald Trump’s lewd comments about women in a new interview with The Salt Lake Tribune.

“It’s terrifying. I don’t really see the world getting any better,” Smart said.

Smart, 28, was abducted in 2002 at the age of 14 from her home in Salt Lake City by Brian David Mitchell and his wife, Wanda Barzee. She was held captive by the couple for nine months before police rescued her. During her time in captivity, Smart was repeatedly raped and threatened.

>> Woman says Donald Trump forced a kiss at Mar-a-Lago in 1990s; Trump denies claim

She slammed the presidential hopeful and claimed that his remarks will significantly affect sexual assault victims.

“The worst part about it is listening to people trying to belittle it, just saying, ‘Well, it’s locker-room talk, it’s locker-room banter,'” Smart said. “Anyone belittling sexual violence, sexual abuse, they’re doing a huge disservice to victims of violent crimes, violent sexual abuse. There’s no justifying it — ever.”

Smart also pointed out the damaging affects of rape culture on society. She believes that people need to be educated on what it means to give consent.

“Especially for girls in Utah, that would be great, because I know I was raised to be kind, to be polite,” she said. “You didn’t say no, you only said yes. I wish the word ‘no’ was emphasized. ‘No’ is a good word to say every now and again, especially when it comes to your personal well-being.”

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Smart is now married to Matthew Gilmour and has a 20-month-old daughter, Chloe. But her abduction had a significant impact on how she will live the rest of her life. 

“When I was first raped, I didn’t realize there was a difference between rape and sex. Immediately, in my little 14-year-old mind when that happened, I thought, ‘I’m impure. Who will ever want to marry me now?’ If my parents knew what happened, would they even want me back, or would they think, ‘Good thing we had six kids, ’cause we still have five others?'”

(h/t US Weekly)

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  • As the Congress returns to work in Washington, D.C. after a two week break, lawmakers in both parties face a series of unsettled political battlegrounds, one of which could bring about a government shutdown by the end of the week, as President Trump and Republican leaders in the Congress grapple with the budget, money for their priorities, and unanswered questions on major issues like health reform. Here’s a snapshot as we begin the week in the nation’s capital. 1. Will the government shutdown on Friday night? That will be the biggest question as lawmakers return to legislative work sessions in the House and Senate this week. A temporary budget plan runs out at midnight on Friday April 28, and the Congress can either enact a short term extension, come to a deal on funding through the end of September (the end of the fiscal year), or get locked in a partisan struggle and do nothing, which would mean a shutdown. Negotiations have been going on for weeks, with flash points over funding for a border wall, money for the Obama health law, a bigger budget for the military and more. One thing to note – a number of Republicans would rather avoid a shutdown in the short term. .@marcorubio: 'We cannot shut down the government right now' pic.twitter.com/ET3J926ZfM — Face The Nation (@FaceTheNation) April 23, 2017 2. One big conflict – money for the border wall. During the campaign, President Donald Trump would get a huge response from his crowds by asking who would pay for a wall along the southern U.S. border. “Mexico!” was the deafening response. But that’s not the way it’s going to work out, as Mr. Trump needs money from Congress to start construction work on the wall. Democrats have made clear they’re not interested in helping in this plan to finish the budget for 2017. Why does the President need the support of Democrats? Because there are expected to be Republicans who won’t vote for a government funding measure for a variety of reasons. Eventually, but at a later date so we can get started early, Mexico will be paying, in some form, for the badly needed border wall. — Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) April 23, 2017 3. Republicans still struggling for health care deal. Over the break, the White House and GOP kept making noise about edging their way closer to a deal on a health care overhaul bill, something that President Trump and GOP leaders made a central promise in the 2016 campaign. But while there have been long distance discussions, there still is a lot of room between more moderate Republicans and more conservative members of the Freedom Caucus on the issue. Mr. Trump last week made clear that he would like to see action this week in the House, but that seems unlikely, as other matters are certainly higher up on the agenda at this point. House Speaker Paul Ryan tells GOP members House will focus on avoiding a government shutdown, not health care vote… https://t.co/KSWOkMSk0U — livenews (@livechannelfeed) April 24, 2017 4. Trump ready to unveil basics of tax reform plan. As if a government shutdown threat, the fight over money for the border wall, and the maneuvering over the health care deal isn’t enough, President Trump may add tax reform to the Legislative Stew this week as well. Mr. Trump said on Friday that he would be announcing his tax reform plan on Wednesday – a declaration that reports indicated caught his staff somewhat by surprise. It’s not expected that the White House will be sending a complete plan to the Congress with all the legislative text, but rather just the bullet points of what they want. As for Democrats, they say they will not give any votes to the GOP on tax reform, until they see the President’s tax returns – saying they want to know how any tax changes would impact Mr. Trump’s personal bottom line. We need to see @realDonaldTrump’s tax returns to know how any proposal for reform would affect him personally. #MTP — Nancy Pelosi (@NancyPelosi) April 23, 2017 5. This week takes us through the first 100 days of Trump. The idea of judging a President by the first hundred days in office has always struck me as sort of arbitrary. You highlight your successes, puff up what you haven’t yet achieved, and try to paper over your false starts. President Trump has been grumbling of late about the whole concept, but his campaign certainly was more than happy to make big pledges for his first 100 days in office. In an interview with the Associated Press last week, Mr. Trump was asked if he should be “held accountable” to that 100-day plan. “Somebody, yeah, somebody put out the concept of a hundred day plan. But yeah. Well, I’m mostly there on most items,” he answered. If you look at the graphic below – produced by the Trump Campaign, and tweeted out by the candidate in October 2016, you will see ten items all ending in “Act” – as in, a law passed by the Congress. None of those things have made it into law as yet. April 29 marks 100 days. My contract with the American voter will restore honesty, accountability & CHANGE to Washington! #DrainTheSwamp pic.twitter.com/sbVwctT1Sj — Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) October 25, 2016 It is possible that President Trump will mark his 100th day in office with a government shutdown. We’ll see if that happens. The Senate is back on Monday. The House returns on Tuesday. Friday is the funding deadline. Pro tip: Last minute surprises are great for kids' birthday parties, not so much for funding the government. #sassywithmassie — Thomas Massie (@RepThomasMassie) April 24, 2017
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  • When Mayor Alvin Brown released his government reform plan the first thing we got to look at was the organizational chart, where citizens got their own slot right at the top.  The reform changes could leave citizens with less say than before.“Council passes the budget and we’re just implementing that,” says Mayor Brown and they don’t plan on spending more than they take in.“With respect to how individual citizens deal with the city, that stuff is not all that changed,” says Councilman Bill Bishop about the reform plan.  What could change is how money gets spent.  The mayor has said before he would like to have a department under the Economic Development Commission that provides incentives for businesses to relocate here.  When he joined WOKV on Jacksonville’s Morning News he echoed what he’s said in that past, the faster we can get incentives to businesses the better chance we have to land more jobs.  However that’s a change that would leave citizens out of the money spending process.  Right now there are public comments through council committees all the way through to the time the City Council votes on something.“When you’re talking about spending money, that’s our job, that’s our one sole mission in life is to spend money,” says Councilman Bishop, “and we’re elected to that and ultimately responsible for that.”Councilman Bishop is not the only person in City Council concerned with what changes could be on the way.“The public needs to be able to weigh in, this is their government,” says Finance Committee Chair Richard Clark, “and we need to be able to vet those not behind closed doors individually but for everyone to be able to see and to be able to have the public to comment on what they see as well.”Mayor Brown wanted to have his first phase of the reform plan voted on by the council on December 13.  Because of the size of the reform and the amount of time needed in individual committees, council members have told me that probably won’t happen and a more realistic timeline would be mid to late January.

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