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National
Super Hero: Surgeon who helped after marathon bombing saved officers as well
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Super Hero: Surgeon who helped after marathon bombing saved officers as well

Super Hero: Surgeon who helped after marathon bombing saved officers as well

Super Hero: Surgeon who helped after marathon bombing saved officers as well

As two officers shot in East Boston last week continue to recover, Boston Police Commissioner William Evans has been speaking openly about the lifesaving treatment they received at Mass. General Hospital from Dr. King and his team.

If that name sounds familiar, it’s because Dr. David King was also among the surgeons who helped survivors of the Boston Marathon bombing in 2013. He had just finished the race himself when he jumped into action.

King served as Lieutenant Colonel and combat surgeon in the US Army while serving in Afghanistan and Iraq, where he learned valuable lessons that translated to the emergency room at MGH when he began there in 2008.

>> Read more trending stories  

"There is no question that our patients now are benefiting from lessons learned in the past decade of war,” King said in 2013.

He saved lives after the Boston Marathon bombing.He saved officers shot in East Boston last week.He’s saving more...

Posted by FOX25 News on Tuesday, October 18, 2016

One of those lessons was the impact a tourniquet can have on a life-saving situation.

King re-introduced the battlefield treatment technique through a program that trains teachers, school nurses, and recently a group of Boston police officers.

Those techniques were used to help the officers shot in East Boston before they were brought to MGH.

“The officer who actually applied it, just came off of training just this past Thursday/so you talk about a coincidence really paying off for us,” Evans said last week.

Since this story aired, several people who have been treated by Dr. King's team have reached out to WFXT, including one man who said his heart needed to be manually restarted twice during surgery after being shot several times at point blank range.

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  • A Utah couple is accused of giving their newborn daughter crushed-up pills to mask her withdrawal symptoms after she was born addicted to drugs.  Lacey Dawn Christenson, 26, and Colby Glen Wilde, 29, both of Elk Ridge, each face multiple drug charges, as well as charges of child abuse and child endangerment. According to the Utah County Sheriff’s Office, Christenson used heroin and prescription pain pills heavily during her pregnancy, leading their daughter to be born addicted to drugs in April.  “(Christenson and Wilde) admitted that, after their daughter was born on April 9, later that same day, Wilde applied some of the crushed Suboxone pills to the infant’s gums while nurses and other medical staff were out of the room,” the Sheriff’s Office said in a news release. “(They) told investigators they talked to friends about how to mask signs of drug dependence in an infant, and that they discussed this issue with each other.” Suboxone is a medication used to treat pain, as well as to treat addiction to opiates.  Utah Valley Hospital, where the girl was born, released a statement to Fox 13 in Salt Lake City, in which officials said newborn safety is a top priority. “The hospital’s team of specially trained caregivers closely monitors each newborn for signs of any difficulty. If there is a known history of drug use by a mother, then her baby will be evaluated and if necessary, receive treatment for withdrawal symptoms,” the hospital’s statement read. “The hospital’s social work team will also contact DCFS (Utah Division of Child and Family Services) immediately if illicit drug use took place during the pregnancy. When a mother does not disclose a history of drug use and her baby has no signs or symptoms of difficulty, then the hospital proceeds with its established care processes.  “While the hospital does everything possible to keep newborns safe, no assumptions are made about a mother’s personal history. Parents have the responsibility to disclose anything that might jeopardize their newborn’s health.” Officials with the Sheriff’s Office said in the news release that investigators found Suboxone, in both solid and crushed pill form, in the couple’s home while executing a search warrant June 28. They also said they found drug paraphernalia throughout the house, including next to the baby’s bassinet and next to a child’s sippy cup. Besides the newborn, Christenson’s other three children, ages 8, 4 and 2, lived in the house with the couple, the Sheriff’s Office said. DCFS became involved in the case, having all four children tested for drugs. All four children tested positive for methamphetamine, the Sheriff’s Office said. The infant girl also tested positive for heroin and morphine. “I don’t have any doubt that Colby and Lacey love their kids,” Sgt. Spencer Cannon, with the Utah County Sheriff’s Office, told Fox 13. “They’re addicts right now, with serious addiction problems, and they’re not in a good place to be taking care of themselves even, let alone anybody else.” >> Read more trending news DCFS contacted the father of Christenson’s oldest child, who took custody of the boy. He did not want the siblings to be separated, and case workers approved him to have custody of all four children, investigators said.  The investigation into Christenson and Wilde began June 26 when police in Spanish Fork were called to Walmart, where employees say they saw Wilde take several items from the store’s shelves and take them to customer service, returning them for a cash card.  When loss prevention workers confronted Wilde, who was carrying his then-two-month-old daughter in a car seat, he ran, slamming the girl’s seat into a pillar and dropping her several times, investigators said.  Investigators said Wilde handed the baby to a stranger before fleeing in his car. He was stopped by Utah County deputies in a nearby parking lot, the Sheriff’s Office said.  Christenson, who was in Walmart with her older children, was taken into custody on an outstanding warrant at that time. 
  • The TSA intercepted a record 89 firearms in carry-on bags over just a week, including one in Jacksonville. The TSA says the prior record was 82 firearms, set in May. 74 of the guns were loaded and 27 had a round chambered. These numbers deal with July 10th through July 16th, which is the most recently released data from the group.  The firearm found at the Jacksonville International Airport was loaded and had a round in the chamber. It was located July 11th.  The TSA is warning that if you bring a firearm to a security checkpoint, you could face arrest and a fine of up to $11,000. If you want to travel with a gun, it needs to be checked, following TSA guidelines.  At airports across the country, the TSA also caught a small pocketknife taped inside of the handle of a toothbrush, a practice tank warhead, and several other sharp bladed items over this time period. One of the guns which was found was actually concealed inside of a wheelchair cushion.
  • An Alabama grandmother is accused of “selling” her 13-year-old granddaughter to her elderly boyfriend for sex, threatening the girl with harm if she did not comply, police said.  Mary Lue Daw, 66, of Atmore, is charged with first-degree rape and first-degree human trafficking, according to WKRG in Mobile. Daw’s 87-year-old boyfriend, Charles Clarence Stacey, is charged with first-degree rape, first-degree human trafficking, first-degree promoting prostitution and enticing a child for immoral purposes.  >> Read more trending news An investigation by the Atmore Police Department indicated that Daw accepted cash from Stacey in exchange for the sexual encounter, WKRG reported.  The Atmore News reported that Daw may have held the girl down while Stacey sexually assaulted her.  Both defendants are being held in the Escambia County Detention Center in lieu of $1 million bond each. 
  • Two Tennessee nurses are facing charges after state investigators said they diverted prescription pain pills away from their patients and to themselves instead for more than a year. >> Read more trending news The nurses, identified as Sarah Thacker, 31, and Kimberly Click, 42, came to the attention of the Tennessee Bureau of Investigation in February after special agents got a pair of tips from the Tennessee Department of Health, authorities said. Investigators were told on Feb. 8 that Thacker, a registered nurse at the Johnson City Medical Center and Franklin Woods Hospital, was suspected of using her job to get hydrocodone pills prescribed to patients. Authorities believe she started diverting the pills in September 2015 and continued until at least January 2017. Later that month, on Feb. 27, the health department again contacted TBI to report that Click, a registered nurse at the John Medical Center, was also suspected of fraudulently obtaining pills for her personal use, according to authorities. A grand jury came back with indictments on July 12 for both women, who turned themselves in over the weekend, TBI said. Thacker was charged with dozen counts of obtaining a controlled substance by fraud. Click was arrested on 33 counts of obtaining a controlled substance by fraud.
  • A Washington state man who once went on the “Dr. Phil” show to proclaim his innocence in his 13-year-old son’s disappearance and death has been charged with the boy’s murder.  Mark Redwine, of Bellingham, is charged with second-degree murder and child abuse knowingly or recklessly resulting in death, according to an indictment handed down by a La Plata County, Colorado, grand jury. He is being held in lieu of a $1 million cash-only bond, according to the La Plata County Sheriff’s Office.  Dylan Redwine was last seen alive on Nov. 18, 2012, the day he arrived in La Plata County for a court-ordered Thanksgiving holiday visit with his father. According to the indictment, the teen did not want to see his father, with whom he had argued on a previous visit.  Dylan, who lived in Colorado Springs with his mother, Elaine Hall, planned to spend most of his visit with friends in Bayfield, near the Vallecito home where his father lived at the time of his disappearance. Text messages showed that Dylan asked to stay with a friend instead of his father the night he arrived, but his father refused.  After stops at McDonald’s and Walmart, the pair went to Mark Redwine’s home, the indictment said.   “Surveillance video from the airport and Walmart show little to no personal interaction between Mark Redwine and his 13-year-old (son) Dylan,” the indictment read. “Dylan Redwine was never seen or heard from after that evening.” Click here to read the entire indictment.  Dylan made plans to visit a friend the next morning around 6:30 a.m., but he never showed up. When the friend texted him, asking where he was, the boy got no response. According to the Durango Herald, Redwine told authorities that he last saw Dylan around 7:30 a.m. that morning. After running errands, he returned home to find Dylan gone, Redwine said. Dylan was reported missing that evening.  During the time Dylan was missing, his parents went on “Dr. Phil,” where Hall confronted her ex-husband about their son’s disappearance. “I really have a concern that you hurt him, and his bones are out there just laying, and you don’t even care,” a tearful Hall said during the television appearance. “No, Elaine, I wouldn’t hurt him,” Redwine responded. “What kind of mother are you to even think that I was even capable of doing something like that?” Despite extensive searches by law enforcement and volunteers, no sign of the teen was found until June 2013, when his partial remains were found on Middle Mountain, about eight miles from his father’s house.  Redwine was named a “person of interest” in his son’s death in August 2015, the Denver Post reported.  Dylan’s skull was found that November, about a mile and a half from the spot where the initial discovery of remains was made. Redwine was familiar with Middle Mountain and the locations where his son’s remains were found, the indictment said.  Forensic anthropologists determined that Dylan’s skull showed signs of blunt force trauma. The skull also bore small marks consistent with a knife, indicating that his head was removed and moved to a separate location to make it more difficult to identify him and determine how he died, the indictment said.  The court document indicated that Dylan’s blood was found in multiple locations in his father’s home, including on a couch, the floor in front of the couch, a love seat, the corner of a coffee table and on the floor beneath a rug.  A K-9 officer and her dog searched Redwine’s home in August 2013, at which time the dog alerted the officer to the scent of a dead body in the living room and the washing machine. The dog, Molly, also alerted the officer to the bed of Redwine’s pickup truck and the clothing Redwine told investigators he wore on the night before Dylan disappeared.  The indictment also revealed suspicious conversations that Redwine allegedly had with people, including after Dylan’s remains were found.  Redwine’s ex-wife, Betsy Horvath, told authorities within days of the boy’s disappearance that she was afraid her ex-husband had hurt Dylan. “Ms. Horvath reported that Mark Redwine had previously said that if he ever had to get rid of a body, he would leave it out in the mountains,” the indictment read. “Also, during their divorce and custody proceedings, Mr. Redwine repeatedly violated the custody agreement and told Ms. Horvath that he would ‘kill the kids before he let her have them.’” Horvath’s sister heard the threat, the indictment said.  Dylan’s half-brother, Brandon Redwine, also told investigators that after Dylan’s partial remains were found in June 2013, his father mentioned blunt force trauma multiple times and said that detectives would have to find the rest of the body, including the boy’s skull, to prove the cause of death, the document said.  >> Read more trending news Some of Dylan’s remains are still missing. The Durango Herald reported that Redwine, who earlier this year criticized the La Plata County Sheriff’s Office’s investigation, was organizing a seven-day search for the rest of his son’s body. The search was scheduled for August on Middle Mountain.  Shelly Watson, a volunteer who was coordinating the search on Redwine’s behalf, said the search is still on.  “The search wasn’t to vindicate Mark,” Watson told the Herald. “It wasn’t to put him in jail, it wasn’t to do anything. I has nothing to do with Mark. It has to do with Dylan, finding Dylan’s remains.” Hall told the Herald after Redwine’s arrest that she credits a new sheriff and new district attorney with finally obtaining her ex-husband’s arrest.  “I’m glad this day has finally arrived,” Hall told the newspaper. “It’s been a long, arduous journey. There will never be closure, because my son will still be dead, unfortunately. But it’s encouraging we’re taking this step in the right direction.” When asked what Redwine might be thinking or feeling in jail, Hall declined to guess. “He killed my 13-year-old son,” she said. “His discomfort is not my concern.”

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