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    A Montana congressman misled investigators about his assault on a reporter the day before he was elected and claimed that the 'liberal media' was 'trying to make a story' out of it, according to documents released Friday.U.S. Rep. Greg Gianforte, a Republican, told an officer in the aftermath of the attack that Guardian newspaper reporter Ben Jacobs had grabbed him by the wrist and pulled both of them to the floor, according to notes from a Gallatin County sheriff's officer who interviewed the politician the night of the attack.Multiple witnesses contradicted that account, and Gianforte later pleaded guilty to misdemeanor assault. The attack occurred the day before his victory in a May 25 special election, by which time many voters already had cast ballots by mail.More than 100 pages of documents, photos and audio from the investigation were released under a court order following requests from The Associated Press and other news organizations.The documents include interviews with members of a Fox News crew who were in the room with Gianforte and Jacobs at the politician's Bozeman campaign office. They said Gianforte became enraged over what he perceived as biased coverage before body-slamming Jacobs, throwing him to the ground and punching him.Gianforte staffer Josh Elle — the candidate's driver — told investigators that he was in an adjacent room when he heard a commotion and looked into the interview room. Elle told investigators that Gianforte appeared to be striking the reporter with closed fists before someone in the room closed the door.Another worker said Gianforte and others on the campaign had been complaining earlier in the day about 'duplicitous' campaign coverage by the Guardian and Buzzfeed.Gianforte told Sgt. Scott Secor in an interview that Jacobs had interrupted as the Fox crew set up for an interview and 'started interrogating in a very intensive way.'I probably shouldn't do it but I reached out for his phone ... he grabbed my wrist, he spun and we ended up on the floor ... so he pulled me down on top of him,' the sergeant quoted Gianforte as saying.In the hours after the assault, Gianforte's campaign spokesman, Shane Scanlon, issued a statement that also blamed the attack on Jacobs, saying the reporter had grabbed the candidate's wrist. The records released Friday show that Gianforte first gave the misleading account to authorities.He didn't appear in public until his victory party the next night, when some in the crowd cheered him over the confrontation. Gianforte publicly apologized to Jacobs and told supporters he wasn't proud of his actions.His spokesman, Travis Hall, insisted on Friday that the documents contained 'nothing new.'No one was misled, and anyone who says otherwise is mistaken. Greg took responsibility for his actions and is focused on serving the people of Montana,' Hall said in an emailed statement.Gallatin County Attorney Marty Lambert said he was aware of Gianforte's comments to investigators but did not consider additional charges such as obstruction of justice because authorities were focused on the assault allegation.'When the police are investigating a case, suspects of crimes will say misleading things, and apparently that's exactly what happened here on the part of both Mr. Gianforte and his campaign,' Lambert said.'It is not a crime per se to lie to the cops,' added Lambert, a Republican. 'The main thing here is he was charged with assaulting Ben Jacobs and pled guilty to that.'Gianforte paid a $385 fine and completed 40 hours of community service and 20 hours of anger management counseling. He also donated $50,000 to the Committee to Protect Journalists.The assault happened too late in the campaign to affect the outcome of the election to replace Ryan Zinke, who resigned to become President Donald Trump's Interior Department secretary.Gianforte is up for re-election next year and has filed to run. Six Democrats have lined up to challenge him.The congressman unsuccessfully fought a judge's order for him to be booked by law enforcement and photographed like other defendants. In October, Gallatin County District Judge Holly Brown ordered the release of Gianforte's mug shot, which is sure to be used as fodder by Democrats in the run-up to the election.__Follow Matthew Brown on Twitter at www.twitter.com/matthewbrownap .
  • The family of a 5-year-old boy whose skull was crushed in the rotating wall of a hotel restaurant has sued the Atlanta hotel, accusing it of negligence in his death. Attorney Joseph Fried filed suit Wednesday for Rebecca and Michael Holt of Charlotte, North Carolina, whose son Charlie died April 14. 'What started out as the best family trip, turned into the worst nightmare,' Rebecca Holt said in a statement emailed by Fried. They had chosen the Sun Dial restaurant 'because it was recommended as a fun place for families with kids to see the Atlanta skyline and enjoy a meal,' Charlie's father, Michael Holt, said in the statement. Marriott International, the hotel's owner, didn't immediately respond to an email and phone call requesting comment. Police had said the boy wandered away from his family's window table at the restaurant atop the Westin Peachtree Plaza hotel and got his head stuck between tables. They also said the rotating floor shut off automatically when he was struck. The lawsuit disagrees with police statements. It said the family left along a path that various members had used without problems to go to and from the bathroom. But this time, it said, a booth rotating near a stationary wall blocked their path. Charlie, a few steps ahead of his parents, 'was too short to see past the booth and did not appreciate the danger until it was too late,' and was trapped in the 'pinch point' between booth and wall, according to the lawsuit. 'To Michael's and Rebecca's horror, the rotation did not automatically stop when Charlie got trapped,' the lawsuit states, and there was no emergency button to stop it. Rebecca Holt tried to pull her son free and Michael Holt 'threw his body against the booth,' but both actions were futile, it said. It said Michael Holt heard his son's skull crack before someone finally stopped the rotation. 'The family has filed this law suit to set the record straight about what happened and to make sure, to the best of their abilities, that no other family ever has to suffer the same fate,' Fried's statement said. Defendants include Marriott, as well as the chain that previously owned the Peachtree before Marriott bought the chain. Also named are other former owners and operators, and the architects, interior designer and contractor in charge of renovations to the restaurant in 2012 and 2013. The hotel reopened the restaurant in June. 'After Charlie's death, Marriott has said that it won't allow the restaurant to revolve again until it has addressed the dangerous pinch points,' Fried's statement said. 'Marriott should not have waited for this tragedy before acting to correct this hazard, especially while it held itself out as a safe place for kids.' ___ McConnaughey reported from New Orleans.
  • California has published the rules that will govern its legal marijuana economy in 2018, giving businesses and consumers a glimpse into the future.But there are important steps before legal recreational sales kick off on Jan. 1, and even more uncertainties about how the marketplace will function. Warning: Don't count on being able to stroll into your local dispensary on New Year's Day to celebrate with a pot cookie or joint.WHY ARE THE REGULATIONS IMPORTANT?They form the framework of the new pot economy, estimated to be worth $7 billion. Can you make animal-shaped edibles? No. Transport pot in a drone? No. But retailers can be open from 6 a.m. to 10 p.m. It's a dense stack of rules that includes fees for licensing (nearly $80,000 annually for a large grower), how pot will be traced from seed to sale and testing requirements to ensure customers get what they pay for.CAN I BUY LEGAL RECREATIONAL POT ON JAN. 1?For most people, probably not. It will vary place to place, but many cities are not prepared. Even though the state regulations went out Thursday, the Bureau of Cannabis Control is still developing an online system for businesses to apply for operating licenses. California is working out technical bugs and hopes it will be ready in early December.'There certainly will be licenses issued on Jan. 1,' said Alex Traverso of the Bureau of Cannabis Control.But there's a snag: To apply for a state license, a grower or seller first needs a local permit, and many cities are struggling to establish those rules, including Los Angeles and San Francisco, two of the biggest markets.'I think the state dropped the ball big time. This should have been done by June, July,' said Los Angeles grower and retailer Donnie Anderson. 'I don't think this is going to be ready.'Other places, like Kern County, have banned commercial pot activity. At the same time, San Diego is among the cities that have local rules in place and are ready for legal sales. Palm Springs is planning for cannabis lounges, where recreational pot can be smoked on site.A GRADUAL STARTFor six months, the state is allowing businesses to bend the rules a bit, recognizing it will take time for the new system to take hold. During that period, businesses can sell products that do not meet new packaging requirements. Retailers can sell inventory that does not meet new rules for ingredients or appearance.At an industry conference in September, California's top pot regulator sought to ease concerns that the state would move quickly on enforcement against operations without licenses. If authorities are aware a business has applied for a license 'I don't want you to have anxiety that we're out there and we're going to be enforcing everything right away,' said Lori Ajax, who heads the state cannabis bureau.EVERYTHING IS TEMPORARYEven if you get a license, it will be temporary — good for 120 days. In some cases, there can be a 90-day extension on top of that. During that time, the state will review a business' credentials and information submitted in the license application, such as financial records and investors in the business.The regulations issued by the state this week are temporary, too.MANY CHALLENGES REMAINKey pieces of the legal pot system are still in the works. A massive tracking system that will follow plants from seed to sale is in development, but officials say it will be ready at the start of the new year. It's not clear if enough distributors will be available to move cannabis from fields to testing labs and eventually to retail shops, possibly creating a bottleneck between growers and store shelves.THE LOOMING BLACK MARKETNo one knows how many operators will apply for licenses. While medical marijuana has been legal in California for over two decades, most growing and selling occurs in the black market. Come Jan. 1, officials hope those growers and sellers will join the legal pot economy.But there are concerns many might continue business as usual to avoid new taxes, which could hit 45 percent in the recreational market in some cases, according to a recent study by Fitch Ratings.'The existing black market for cannabis may prove a formidable competitor' if taxes send legal retail prices soaring, the report said.
  • A priest who wasn't allowed to preach instead turned his ears and heart to the needy. Now, decades after his death, Solanus Casey is on a path to sainthood, celebrated as an incredibly humble man who brought people to God.Father Solanus, as he was known, will be beatified Saturday at a Mass attended by 65,000 people at a stadium in Detroit where he spent much of his ministry. Pope Francis said he met the requirements to earn the title of 'blessed,' especially after a woman from Panama was instantly cured of a chronic skin disease while she prayed at his tomb in 2012.Father Solanus can be made a saint in the years ahead if a second miracle is attributed to him. He'll be only the second U.S.-born man to be beatified by the Roman Catholic Church, joining the Rev. Stanley Rother, a priest killed in Guatamala's civil war, who was beatified in Oklahoma in September. One U.S.-born woman has been beatified and two others have been declared saints.'It's a great event,' Archbishop Allen Vigneron, who leads the southeastern Michigan church, said of the honor for Father Solanus. 'It's hard to communicate how vivid and real the presence of Father is to our community.'Even 60 years after his death, 'people don't say, 'I'm going to Father's tomb,'' Vigneron told The Associated Press. 'They say, 'I'm going to talk to Father.''Father Solanus, a native of Oak Grove, Wisconsin, joined the Capuchin religious order in Detroit in 1897 and was ordained a priest seven years later. But there were conditions: Because of academic struggles, he was prohibited from giving homilies at Mass and couldn't hear confessions.'He accepted it,' said the Rev. Martin Pable, 86, a fellow Capuchin. 'He believed whatever God wants, that's what he would do.'He served for 20 years in New York City and nearby Yonkers before the Capuchins transferred him back to the St. Bonaventure Monastery in Detroit in 1924. Wearing a traditional brown hooded robe and sandals, Father Solanus worked as a porter or doorkeeper for the next two decades, but his reputation for holiness far exceeded his modest title.The unemployed shared their anxieties with Father Solanus, the parents of wayward kids sought his advice, and the ill and addicted asked him to urge God to heal them. As he listened, he took notes that were later turned into typewritten volumes of his work.Later in life, when Father Solanus was stationed at a seminary in Huntington, Indiana, Detroiters boarded buses for a four-hour ride just to see the man with a wispy white beard. Mail piled up from across the country.'He had a gentle presence. He left people with a wonderful feeling of peace inside their hearts,' Pable said. 'He would say, 'Let's just pray about this and see what God wants to do.' Some people were not healed. He told them to bear their problems with God's help.'Father Solanus, who died in 1957, also co-founded the Capuchin Soup Kitchen, which serves up to 2,000 meals a day to Detroit's poor.The Capuchins built a center that bears his name and explains his life story. The public is invited to pray and leave handwritten pleas atop his tomb. Father Solanus' name is invoked by many people who attend a weekly service for the sick.Shirley Wilson, 78, said she regularly prayed to Father Solanus to help her nephew get a kidney. He got one a few weeks ago.'It was a perfect match,' she said. 'I believe in miracles.'Vigneron hopes Father Solanus will inspire people to show mercy toward others.'We need to care for the poor and give them a high priority,' the archbishop said. 'Father was very loving and understanding to people who came to him with their troubles.'___Follow Ed White at https://twitter.com/edwhiteap
  • A state Supreme Court justice running for governor volunteered candid details of his sexual past on Facebook on Friday, saying he was taking a swipe at the 'media frenzy' over sexual misconduct.Democrat William O'Neill's post was immediately attacked as inappropriate and led to calls for his ouster.In it, he wrote that he has been 'sexually intimate with approximately 50 very attractive females,' including 'a gorgeous blonde' with whom he 'made passionate love' in a hay loft and a 'drop dead gorgeous red head' from Cleveland.After posting the message, he edited it to remove some identifying information about the women.O'Neill, 70, told The Associated Press the details provided were true and he was trying to make a point.'It's a matter of parody suggesting that, as a governor candidate, I assume I am the next target of the media frenzy,' he said.'So I figure let's just get it out here on Front Street right here and now,' he added, referring to the street where the Supreme Court building sits.Chief Justice Maureen O'Connor, the first woman to lead the state's high court, immediately condemned the post.'No words can convey my shock,' she said in a statement. 'This gross disrespect for women shakes the public's confidence in the integrity of the judiciary.'All other Democrats seeking the governorship — former U.S. Rep. Betty Sutton, Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley, former state Rep. Connie Pillich and state Sen. Joe Schiavoni — called for O'Neill to resign, saying he was trivializing the issue.'As an attorney, I'm appalled at these remarks of a Supreme Court Justice,' Sutton said. 'As a Democrat, I'm horrified a statewide candidate would belittle victims of sexual harassment and assault this way. And, as a woman, I'm outraged he would equate sexual assault with indiscretion.'Only a day earlier, Sutton unveiled a plan to combat sexual harassment and sexual assault in state government, where two lawmakers have resigned amid sexual misconduct allegations in about a month's time.Others to condemn the post included Lt. Gov. Mary Taylor, a Republican candidate for governor; state Democratic Chairman David Pepper; and the Republican National Committee. O'Neill's campaign spokesman resigned over it.The post drew thousands of comments, reactions or shares on Facebook and was a trending topic on Twitter, drawing mostly negative reaction but some positive comments.O'Neill said the Facebook post grew out of frustration over Democrats' calls to remove Al Franken, a Minnesota U.S. senator and former 'Saturday Night Live' performer, from the U.S. Senate over sexual misconduct allegations.'When a United States Senator commits a non criminal act of indiscretion; and when it is brought to his attention he immediately has the integrity to apologize; and the apology is accepted by the victim: IT IS WRONG for the dogs of war to leap onto his back and demand his resignation from the United States Senate,' O'Neill wrote on Facebook, following up on similar remarks he made earlier. 'It is morally wrong.'He suggested calls for removing Franken were part of a 'feeding frenzy' and said his critics should 'Lighten up folks.'But many critics were particularly offended that O'Neill purported to be 'speaking for all heterosexual males.'Newsflash: no one asked how many notches you have on your belt,' the Republican National Committee's Ellie Hockenbury wrote in an email. 'The so-called 'national feeding frenzy' is about empowering victims of sexual assault or harassment who've been afraid to speak up; it's not an opportunity to brag about your sexual conquests through the years.'O'Neill's candidacy had already been under scrutiny.Republicans have launched efforts to remove O'Neill from the bench for violating a prohibition in the judicial code of conduct against running for a non-judicial office while serving on the bench. O'Neill argues he will not be a 'candidate' under that rule until he files the necessary paperwork in February.O'Neill told the AP this week he will not run for governor if Democrat Richard Cordray does. Corday resigned his post as federal consumer chief Wednesday and is widely expected to make a bid for governor.
  • A new report on recalls of potentially deadly Takata air bag inflators shows that automakers have replaced only 43 percent of the faulty parts even though recalls have been under way for more than 15 years.The report, issued Friday by an independent monitor who is keeping tabs on the recalls, also shows that auto companies are only about halfway toward a Dec. 31 goal of 100 percent replacement of older and more dangerous inflators.The slow completion rate comes even though the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration began coordinating the recalls and phasing them in two years ago. Before that, the automakers were obtaining parts and distributing them on their own. Normally automakers fix 75 percent of vehicles within 18 months after the recall is announced.The report brought criticism from a U.S. senator in Florida, whose state has seen three deaths caused by the problem and where automakers have fixed 41.7 percent of the 3 million affected inflators.Takata uses the chemical ammonium nitrate to create a small explosion and fill air bags quickly in a crash. But the chemical can deteriorate when exposed to high humidity and temperatures and burn too fast, blowing apart a metal canister designed to contain the explosion. That can hurl hot shrapnel into unsuspecting drivers and passengers. At least 19 people have been killed worldwide and more than 180 injured.The problem touched off the largest series of automotive recalls in U.S. history, with 19 car and truck makers having to recall up to 69 million inflators in 42 million vehicles. It also brought a criminal conviction and fine against Takata and forced the Japanese company into bankruptcy protection.The report by independent monitor John Buretta says that as of Sept. 15, automakers have recalled 43.1 million inflators. Of those, only 18.5 million have been replaced, even though Takata recalls date to 2001.In his report, Buretta concludes that there is 'much room for improvement' in the Takata recalls. But he says that manufacturers are starting to make meaningful progress toward 'developing sound strategic approaches.'The automakers, he writes, are using different communications methods to reach owners such as door-to-door canvassing. They also are offering mobile repair and trying to use third parties such as independent repair facilities to speed up the process.Sen. Bill Nelson, D-Florida, blamed the slow pace on a lack of leadership at NHTSA, which has been without its top administrator since the end of the Obama administration in January. 'We still don't have any leadership at NHTSA to ensure this stuff actually gets done by the automakers,' he said in a statement. 'Until the agency gets a permanent administrator this recall is going to continue to drag on while the injury and death toll mounts.'NHTSA said in a statement that the Takata recalls are unprecedented in size and complexity and have resulted in groundbreaking lessons that will help automakers reach their repair goals. The agency said it is monitoring the automakers' progress and working to expand best practices to boost completion rates. The agency also has the authority to fine automakers that don't make recall repairs in a timely manner.'NHTSA will rely on its broad array of enforcement authorities and will take further action as appropriate,' the statement said.Completion rates vary wildly by automaker, according to a separate document posted by NHTSA. Tesla was best at 78.6 percent, followed by Honda at 64.8 percent. Mercedes-Benz was the worst at 2.3 percent, followed by Karma at 9.9 percent.Automakers initially were slowed by a lack of replacement inflators as Takata and other manufacturers ramped up manufacturing. But for many such as Honda, Takata's largest customer, ample parts are now available.NHTSA coordinated the parts distribution, sending them first to southern states with higher temperatures and humidity. The recalls will be phased in over roughly the next three years.
  • A roundup of some of the most popular, but completely untrue, headlines of the week. None of these stories are legit, even though they were shared widely on social media. The Associated Press checked these out; here are the real facts: NOT REAL: Second Roy Moore Accuser Works For Michelle Obama Right NOW THE FACTS: The woman named as an accuser of Republican U.S. Senate candidate Roy Moore in a story by the Last Line of Defense doesn't work for Michelle Obama. In fact, it's unclear that she's a real person. The article claims a woman named Fiona Dourif told MSNBC's Rachel Maddow last week that she was groped by Moore in 1957. No one by that named appeared on Maddow's show. An actress with the same name called out the story on Twitter , saying she has nothing to do with Moore. The story is linked to a photo of former Alabama U.S. Attorney Joyce Vance. An Obama family representative tells the AP the claim that the woman worked as a housekeeper for the Obamas is completely false. ____ NOT REAL: Trump Abruptly Shuts Down Dogs for Wounded Warriors Program, Leaving Vets High and Dry on Veteran's Day! THE FACTS: Officials at Walter Reed National Medical Center in Bethesda, Maryland, did issue a stop work order to an animal therapy group contracted with the hospital, but it came on Oct. 27, more than two weeks before Veteran's Day. The order to the Warrior Canine Project came from hospital officials, not the White House. Hospital spokeswoman Sandy Dean says it's looking to restructure its animal therapy contracts to improve patient care. She adds that therapy dogs continue to be available for patients at Walter Reed. ____ NOT REAL: British Intelligence Seizes Clinton Foundation Warehouse, $400 Million In Cash THE FACTS: Several websites have posted a story claiming the Clinton Foundation was leasing a British warehouse owned by a man on the U.K.'s terrorist watch list, quoting an unnamed assistant to Chelsea Clinton stating that the facility was 'rented through an agency.' Foundation spokesman Brian Cookstra tells the AP the story is 'totally false.' He adds: 'We don't rent a warehouse in the UK, the quote from 'Chelsea Clinton's assistant' is made up, and nothing in this story seems to be based in reality.' A photo included with the story is a picture from Britain's The Sun newspaper that shows unrelated police activity in Kent, England. ___ NOT REAL: English actor Ian McKellen dies aged 78 THE FACTS: McKellen is alive and actively working despite a story from a website appearing to mimic Britain's Daily Mail reporting he died after a lengthy hospitalization for pneumonia. The story first published last year has recirculated in recent days. McKellen has starred in several projects on stage and screen this year alone, including the British sitcom 'Vicious.' The show's Twitter account posted a photo of McKellen and co-star Derek Jacobi Saturday with the note: 'In case you were wondering, we're still alive.' ___ NOT REAL: Iceland Mandates Mental Health Warnings On All Bibles THE FACTS: No warnings are required to be put on Bibles sold in the island nation. A widely-shared hoax story from the website Patheos offers a clue to the joke by naming the prime minister of the country as Andrew Canard. Canard is a seldom used word that means a fabricated report. The actual prime minister of Iceland is Bjarni Benediktsson. ___ This is part of The Associated Press' ongoing effort to fact-check misinformation that is shared widely online, including work with Facebook to identify and reduce the circulation of false stories on the platform. ___ Find all AP Fact Checks here: https://www.apnews.com/tag/APFactCheck
  • A police disciplinary board on Friday cleared the highest-ranking Baltimore officer involved in the 2015 arrest of Freddie Gray, a young black man who died from a spinal cord injury he sustained in a police van.The three-member panel ruled that Lt. Brian Rice was not guilty of all 10 administrative charges related to Gray's arrest and transport, meaning he can keep his job. The board was chaired by Prince George's County Police Maj. Melvin Powell and also included two Baltimore police officials.Rice appeared visibly relieved and hugged his attorney and others after the findings were read aloud. His lawyer, Michael Davey, later said the lieutenant is 'extremely happy' with the decision.The death of the 25-year-old set off Baltimore's worst riots in decades and led to a federal investigation into allegations of police abuse. Baltimore and the Justice Department entered into a reform agreement after a scathing report by the federal agency outlined widespread misconduct and abuse within the city's police department.Gray's death was 'a terrible tragedy, and honestly that's all it was,' Davey, a former policeman, told reporters. That tragedy is 'not lost on anybody, especially Lt. Rice due to the fact he was there.'Rice and other officers also were acquitted of criminal charges in Gray's arrest and death. He has been working for the police department's forensic services division.The 10 administrative charges Rice faced during a trial this week focused on how he handled himself as shift commander during Gray's arrest and transport. The charges ranged from failing to ensure Gray's safety in the police van by not strapping him with a seat belt, to incompetence, to failure to monitor communications.Gray was arrested April 12, 2015, after running from Rice and two other officers outside a public housing project. A neighbor's video showed him handcuffed behind his back and hoisted into a police van. Officers later shackled his feet as well and put him face-down on the floor of the metal compartment. The van made a total of six stops during the roughly 45-minute journey to the nearby station. Gray was found unresponsive with a broken neck on arrival, and died a week later.Neil Duke, the lead attorney for the police department, argued that Rice had to face disciplinary actions because he was the officer in charge. He didn't follow protocol in his leadership role, he argued, including failing to put Gray in a seatbelt and neglecting to act after he was told by a subordinate that the detained man appeared 'lethargic' at the fifth stop.'This is all about accepting personal responsibility. Leaders lead, others make excuses,' Duke said during his closing arguments.But Davey argued that the prosecution failed to provide any evidence that could possibly justify discipline leading to the lieutenant losing his job.'The evidence of this case, presented to you by the department, didn't even come close,' Davey said.Davey highlighted the officers' testimony that Gray was 'combative and violent' up to the van's fifth stop.He also blamed the department's 'very inefficient policies' and said transport vans were unsafe in 2015.'They clearly had some dangerous equipment that these officers had to go out on the street with and honestly hope that no one was injured. And, unfortunately, on that day someone was,' Davey said outside the University of Baltimore, where the police trial board was held.The same panel recently found the police van's driver, Officer Caesar Goodson, not guilty of 21 charges.Baltimore's mayor has said she will renew efforts to persuade the legislature to add two civilians to police trial boards. Police union opposition has kept civilians off such panels in Baltimore, even as civilians join police in handling complaints in other cities.Adam Jackson, director of Leaders of a Beautiful Struggle, an activist group that advocates for 'the public policy interest of Black people,' said he wasn't surprised by the police board's rulings with Rice and Goodson.'Until we have more civilian participation I believe we will be dissatisfied with the results,' he said by phone after the board's Rice ruling.One other police officer, Sgt. Alicia White, still faces a trial board and possible termination related to Gray's arrest and van transport. She is due to go to trial on Dec. 5.___David McFadden on Twitter: www.twitter.com/dmcfadd
  • Police have arrested two people after the fatal stabbing of a New Jersey man who relatives say was trying to defend his 8-year-old son from being robbed.Detectives arrested 19-year-old Nasiar Day, of Newark, on Thursday, two days after police found 30-year-old Jose Malave in the doorway of his Jersey City apartment.Day is charged with murder, armed burglary and weapon offenses. He remains in custody and it is not clear whether he has a lawyer to comment on his behalf.A 17-year-old also is charged with murder.Family members told The Jersey Journal Malave's son had been targeted earlier in the day for his sneakers by a group of teenagers. Relatives say the teens came to Malave's home and he defended his son when an altercation ensued.___This story has been corrected to show that the suspect's first name is Nasiar, not Nasir.___Information from: The Jersey Journal , http://www.nj.com/jjournal
  • A couple who say they were handcuffed for hours in a police patrol car after their hibiscus plants were confused for marijuana are suing the police and an insurance company.Edward and Audrey Cramer say in a lawsuit filed Tuesday that a Nationwide Insurance Co. agent investigating a fallen tree at their Buffalo Township home sent photos of their flowering plant to police. The lawsuit alleges that Buffalo Township police officers with assault rifles went to their home on Oct. 7 to investigate.Audrey Cramer, 66, said she was partially dressed when she went to the door and police would not let her put on pants before she was handcuffed.'I was not treated as though I was a human being,' she said. 'I was just something they were going to push aside.'Edward Cramer, 69, said he returned home a half-hour later to find his wife in the back of a police cruiser and officers pointing guns at him. He also was placed in the cruiser despite trying to convince the officers the plants were hibiscus, not marijuana.'They actually ignored me,' he said. 'They wouldn't even listen. I said, 'I can show you pictures on the internet.''The Cramers eventually were released without charges. They are seeking monetary and compensatory damages and court costs.Nationwide Insurance declined to comment on Friday, citing the litigation. Township police also declined to comment.

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  • The Jacksonville Sheriff's Office said a boy died Friday night after becoming tangled in chains on a swing at a park in Northwest Jacksonville. #JSO is working a death investigation of a child in the 8700 Sibbald Rd. Media will be addressed at 9pm at Sibbald Rd and Archery Ave.— Jax Sheriff's Office (@JSOPIO) November 18, 2017 Officers responded at 6:15 p.m. to Charles 'Boobie' Clark Park on Sibbald Road, where they found an unresponsive 10-year-old boy. A mother of four children walked with her kids to play at the park. The 10-year-old boy was standing on the swing, police said. When the mother looked back at the boy, she saw the chains of the swing wrapped around the child's neck. 10 year old child at the park was on a swing when he got entangled in the chains and they wrapped around his neck. Child died at the hospital. At this time, the death is being investigated as a tragic accident and foul play is not suspected. https://t.co/lCOrhRPBGd — Jax Sheriff's Office (@JSOPIO) November 18, 2017 The boy was brought to UF Health Jacksonville, where he died from his injuries. The child's mother and other children are being questioned, but police said no foul play is suspected and the incident is being called a tragic accident by JSO. Refresh this page, follow @ActionNewsJax on Twitter and watch FOX30 Action News Jax at 10 for updates. HAPPENING NOW: #JSO investigating a death reported off 8700 Sibbald Rd. @ActionNewsJax crew is headed to scene. pic.twitter.com/2V2qCkexVU — Tenikka Smith Hughes (@TenikkaANjax) November 18, 2017 #BREAKING: JSO is working a death investigation of a child on Sibbald Rd. I'm headed to the scene @ActionNewsJax — Danielle Avitable (@DanielleANjax) November 18, 2017 JSO says 10 year old got tangled in chains on swing & died. No foul play is suspected. Police call it a 'tragic accident' pic.twitter.com/EwQi7tNOQ9 — Danielle Avitable (@DanielleANjax) November 18, 2017 Police say mother was at park with 4 kids and she looked away for a second when she turned around her child was unconscious on the swing. Taken to UF health where child pronounced dead @ActionNewsJax pic.twitter.com/I5AMOBAdlz — Danielle Avitable (@DanielleANjax) November 18, 2017 Police say mother was at park with 4 kids and she looked away for a second when she turned around her child was unconscious on the swing. Taken to UF health where child pronounced dead @ActionNewsJax pic.twitter.com/I5AMOBAdlz — Danielle Avitable (@DanielleANjax) November 18, 2017
  • Update (Friday, November 17) President Donald Trump said in a tweet Friday he’s delaying a new policy allowing the body parts of African elephants shot for sport to be imported until he can review “all conservation facts.” The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service said Thursday that it will allow the importation of body parts from African elephants shot for sport. The agency said encouraging wealthy big-game hunters to kill the threatened species would help raise money for conservation programs. Animal rights advocates and environmental groups criticized the decision. On Friday, the Republican chairman of the House Foreign Affairs Committee urged the administration to reverse the policy, calling it the “wrong move at the wrong time.” Trump said that the policy had been “under study for years.” He says he will review the issue with Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke. Earlier The Trump administration plans to lift a ban on Friday that barred big game hunters from bringing trophies from elephants killed in a pair of African nations to America, according to multiple reports. >> Read more trending news A spokesperson for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service told ABC News in a statement Wednesday that the decision was made after officials in Zimbabwe and Zambia provided them with information to support a reversal of the ban. 'Legal, well-regulated sport hunting as part of a sound management program can benefit the conservation of certain species by providing incentives to local communities to conserve the species and by putting much-needed revenue back into conservation,' the spokesperson told ABC News. The decision will overturn a 2014 ban implemented by President Barack Obama’s administration in response to falling elephant populations.  African elephants are listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act. A provision in the act, however, allows for the government to give permits that let people import trophies from such animals if evidence shows that hunting them helps conservation efforts, according to NBC News. The rule reversal will apply to elephants hunted in Zimbabwe from Jan. 21, 2016, to Dec. 31, 2018, the news station reported. It will also apply to elephants killed in Zambia in 2016, 2017 and 2018 and “applications that meet all other applicable permitting requirements,” a Fish and Wildlife spokesperson told NBC News. According to the 2016 Great Elephant Census, Savanna elephant populations fell by 30 percent between 2007 and 2014. About 352,000 elephants were spotted during the survey, 82,300 in Zimbabwe and 21,700 in Zambia. Both countries had areas that saw substantial declines in elephant populations along the Zambezi river in Zambia and in Zimbabwe’s Sebungwe region, according to the census. The Associated Press contributed to this report.
  • The 45th American Music Awards ceremony is set for Sunday in Los Angeles, and if the past is any indication, you can expect a night with a few surprising moments.  Remember Garth Brooks declining the award, or the time Pat Boone dressed in leather? Yeah, it’s likely to be that kind of night. The show will be broadcast live from the Microsoft Theater in Los Angeles. Here’s what you need to know about the show. What time: The show begins at 8 p.m. ET What channel: The AMAs will be broadcast live on ABC. Who is hosting: Tracee Ellis Ross, star of “black-ish,” is hosting. What about a pre-show: What would a music awards show be without a pre-show? AJ Gibson, Marc Malkin, Laura Marano and Oliver Trevena will host the official pre-show, “AMAs Red Carpet Live presented by Security Benefit.” The two-hour pre-show will stream live from the Microsoft Theater beginning at 6 p.m. ET. You can watch the show on Twitter. Find it here. live.twitter.com/amas or via @AMAs. You can also watch “E! Live from the Red Carpet” from 6-8 p.m. ET. on the E! Network. Who has the most nominations: Bruno Mars has the most nominations this year – eight. Who is nominated for Artist of the Year: The Chainsmokers, Drake, Kendrick Lamar, Bruno Mars and Ed Sheeran are up for the award. Who is up for Video of the Year: Luis Fonsi and Daddy Yankee ('Despacito'), Bruno Mars ('That's What I Like') and Ed Sheeran ('Shape of You') are the nominees. For a complete list of nominees, click here. Who is performing: Here is a list of those scheduled to perform: Alessia Cara Alesso BTS Christina Aguilera  Kelly Clarkson  Florida Georgia Line Niall Horan Selena Gomez Imagine Dragons Lady Gaga Nick Jonas Khalid Demi Lovato  Shawn Mendes P!nk Portugal. The Man Diana Ross Hailee Steinfeld watt Zedd Anything special: Diana Ross, mother of host Tracee Ellis Ross, is both performing and receiving a lifetime achievement award.
  • A New Jersey man was stabbed to death in his home Tuesday night when he tried to defend his 8-year-old son from a group of teens trying to steal the boy’s sneakers, according to family. Jose “Migue” Malave, 30, of Jersey City, was stabbed around 7 p.m. at his home, according to the Hudson County Prosecutor’s Office. He was pronounced dead about 25 minutes later at the scene.  A 17-year-old boy was arrested at the scene and charged as a juvenile, prosecutors said. The unidentified teen is charged with murder, felony murder, armed burglary, conspiracy and multiple weapons charges.  A second suspect, Nasiar Day, 19, of Newark, was taken into custody Thursday, NJ.com reported. Day is also charged with murder, felony murder, armed burglary, weapons charges and conspiracy.  NJ.com reported that Malave died in front of his girlfriend and four of his 11 children. Malave had just returned home to drop off his son before heading to his construction job.  Responding police officers found him lying in a “lifeless state” in the doorway of the family’s apartment, prosecutors said.  Malave’s 8-year-old son had reportedly been targeted earlier in the day by a group of teens who tried to steal his sneakers. The teens later went to the boy’s home because they assumed he had other nice belongings, Jose Malave’s sister, Yesenia Malave, told NJ.com. >> Read more trending news Yesenia Malave described her brother as a man who always tried to brighten people’s days. “He was always outgoing, always happy, always trying to help people,” she said. “You could be down and he was the one who could bring your life up.” In a Facebook post on Thursday, the grieving sister said she could not adequately express her grief.  “I wish I would have one more day with my little brother to tell him I love him,” Yesenia Malave wrote. “I miss his 3 a.m. call; (who’s) going to call me now?” Friends and family members have established crowdfunding pages to help the Malave family with funeral arrangements and to help financially support Jose Malave’s children. Petitions have also been established to urge prosecutors to charge both suspects as adults in the slaying.
  • A food server at a Pittsburgh hospital is accused of exposing himself in front of a patient.  Police said Michael Booker, 37, a dietary server at University of Pittsburgh Medical Center Mercy, approached the female patient at the walking bridge that joins the parking garage and the hospital.  >> Read more trending news WPXI reported that the woman told investigators Booker approached her, said something vulgar and started fondling himself.  Booker is facing charges that include open lewdness. Officials said he has since been terminated from his position as a server.  Booker faces a preliminary hearing next month.

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