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Study: Babies cry at night to keep parents from having sex

In her first few months, your baby cries incessantly in the wee hours of the night, quashing any plans you might have had for love making. Is she just hungry or could this bundle of joy be blocking your joy for another reason?

A recent Harvard University study suggests that babies cry to keep their mom exhausted and to keep her from ovulating. If she can keep her parents from having sex, that will delay the arrival of a sibling who would compete for food and affection.

>> Read more trending stories  

"I'm just suggesting that offspring have evolved to use waking up mothers and suckling more intensely to delay the birth of another sibling," Harvard researcher David Haig told an NPR health blog.

Haig, an evolutionary biologist, published his interesting findings in the current issue of the journal Evolution, Medicine and Public Health. Other researchers weighed in on the subject.

Read more about what the study says here

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The Latest News Headlines

  • By the end of the day today, we could have the jury that will sit over the federal fraud case of former Congresswoman Corrine Brown.  With the trial currently slated to begin Wednesday, the goal is to have the 12 person jury and two alternates selected by the end of the day today. There is still a substantial amount of screening that needs to take place, though- and the court is coming off a longer than scheduled day Monday, when the jury selection process started.  The first day of questioning focused specifically on this case, with Magistrate Judge James R. Klindt asking prospective jurors whether they were previously aware of the charges, if they have any feelings toward former and- ultimately- if the information and pre-conceived notions could be set aside in order to consider only the evidence presented at trial. Prospective jurors were also able to raise issues of “extreme hardship”. In all, that led to 21 people being excused from the pool, while 44 rolled over to today.  Klindt wanted to have around 50 prospective jurors before moving to the second phase of questioning, so more were summoned to report for jury duty Tuesday morning. The day started with those new jurors facing the same hardship and case knowledge questions as those who first reported Monday. Of the 30 questioned as a group, 17 said they have some knowledge of the case and six said they have strong feelings toward Brown one way or the other. While 19 were flagged for further questioning, the court only needed to vet a few in order to reach a threshold where they were comfortable moving forward- 53 total prospective jurors, including the ones who rolled over from yesterday. The second round of questioning is now getting underway for the 53, including looking at areas which are more broad and standard for jury selection- employment, prior experience in the legal or criminal systems, and more.  At the conclusion of the individual questioning along that line- and any challenges “for cause” that come as a result- prospective jurors will be sat in the order of their randomly selected number, and the first 12 designated as the possible panel. From there, both prosecutors and the defense have a specific number of “peremptory” strikes- or strikes without cause- which they can exercise. As prospective jurors are removed from the box for those strikes, the next in line by number will fill in.  Once the 12 person jury is chosen, a similar process takes place for the two alternates. Once that is done, the jury is set.  This jury will not be sequestered for this trial, which is currently scheduled for three weeks. Klindt has given the pool specific and repeated instruction that they’re not allowed to consume any news or social media about the trial, that they’re not allowed to communicate with anyone about the case, and that if someone speaks about the case in their presence they’re supposed to leave.  Brown and two others are accused of soliciting more than $800,000 in donations to “One Door For Education”- a group she represented as a charity- but using the money for personal expenses instead, including travel, luxury events, and more. Her two alleged co-conspirators- former Chief of Staff Ronnie Simmons and the head of One Door Carla Wiley- both previously pleaded guilty. Brown has been indicted on 22 charges.  WOKV is in the federal courthouse as these proceedings move forward. Check back frequently to WOKV.com for updates, and follow our reporter Stephanie Brown on Twitter for updates during court recesses.
  • Controversial Brunswick pastor Ken Adkins was sentenced to 35 years in prison Tuesday for child molestation. Adkins, 57, will serve life on probation, upon his release.  Earlier this month, Adkins was found guilty on all eight counts, including aggravated child molestation, child molestation, enticing a child for indecent purposes, and more.  Prosecutors said that Adkins watched two 15-year-olds have sex and that he engaged in sexual acts with one of the teens. Adkins was initially arrested in August 2016. He turned himself in, and has been in the Glynn County, Georgia Jail since. 
  • Nearly eight months after his initial arrest, the child molestation trial for controversial pastor Ken Adkins has come to an end.   Adkins has been found guilty on all eight counts, including aggravated child molestation, child molestation, enticing a child for indecent purposes, and more.   A jury of eleven women and three men- including two alternates- were seated for the trial, which began last week.  Prosecutors argued that Adkins watched two 15-year-olds having sex and that he engaged in sexual acts with one of the teens. Adkins is set to be sentenced on April 25th.
  • Police are searching for three suspects after a man is beaten, robbed and shot near Edward Waters College early this morning. The Jacksonville Sheriff's Office says the attack happened around 2 a.m. in a parking lot near Sassy's Wings on Kings Road, but it was the man's roommate who actually called for help around five hours later. 'The victim was beaten severely, so he might have not known how bad he was,' said a JSO lieutenant briefing reporters at the scene. According to that lieutenant, the victim - identified only as a white man in his 20's - was walking through the area when three individuals stopped him. Those suspects then beat him up, robbed him and shot him. No suspect description has been given at this time by JSO. The victim is being treated at UF Health for injuries to his face as well as the bullet wound. JSO isn't saying where the man was shot but did say his injuries aren't life-threatening. It's not clear at this point if the victim knew his attackers or what was taken from him. JSO is actively investigating the area, including gathering any video footage and speaking to potential witnesses. Anyone with information is asked to call JSO at 904-630-0500 or email JSOCrimeTips@jaxsheriff.org. Those who wish to remain anonymous and possibly qualify for a cash reward can call Crime Stoppers at 866-845-TIPS (8477). 
  • While President Donald Trump seems never to be at a loss for words, both spoken and tweeted, a linguistics professor at Georgetown University says there is one phase that does seem to crop up in his public speaking more often than others.  “Believe me” is the most common two-word phrase the president has used in public in his almost 100-day administration, according to a story from CNN. The network asked Georgetown linguistics professor Jennifer Sclafani to study Trump’s remarks during the past three months. Sclafani said she found that Trump said “believe me” 26 times in speeches since his inauguration. 'Trump doesn't bother to get bogged down by details,' Sclafani told CNN after studying the president’s speech patterns. 'He presents himself as a visionary type of leader, focused solely on his vision for the future of the country.' Click here to read the entire story.

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