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    The condition of a North Korean soldier severely wounded by gunfire while escaping to South Korea is gradually improving after two surgeries but it's too early to tell whether he makes a recovery, hospital officials said SaturdayWhile the soldier's vital signs are stabilizing, he continues to remain unconscious and relying on a breathing machine. After consecutive surgeries to repair internal organ damage and other injuries, no further surgeries are planned as of yet, said Shin Mi-jeong, an official at the Ajou University Medical Center near Seoul.The unarmed soldier, whose name and rank have not been disclosed, defected to the South on Monday by driving a military jeep near a line that divides the Koreas at the Joint Security Area and then rushing across it under a barrage of bullets.While treating the wounds, surgeons removed dozens of parasites from the soldier's ruptured small intestine, including presumed roundworms that were as long as 27 centimeters (10.6 inches), which may be reflective of poor nutrition and health in North Korea's military. Doctors measured the soldier as being 1.7 meters (5.6 feet) tall, but weighing just 60 kilograms (132 pounds).'I spent more than 20 years of experience as a surgeon, but I have not found parasites this big in the intestines of South Koreans,' Lee Cook-jong, who leads the soldier's medical team, told reporters earlier this week.Lee is a famous trauma specialist who was hailed as a hero in 2011 after conducting life-saving surgeries on the captain of a South Korean freighter ship who was shot during a rescue mission after being held by Somali pirates.South Korea's military said four North Korean soldiers used handguns and AK rifles to fire about 40 rounds at their former comrade, who was hit at least five times. He was found beneath a pile of leaves on the southern side of the Joint Security Area, and South Korean troops crawled there to recover him. A United Nations Command helicopter later transported him to the Ajou hospital.It remains unclear whether the North Koreans chasing the soldier fired at him even after he crossed into the southern side of the border, which would be a violation of an armistice agreement that ended the 1950-53 Korean War. The U.N. Command, which is investigating the incident, postponed a plan to release video footage of the soldier's escape on Thursday.The JSA is jointly overseen by the American-led U.N. Command and by North Korea, with South Korean and North Korean border guards facing each other only meters (feet) apart. It is located inside the 4-kilometer (2 1/2-mile) -wide Demilitarized Zone, which forms the de facto border between the Koreas since the Korean War.
  • Russia again vetoed a U.N. resolution Friday that would extend the mandate of the expert body charged with determining responsibility for chemical weapons attacks in Syria, dooming its operation and making it exceedingly difficult to hold anyone accountable for the deaths of hundreds of civilian victims.It was Russia's second veto in 24 hours of a resolution to keep the Joint Investigative Mechanism, or JIM, in operation. And it was Russia's 11th veto of a Security Council resolution dealing with Syria, its close ally.Russia cast its latest veto Friday night on a last-ditch resolution by Japan to extend the mandate for 30 days for further discussions. It was supported by 12 of the 15 council members with Bolivia joining Russia in voting 'no' and China abstaining.The first Russian veto on a U.S.-sponsored resolution, and Russia's failure to get the minimum nine 'yes' votes on its rival resolution during a highly contentious three-hour council meeting Thursday, reflected the deterioration of U.S.-Russian relations.At the heart of the dispute is the demand by Russia for major changes in the way the JIM operates, and the United States' insistence that the current mandate be extended and the JIM's independence be preserved.U.S. Ambassador Nikki Haley told the council after the vote the veto 'shows us that Russia has no interest in finding common ground with the rest of this council to save the JIM.'Russia will not agree to any mechanism that might shine a spotlight on the use of chemical weapons by its ally, the Syrian regime,' she said. 'It's as simple and sinful as that.'White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders said that by vetoing the JIM's renewal 'Russia has sent a clear message that it does not value the lives of the victims of chemical weapons attacks.'Russia's U.N. Ambassador Vassily Nebenzia shot back that the JIM for two years 'has rubber-stamped baseless accusations against Syria,' stressing that the failure to eradicate its 'fundamental flaws' brought about its downfall.He said Thursday's heated council meeting 'left behind a very unpleasant sludge, and it focused on political content which is far from the issue of Syrian chemical weapons.'What is taking place here is akin to a bad theater production,' Nebenzia said. 'Russia is being accused of having shut down the JIM' by the U.S. and its supporters.He said they are really responsible for shutting the JIM down by refusing to support the Russian resolution on Thursday. It remains on the table, Nebenzia said, but any extension of the JIM's mandate is only possible if its flaws are fixed and it is made 'stronger and more robust.'The JIM is a joint investigative body of the U.N. and the international chemical weapons watchdog, the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons or OPCW.The Japanese draft asked Secretary-General Antonio Guterres and the head of the OPCW to submit proposals for the structure and working methods of the JIM within 20 days. It said the proposals should reflect the views of Security Council members.Nebenzia said the draft placed 'a completely impossible challenge' for the secretary-general because Thursday's heated council meeting demonstrated that council members on many issues 'are diametrically opposed.'The day began with closed council discussions on the Japanese draft where Russia's deputy U.N. ambassador Vladimir Safronkov opposed the measure while Haley and many other council members supported it, according to council diplomats speaking on condition of anonymity because the meeting was private.So the Russian veto was no surprise.Russia has been highly critical of the JIM's findings that the Syrian government used chlorine gas in at least two attacks in 2014 and 2015 and used sarin in an aerial attack on Khan Sheikhoun last April 4 that killed about 100 people and affected about 200 others who survived the nerve agent.The JIM has also accused the Islamic State extremist group of using mustard gas in 2015 and again in September 2016 in Um Hosh in Aleppo.Syria has denied any use of chemical weapons, while Russia has accused the JIM of using faulty methods to determine that President Bashar Assad's government was to blame for the attacks, including not visiting Khan Sheikhoun.Nebenzia said the JIM's leadership 'disgraced itself with a fictitious investigation into the episode of sarin use in Khan Sheikhoun.'After Friday's vote, Sweden's U.N. Ambassador Olof Skoog asked for new Security Council consultations to see if there was any way of salvaging the JIM.Italy's U.N. Ambassador Sebastiano Cardi, the council president, emerged about an hour later telling reporters: 'We will continue to work in the coming hours and days constructively to find a common position in light ... of this crucial nonproliferation issue.'France's U.N. Ambassador Francois Delattre called the vote 'disastrous,' saying council members can't 'throw in the towel' because the Russian veto poses 'a major threat to the security of us all.'He said it is liable to weaken international efforts to prevent the use of chemical weapons, to be a green light for some to use chemical weapons because there is no way to ensure accountability, and to create a 'fertile breeding ground for chemical terrorism which is something we are all gravely concerned about.'Britain's U.N. Ambassador Matthew Rycroft told the council: 'We will keep going, not only to bring justice to those who have suffered from the use of these despicable weapons, but also to deter those who might think of doing so in the future.'___Associated Press writer Vladimir Isachenkov contributed to this report from Moscow
  • Poland's prime minister told other European leaders at a summit Friday that it is not acceptable that Poles who took part in an Independence Day march in Warsaw were denounced as 'fascists' in the European Parliament.Prime Minister Beata Szydlo said she would never let Poles to be 'slandered and insulted' in such a way in an international forum.Some 60,000 people joined a march Saturday that was organized by extreme far-right groups. Some carried banners calling for a 'White Europe' or displayed other white supremacist symbols, including the Celtic Cross.The march sparked criticism of Poland in a debate Wednesday in the European Parliament, where some representatives described the participants as 'fascists.'Speaking Friday after a European Union summit in Goteborg, Sweden, the conservative Szydlo said she strongly condemned extremism but that most who marched were not extremists.'I will never allow my nation, which was a victim of two totalitarian states, (or) the citizens of my country, to be slandered and insulted,' Szydlo said.The march was organized by the National Radical Camp and the All-Polish Youth, modern incarnations of radical nationalist groups that first arose in the 1930s.Polish President Andrzej Duda sharply condemned the expressions of extremism on the country's Independence Day. However, other government officials have described the extremist elements as marginal.Szydlo on Friday called the march a 'beautiful white-red manifestation,' a reference to the colors of the national flag.
  • Snow? Check. Breathtaking mountain views? Check. Historical city charm and Instagram-worthy photo ops? Check and check.  Bern, Switzerland, is the city with the most Instagram posts in the world for the winter season — and it truly has it all. >> Read more trending news That’s according to analysts at Focus Clinic, a popular laser eye surgery clinic in the United Kingdom, who gathered the 20 most popular winter travel destinations across the world based on Google search and ranked each by the number of times a city’s hashtag was used on Instagram to determine its popularity on the photo-sharing app. According to the research, the #bern hashtag has been used more than 1,082,440 times. A popular destination in the Swiss city is the medieval Old City of Bern, a city center surrounded by the Aare river. Old City is also a UNESCO World Heritage Site with one of Europe’s longest weather-sheltered shopping centers. The “gateway to the Alps” is also known for its mountain views, many fountains, walkable streets, cafes, museums and colorful weekly markets, according to MySwitzerland.com. Rounding out the top 10 winter destinations according to Instagram are: Aspen, Colorado; the Northern Lights in Tromso, Norway; Chamonix, France; Yosemite National Park in California; Zermatt, Switzerland; Yellowstone National Park in Wyoming; Bled, Slovenia; Cesky Krumlov, Czech Republic and Grindelwald, Switzerland. >> Explore the full list at focusclinics.com/most-popular-winter-sights Take a look at some of our favorite Instagram shots of Bern:
  • The Latest on riots in Greece (all times local):9:25 p.m.Youths have clashed with police in Greece's two largest cities, injuring two bystanders.Police say a woman was hospitalized with burns in Athens after being hit in the thigh with a flare during the clashes.In Thessaloniki, in northern Greece, a motorcycle driver was taken to the hospital after driving into a barricade set up by protesters.More than 5,000 officers were on duty for annual march in the Greek capital to the U.S. Embassy, which commemorates those who died in the 1973 crackdown by Greece's former junta.___8 p.m.Hundreds of youths have attacked police in Greece's two largest cities, hurling rocks, flares and gas bombs following large and peaceful marches to mark the anniversary of the 1973 crackdown on a student uprising against Greece's military dictatorship.In Athens, protesters hurled dozens of petrol bombs as they confronted police in narrow streets in the city center. Police fired tear gas at the protesters. There were no immediate reports of injuries or arrests.Violence also broke out in Greece's second largest city, Thessaloniki.More than 5,000 officers were on duty for annual march in the Greek capital to the U.S. Embassy, which commemorates those who died in the crackdown by the junta. The sidewalk outside the embassy was blocked off by police buses.___3:55 p.m.Thousands of protesters were marching Friday to the U.S. Embassy in Athens to mark the anniversary of the 1973 crackdown on a student uprising against the military dictatorship then ruling Greece.More than 5,000 officers were on duty for the demonstration, which commemorates those who died in the crackdown on the uprising against the 1967-74 junta.The annual march is often used as a means of expressing displeasure with various government, European and American policies, and often turns violent.The demonstration begins at the gates of the polytechnic, where the junta had sent a tank to crush the entrance gate as it cracked down on rebellious students holed up inside. It is traditionally headed by protesters carrying a blood-stained Greek flag found at the polytechnic that night____1:20 p.m.Thousands of Greeks are expected to march to the US Embassy in Athens to mark the anniversary of the 1973 crackdown on a student uprising against the military dictatorship then ruling Greece.The annual march from the gates of the Polytechnic building in downtown Athens to the embassy often attracts tens of thousands of demonstrators. Police have said more than 5,000 officers will be on duty for Friday's demonstration, which commemorates those who died in the crackdown on the uprising against the 1967-74 junta.Ahead of the anniversary, some anarchist groups occupied the polytechnic building and distributed fliers urging nearby residents to attack police by dropping flower pots from their balconies.
  • The Latest on developments surrounding Lebanon's crisis with Saudi Arabia in the wake of Prime Minister Saad Hariri's resignation (all times local):1:30 a.m.Saudi Arabia has asked its citizens for the second time in less than two weeks to leave Lebanon 'as soon as possible' given the tension over the resignation of Prime Minister Saad Hariri.The announcement early Saturday was posted on the Saudi embassy Twitter account. It came shortly after the embassy reported that it is closely following reports of an attack on two Saudi nationals in a Beirut neighborhood. There was no immediate security report of the incident. Hariri tweeted before he left Saudi Arabia that any attack on a Saudi is an attack on him personally.Hariri, a dual Lebanese-Saudi national, stunned Lebanon and the region when he declared his resignation from Saudi Arabia, citing meddling by Iran and its Lebanese ally Hezbollah in Arab countries affairs.Days later, Saudi Arabia ordered its citizens out of Lebanon on Nov. 9. It was the first concrete action against the Mediterranean country after days of leveling threats against Beirut.Hariri's resignation sparked speculations he was held against his will, and forced to resign. Hariri left to Paris early Saturday.___1 a.m.Lebanon's Prime Minister Saad Hariri says he is on his way to the airport, leaving Saudi Arabia two weeks after he declared his resignation from there.In his first English tweet, Hariri said early Saturday that it is 'a lie' that he is detained in Saudi Arabia and not allowed to leave the country. Hariri is heading to Paris, after France extended an invitation, apparently to put an end to speculation Hariri was being held against his will.Hariri resigned on Nov.4 in a televised announcement from Saudi Arabia that stunned the country and plunged it into turmoil. Top officials in Lebanon accused Saudi Arabia of holding Hariri against his will and forcing his resignation.Hariri dedicated his tweet to German Foreign Minister Sigmar Gabriel. Gabriel warned against instability in Lebanon during a meeting with Lebanon's Foreign Minister Gebran Bassil, who has toured European countries to lobby for stability in his country. Without naming Saudi Arabia, Gabriel warned against those behind the crises in Lebanon and Yemen, according to reports from a joint press conference.___10:30 p.m.President Emmanuel Macron says that France doesn't want to choose one camp against another in the Middle East or become involved in 'national or regional divisions.'Macron spoke to reporters on Friday at an EU summit in Sweden and said that 'the role of France is to talk to everyone.'He spoke a day before a scheduled meeting with Lebanese Prime Minister Saad Hariri, who was invited to France with his family. Hariri's surprise Nov. 4 resignation as prime minister from Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, led to theories that Hariri was caught in regional power games between the Saudis, Sunni Muslims and Shiite Iran.Macron wants to ease tensions, but he also said he wants Iran to lead a 'less aggressive regional strategy' and its ballistic missile strategy 'clarified.'Iran-allied rebels in Yemen fired a ballistic missile that was intercepted outside the Saudi capital earlier this month.___8:15 p.m.French President Emmanuel Macron says that Lebanese Prime Minister Saad Hariri will be received with all honors due his rank when he visits this weekend — even though he announced his resignation — and could stay in Paris for weeks should he choose.Hariri has been in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, where he announced his resignation on Nov. 4, stunning Lebanon and leading to theories he was caught in regional power games. Macron's invitation this week to Hariri and his family aims at easing tensions.Macron said at an EU summit in Goteborg, Sweden, that Hariri will be received on Saturday 'with the honors due a prime minister' since Lebanon hasn't yet recognized the resignation.Significantly, Macron said that Hariri 'has the intention, I believe, of going to his country in the days or weeks ahead' — the first time a possible timeframe was evoked.___4:30 p.m.Lebanon's Prime Minister Saad Hariri has dismissed reports about his alleged detention in Saudi Arabia as 'rumors.'Hariri said in a tweet on Friday that he has stayed in Saudi Arabia to consult about the future of Lebanon and its relations with the region.He is expected to head to France this weekend upon a French invitation, which has appeared to end speculation about being held against his will.Hariri also says 'stories' about his and his family's sojourn in Saudi Arabia are only 'rumors.'Hariri's televised Nov. 4 resignation from Riyadh stunned the Lebanese, many of whom saw it as a sign that the kingdom — the prime minister's chief ally — had decided to drag tiny Lebanon into the Sunni kingdom's feud with the other regional powerhouse, the predominantly Shiite Iran.___3:30 p.m.Russia has spoken out against foreign interference in Lebanese affairs following the surprise resignation of the Lebanese prime minister.Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov said Friday at a meeting with his Lebanese counterpart, Gibran Bassil, that 'Russia invariably stands for supporting the sovereignty, unity and territorial integrity of Lebanon.'He added that the crisis should be settled internally in Lebanon, without foreign interference, and through dialogue.Bassil is visiting world capitals as part of a tour to clarify Lebanon's position following Lebanese Prime Minister Saad Hariri's surprise resignation in a Nov. 4 broadcast from Saudi Arabia, which has thrown the small country into turmoil.The resignation of Saudi-aligned Hariri was seen by some as engineered by Riyadh, raising concerns that it could drag Lebanon into a battle for regional supremacy.
  • More than two dozen young Nigerian women who drowned during a migrant crossing from Libya were honored Friday with an interfaith funeral, closing out a gruesome new chapter in the years-long tragedy of desperate migrants trying to reach Europe and dying along the way.To date, only two of the 26 women whose bodies were recovered Nov. 3 by Spanish rescue ships have been identified: Marian Shaka, a Muslim, and Osato Osara, a Christian.Prosecutors are working to contact relatives of the others, using phone numbers the women had hidden in their clothes before setting off from Libya's lawless shores. So far, investigators have reached family members of three of them. Relatives were able to provide general descriptions of their girls, and confirmed they hadn't heard from them.Autopsies showed all but one drowned. The other had internal bleeding from a ruptured liver as a result of blunt trauma before falling in the water. None bore signs of recent physical or sexual abuse, prosecutors said in a statement Friday. Two of the women were pregnant.Overall, 100 people were believed to have drowned in the crossing. The other bodies were lost at sea. They had all set off aboard a blue rubber raft. Sixty-four survived.On Friday, 26 wooden coffins were laid out in a circle in the middle of Salerno's cemetery for the interfaith funeral ceremony. There was no indication the Nigerian Embassy or Consulate sent a representative.Salerno Archbishop Luigi Moretti told the crowd that the women 'lost their lives as they were seeking freedom and a better life.'And we give the last farewell not only to the 26 girls but also to two lives that these girls were carrying in their wombs,' he added.Imam Abderrhmane Es Sbaa offered a prayer before he and Moretti blessed the coffins, with Moretti sprinkling holy water on them. The crowd silently passed by, placing white roses on each one.Overall this year, nearly 168,000 migrants have arrived in Italy, a 32-percent decline over last year thanks to a deal Italy struck with the Libyan government and its militias to curb the exodus. The U.N. refugee agency estimates around 3,000 have died trying, though the number is likely much higher given the unknown number of shipwrecks that are never reported.It's not clear whether the 26 women were part of the huge human trafficking business that brings thousands of Nigerian women to Italy every year to work as prostitutes.The past three years has seen a 600-percent increase in potential sex trafficking victims arriving in Italy, most of them from Nigeria, according to the International Organization for Migrants. IOM statistics show 1,454 girls arrived from Nigeria in 2014 and the number soared to 11,009 in 2016.Alessandra Galatro, who works to help young Nigerian women escape prostitution, came to the funeral with a group of Nigerian girls who stood at a distance during the ceremony then shyly approached the coffins at the end, gently touching them one by one.'It is not easy for them because they have all made that crossing, that journey,' Galatro said. 'The cruelty that these women faced in Libya, they all experienced.
  • Turkey's top diplomat says followers of a U.S.-based Muslim cleric blamed for last year's failed coup have infiltrated the 'American system' of justice and are behind accusations leveled against a Turkish-Iranian businessman in the U.S.Foreign Minister Mevlut Cavusoglu also told journalists Friday that cleric Fethullah Gulen 'has entered American missions here through their local staff.' He was referring to the arrest of a local employee of the U.S. Istanbul consulate in October for alleged links to Gulen.The cleric has denied involvement in the coup attempt. The U.S. says its employee had contacts with police and a prosecutor as part of his job, not for other reasons.Cavusoglu claims that Gulen's followers wielded influence over the U.S. judicial system, pointing to the case of Turkish-Iranian businessman Reza Zarrab, charged by an ex-U.S. attorney for evading U.S. sanctions on Iran. The gold trader was arrested in March 2016 during a trip to the United States.Cavusoglu claimed that former U.S. attorney Preet Bharara used the same indictment that alleged Gulen-linked Turkish prosecutors had filed against Zarrab in Turkey amid a sweeping corruption scandal involving leaked wiretaps and documents that shook the country in 2013.'It seems very politically motivated,' Cavusoglu said.Also indicted in the case is Mehmet Hakan Atilla, an executive of the state-owned Halkbank, currently under arrest in the U.S. and set to appear in court on Nov. 27 for violating sanctions on Iran through financial transactions amounting to hundreds of millions of dollars.The foreign minister insisted the bank did not violate any sanctions.Turkey's former economy minister Zafer Caglayan is among the nine defendants implicated in the case.Zarrab and his lawyer have skipped several court appearances recently, leading to speculation that he may be cutting a deal with U.S. officials to avoid prosecution.Turkey is seeking Gulen's extradition from the U.S. to try him for his alleged role in the failed coup and has been infuriated that its demand has not yet been met. Gulen has been living in self-imposed exile in Pennsylvania for nearly two decades.Turkey has arrested over 50,000 people and fired more than 100,000 from state jobs for alleged links to the cleric since the July 2016 coup attempt.'(Gulen's network) couldn't succeed in the coup and they are trying in the U.S. and they are getting support from some U.S. institutions,' Cavusoglu said.
  • Corleone is a Sicilian medieval hill town whose bloody past began generations before 'The Godfather' novels and films borrowed its name for a fictional Mafia don.It is the birthplace of several convicted real-life Mafia bosses, among them Salvatore 'Toto' Riina, the reputed 'boss of bosses,' who died Friday at 87 in a prison ward of a northern Italian hospital.Corleone has witnessed recent signs of rebellion against an entrenched Mafia culture where religious pageants pay tribute to reigning mob bosses, with processions stopping outside the dons' homes.A town square is named after two top anti-Mafia magistrates slain by Cosa Nostra bombings in 1992. Inaugurated in 2000, an anti-Mafia museum, together with the International Center for Anti-Mafia documentation, also educates visitors about the fallen heroes in the war against the Sicilian crime syndicate.When native son Riina was arrested in 1993 in Palermo, schoolchildren ran into Corleone's streets in joy, rallying behind a banner that read 'Finally' — their jubilation a reflection of a new and burgeoning resistance to the Mafia by a younger generation of Sicilians.But the Mafia's grip on the town isn't easily removed.Corleone's City Hall is currently run by authorities sent from Rome's Interior Ministry after the municipal government was dissolved by government decree due to Mafia infiltration. Local public contracts have long been a traditional source of income for Cosa Nostra.Whether the end of the Riina era will spell change for Corleone was unclear for its citizenry.Whoever his successor as the top Mafia boss may be, 'I know for sure there is still a (Mafia) mentality here that we need to dismantle,' said Mario Alfieri a Corleone pharmacist.An employee of the anti-Mafia museum, Lorena Pecorella, noted that Riina died in prison, 'where it was right for him to die.' She said the town's negative heritage as a synonym for the Mafia will be difficult to eradicate.'We know the negative heritage he is leaving us young people,' she said.Old-timers in the town can recall when in the 1950s and 1960s, parents warned children to come home straight from school because Mafia rivalry was exploding into a killing nearly every day. Riina's predecessor as a top boss, Luciano Liggio, emerged from a string of bloody murders, including one series triggered by the killing of a Mafia don who was a prominent town physician.
  • As negotiations at the global climate conference in Bonn, Germany, draw to a close Friday, here's a look at which steps will be taken in the coming years to further international efforts to curb global warming:— Dec. 12, 2017: French President Emmanuel Macron has invited more than 100 world leaders to Paris for the second anniversary of the landmark climate accord forged in the city in 2015. President Donald Trump, who has said he wants to withdraw from the agreement, hasn't been invited to the 'One Planet Summit.'— 2018: Next year's global climate talks take place in Katowice, Poland, from Dec. 3-14. In order for officials to finalize the rulebook there, preliminary meetings will have to be held during the course of the year. These low-level encounters will include the Talanoa Dialogue, a Fijian-inspired process in which countries start to take stock of what's been achieved so far under the Paris agreement and consider what more can be done. The talks in Katowice will be strongly influenced by the U.N. scientific panel's October report on whether the most ambitious goal of keeping global warming at 1.5 degrees Celsius can be achieved.— 2020: If the U.S. goes through with its threat to withdraw from the Paris accord, the earliest this could come into effect would be on Nov. 4, 2020 — shortly after the next American presidential election. Countries that are party to the Paris agreement have until 2020 to submit new or updated plans, known as Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs), on what they are doing to reduce emissions and adapt to climate change.— 2023: Eight years after the Paris accord countries will for the first time conduct a full and formal review of what's been achieved to date, known as a global stock-take. The process is meant to be repeated every five years.— 2030: Many countries have set themselves substantial emissions reduction targets 15 years from the Paris accord. The European Union, for example, wants to cut its emissions by 40 percent from 1990 levels, though some countries including Germany are aiming for a 55-percent reduction.— 2050: Climate scientists calculate that the world economy will have to go 'carbon neutral' by the middle of the century if the Paris goal of keeping global warming well below 2 degrees Celsius (3.6 Fahrenheit) is to be achieved. That can either be done by ending all use of fossil fuels or by finding a way to remove carbon dioxide from the atmosphere at an industrial scale.

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  • Update (Friday, November 17) President Donald Trump said in a tweet Friday he’s delaying a new policy allowing the body parts of African elephants shot for sport to be imported until he can review “all conservation facts.” The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service said Thursday that it will allow the importation of body parts from African elephants shot for sport. The agency said encouraging wealthy big-game hunters to kill the threatened species would help raise money for conservation programs. Animal rights advocates and environmental groups criticized the decision. On Friday, the Republican chairman of the House Foreign Affairs Committee urged the administration to reverse the policy, calling it the “wrong move at the wrong time.” Trump said that the policy had been “under study for years.” He says he will review the issue with Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke. Earlier The Trump administration plans to lift a ban on Friday that barred big game hunters from bringing trophies from elephants killed in a pair of African nations to America, according to multiple reports. >> Read more trending news A spokesperson for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service told ABC News in a statement Wednesday that the decision was made after officials in Zimbabwe and Zambia provided them with information to support a reversal of the ban. 'Legal, well-regulated sport hunting as part of a sound management program can benefit the conservation of certain species by providing incentives to local communities to conserve the species and by putting much-needed revenue back into conservation,' the spokesperson told ABC News. The decision will overturn a 2014 ban implemented by President Barack Obama’s administration in response to falling elephant populations.  African elephants are listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act. A provision in the act, however, allows for the government to give permits that let people import trophies from such animals if evidence shows that hunting them helps conservation efforts, according to NBC News. The rule reversal will apply to elephants hunted in Zimbabwe from Jan. 21, 2016, to Dec. 31, 2018, the news station reported. It will also apply to elephants killed in Zambia in 2016, 2017 and 2018 and “applications that meet all other applicable permitting requirements,” a Fish and Wildlife spokesperson told NBC News. According to the 2016 Great Elephant Census, Savanna elephant populations fell by 30 percent between 2007 and 2014. About 352,000 elephants were spotted during the survey, 82,300 in Zimbabwe and 21,700 in Zambia. Both countries had areas that saw substantial declines in elephant populations along the Zambezi river in Zambia and in Zimbabwe’s Sebungwe region, according to the census. The Associated Press contributed to this report.
  • The Jacksonville Sheriff's Office said a boy died Friday night after becoming tangled in chains on a swing at a park in Northwest Jacksonville. #JSO is working a death investigation of a child in the 8700 Sibbald Rd. Media will be addressed at 9pm at Sibbald Rd and Archery Ave.— Jax Sheriff's Office (@JSOPIO) November 18, 2017 Officers responded at 6:15 p.m. to Charles 'Boobie' Clark Park on Sibbald Road, where they found an unresponsive 10-year-old boy. A mother of four children walked with her kids to play at the park. The 10-year-old boy was standing on the swing, police said. When the mother looked back at the boy, she saw the chains of the swing wrapped around the child's neck. 10 year old child at the park was on a swing when he got entangled in the chains and they wrapped around his neck. Child died at the hospital. At this time, the death is being investigated as a tragic accident and foul play is not suspected. https://t.co/lCOrhRPBGd — Jax Sheriff's Office (@JSOPIO) November 18, 2017 The boy was brought to UF Health Jacksonville, where he died from his injuries. The child's mother and other children are being questioned, but police said no foul play is suspected and the incident is being called a tragic accident by JSO. Refresh this page, follow @ActionNewsJax on Twitter and watch FOX30 Action News Jax at 10 for updates. HAPPENING NOW: #JSO investigating a death reported off 8700 Sibbald Rd. @ActionNewsJax crew is headed to scene. pic.twitter.com/2V2qCkexVU — Tenikka Smith Hughes (@TenikkaANjax) November 18, 2017 #BREAKING: JSO is working a death investigation of a child on Sibbald Rd. I'm headed to the scene @ActionNewsJax — Danielle Avitable (@DanielleANjax) November 18, 2017 JSO says 10 year old got tangled in chains on swing & died. No foul play is suspected. Police call it a 'tragic accident' pic.twitter.com/EwQi7tNOQ9 — Danielle Avitable (@DanielleANjax) November 18, 2017 Police say mother was at park with 4 kids and she looked away for a second when she turned around her child was unconscious on the swing. Taken to UF health where child pronounced dead @ActionNewsJax pic.twitter.com/I5AMOBAdlz — Danielle Avitable (@DanielleANjax) November 18, 2017 Police say mother was at park with 4 kids and she looked away for a second when she turned around her child was unconscious on the swing. Taken to UF health where child pronounced dead @ActionNewsJax pic.twitter.com/I5AMOBAdlz — Danielle Avitable (@DanielleANjax) November 18, 2017
  • The 45th American Music Awards ceremony is set for Sunday in Los Angeles, and if the past is any indication, you can expect a night with a few surprising moments.  Remember Garth Brooks declining the award, or the time Pat Boone dressed in leather? Yeah, it’s likely to be that kind of night. The show will be broadcast live from the Microsoft Theater in Los Angeles. Here’s what you need to know about the show. What time: The show begins at 8 p.m. ET What channel: The AMAs will be broadcast live on ABC. Who is hosting: Tracee Ellis Ross, star of “black-ish,” is hosting. What about a pre-show: What would a music awards show be without a pre-show? AJ Gibson, Marc Malkin, Laura Marano and Oliver Trevena will host the official pre-show, “AMAs Red Carpet Live presented by Security Benefit.” The two-hour pre-show will stream live from the Microsoft Theater beginning at 6 p.m. ET. You can watch the show on Twitter. Find it here. live.twitter.com/amas or via @AMAs. You can also watch “E! Live from the Red Carpet” from 6-8 p.m. ET. on the E! Network. Who has the most nominations: Bruno Mars has the most nominations this year – eight. Who is nominated for Artist of the Year: The Chainsmokers, Drake, Kendrick Lamar, Bruno Mars and Ed Sheeran are up for the award. Who is up for Video of the Year: Luis Fonsi and Daddy Yankee ('Despacito'), Bruno Mars ('That's What I Like') and Ed Sheeran ('Shape of You') are the nominees. For a complete list of nominees, click here. Who is performing: Here is a list of those scheduled to perform: Alessia Cara Alesso BTS Christina Aguilera  Kelly Clarkson  Florida Georgia Line Niall Horan Selena Gomez Imagine Dragons Lady Gaga Nick Jonas Khalid Demi Lovato  Shawn Mendes P!nk Portugal. The Man Diana Ross Hailee Steinfeld watt Zedd Anything special: Diana Ross, mother of host Tracee Ellis Ross, is both performing and receiving a lifetime achievement award.
  • A New Jersey man was stabbed to death in his home Tuesday night when he tried to defend his 8-year-old son from a group of teens trying to steal the boy’s sneakers, according to family. Jose “Migue” Malave, 30, of Jersey City, was stabbed around 7 p.m. at his home, according to the Hudson County Prosecutor’s Office. He was pronounced dead about 25 minutes later at the scene.  A 17-year-old boy was arrested at the scene and charged as a juvenile, prosecutors said. The unidentified teen is charged with murder, felony murder, armed burglary, conspiracy and multiple weapons charges.  A second suspect, Nasiar Day, 19, of Newark, was taken into custody Thursday, NJ.com reported. Day is also charged with murder, felony murder, armed burglary, weapons charges and conspiracy.  NJ.com reported that Malave died in front of his girlfriend and four of his 11 children. Malave had just returned home to drop off his son before heading to his construction job.  Responding police officers found him lying in a “lifeless state” in the doorway of the family’s apartment, prosecutors said.  Malave’s 8-year-old son had reportedly been targeted earlier in the day by a group of teens who tried to steal his sneakers. The teens later went to the boy’s home because they assumed he had other nice belongings, Jose Malave’s sister, Yesenia Malave, told NJ.com. >> Read more trending news Yesenia Malave described her brother as a man who always tried to brighten people’s days. “He was always outgoing, always happy, always trying to help people,” she said. “You could be down and he was the one who could bring your life up.” In a Facebook post on Thursday, the grieving sister said she could not adequately express her grief.  “I wish I would have one more day with my little brother to tell him I love him,” Yesenia Malave wrote. “I miss his 3 a.m. call; (who’s) going to call me now?” Friends and family members have established crowdfunding pages to help the Malave family with funeral arrangements and to help financially support Jose Malave’s children. Petitions have also been established to urge prosecutors to charge both suspects as adults in the slaying.
  • A food server at a Pittsburgh hospital is accused of exposing himself in front of a patient.  Police said Michael Booker, 37, a dietary server at University of Pittsburgh Medical Center Mercy, approached the female patient at the walking bridge that joins the parking garage and the hospital.  >> Read more trending news WPXI reported that the woman told investigators Booker approached her, said something vulgar and started fondling himself.  Booker is facing charges that include open lewdness. Officials said he has since been terminated from his position as a server.  Booker faces a preliminary hearing next month.

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