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Report: Man in custody after trying to climb White House fence

Authorities say a man has been arrested trying to climb over a fence at the White House.

The Secret Service says the unidentified man was apprehended before he could get over the fence.

He had two bags with him and authorities are waiting for the Washington police to arrive to screen the bags' contents.

It is unclear why the man tried to climb the fence around the heavily guarded White House or what may be in the bags he was carrying.

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The Latest News Headlines

  • A good Samaritan did what almost anyone would do: try to reunite a lost child with his or her family. But police in Lakeland, Florida, said that the man was beaten by the parent of the child he was trying to help. Police said the man was with friends when he saw the 2-year-old girl alone. Thinking she was lost he walked her around hoping she would point out her parents, WFLA reported. >> Read more trending news At the same time, the parents were told that the man was walking toward the playground and that bystanders thought he was trying to kidnap the little girl. Three men found the man and the little girl. The father said that as one of his friends grabbed his daughter, he punched the man several times, WFLA reported. “I saw this man with my daughter in his hands walking toward the parking lot. What would you do?” the father said to WFLA. Police said they investigated and determined no crime had happened. They confirmed the man who was trying to help was visiting friends who happened to be off-duty deputies. The man decided not to file charges against the girl’s father. But the father and his friends and family aren’t taking the man at his word. They’ve gone to to social media and shared his photo, Facebook page and his business, saying he’s a child predator, WFLA reported. Police warn that anyone who posts false information on social media could be the source of a defamation of character claim and could be held liable, WFLA reported. Before posting to social media, police suggest calling police to verify what happened and get correct information.
  • A 17-year-old teen has been charged with first-degree involuntary manslaughter after running over and killing another teen while high on psychedelic mushrooms. KSHB reported that, according to a probable cause statement, Jacob David Mustoe told police that he was high on mushrooms on Sunday morning when he crashed into a house in Kansas City, Missouri. >> Read more trending news The Kansas City Star reported that Mustoe got into an argument with Jake A. Wehmeyer, 17, while visiting Wehmeyer’s house with two other friends. The argument, according to court documents, led to Mustoe and Wehmeyer throwing items, including billiard balls, at each other. KCTV reported Wehmeyer’s parents were out of town and Wehmeyer and his 14-year-old brother were left at home. Mustoe reportedly told police he left the house, walked to his own home and got into his car, then aimed it at Wehmeyer’s house and drove into a neighbor’s yard.  Police were called to the area around 4 a.m. Sunday, where they fould a vehicle driven through a closed garage door of a house, KCTV reported. According to court documents, Mustoe said he did it because he was high on mushrooms. The documents also said he told police he thought “everything would be OK” and that he saw Wehmeyer in a neighbor's yard telling him to slow down. Wehmeyer was found dead at the scene and was partially under the vehicle. Mustoe left the home and ran to his own house, where he contacted his mother, took a shower and changed his clothes. The Kansas City Star reported that police arrived at Mustoe’s home and found that he had injuries consistent with the crash. He was arrested after being taken to a hospital for minor injury treatment. Mustoe has a $200,000 bond.
  • A Minnesota woman was making her husband’s funeral arrangements earlier this month when she got a devastating phone call from her own doctor, who told her she has inoperable cancer.  Tessie Sylvester and her young sons, Gus, 6, and Freddy, 5, sat at John Sylvester’s bedside on June 16 as the beloved husband and father drew his last breath. John Sylvester, 44, had Lou Gehrig’s disease for six years before he died.  His wife told the Twin Cities Pioneer Press that she was just beginning to deal with the aftermath of his death when her phone rang.  “As I was calling the funeral home to tell them that John had passed, the doctor called me on the other line and said the biopsy had come back and it was cancer,” Sylvester told the Pioneer Press. The adenocarcinoma had already metastasized to Sylvester’s liver and lymph nodes, meaning surgery was not an option.  She is due to begin chemotherapy on Tuesday.  Sylvester told the newspaper that she never felt sick. She went to the doctor for a routine physical in late May. Abnormal bloodwork led to more tests and, eventually, the biopsy.  Sylvester’s sister has started a GoFundMe page to raise money to help Sylvester, a self-insured dentist, keep her household running and pay for her treatment.  “Tessie is terrified by the thought of leaving her sons without their daddy and mommy,” the page read. “She is only 36 years old and she is going to do everything she can to fight this cancer. She will have chemotherapy to try to keep it at bay and buy her time with her sons.” As of Monday afternoon, the page had raised more than $170,500 of the $500,000 goal.  >> Read more trending news The fundraising has been helped along by food writer and television personality Andrew Zimmern, who said on Facebook that the Sylvester family’s plight “hits home” for him. John Sylvester, a longtime soccer coach, coached the children of one of Zimmern’s colleagues.  John Sylvester, who met his wife in 2001 when both coached summer youth soccer, was also a professional soccer player in the ‘90s, playing for the Minnesota Thunder.  As she prepares to fight for her life, Tessie Sylvester is also trying to figure out how to explain her illness to her sons. She told the Pioneer Press that one question the boys always had while they watched their father’s disease progress was, “Why can’t the doctors help daddy?” She hopes the chemotherapy can offer them some comfort. “I am sick, but the doctors can help,” she wants to tell them. “They couldn’t help daddy, but they can help me.”  
  • Here's a roundup of news trending across the nation and the world today. What to know now: 1. Syrian attack: The White House is warning Syria that there will be a “heavy price” if a chemical weapons attack is carried out in that country. The “United States has identified potential preparations for another chemical weapons attack by the Assad regime that would likely result in the mass murder of civilians, including innocent children,” according to a statement from the administration. The White House noted that the preparations intelligence sources discovered “are similar to preparations the regime made before its April 4, 2017, chemical weapons attack. As we have previously stated, the United States is in Syria to eliminate the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria. If, however, Mr. Assad conducts another mass murder attack using chemical weapons, he and his military will pay a heavy price.'  2. CBO score on health care: The Congressional Budget Office estimates that 22 million fewer people will have health care coverage in the next decade if the Senate health care bill passes and is signed into law. According to the CBO, 15 million people would be uninsured by 2018. The other 7 million would lose coverage by 2026. The 22 million number is compared to the estimated coverage provided by the Affordable Care Act. 3. Supreme Court travel ban ruling: The Supreme Court ended its session on Monday saying it would hear arguments in the fall over President Trump’s travel ban, but, in the meantime, allow parts of the executive order to go into effect. The court ruled that people from the six countries named in the executive order -- Iran, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria and Yemen -- could be barred from entering the country if they have no “bona fide” relationship with anyone in the United States.  4. Another Cosby hearing: A hearing is scheduled for Tuesday in California to set a trial date for a lawsuit that accuses Bill Cosby of sexually assaulting a teenager at the Playboy Mansion in 1974. Judy Huth said Cosby assaulted her in one of the bedrooms of the mansion when she was 15. A Pennsylvania jury failed to come to a verdict two weeks ago in Cosby’s criminal trial on charges he sexually assaulted Andrea Constand in his Philadelphia home in 2004. Authorities there say they will retry that case.  5. Baylor being investigated: Baylor University officials have confirmed that the NCAA is conducting an investigation into reports of sexual assaults at the country’s largest Baptist-sponsored university. The school’s football coach, Art Briles, was fired, and the school’s president, Ken Starr, resigned in the wake of the scandal that has seen several women file suit against the school, saying it mishandled claims of rape against football players and other students.  And one more Three journalists at CNN have resigned after the network retracted a story that linked a friend of President Donald Trump’s to a Russian bank. According to the network, the story, which connected Trump campaign team executive Anthony Scaramucci to the Russian Direct Investment Fund, “did not meet CNN’s editorial standards and has been retracted. Links to the story have been disabled. CNN apologizes to Mr. Scaramucci.” Thomas Frank, who wrote the story; Eric Lichtblau, an editor; and Lex Haris, who oversaw a new investigative unit at CNN, all resigned after the story was retracted. In case you missed it

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