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    The murder trial of the only two suspects arrested in the assassination of the North Korean leader's half brother was transferred to another Malaysian court Tuesday. Armed escorts accompanied the women, Doan Thi Huong of Vietnam and Siti Aisyah from Indonesia, as they arrived for their morning court appearance in Kuala Lumpur. Both smiled at their embassy representatives as they were brought to the dock and wore the same clothes as they did at earlier court appearances. Their case was formally transferred to the High Court as the lower court had no jurisdiction to hear a murder case. Prosecutor Iskandar Ahmad said the date for their first appearance in the High Court would usually be within a month. The suspects would then enter pleas and the trial would have to start within 90 days, Iskandar said. The two women are accused of smearing VX nerve agent on Kim Jong Nam's face at the Kuala Lumpur airport on Feb. 13. Kim died soon afterward. The women have said they were duped into thinking they were playing a harmless prank for a hidden-camera show. Yusron Ambary, counsellor at the Indonesian Embassy, said Siti wrote a letter to her parents recently, asking them not to worry about her. 'I am in good health. Just pray. Don't think about me too much. Keep healthy and pray at night. I have a lot of people helping me. The embassy officials always come to see me, my lawyers also. Don't worry. Pray for me so that the case will be over soon and I can go back home. Send my love to my son Rio,' he read from the letter to reporters outside the courtroom. Police have said four North Korean suspects fled Malaysia the day of the attack. Defense lawyers previously expressed fear the women will be scapegoats because other people believed to have knowledge of the case left the country. Although Malaysia never directly accused North Korea of carrying out the attack, speculation is rampant that Pyongyang orchestrated a hit on a long-exiled member of its ruling elite. Although Kim was not an obvious political threat, he may have been seen as a potential rival in the country's dynastic dictatorship. Norht Korea has denounced such speculation.
  • The Latest on militant violence in a southern Philippine city (all times local): 8 a.m. The Philippine military chief says three Malaysians, an Indonesian and possibly Arab extremists have been killed in a southern city that Islamic militants planned to burn entirely in an audacious plot to project the lethal influence of the Islamic State group. Gen. Eduardo Ano told The Associated Press in an interview Tuesday that the military has made advances in containing the weeklong siege of Marawi city. He says a top Filipino militant is believed to have been killed and the leader of the attack was wounded in the fighting. Ano also told AP that the extremists plotted to set Marawi ablaze and kill as many Christians in nearby Iligan city on Ramadan to mimic the violence seen by the world in Syria and Iraq.
  • Prime Minister Theresa May and Labour Party leader Jeremy Corbyn faced tough questions and a skeptical audience in a live TV event Monday night ahead of next week's parliamentary elections. It was not a debate, but did air policy and stylistic differences between the two foes. They did not appear together but were questioned separately by members of the audience and by aggressive interviewer Jeremy Paxman. The June 8 election pits May, the Conservative Party leader who opposed Brexit before the referendum last June but now favors it, against Corbyn, who has alienated many longtime Labour supporters with his hard-left views. The 'Battle for Number 10' show broadcast on Sky News and Channel 4 brought the two prime contenders together in the same studio at the same time, but they did not appear together at any point. Voters are not likely to get a true debate before the vote. Facing harsh questioning from Paxman, one of Britain's best known TV journalists, May defended her about-face on Brexit. She rebuffed his repeated attempts to get her to say whether she now thinks leaving the European Union is a good idea, saying only that the British voters have decided and that she is determined to get the best deal possible. 'We are doing the right thing in making a success of Brexit,' she said, vowing to maintain her reputation as a 'bloody difficult woman' during talks with European Union leaders if her party wins the election and keeps power. But Paxman set the tone by saying that if he were an EU negotiator who had observed all her recent flip flops, he would think of her as a 'blowhard who collapses at the first sound of gunfire.' May often found herself on the defensive as audience members grilled her on cuts to the police, National Health Service and education, and a so-called 'dementia tax' that might make it harder for elderly Britons to pass on their property to their heirs. At one point a heckler yelled, 'You've clearly failed.' Corbyn did not enjoy smooth sailing either, with Paxman making numerous accusations and typically cutting Corbyn off before he could reply. Paxman challenged Corbyn's refusal to denounce the Irish Republican Army and his having met with Hamas officials and suggested the Labour leader would seek to abolish the monarchy if his party triumphed. Corbyn said getting rid of Britain's constitutional monarchy is 'certainly not on my agenda.' He said he was fighting the election for 'social justice' and to reduce poverty, not to change the law regarding the monarch.
  • Constantine Mitsotakis, a former Greek conservative prime minister remembered for his fierce confrontations with liberal and socialist parties as well for backing free-market reforms, died Monday at 98 after a 60-year political career. His family announced the death, saying Mitsotakis was 'surrounded by those whom he loved. ' Mitsotakis, father of the current conservative Greek opposition leader, Kyriakos Mitsotakis, will be buried Thursday in his hometown of Hania on the island of Crete. The government ordered that he be awarded full state honors, with four days of official mourning. His body will lie in state at Athens Cathedral on the eve of his funeral. 'A dedicated European, Constantine Mitsotakis was one of the emblematic figures of Greek political life during a political career that lasted more than 50 years,' European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker said. Mitsotakis served as prime minister between 1990 and 1993, a brief spell during two decades dominated by his Socialist rivals. He retired from active politics in 2004 but remained honorary chairman of the center-right New Democracy party. He was credited with starting unpopular financial reforms to loosen state control of the economy, which were quietly continued by later governments, and improving relations with Turkey. But he was also often regarded as a divisive figure in a country struggling to escape its volatile political history. Born in Hania on Oct. 18, 1918, Mitsotakis was the nephew of liberal statesman Eleftherios Venizelos and was first elected to Parliament in 1946. He served in several Cabinet posts, including finance minister, in liberal governments in 1951-52 and 1963-65. But in 1965, he led a group of dissidents who abandoned George Papandreou's liberal Center Union government following its clash with King Constantine II over control of the armed forces — a decision for which most liberal critics never forgave Mitsotakis. The meteoric rise of Andreas Papandreou, George's son and a U.S.-educated economist who had returned to Greece in the early 1960s, was widely seen as a factor in Mitsotakis' split with the party. The resulting political crisis and nearly two years of unstable government in part prompted army colonels to carry out a coup in 1967. Mitsotakis was arrested along with other politicians at the start of the seven-year military dictatorship. He later lived in exile in Paris until shortly before the junta collapsed in 1974. In 1977, Mitsotakis re-entered Parliament at the head of the small Neoliberal Party and, the following year, joined the governing New Democracy party, serving first as finance minister and later as foreign minister. He became the party's leader in 1984 while the conservatives were in opposition. Mitsotakis emerged as the main adversary of Andreas Papandreou, who founded the Panhellenic Socialist Movement in 1974 rather than head his father's old party and then defeated the conservatives in a 1981 landslide. Andreas Papandreou's son, George, became prime minister in 2009. Both leaders ran lavish election campaigns that brought hundreds of thousands of supporters to Athens to attend mammoth flag-waving rallies. Mitsotakis narrowly won in 1990 after the Socialists became entangled in a financial scandal and votes in 1989 twice produced a hung parliament. His administration was marked by a dispute with neighboring Macedonia over the newly independent country's name and by large-scale union and student protests against his free market and education reforms. Governing with a one-seat majority in Parliament, Mitsotakis' government was brought down by conservative dissenters in 1993, condemning New Democracy to spend the next 11 years in opposition. The leader of those dissenters, Antonis Samaras, was eventually welcomed back into the party and defeated Dora Bakoyannis in a leadership contest after the conservatives lost the 2009 election. Samaras served as prime minister from 2012 to 2015, in coalition with the Socialists. After his resignation as party leader, Mitsotakis often urged Greek governments to take bolder steps in their market reforms, and he led an unsuccessful effort for Greece's president to be elected directly by the people. Two of his children followed him into politics. Mitsotakis' eldest daughter, Dora Bakoyannis was mayor of Athens during the 2004 Olympic Games and later was foreign minister from 2006-2009 in a New Democracy government. Her husband, Pavlos Bakoyannis, a conservative politician, was shot to death in 1989 by the far-left Greek terrorist group November 17. Mitsotakis, who enjoyed good health until late in life, also lived long enough to see his youngest child and only son, Kyriakos, elected as leader of New Democracy in January 2016. Mitsotakis is also survived by two other daughters and several grandchildren and great-grandchildren. His wife, Marika, died in 2012. ___ Derek Gatopoulos in Athens contributed
  • Montenegro on Monday strongly protested 'inappropriate' conduct by Russian authorities against a senior ruling party leader who was prevented from changing planes at a Moscow airport. Lawmaker Miodrag Vukovic said he was kept overnight in a transit zone at Domodedovo International Airport while on his way to an international meeting in Belarus. He returned to Montenegro on Monday. The Montenegrin Foreign Ministry summoned the Russian ambassador, telling him the incident 'represents a breach of basic international rules and diplomatic practices.' Russian Foreign Ministry spokeswoman Maria Zakharova said the Kremlin imposed the ban against Vukovic because Montenegro had joined Western sanctions against Moscow over its actions in Ukraine. 'It's not a secret that Montenegro joined the European Union's anti-Russian sanctions, including against (Russian) individuals,' Zakharova said on the Foreign Ministry's website. 'We have always said that we reserve the right to take retaliatory measures on the basis of reciprocity, as is customary in diplomacy,' she said. 'We will provide a relevant explanation to the Montenegrin side.' Vukovic said the incident was politically motivated. Montenegro previously was a close ally of Russia, but is set to become NATO's 29th member in June. Russia has threatened economic and political retaliation against the small nation. Montenegro says that Russia was behind a foiled coup attempt in October to prevent it from joining NATO, which Moscow denies.
  • Thunderstorms and strong winds buffeted Moscow and its surrounding areas on Monday, killing 11 people and injuring dozens, Russian officials said. Most of the fatalities were caused by falling trees. Another 70 people were injured, Moscow Mayor Sergei Sobyanin said. Russian television stations showed metal fences, garages and even a construction crane toppled by winds around the capital, where about 3,500 trees were destroyed. The gusts damaged dozens of cars and disrupted train service and electricity supplies in some areas. Flights at Moscow's airports were delayed. A top emergency official said that 60,000 people in Russia's Stavropol region are being evacuated due to the threat of flooding.
  • While Iraq's conventional military has been slowly clearing the Islamic State group from inside Mosul's complex urban terrain, Iraq's Iran-backed Shiite paramilitary forces have been working their way through less glamorous territory: vast deserts west and south of the city that run along and across Iraq's border with Syria. The territory, dotted with small villages and dusty roads, is home to key supply lines into neighboring Syria and connecting Iraq's north to the capital Baghdad. Control of the Iraqi-Syrian border would be a key strategic prize for the mostly Shiite paramilitary forces and their backer Iran, who also supports the government of Syrian President Bashar Assad. One division of the Iraqi government-sanctioned paramilitary group known as the Popular Mobilization Forces first reached Iraq's border with Syria on Monday after securing a string of small villages west of Mosul and south of Sinjar, according to Ahmed al-Asadi, the group's spokesman. 'This will be the first step to the liberation of the entire border,' he said. The PMF began Monday's operation by pushing IS militants out of the center of the town of Baaj, some 40 kilometers (25 miles) from the Syrian border. Once the town was retaken a unit was dispatched to secure the village of Um Jrais along the border. 'This victory will also be an important incentive for the Syrian Arab Army to secure the entire border from the Syrian side,' al-Asadi said, referring the Assad's government forces. As the PMF secure more of the border region, they plan to 'erect a dirt barricade and dig a trench,' said Sheikh Sami al-Masoudi, a paramilitary group leader. Iraq's border with Syria has long been a haven for smugglers and insurgent activity. The Nineveh foothold would give the paramilitary forces considerable leverage politically and militarily in Iraq after the fight against IS is concluded, according to Maria Fantappie, the senior Iraq researcher for the International Crisis Group, a non-governmental research firm. 'The Iranians have been prioritizing something that the U.S. has overlooked: control over strategic roads, rather than control of the Sunni communities,' Fantappie said explaining that the U.S.-led coalition's fight against IS has largely focused on retaking cities while the PMF have instead focused on transit and supply lines. Control of roads and borders also allows the paramilitary forces to divide Iraq's Sunni community geographically and politically, Fantappie said. 'They have been trying to bisect Iraq and prevent a unified Sunni block from emerging,' she said. More than 150 kilometers (93 miles) away from the PMF's border advance, Iraqi military and police forces are slowly closing in on the last pockets of IS control in Mosul's Old City. Iraqi commanders say the grueling fight that is now in its eighth month is in the final stage, an operation that the United Nations warns will likely put the more than 100,000 civilians still trapped by IS inside Mosul at severe risk. In Syria, Assad's forces and their allies have also been on the offensive, moving toward the Iraqi and Jordanian border, but are still far from reaching it. U.S.-backed Syrian Democratic Forces, IS militants and Syrian rebels are also fighting for territory in an increasingly messy battle space. On May 18, a U.S. airstrike hit pro-Syrian government forces that the U.S.-led coalition said posed a threat to American troops and allied rebels operating near the border with Jordan. The attack was the first such close confrontation between America troops and fighters backing Assad. The Islamic State group traces its roots to the insurgency that grew in Iraq after the 2003 toppling of Saddam Hussein, but the group rose to power under the leadership of Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi in Syria following the 2011 uprising against Assad. In early 2014, IS began driving Iraqi government forces out of the country's western Anbar province and that summer overran Mosul and large swaths of Iraq's north. At the height of the group's power IS controlled nearly a third of Iraq, but with aid, training and weapons from Iran and then the U.S.-led coalition, Iraqi forces have retaken more than half of the land the extremists once held. After securing the Iraqi side of the border with Syria, Iraq's Popular Mobilization Forces are ready to move inside Syrian territories to assist Assad, said Hashim al-Mousawi, a leader with the powerful al-Nujaba militia that falls under the PMF umbrella. Before the PMF was sanctioned by the Iraqi government al-Nujaba fighters openly fought inside Syria, helping prop up the Assad regime during the early days of the uprising against his government. But, now al-Mousawi said crossing into Syria to fight would require the approval of the Iraqi government in Baghdad. ___ Associated Press writers Sinan Salaheddin in Baghdad and Bassem Mroue in Beirut contributed to this report.
  • The head of the European Central Bank says while the economy of the 19-nation eurozone is improving, it still needs substantial stimulus. At a parliamentary hearing Monday in Brussels, Mario Draghi said 'the economic upswing is becoming increasingly solid and continues to broaden across sectors and countries.' However, he says, wages are not growing enough to push inflation back up to healthy levels. Draghi says 'overall, we remain firmly convinced that an extraordinary amount of monetary support ... is still necessary.' The ECB is pumping 60 billion euros ($67 billion) a month into the eurozone economy to support lending and growth. Whether it signals a tapering off in that program will be the focus of its next meeting on June 8.
  • Cyprus remains 'very, very close' to an agreement to reunite the ethnically-divided island despite a breakdown in talks last week, a U.N. official said Monday. Espen Barth Eide, the U.N.'s special adviser on Cyprus, called off mediation efforts Friday following a disagreement between Greek Cypriot President Nicos Anastasiades and Turkish Cypriot leader Mustafa Akinci on how the talks should proceed. The two leaders also differ on the future of around 35,000 Turkish troops on the island. But Eide said in Athens on Monday that the talks until now had brought the prospect of federal reunification closer than ever since the island's division in 1974. 'We are indeed very, very close — actually more close than most people seem to understand,' Eide told reporters after a 90-minute meeting with Greek Foreign Minister Nikos Kotzias. 'On at least five of the six issues, the leaders see eye to eye. We still have this issue of security and guarantees,' he said, explaining that Anastasiades and Akinci have agreed on most issues required for a deal. Cyprus was split in 1974 when Turkey invaded following a coup by supporters of union with Greece. The most recent negotiations began two years ago and made significant progress on how to share power in an envisioned federation. But they stumbled on key issues of post-reunification security arrangements and how much territory each side would administer. Over the weekend, dozens of Greek and Turkish Cypriot protesters — beating drums, blowing whistles and singing folk songs — linked arms across a U.N.-controlled buffer zone dividing the capital Nicosia to voice support for reunification. Eide was due in Ankara, Turkey, later Monday, and he argued that his goal was to gain support needed to restart the talks. 'I'm not asking them (leaders in Greece and Turkey) to put pressure on anyone,' he said. 'But I want to share with them that I am worried. I am more worried than I have been at any time during these last three years that the process is in serious trouble.' __ Follow Derek Gatopoulos at http://www.twitter.com/dgatopoulos
  • Prince William says he is sad his wife and two young children can't meet his late mother, Princess Diana. In an interview with the magazine British GQ, the heir to the throne opened up about his feelings about his mother's 1997 death in a Paris car crash. William told the magazine he would have liked having his mother's advice and for her to meet his wife, Kate, and to see her grandchildren grow up. Diana died long before 3-year-old Prince George and Princess Charlotte, who recently turned 2, were born. The interview with former Tony Blair spin doctor Alastair Campbell focuses on William's strong support for charities working on mental health issues. William says his chief goal is 'smashing' the taboo surrounding mental health discussions.

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  • The box says “It's amazing what she knows,” but security experts say the My Friend Cayla doll also makes it easy for strangers to know your child. The doll uses Bluetooth technology to connect to a device with no PIN or password required.  >> Read more trending news “On a scale of one to 10 this doll was definitely one to hack,” Ken Munro with Pentest Partners, who discovered the vulnerability in 2015, said. “I don't think anybody takes this seriously enough. What bothers me is we're expecting parents to become computer security experts and that's not realistic.” Privacy groups are taking action. Last December the Electronic Privacy Information Center in Washington filed a complaint with the FTC about Genesis toys, the maker of My Friend Cayla and the robot I-Que. The complaint cites ease of access and how the app recordings were sent to a third party software company, Nuance Communications, without making it clear to parents.  RELATED: Germany bans talking doll due to security concerns The Children's Online Privacy Protection Act, or C.O.P.P.A, sets strict guidelines on how parents must be notified about information collected on their children.  “The parent has to actually know what is going on and then say, ‘Yes, I agree.’ The box cannot already be checked. It cannot be just hidden somewhere in the terms of service. It's supposed to be a moment where the parent realizes what's going on and says, ‘Yes, I'm OK with that,’” Munro said. RELATED: Do some toys threaten your child’s privacy? Even if parents are notified, understanding how the information is stored is key.  'It's going to the cloud. That's the basic thing for so many of our devices,' said Munro. Child user profiles and recordings collected by some other companies have also been compromised. In 2015, V-Tech Toys was hacked exposing over six million child profiles. Plus, security researchers recently discovered that people could access voice recordings of Spiral Toys Cloudpets. Munro said that the best way to make sure your children's privacy is secure is to not give out their information in the first place.  “It's really more of a problem of how we as Americans view our privacy, and we keep giving more and more information out,” Munro said. “Eventually, we're not going to have any more privacy if we don't stop.” The FTC would not comment on their investigation of complaints against Genesis Toys and Nuance. 
  • While the calendar says we are days away from the month of June, Republicans in Congress are already feeling pressure over their legislative agenda for 2017, as time is already growing short for GOP efforts to overhaul the Obama health law, which also puts a time squeeze on other major initiatives on Capitol Hill. There are no votes scheduled this week in the Congress; the Senate returns to legislative session on June 5, while the House is back in Washington, D.C. on June 6. Here’s some of what faces Republicans in the Congress: 1. Everything keys off of the GOP health care bill. Because the GOP is trying to use the expedited “budget reconciliation” process, which allows them to avoid a filibuster in the Senate, nothing involved with next year’s budget – or with tax reform – can move until health care is settled. GOP Senators have been meeting regularly in recent weeks to decide what to do on health care – but they don’t have a deal as yet, and no one is quiet sure when they might have a vote. “We’re a long ways from that,” said Sen. Mike Rounds (R-ND) told reporters this week. “Damned if I know,” Sen. John McCain (R-AZ) said about when a deal might be reached. Writing their own bill takes time. Senate laying groundwork for own health care replacement bill — Rusty Arrison (@RustyArrisonXVJ) May 26, 2017 2. Why do you keep saying there isn’t much time? Two things are at work here – the Congressional calendar, and the limits on the “budget reconciliation” process. The authorization to use reconciliation for a health care bill expires on September 30 – the end of the 2017 Fiscal Year. So, the GOP has four months to figure out a bill, and get it approved and sent to the President. But, lawmakers won’t be here much of that four month period. In fact, between now and the end of the fiscal year – there are 43 scheduled legislative work days in the House, which mirrors the Senate schedule. That’s 43 legislative days in session spread out over 18 weeks. You could always get extra time by scrapping the August recess, or working some weekends. 3. The budget is way behind schedule – more than usual. This past week, President Trump delivered his 2018 budget to the Congress. Normally that is done in February. The House and Senate only started having hearings on spending bills this past week. Lawmakers were supposed to approve the blueprint known as the “budget resolution” by April 15. As of now, that plan doesn’t even exist. Congress is supposed to pass all spending bills by October 1, the start of the new fiscal year, but that has not happened since 1996. With the schedule still showing five weeks off during the summer, there is no way that lawmakers are going to meet that spending deadline, which will pave the way for stop gap budgets, and then most likely a year-end omnibus spending deal. Sound familiar? @TheDCVince the congress cannot walk and crew gum at the same time. They haven't begun the FY18 budget.We will get more CRs and then omnibus — Bulldog 6 (@MC22554) May 24, 2017 4. Tax reform still hasn’t taken shape. Despite the Sunday tweet by President Trump about his tax plans, it was obvious in budget hearings last week involving Secretary of Treasury Stephen Mnuchin that a Trump tax plan is not ready to be rolled out any time soon. Remember – all we have right now is a one page document with some bullet points. Even if the White House put out the details this next week, Republicans couldn’t take it up under budget reconciliation rules until they get finished with health care legislation. And, as stated above, the GOP does not seem to be near a deal. Senate Republicans probably cannot let June go by without some kind of agreement on health care. The massive TAX CUTS/REFORM that I have submitted is moving along in the process very well, actually ahead of schedule. Big benefits to all! — Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) May 29, 2017 5. You can’t pass bills when you aren’t in DC. Whenever I point out how the Congress is going to be home for an extended break, I always hear from people who say, “If they’re not in DC, they can’t screw things up.” Yes, that’s true. On the other hand, it’s also true that when they aren’t working on Capitol Hill, they can’t pass any bills to fix things, either. And for Republicans right now, if you aren’t at work on the floors of the House and Senate, you aren’t passing any of President Trump’s agenda. Those Republican lawmakers having town hall meetings this week will get a lot of attention. If Republicans in the House and Senate were doing their job, Pres Trump could be returning home to sign laws for taxes, health care, etc. — Pat (@Pat170017001) May 26, 2017 It’s not even the end of May. But time is already running short for Republicans in 2017.
  •   An investigation is underway into the tragic death of a Navy SEAL in a parachuting accident Sunday during a demonstration for Fleet Week in Jersey City, New Jersey, across the Hudson River from Manhattan. >> Read more trending news The SEAL, part of the Navy’s elite skydiving team, the Leap Frogs, plunged to his death in the river when his chute failed to open, according to a Navy spokesperson. The SEAL was immediately rescued from the water, but later pronounced dead at Jersey City Medical Center, the Navy said in a statement. The parachutist was not identified pending notification of his family. “Our hearts and prayers go out to his family, and I ask for all your prayers for the Navy SEAL community who lost a true patriot today,” Navy Rear Adm. Jack Scorby said, according to The Associated Press.  The Leap Frogs have numerous performances scheduled throughout the rest of the year, according to their website.
  • It started as attempted retail theft and only escalated from there.   A St. Augustine woman is facing a felony charge, after an incident at a Jacksonville department store.   According to the arrest report from the Jacksonville Sheriff's Office, employees at the Kohl's on Old St. Augustine Road spotted April Felder, 29, load up her cart with merchandise and then walk out of the store with that cart, without making any attempt to pay.   When store security confronted her in the parking lot, Felder allegedly ditched the cart, containing not only the stolen goods, but her young child as well.   Felder faces a felony charge of child neglect, after being arrested about a block away from the store.
  • President Donald Trump marked his first Memorial Day in office with a somber service at Arlington National Cemetery on Monday. >> Read more trending news The president first participated in a wreath-laying ceremony at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier, before addressing a crowd of family members of the fallen gathered there to remember those who have made the ultimate sacrifice for their country. In his speech, the president recognized the Gold Star families at the service. 'To every Gold Star family: God is with you, and your loved ones are with him.' Trump said.  'I believe that God has a special place in heaven for those who laid down their lives so that others may live free.' Trump, along with Vice President Mike Pence, who was also at the service, visited Section 60, where the military members who have died in Iraq and Afghanistan since 9/11 are buried chatting and shaking hands with the families of the fallen. The president took to Twitter this morning, posting several tweets about Memorial Day.  “Today we remember the men and women who made the ultimate sacrifice in serving,” he wrote early Monday before heading over to Arlington for the somber remembrance ceremony. “Honoring the men and women who made the ultimate sacrifice in service to America. Home of the free, because of the brave,” he tweeted even earlier Monday morning. >> Related: Trump approval rating hits new low in poll Also Monday, Pence and his wife, Second Lady Karen Pence, helped kick off a bike race in Washington for Project Hero, a veterans and first responders group, according to CNN.  

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