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    A weeklong conservative free speech showcase at famously liberal University of California, Berkeley was supposed to start Sunday. But it apparently ended the same day after a blink-and-you-miss-it appearance by right-wing firebrand Milo Yiannopoulos and angry shouts from small groups of competing protesters who came to celebrate and condemn him. Yiannopoulos blew kisses, posed for selfies and briefly addressed a few dozen supporters at the campus while a slightly larger crowd protesting him was kept separate by police. Wearing sunglasses and an American flag hoodie under a denim jacket, he spoke without amplification for a few moments on the steps of Sproul Hall. Then he led a rendition of the 'Star Spangled Banner' before being whisked away in a car. The whole appearance lasted less than a half hour. Jake Wall, a college student from Los Angeles in town to visit his girlfriend, described Yiannopolous' showing as a 'meet and greet.' He said Yiannapoulos couldn't make any points without a microphone and promised his admirers he'd return to deliver a proper address. 'When you can't speak through a mic, how effective was that?' Wall asked. University officials said a request for amplification, required under school rules, was never made. A defiant Yiannapoulos announced Saturday that he would appear at an unsanctioned rally despite the sudden cancellation of a planned four-day conservative event dubbed Free Speech Week. The campus conservative group Berkeley Patriot, which had been organizing the gathering with Yiannopoulos, told university administrators that the group would cancel it, the university said. Yiannopoulos said he was blindsided by the news. Those hoping to hear him speak Sunday were herded through metal detectors, while demonstrators who came out against the appearance were held behind barricades on Sproul Plaza, the center of activity on campus during the 1960s Free Speech Movement. Kat McLain, 26, said she considers herself a liberal but decided to come out to support conservatives' right to be heard. 'There's no way to come to a peaceful resolution until we can stop and talk to each other,' she said. University officials said there were no injuries and at least two arrests, including one of somebody allegedly using unpermitted amplified sound. UC Berkeley spokesman Dan Mogulof joked that the money spent on mobilizing police for the short appearance amounted to 'probably the most expensive photo op in the university's history.' But he defended the tactical strategy of deploying so many officers, saying they had to be prepared for the unexpected. Campus police Chief Margo Bennett estimated that the university spent roughly $800,000 on security. Berkeley freshman Alexandria Storm bemoaned the money spent on a huge police presence for an event that went bust. 'This is a waste of resources, a waste of student dollars to militarize the police,' she said. UC Berkeley recently shelled out $600,000 for security when conservative Ben Shapiro spoke. Berkeley's reputation as a liberal stronghold and the birthplace of the Free Speech Movement has made the city and campus flashpoints for the country's political divisions since the election of Republican President Donald Trump. Yiannopoulos' attempt to speak at Berkeley in February was shut down by masked anarchists who rioted on campus. 'Claims that this (the cancellation of the Free Speech Week event) is somehow the outcome desired by the campus are without basis in fact,' Mogulof said in a statement Saturday. 'The University was prepared to do whatever was necessary to support the First Amendment rights of the student organization.' ____ Associated Press writer Christopher Weber contributed from Los Angeles.
  • Protesters who were arrested at an unruly demonstration at a suburban St. Louis shopping mall were released from jail Sunday amid cheers from demonstrators. An estimated 200 people gathered at the St. Louis County Justice Center Sunday afternoon, a day after 22 protesters were arrested at the St. Louis Galleria in Richmond Heights. Among those released Sunday was the Rev. Karla Frye. Protesters claim Frye was choked by police. Frye was charged with assault, rioting and two counts of resisting arrest. A court document accused her of jumping on the back of a police officer, injuring the officer. Six other protesters were charged with rioting and resisting arrest. The 15 others will be referred to Richmond Heights Municipal Court for local charges. The protest was one of several since mid-September, when a judge acquitted former police officer Jason Stockley of first-degree murder in the death of a black drug suspect. Nearly 200 people have been arrested in demonstrations since the ruling. On Sunday, a much smaller group of protesters stood outside a hotel near Lambert Airport, where a conservative group was hosting a rally that included Steve Bannon, the former chief strategist to President Donald Trump. The Galleria protest began peacefully before some protesters began overturning trash cans, leading to a confrontation between police and demonstrators. Officers cleared out the mall and began making arrests. Stockley was found not guilty in the 2011 death of Anthony Lamar Smith. He testified he shot Smith in self-defense because Smith was reaching toward a gun in his car. Prosecutors accused Stockley of planting the gun.
  • The Latest on a planned speech by a right-wing provocateur at the University of California, Berkeley (all times local): 12:45 p.m. Milo Yiannopoulos was whisked away in a car after a brief appearance at the University of California, Berkeley that drew a few dozen supporters and a slightly larger crowd protesting the right-wing provocateur. Yiannopoulos made a few comments from the steps of Sproul Hall shortly after noon Sunday. He blew kisses, posed for selfies and led a rendition of the Star Spangled Banner before leaving. The appearance lasted less than a half hour before the crowds dispersed. Demonstrators protesting it were kept behind barricades by police on Sproul Plaza. Yiannopoulos said Saturday that he would appear at an unsanctioned rally despite the cancellation of a planned four-day event dubbed Free Speech Week. ___ 12:15 p.m. Right-wing provocateur Milo Yiannopoulos blew kisses, posed for selfies and addressed a few dozen supporters at the University of California, Berkeley, while a slightly larger crowd protesting his appearance was kept separate by police. Yiannopoulos, wearing sunglasses and an American flag hoodie under a denim jacket, spoke without amplification Sunday on the steps of Sproul Hall. Those hoping to hear his speech were herded through metal detectors, while demonstrators protesting it were kept behind barricades on Sproul Plaza. Yiannopoulos vowed Saturday to appear at an unsanctioned rally despite the cancellation of a planned four-day event dubbed Free Speech Week. ___ 11:30 a.m. Several dozen demonstrators who've gathered at the University of California, Berkeley, to protest a planned speech by Milo Yiannopoulos have been met by a similarly-sized crowd supporting the right-wing provocateur. Police are keeping the two sides separated Sunday at the university's Sproul Plaza, where Yiannopoulos has yet to appear. His speech was set for noon. A conservative campus group says a planned four-day event dubbed Free Speech Week was canceled. However, Yiannopoulos announced Saturday that he would appear with others at an unsanctioned rally. His supporters toted signs saying 'Stop liberal intolerance, support Trump' while demonstrators on the other side shouted slogans like 'No Trump, no KKK.' Berkeley's Sproul Plaza was the center of activity on campus during the 1960s Free Speech Movement.
  • A masked gunman invaded a Nashville church Sunday and opened fire, walking silently down the aisle as he shot unsuspecting congregants. At least one person was killed and seven others wounded, authorities said. An usher confronted the shooter, who apparently shot himself in the struggle before he was arrested, police said. No motive was immediately determined. Church members told investigators that the suspect had attended services a year or two ago, said Don Aaron, a spokesman for the Metro Nashville Police Department. The gunman pulled into the parking lot at the Burnette Chapel Church of Christ as services were ending. He fatally shot a woman who was walking to her vehicle, then entered the rear of the church with two pistols and kept firing, hitting six people, Aaron said. Authorities identified the attacker as Emanuel Kidega Samson, 25, of Murfreesboro, who came to the United States from Sudan in 1996 and was a legal U.S. resident. It was unclear whether the self-inflicted wound to the chest was intentional, Aaron said. The gunman was discharged hours later from Vanderbilt University Hospital but remained in police custody. Warrants charging him with murder and attempted murder were pending, Aaron said. Witness Minerva Rosa said the usher was 'a hero.' 'He's amazing,' said Rosa, a member of the church for eight years. 'Without him, I think it could be worse.' The suspect said nothing as he fired. While the gunman made his way down the aisle, Rosa said, the pastor started shouting, ''Run! Run! Gunshots!'' Aaron called the usher, 22-year-old Robert Engle, 'an extraordinarily brave individual.' The woman who was killed in the parking lot was identified as Melanie Smith, 39, of Smyrna, Tennessee. The gunman and six others were treated for gunshot wounds at nearby hospitals, along with Engle, who was pistol-whipped, Aaron said. Witnesses were being interviewed by police. Forty-two people were at the church at the time of the shooting, and that all victims were adults, Aaron said. The small brick church describes itself on its website as a 'friendly, Bible-based group of folks who love the Lord and are interested in spreading his word to those who are lost.' Photos on the church's Facebook page show a diverse congregation with people of various ages and ethnicities. After the attack, the nearby New Beautiful Gate Church opened its doors to Burnette Chapel churchgoers as they reunited with loved ones. New Beautiful Gate Pastor Michael Moseby said he is neighbors with Burnette Chapel Pastor Joey Spann. 'As a pastor myself, you come with the expectation of sitting down and having a service and not thinking about what can happen around you,' Moseby said. 'You never know who is going to come to the door or what reasons they would come to the door, come to your church and do something like that. We're always on guard. We just thank God many more weren't hurt.' Nashville Mayor Megan Barry said in a statement that the shooting was 'a terrible tragedy for our city.' She said her administration 'will continue to work with community members to stop crime before it starts, encourage peaceful conflict resolution and promote non-violence.' ___ Raby reported from Charleston, West Virginia.
  • To ease overcrowding in state prisons, California lawmakers want to release more of the state's older prisoners and more of the inmates who were young when they committed their crimes. The two bills sent to Gov. Jerry Brown in the waning days of the legislative session are the latest attempt to keep the prison population below the cap set by federal judges, with the goal of eventually ending federal oversight. One requires parole officials to consider whether 'age, time served and diminished physical condition' reduced the risk for future violence by older inmates. And the other mandates officials consider whether young people fully understood their actions and if their lack of maturity allowed for a greater chance of rehabilitation. The measures follow voter-approved early-release efforts in recent years that have reduced penalties for drug and property crimes and, most recently, allowed more sentencing credits that can lead to earlier releases for inmates who complete rehabilitation programs. Law enforcement agencies and victims' organizations say the efforts put hardened criminals on the streets and create safety issues for communities. They point to rising crime rates following the earlier initiatives as evidence that once out from behind bars many convicts return to their criminal ways. 'At some point you have to ask, when it is it going to stop?' said California District Attorneys Association legislative director Sean Hoffman. Supporters of the measures emphasize they do not guarantee parole for anyone and say it makes sense to target the young and old as lawmakers try to unwind decades of get-tough policies that led to unprecedented prison crowding. Many older inmates have health issues that make them extremely costly to house. 'There's no point of incarcerating someone who's at the point of death,' said Assemblywoman Shirley Weber, D-San Diego. Weber's bill would write into law a 2014 federal court order that requires California to consider releasing inmates age 60 or older who have served at least 25 years. Death row and other no-parole inmates were excluded by the judges, and her bill further excludes cop killers and third-strike career criminals. Sen. Jim Nielsen, R-Gerber, mocked the bill when it was debated in the Senate. 'Why not Charles Manson? For heaven's sake, he's done a lot of time, he's really suffered. Poor guy,' Nielsen said. The 82-year-old Manson, leader of the murderous Manson 'family,' is among more than 200 octogenarian prisoners. He's not up for parole until 2027 and should he make to then it's extremely unlikely his age will prompt officials to free him. California has six inmates are 90 or older and the oldest of all is 101-year-old child molester Joseph Mannina, serving a life sentence with the chance of parole. At the other end of the age spectrum, lawmakers approved a bill expanding the state's youthful parole program. State law already requires that inmates who were under 23 when they committed their crimes be considered for parole after serving at least 15 years. AB1308 raises the age to 25. The age for such consideration was 18 when lawmakers passed the first youth offender parole law in 2012. 'That gap in the middle is shrinking, it seems, every year,' Hoffman said. Paroling younger inmates is more concerning to law enforcement than freeing older criminals, he said, because they are more likely to be healthy enough to commit new crimes. Statistics show less than one-third of California inmates paroled when they were 60 or older were back behind bars within three years compared to more than 50 percent of those 18-24. There are about 131,500 inmates in the California prison system, nearly 11 percent of whom are 18-24 and 7 percent are 60 and up. In the last three years about 2,000 inmates over 60 and 900 under 23 when they committed their crimes have been recommended for release, or about one-quarter of all those considered. Legislative analysts say extending the age to 25 would mean about another 170 parole hearings each year. There would likely be a slight decrease in the roughly 160 elderly inmates granted parole each year because of the narrower eligibility in Weber's bill compared to the federal court order. Her office projects that about 2,300 older inmates would qualify for consideration. Sen. Steven Bradford, D-Gardena, said people who were young when they committed crimes deserve a second chance. 'Certain areas of the brain, particularly those affecting judgment and decision-making, do not develop until their early to mid-20s,' he said, adding that, 'To say that young people aren't salvageable is a crime in and of itself.' Christine Ward, executive director of the Crime Victims Action Alliance, rejected that reasoning. 'To my mind it's ridiculous to say a 24- or 25-year-old doesn't know the difference between right and wrong,' she said.
  • Puerto Rico's nonvoting representative in the U.S. Congress said Sunday that Hurricane Maria's destruction has set the island back decades, even as authorities worked to assess the extent of the damage. 'The devastation in Puerto Rico has set us back nearly 20 to 30 years,' said Puerto Rico Resident Commissioner Jenniffer Gonzalez. 'I can't deny that the Puerto Rico of now is different from that of a week ago. The destruction of properties, of flattened structures, of families without homes, of debris everywhere. The island's greenery is gone.' Engineers on Sunday planned to inspect the roughly 90-year-old Guajataca Dam, which holds back a reservoir covering about 2 square miles (5 square kilometers) in northwest Puerto Rico. The government said it suffered a large crack after Maria dumped 15 inches (nearly 40 centimeters) of rain on the surrounding mountains and that it 'will collapse at any minute.' Nearby residents had been evacuated, but began returning to their homes Saturday after a spillway eased pressure on the dam. Puerto Rico's National Guard diverted an oil tanker that broke free and threatened to crash into the southeast coast, said Gov. Ricardo Rossello, and officials still had not had communication with nine of 78 municipalities. 'This is a major disaster,' he said. 'We've had extensive damage. This is going to take some time.' The death toll from Maria in Puerto Rico was at least 10, including two police officers who drowned in floodwaters in the western town of Aguada. That number was expected to climb as officials from remote towns continued to check in with officials in San Juan. Authorities in the town of Vega Alta on the north coast said they had been unable to reach an entire neighborhood called Fatima, and were particularly worried about residents of a nursing home. Across the Caribbean, Maria had claimed at least 31 lives, including at least 15 on hard-hit Dominica. Mike Hyland, a spokesman for the American Public Power Association, which represents the Puerto Rican power agency, said Sunday that restoration is a long ways off. The organization is working with U.S. Energy Department crews as well as New York Power Authority workers sent down by Gov. Andrew Cuomo to fly over the island and assess damage. Crews hoped to get helicopters and drones in the air over the next two days to assess the damage, but Hyland said they need to be patient and let the military continue rescuing people before focusing on restoring power. 'We are trying to get an understanding of the extent of the damage over the next 48 hours to then begin to work with our federal partners to get the right crews and equipment down to Puerto Rico,' Hyland said. Large amounts of federal aid have begun moving into Puerto Rico, welcomed by local officials who praised the Trump administration's response but called for the emergency loosening of rules long blamed for condemning the U.S. territory to second-class status. The opening of the island's main port in the capital allowed 11 ships to bring in 1.6 million gallons of water, 23,000 cots, dozens of generators and food. Dozens more shipments are expected in upcoming days. The federal aid effort is racing to stem a growing humanitarian crisis in towns left without fresh water, fuel, electricity or phone service. Officials with the Federal Emergency Management Agency, which is in charge of the relief effort, said they would take satellite phones to all of Puerto Rico's towns and cities, more than half of which were cut off following Maria's devastating crossing of Puerto Rico on Wednesday. The island's infrastructure was in sorry shape long before Maria struck. A $73 billion debt crisis has left agencies like the state power company broke. As a result the power company abandoned most basic maintenance in recent years, leaving the island subject to regular blackouts. A federal control board overseeing Puerto Rico's finances authorized up to $1 billion in local funds to be used for hurricane response, but the governor said he would ask for more. 'We're going to request waivers and other mechanisms so Puerto Rico can respond to this crisis,' Rossello said. 'Puerto Rico will practically collect no taxes in the next month.' U.S. Rep. Nydia Velazquez of New York said she will request a one-year waiver from the Jones Act, a federal law blamed for driving up prices on Puerto Rico by requiring cargo shipments there to move only on U.S. vessels as a means of supporting the U.S. maritime industry. 'We will use all our resources,' Velazquez said. 'We need to make Puerto Rico whole again. These are American citizens.' A group of anxious mayors traveled to the capital to meet with Rossello to present a long list of items they urgently need. The north coastal town of Manati had run out of fuel and fresh water, Mayor Jose Sanchez Gonzalez said. 'Hysteria is starting to spread. The hospital is about to collapse. It's at capacity,' he said, crying. 'We need someone to help us immediately.' Across Puerto Rico, more than 15,000 people were in shelters, including some 2,000 rescued from the north coastal town of Toa Baja. Many Puerto Ricans planned to head to the mainland to temporarily escape the devastation. ___ AP reporter Christopher Gillette contributed from Guajataca, Puerto Rico.
  • Large amounts of federal aid began moving into Puerto Rico on Saturday, welcomed by local officials who praised the Trump administration's response but called for the emergency loosening of rules long blamed for condemning the U.S. territory to second-class status. In northwest Puerto Rico, people began returning to their homes after a spillway eased pressure on a dam that cracked after more than a foot of rain fell in the wake of the hurricane. The opening of the island's main port in the capital allowed 11 ships to bring in 1.6 million gallons of water, 23,000 cots, dozens of generators and food. Dozens more shipments are expected in upcoming days. The federal aid effort is racing to stem a growing humanitarian crisis in towns left without fresh water, fuel, electricity or phone service. Officials with the Federal Emergency Management Agency, which is in charge of the relief effort, said they would take satellite phones to all of Puerto Rico's towns and cities, more than half of which were cut off following Maria's devastating crossing of Puerto Rico on Wednesday. The island's infrastructure was in sorry shape long before Maria struck. A $73 billion debt crisis has left agencies like the state power company broke. As a result the power company abandoned most basic maintenance in recent years, leaving the island subject to regular blackouts. A federal control board overseeing Puerto Rico's finances authorized up to $1 billion in local funds to be used for hurricane response, but Gov. Ricardo Rossello said he would ask for more. 'We're going to request waivers and other mechanisms so Puerto Rico can respond to this crisis,' he said. 'Puerto Rico will practically collect no taxes in the next month.' U.S. Rep. Nydia Velazquez of New York said she will request a one-year waiver from the Jones Act, a federal law blamed for driving up prices on Puerto Rico by requiring cargo shipments there to move only on U.S. vessels as a means of supporting the U.S. maritime industry. 'We will use all our resources,' Velazquez said. 'We need to make Puerto Rico whole again. These are American citizens.' A group of anxious mayors arrived in the capital to meet with Rossello to present a long list of items they urgently need. The north coastal town of Manati had run out of fuel and fresh water, Mayor Jose Sanchez Gonzalez said. 'Hysteria is starting to spread. The hospital is about to collapse. It's at capacity,' he said, crying. 'We need someone to help us immediately.' The death toll from Maria in Puerto Rico was at least 10, including two police officers who drowned in floodwaters in the western town of Aguada. That number was expected to climb as officials from remote towns continued to check in with officials in San Juan. Authorities in the town of Vega Alta on the north coast said they had been unable to reach an entire neighborhood called Fatima, and were particularly worried about residents of a nursing home. 'I need to get there today,' Mayor Oscar Santiago told The Associated Press. 'Not tomorrow, today.' Rossello said Maria would clearly cost more than the last major storm to wallop the island, Hurricane George in September 1998. 'This is without a doubt the biggest catastrophe in modern history for Puerto Rico,' he said. Rossello and other officials praised the federal government for planning its response in detail before the storm hit, a contrast with what Puerto Rico has long seen as the neglect of 3.4 million Americans living in a territory without a vote in Congress or the electoral college. 'This is the first time we get this type of federal coordination,' said Resident Commission Jenniffer Gonzalez, Puerto Rico's non-voting representative in Washington. A dam upstream of the towns of Quebradillas and Isabela in northwest Puerto Rico was cracked but had not burst by Saturday night as water continued to pour out of rain-swollen Lake Guajataca. Federal officials said Friday that 70,000 people, the number who live in the surrounding area, would have to be evacuated. But Javier Jimenez, mayor of the nearby town of San Sebastian, said he believed the number was far smaller. Secretary of Public Affairs Ramon Rosario said about 300 families were in harm's way. The governor said there is 'significant damage' to the dam and authorities believe it could give way at any moment. 'We don't know how long it's going to hold. The integrity of the structure has been compromised in a significant way,' Rossello said. Some residents nonetheless returned to their homes Saturday as the water levels in the reservoir began to sink. 'There were a lot of people worried and crying, but that's natural, because the reservoir was about to break through,' said Maria Nieves, 43. 'They couldn't open the spillway until later in the night.' The 345-yard (316-meter) dam, which was built around 1928, holds back a man-made lake covering about 2 square miles (5 square kilometers). More than 15 inches (nearly 40 centimeters) of rain from Maria fell on the surrounding mountains. Officials said 1,360 of the island's 1,600 cellphone towers were downed, and 85 percent of above-ground and underground phone and internet cables were knocked out. With roads blocked and phones dead, officials said, the situation may worsen. At least 31 lives in all have been lost around the Caribbean due to Maria, including at least 15 on hard-hit Dominica. Haiti reported three deaths; Guadeloupe, two; and the Dominican Republic, one. Across Puerto Rico, more than 15,000 people are in shelters, including some 2,000 rescued from the north coastal town of Toa Baja. Many Puerto Ricans planned to head to the mainland to temporarily escape the devastation. ____ Coto reported from San Juan.
  • It seemed as if Anthony Weiner had hit rock bottom when he resigned from Congress in 2011. 'Bye-bye, pervert!' one heckler shouted as the Democrat quit amid revelations that he had sent graphic pictures of himself to women on social media. Time has shown his self-destructive drama had only just begun. Weiner, 53, is set to be sentenced Monday for sending obscene material to a 15-year-old girl in a case that may have also have played a role in costing Hillary Clinton — former boss of Weiner's wife, Huma Abedin — the presidential election. Federal prosecutors have asked for a sentence of slightly more than two years behind bars because of the seriousness of the crime, in which Weiner sent adult porn to the girl and got her to take her clothes off for him on Skype. 'The defendant did far more than exchange typed words on a lifeless cellphone screen with a faceless stranger,' prosecutors wrote to the judge. 'Transmitting obscenity to a minor to induce her to engage in sexually explicit conduct by video chat and photo — is far from mere 'sexting.'' But Weiner's attorneys contend he is a changed man who has finally learned his lesson, calling his compulsive sexting a 'deep sickness' best treated without time behind bars. The memo also suggested Weiner himself was a victim of the scandal, saying the North Carolina high school student initiated contact with him because she 'hoped somehow to influence the U.S. presidential election' and write a tell-all book. Some legal observers doubt the wisdom of the defense in questioning the girl's motivations. The strategy 'is fraught with peril since an attack on a victim can be read by the judge as undermining the defendant's claim that he has accepted full responsibility,' said Robert Mintz, a former federal prosecutor. He added that he expects Weiner to get jail time, 'given the nature of the charges and the lack of any real mitigating factors here.' The sentencing will be the latest chapter in the spectacular downfall of Weiner, a once-promising politician and half of an up-and-coming Washington power couple. The trouble began in 2011, when an explicit photo of Weiner, then a congressman representing part of New York City, sent from his Twitter account became public. He first claimed his account had been hacked but later resigned after admitting he'd had explicit online contact with at least a half-dozen women. Weiner tried to resurrect his career by running for mayor in 2013 and surged to the lead in the polls. But once again, more racy online messages, where he used the cheesy moniker 'Carlos Danger,' surfaced to doom his candidacy and open the door for the then-little-known Democrat who would go on to win, Bill de Blasio. His stunning downfall in that campaign was captured in the behind-the-scenes documentary 'Weiner,' which featured a memorable scene of Weiner and his wife alone in a conference room staring at each other in what a New York Times review called 'the longest and most painful onscreen marital silence this side of an Ingmar Bergman film.' In the end, the most significant impact of Weiner's woes may have been on the 2016 presidential contest. More than any other factor, Clinton has blamed her loss on FBI Director James Comey's decision to reopen an investigation into her private email server in the campaign's final days. Comey's decision came after FBI agents investigating Weiner's sexual misdeeds discovered that her emails had been forwarded to Weiner's laptop, apparently by his wife. In a matter of days, the FBI concluded there was nothing new in the emails, but Clinton has said the damage was done. Some political analysts suggested the issue may have indeed been a factor in tilting the election in Donald Trump's favor, particularly across Midwestern battlegrounds such as Michigan, Pennsylvania and Wisconsin. In her new book 'What Happened,' Clinton revealed the moment that Abedin burst into tears after learning her husband had triggered Comey's 'October surprise.' 'When we heard this Huma looked stricken,' Clinton wrote. 'Anthony had already caused so much heartache. And now this. 'This man is going to be the death of me,' (Huma) said, bursting into tears.' In a letter to the court, Weiner expressed his 'profound' sorrow for endangering the welfare of a girl he admits knowing was underage. The fallout included news his wife had filed for divorce in May on the same day he pleaded guilty. 'My continued acting out over the years crushed the aspirations of my wife and ruined our marriage,' he said. His young son, he added, 'will forever have to answer questions about the public and private failings of his father.' ___ Associated Press writer Larry Neumeister contributed to this report.
  • President Donald Trump is expected to announce new restrictions on travel to the United States as his ban on visitors from six Muslim-majority countries expires Sunday, 90 days after it went into effect. The Department of Homeland Security has recommended the president sign off on new, more targeted restrictions on foreign nationals from countries it says refuse to share information with the U.S. or haven't taken necessary security precautions. Trump appeared to preview his intentions as he spoke with reporters on the tarmac of a New Jersey airport Sunday, saying: 'the tougher the better.' Officials haven't said which — or how many — countries will be affected by the new restrictions, which could take effect as soon as Sunday. 'The acting secretary has recommended actions that are tough and that are tailored, including restrictions and enhanced screening for certain countries,' said Miles Taylor, counselor to acting Homeland Security Secretary Elaine Duke. The current ban bars citizens of Iran, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria and Yemen who lack a 'credible claim of a bona fide relationship with a person or entity in the United States' from entering the U.S. Unlike Trump's first travel ban, which sparked chaos at airports across the country and a flurry of legal challenges, officials said they have been working for months on the new rules, in collaboration with various agencies and in conversation with foreign governments. The recommendations are based on a new baseline developed by DHS that includes factors such as whether countries issue electronic passports with biometric information and share information about travelers' terror-related and criminal histories. The U.S. then shared those benchmarks with every country in the world and gave them 50 days to comply. The citizens of countries that refused could now face travel restrictions and more stringent screening measures that would last indefinitely, until their governments complied. Trump last week called for a 'tougher' travel ban after a bomb partially exploded on a London subway. 'The travel ban into the United States should be far larger, tougher and more specific-but stupidly, that would not be politically correct!' he tweeted. Critics have accused Trump of overstepping his authority and violating the U.S. Constitution's protections against religious bias. Trump had called for a 'total and complete shutdown of Muslims entering the United States' during his campaign.
  • When Luis Ramirez finally reached his mother after the powerful Mexico earthquake, he learned her home was so badly damaged that it had to be demolished. He considered getting on a plane from New York to help her find a new home, but it was too risky now that the program that has been shielding him from deportation is being phased out. He tried to send money, but the usual courier that he uses shut down because of the damage from the 7.1-magnitude quake in his home state of Morelos. 'The situation is eating me alive because you can't do anything,' he said about sending help to his mother from New York City. The earthquake that killed nearly 300 people and destroyed dozens of buildings in Mexico set off a frantic response in communities around the U.S. as people desperately try to connect with their loved ones, figure out ways to send emergency help, money and goods as well as raise funds for smaller towns around the capital they say are receiving less help from the government. Those in the country illegally wish they could travel to help their loved ones cope with the aftermath but are afraid they wouldn't be able to return. 'We saw people desperately trying to connect with their families. Lines were down. They couldn't think of other ways to find their relatives,' said Ana Flores, who heads an office for the Mexican state of Puebla in Passaic, New Jersey. 'We have gone through all of the feelings from anxiety, to anguish and now trying to find all the support we can.' Traditionally a month of parties for Mexicans who celebrate the country's independence from Spain, September has dealt one blow after another. It started with the aftermath of Hurricane Harvey in Houston, which has the third-largest population of Mexicans in the U.S. Then on Sept. 5, President Donald Trump announced his decision to phase out the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program that shielded from deportation nearly 800,000 immigrants — the great majority from Mexico — brought to the U.S. as children. Another earthquake struck in Mexico's southern coast on Sept. 7, killing at least 90 people. Tuesday's earthquake has Mexicans in the U.S. glued to their televisions and their phones trying to get specific news from their local towns to help their families. Monica Dominguez, who lives in Huntington Beach, California, had been calling childhood friends who now work for Mexico's Civil Protection trying to pull strings to move the construction rubble from her grandparents' home in the town of Yautepec south of Mexico City so her family can go out to the street. The old house where she lived when she was 5 collapsed when the wooden beams cracked, leaving it in ruins. 'All they were able to get out of there were some couches where they have been sleeping in the back. They have power but they are running out of food,' she said. 'There are so many of us with similar stories of suffering.' In Las Vegas, Luis Ramon Corona-Rizo is helping collect funds among friends and hosting a car wash to raise money to send back home. Corona-Rizo says his parents and sister survived the quake and offered to use the money he sends to buy medicines and take them to a collection center. 'A lot of people don't trust the government in Mexico, so I'm going to send the money to my family,' he said. A grocery store chain in Las Vegas that caters to the area's Hispanic community is also hosting a fundraiser this weekend at one of its shops where it will have local bands and sell tacos and donate proceeds to the Mexican Red Cross. In Miami, a group is hosting a Day of the Dead arts and crafts event for families and sending money from ticket sales to the Topos, a group of rescue workers who emerged after the 1985 earthquake killed thousands in Mexico. In San Diego, the chambers of commerce in the San Ysidro and Otay Mesa border communities launched a drive to collect donated goods and fly them to Mexico City on a private plane. The Mexican customs agency is waiving duties. 'Many of our employees have relatives and friends who were affected by the earthquake,' said Ruben Anaya, chief operations officer of Mariana's Supermarkets in Las Vegas. 'It is our duty as human beings to help when tragedies like the one that just happened in Mexico occur. Many of the videos we've watched are horrible.' The quake happened around the same time as Hurricane Maria ravaged Puerto Rico, and Mexican immigrants are joining efforts in places such as New York City where Puerto Ricans are also in distress. Both Univision and Telemundo broadcasters are also producing television specials this weekend with actors, singers and news anchors to help raise funds for those affected by the earthquake and hurricanes Harvey, Irma and Maria in Texas, Florida and Puerto Rico. For immigrants like Ramirez, sending money is a race against time. His mother is confined to a room on her property that — unlike her home — the authorities have not condemned. Her poor health makes it impossible for her to wait in line for relief services, so Ramirez is hoping to send her money via wire transfer from his savings so she can get food and supplies at the store and find a new place to live, but so far it hasn't been easy. 'She waited five hours at this place with so many other people waiting for money transfers to help them get by, only to hear that the funds could not go through,' he said. 'She went back home empty-handed and crying.' ___ Garcia Cano reported from Las Vegas.

The Latest News Headlines

  • Ahead of the Jacksonville Jaguars and Baltimore Ravens kicking off in London this year, a big focus was not just what players would do on the field, but what would happen on the sidelines.  In recent days, President Trump has spoken out in person and on Twitter about athletes who kneel during the National Anthem. He has said the NFL should fire players who take part in this demonstration, and expanded the criticism to athletes in other sports as well.  VIDEO: President Trump speaks on athletes who kneel during National Anthem Kneeling during the National Anthem was first done by Colin Kaepernick, with the then-quarterback saying it was in protest of the treatment of black people by police. Since his first demonstration, more athletes have continually joined in, but there was a heightened attention heading in to today’s game, because of the President’s comments.  About a dozen athletes from each team took a knee during the National Anthem ahead of kickoff in London. Their arms were linked, as were those of the athletes, coaches, and staff who remained standing. Among those linked in arms along the sideline was Jaguars owner Shad Khan, who says his presence was very intentional  “It was a privilege to stand on the sidelines with the Jacksonville Jaguars today for the playing of the U.S. national anthem at Wembley Stadium. I met with our team captains prior to the game to express my support for them, all NFL players and the league following the divisive and contentious remarks made by President Trump, and was honored to be arm in arm with them, their teammates and our coaches during our anthem. Our team and the National Football League reflects our nation, with diversity coming in many forms – race, faith, our views and our goals. We have a lot of work to do, and we can do it, but the comments by the President make it harder. That’s why it was important for us, and personally for me, to show the world that even if we may differ at times, we can and should be united in the effort to become better as people and a nation,” says the full statement issued by the team on behalf of Khan.  The team also posted on social media with a photo of Khan and Head Coach Doug Marrone linked arms with players, with the caption saying only “Unity”.  Khan joins a growing list of team owners and organizations that are supporting the players and their demonstrations. NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell announced on Twitter that they would aid a “Unity” spot called “Inside These Lines” during Sunday night’s game, and that “it reflects the unifying force of our great game, our players & clubs”. Head Coach Doug Marrone, in his post-game press conference, said there was a lot of coordination ahead of time among the entire organization, and that he stands behind Khan’s statement. “I’m just trying to make sure this team sticks together. It’s an unusual situation, one I’ve never- there’s no book that tells you how to do it. But I think the way we handled it- at least from my standpoint I can speak from a head coach- at least there was a lot of communication, there was a lot of talking, and at the end of the day our team is going to be closer together for it,” Marrone says. The Jaguars went on to win the game 44-7 over the Ravens. The NFL UK says the game was played in front of a record crowd. Neither the Jaguars nor the Ravens knelt during the playing of the British National Anthem.  The owner of the Ravens respects and supports the demonstration by the players “100 percent”, according to a statement issued by the team. The statement says “all voices need to be heard”, and “that’s democracy in its highest form”. President Trump tweeted and retweeted several times through Sunday about the demonstrations.
  • As rescue workers tirelessly searched and the world waited breathlessly for them to find a 12-year-old girl believed to be trapped under the rubble of a caved-in school toppled by the devastating earthquake in Mexico City, it became apparent that the little girl never existed, Mexican officials said. >> PHOTOS: Major earthquake strikes Mexico City According to the New York Post, the girl, called “Frida Sofia,” was a case of a story that ran wild in the frantic aftermath of the disaster. >> How you can help Mexico and people affected by the Mexico earthquake “We are certain that it was not an actuality,” Adm. Angel Enrique Sarmiento, assistant secretary of the Mexican navy, told local paper El Universal. “We don’t have any knowledge, we never had any knowledge of the account.” >> Frida, the hero rescue dog, saves 12 following Mexico earthquake In the face of unimaginable destruction and hundreds killed, the story took on a life of its own as a symbol of much-needed help. A report first surfaced Wednesday that a little girl had signaled to rescuers from under the rubble of the Enrique Rebsámen school. >> On Rare.us: A family is devastated after this baptism turned tragic during the Mexican earthquake From that report came a series of details that included the girl’s name and age, and even reports of communication with the girl. Rescuers said they managed to slide a hose to her for her to drink, and other workers told MSNBC that they handed the little girl a phone and that she reported two other children were trapped with her under a granite table. >> On Rare.us: Salma Hayek generously pledges $100,000 to Mexican earthquake victims However, no parents came to claim the girl, which led some to believe she was misidentified. And, then Thursday, Sarmiento announced that after 11 children had been rescued, and 19 other children, plus six adults found dead, there were no other children beneath the collapsed school. >> Read more trending news “We have carried out a full count with the directors of the school, and we are sure that all the children are either safe at home, in the hospital or, unfortunately, died,” Sarmiento said.
  • Many First Coast counties are hosting workshops to get  you one-on-one assistance in applying for FEMA assistance in the aftermath of Hurricane Irma. Some of the counties will announce more workshop days in the future as well. If you do not need assistance in person, you can go to www.DisasterAssistance.gov or call 1-800-621-3362. Get help: How to register through FEMA DUVAL COUNTY Workshops Tuesday, September 19th: 8:00am to 6:00pm, at the Prime Osborne Convention Center on 1000 Water Street. Florida Chief Financial Officer Jimmy Patronis, in partnership with Senator Marco Rubio, is holding insurance villages and disaster recovery centers. In addition to Senator Marco Rubio’s staff and those participating from the Department of Financial Services, the following companies, non-profit organizations, and federal and state agencies have confirmed:   • Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA)  • American Red Cross  • Florida SBDC Network  • U.S. Small Business Administration  • Florida Departments of Children and Families and Economic Opportunity  • First Data Corporation  • Anheuser-Busch Companies  • CareerSource Florida  • ElderSource  • United Way of Florida  • The Salvation Army The U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA) announced the opening of a Business Recovery Centers (BRC) in Duval County, to help businesses impacted by Hurricane Irma.  SBA representatives at the Centers can provide information about disaster loans, answer questions and assist businesses in completing the SBA application. The Center will operate until further notice from 9AM to 6PM Monday through Saturday at Beaver Street Enterprise Center, 728 Blanche St, Bldg 2. A Mobile Registration Intake Center has been set up by Matthew’s Restaurant in San Marco. At an MRIC, you can inquire about the status of your application for individual assistance or register for individual assistance. This is difference from a Disaster Recovery Center, because it does not also feature other partner agencies, including non-profits, on site. There is no set time frame for how long the MRIC will be open. Saturday, September 16: Council Members Katrina Brown, Reggie Gaffney, & Reggie Brown are hosting Hurricane Disaster Relief Assistance from 10AM to 2PM at the Bradham-Brooks Library, 1755 Edgewood Avenue W. You will get assistance registering for FEMA benefits. You should have information available regarding your Social Security number, address of the damaged home or apartment, description of the damage, information about insurance coverage, telephone number, mailing address, and bank account and routing numbers for direct deposit. Saturday, September 16: Council Member Joyce Morgan, the Arlington 20/20 initiative, churches and other community partners will provide hurricane relief assistance from 11:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. at the Town and Country Shopping Center on University Boulevard at the Arlington Expressway. Relief supplies (water, ice, cleaning supplies, household items, etc.) will be available, along with volunteer assistance with yard cleanups and information about disaster recovery resources. CLAY COUNTYRecovery Center A Mobile Disaster Recovery Center is opening Sunday at 1:30PM, at the Clay County Fairgrounds, building 3- 2497 State Road 16, Green Cove Springs. This center is open from 8AM to 8PM every day beginning Monday, September 25th, offering you in person support and assistance for both individuals and businesses. That includes helping you register for federal disaster assistance, applying for Small Business Administration loans, giving you updates on your specific case, processing appeals, and connecting you with state program information. Workshops FEMA representatives will be available to assist Clay County residents from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. at the following dates/locations. You should bring information about your social security number, the name of your insurance company, description of damage, income and other financial information, and contact information. The Salvation Army will be providing meals on site.  -Saturday, Sept. 16, Orange Park Library, 2054 Plainfield Ave, Orange Park, FL 32073 -Sunday, Sept. 17, Keystone Heights City Hall, 555 S Lawrence Blvd, Keystone Heights, FL 32656 -Monday, Sept. 18, FEMA Team will be canvasing the area for additional impacted areas -Tuesday, Sept. 19, Fleming Island Library, 1895 Town Center Blvd, Orange Park, FL 32003 -Wednesday, Sept. 20 – FEMA Team will be canvasing the area for additional impacted areas -Thursday, Sept. 21, Supervisor of Elections Office, 500 N Orange Ave, Green Cove Springs, FL 32043 Hurricane Irma  Resource Recovery Event Friday, September 22, 4-7PM at Middleburg Civic Association at 2102 Palmetto St, Middleburg. Representatives from the following agencies will attend: • FEMA - answer questions on the registration process • Clay County Board of County Commissioners • Clay County Building Department – Permitting and processes to get back in my home • Clay County Health Department – speaking on well testing, mold exposure, special needs • University of Florida’s IFAS – mosquito control, etc. • Clay Safety Net – Unmet needs • Northeast Florida Builders Association – working with licensed contractors, what to do with mold, etc. • Small Business Development Center – working with small businesses to recover ST. JOHNS COUNTY Recovery Center A Disaster Recovery Center will operate at the St. Johns Wind Mitigation Building at 3111 Agricultural Center Drive 8AM to 8PM seven days a week. The Center will be open for the immediate future. This will serve as a one-stop-shop for anyone seeking one-on-one help, including access to the Florida Division of Emergency Management, DEMA, the US Small Business Administration, and other state agencies. You can get more information from the Emergency Operations Center hotline at 904-824-5550. Workshops Monday, September 18th:  St. Johns County and Senator Marco Rubio are hosting a Disaster Recovery Center event for residents affected by Hurricane Irma from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. at the St. Johns County Administration Building, 500 San Sebastian View. Representatives from FEMA, insurance agencies, and other state, federal, and local entities will be available to answer questions and provide needed hurricane recovery assistance and information. For more information regarding Hurricane Irma recovery and response, please visit www.sjcfl.us/hurricane or call the St. Johns County Emergency Management hotline at 904.824.5550. In addition to Senator Marco Rubio’s staff and those participating from the Department of Financial Services, the following companies, non-profit organizations, and federal and state agencies have confirmed:   • Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA)  • American Red Cross  • Florida SBDC Network  • U.S. Small Business Administration  • Florida Departments of Children and Families and Economic Opportunity  • First Data Corporation  • Anheuser-Busch Companies  • CareerSource Florida  • ElderSource  • United Way of Florida  • The Salvation Army Baker County Workshops Florida Senator Bill Nelson’s staff will be in Baker County Wednesday 9/20 to help people register with FEMA. The event will take place from 2-4PM at the Baker County Administration Building, 55 North 3rd Street, Macclenny. Nassau County Resources Friday, September 22- Disaster Survival Assistance Teams will be arriving in Nassau County. The teams will be doing door-to-door canvassing of areas affected by Hurricane Irma, and Nassau County Emergency Management will post information on the specific areas as that is available. They will provide information directly to survivors on how to register for FEMA disaster aid and other things. These DSAT members will have identification. If you are not sure if the person who contacts you is a legitimate DSAT representative, you can call the Nassau County Sheriff’s Office non-emergency line at 904-225-5174.
  • WOKV will continue updating this list of cancellations, closures/openings, and resources for you in connection to Hurricane Irma as new information comes in. This list represents Baker, Clay, Duval, Nassau, and St. Johns counties. POST-STORM RESOURCES In Baker, Clay, Duval, Nassau, and St. Johns counties, if your home has suffered damage, you can apply for individual assistance. To register online, go to www.disasterassistance.gov. To register by phone, 1-800-621-3362 (FEMA) Several resource and recovery centers are opening across the First Coast if you need help registering with FEMA. Locations can be found here. The U.S. Small Business Administration has added more counties to the disaster declaration in Florida affected by Hurricane Irma that began on Sept. 4, 2017. Eligible for both Physical and Economic Injury Disaster Loans: Duval, Clay, and St. Johns. Eligible for Economic Injury Disaster Loans: Baker and Nassau counties. St. Johns County has opened four water distribution points: SJC Parks and Recreation Administration Office at 2175 Mizell Road (THIS ONE IS NOW CLOSED), the Solomon Calhoun Community Center at 1300 Duval Street, Flagler Estates Road and Water Office at 9850 Light Avenue, and Al Wilke Park at 6150 South Main Street (THIS ONE IS NOW CLOSED). They will be open daily 8am-7pm through Friday. Limit one case of water per car. The City of Jacksonville is distributing water from 10AM to 5PM while supplies last at Hobby Lobby, 14286 Beach Blvd; McDonalds, 5751 Beach Blvd; Edwaters College, 1853 Kings Road; and the Supervisor of Elections Office, 1 Imeson Park Blvd. The Prime Osborne Convention Center, 1000 Water Street, is opening its doors to help people seeking to cool off with some air conditioning and access to electricity and internet. You need to bring your own equipment. The Center will be open 3PM to 9PM Wednesday and 9AM to 9PM Thursday, September 14 through Sunday, September 17. St. Johns County has opened a post-impact shelter at the Solomon Calhoun Community Center at 1300 Duval Street (THIS SHELTER IS NOW CLOSED). This is for anyone who can’t return to his or her home. All other shelters are now closed. THESE SHELTERS ARE NOW CLOSED---In Nassau County, there is a shelter at The Journey Church at 95707 Amelia Concourse, Fernandina Beach. The facility has special needs capabilities and is pet friendly. A second shelter has also opened at the First Baptist Church in Hilliard. In Duval County, The Legends Center, 5054 Soutel Drive, remains open as a general population shelter, but is now closed as a special needs shelter (THIS SHELTER IS NOW CLOSED). Southside Baptist Church, 1936 Hendricks Avenue, is open as a general population shelter. THIS SHELTER IS NOW CLOSED---The Baker County Family Service Center by Keller Intermediate School, 420 8th Street in Macclenny, remains open as a general population shelter. Clay County has opened a post-storm shelter at First Baptist Church Middleburg, 2645 Blanding Blvd. FEMA has issued an Individual Assistance Declaration for St. Johns County in response to damage incurred due to Hurricane Irma. To apply for individual assistance, please visit www.disasterassistance.gov or call 800.621.3362. The Nassau County Emergency Operations Center is providing free water for residents to pick up at the Callahan Fairgrounds. St. Johns County is offering a limited number of free tarps for residents with homes affected by Hurricane Irma. Tarp sizes include 20’ x 30’ or 30’ x 40’ and are available on a first-come, first-serve basis at the St. Johns County Health and Human Services Building, 200 San Sebastian View. Please call 904.209.1250 in advance to request a tarp that can be picked up at the Health and Human Services Building during standard business hours. At Governor Scott’s direction, the Florida Highway Patrol continues to escort fuel resupply trucks so fuel is quickly delivered to communities across Florida. In an effort to best support the communities it serves, Sam’s Club has reopened all club locations in Florida and is temporarily waiving its membership requirements for the communities affected by Hurricane Irma at select club locations. In Jacksonville, that includes 300 Busch Drive, 10690 Beach Blvd, and 6373 Youngerman Circle. Florida Commissioner of Agriculture Adam H. Putnam issued an emergency order to waive the fees to replace Florida concealed weapon licenses and security guard licenses that were lost or destroyed during the hurricane. The U.S. Department of Agriculture accepted a request to allow all students in 48 counties subject to a FEMA Major Disaster Declaration access to free school meals through the National School Lunch Program. These changes, in effect Sept. 18 – Oct. 20, will potentially impact over 3,000 schools and 2.5 million children. Baker, Clay, Duval, Nassau, and St. Johns counties are all covered. A Mobile Disaster Recovery Center is opening Sunday at 1:30PM, at the Clay County Fairgrounds, building 3- 2497 State Road 16, Green Cove Springs. This center is open from 8AM to 8PM every day beginning Monday, September 25th, offering you in person support and assistance for both individuals and businesses. That includes helping you register for federal disaster assistance, applying for Small Business Administration loans, giving you updates on your specific case, processing appeals, and connecting you with state program information. HOTLINES Individuals needing assistance with clean-up on their private property are encouraged to contact Crisis Cleanup at 1-800-451-1954. As they are able, reputable and vetted relief agencies may assist you and your neighbors cut fallen trees, remove drywall, insulation, flooring, furniture, appliances, tarp roofs, etc. All services are free, but service is not guaranteed due to the overwhelming need. Attorney General Pam Bondi has opened up a Price Gouging Hotline: (866) 9-NO-SCAM. Florida Emergency Information Hotline for all state residents: 1-800-342-3557. The Department of Financial Services (DFS) has launched a Hurricane Irma insurance information hotline: 1-877-MY-FL-CFO. St. Johns County Emergency Management has opened a hotline for residents to call about county services, storm response, and events: (904) 824-5550. St. Johns County has also launched a Building Services Structural Hotline at (904) 827-6836. Clay County Call Center 904-284-7703 JTA Customer Service 5:30AM through 8:30PM 904.630.3100 or TTY 904.630.3191. Hotline for storm-related questions and problems in Jacksonville is 904-630-CITY In Nassau County, iIf you have any questions or concerns not addressed, please contact our Citizens Information Center at 1-904-548-0900. JEA Customer Care Consultants: 904.655.6000 or 800.683.5542- Consultants are able to give customers an idea of when a crew will be assigned to their area or circuit, according to JEA’s CEO, but it doesn’t guarantee when it will happen or when power will be restored. Consultants are also able to answer questions about why their power outage map shows you have power when you do not.   JEA and United Way- All counties: 2.1.1 or 904.632.0600- Customers without power are able to call this line seeking assistance, and JEA says they will work to try and transfer those to an agency that might be able to provide essential needs. Florida Blue, in partnership with New Directions Behavioral Health, is offering emotional support to individuals and loved ones affected by Hurricane Irma. The companies are providing community access to specially trained behavioral health counselors via a 24-hour, toll-free help line: 800-843-6514. K-12 SCHOOLS Duval County Schools: Duval County Public Schools will be closed on Friday, September 8 through Friday, September 15. School offices, after-school activities, and extended day care will also be closed those days. They aim to reopen on Monday. High School football games that had to be rescheduled because of Irma will now take place at the following days and times: Paxon v Yulee, 9/18 at 6PM at Paxon; Fletcher v Atlantic Coast, 9/18 at 6PM at Fletcher; Wolfson v Fernandina, 9/18 at 7PM at Wolfson; Westside v Ponte Vedra, 9/18 at 6PM at Westside; Lee v Columbia, 9/19 at 6PM at Lee; Mandarin v Deland, 9/19 at 6PM at Mandarin; Sandalwood v Spruce Creek, 9/19 at 6PM at Sandalwood; Terry Parker v Bishop Kenny, 9/22 at 7PM at Bishop Kenny; Ed White v Nease, 10/6 at 7PM at Ed White; Ribault v Suwanee, 10/10 at 7PM at Suwanee; Eglewood v Middleburg, 10/17 at 7PM at Endlewood; Baldwin v Stanton, 10/30 at 6PM at Baldwin. The Catholic Diocese of St. Augustine has announced all Diocesan schools will be closed Friday 9/8 through Wednesday 9/13. The only schools that will not open Sept. 14 are Blessed Trinity, Cathedral Parish School and Early Learning Center, Christ the King, Morning Star and Morning Star High School, San Jose and San Juan del Rio. The Salvation Army of Northeast Florida's Child Development Center at 318 N. Ocean St. will be closed on Friday, September 8, and Monday, September 11, and Tuesday, September 12. The center will remain closed for all dates that Duval County schools are closed. The Jericho School for Children with Autism will be closed on Friday, September 8 through Wednesday, September 13. School resumes Thursday, September 14. Beaches Episcopal School cancels all after school activities Thursday. School will be closed Friday, September 8 through Wednesday, September 13. Classes will resume Thursday.  The first hurricane make-up day will be Thursday, November 9th, which was initially a Teacher Planning Day.  Jacksonville Country Day School will be closed on Friday, September 8, through Wednesday, September 13.  Extended Care and all after school activities, including Sharks basketball games, are also canceled on those days. They are reopening Thursday, September 14th. The Bolles School is closed through Wednesday. It will reopen Thursday. Bishop Kenny High School resumes classes Thursday. Arlington Community Academy Elementary is closed through Wednesday, September 13th. They are opening Thursday. Clay County Schools: All Clay schools will be closed Friday, September 8, through Friday, September 15th. School administrators are asked to report to their schools to assess damage on Thursday, September 14th. Transportation mechanics will report to the Middleburg compound on Thursday. Maintenance Staff will report to Operations on Thursday. Cafeteria Managers will report to their schools on Friday, September 15th. School board meeting on September 7 was canceled. The board plans to hold two meetings to make up for the cancellation, one on the 18th and one on the 26th. High School football makeup games: Clay High v Orange Park High, Oct 6th at 7PM at Orange Park High; Fleming Island High v Bucholz High, Sept 18th at 7PM at Fleming Island High; Middleburg High v Englewood High, Oct 17 at 7PM at Englewood High; Oakleaf High v Bartram Trail High, Oct 6 at 7PM at Bartram Trail High School; Orange Park High v Clay High, Oct 6 at 7PM at Orange Park High; Ridgeview High v Palatka High, Sept 18 at 7PM at Palatka High. Keystone Heights High v Umatilla High has been canceled. Nassau County Schools: All public schools and district offices in the district will be closed Friday, September 8 through Thursday, September, 14th. 12-month employees should report to work Thursday, September 14th, if possible. Classes will resume Friday. St. Johns County Schools: All schools will be closed Friday, Stepember 8, through Friday, September,15th. Schools will reopen Monday. All extracurricular and interscholastic activities have been canceled starting Friday, September 8th.  All St. Johns County after-school programs held at the Ketterlinus Gym and the W. E. Harris Community Center will resume on Monday, September 18 to coincide with schools reopening Baker County Schools: Baker County Public Schools are closed Friday, September 8, through Monday, September 18. Classes will resume Tuesday. COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES Jacksonville University will be closed Friday, September 8, through Friday, September 15. Normal activities resume Monday, September 18th. FSCJ will be closed from Friday, September 8, and remain closed through Sunday the 17th. Classes are set to resume Monday, September, 18, at regularly scheduled times. The Florida School for the Deaf and Blind has canceled classes Thursday September 7 through the weekend. Classes will resume on Monday, September 18th.  Florida Coastal School of Law will resume classes Monday, Septemeber 18.  University of North Florida classes, including online classes, have been canceled from Friday, September 8, through Wednesday, September 13th. Class at the University of North Florida will resume on Thursday, Sept. 14. Offices will reopen , Wednesday, Sept. 13,  Edward Waters College will close Friday, September 8 and reopen Wednesday, September 13. Any classes, activities, or events that are scheduled to be held on campus between Sept. 8 and Sept. 12 have been cancelled.  The Edward Waters College Football Game Saturday, September 16th has been moved to University Christian School at 5520 University Blvd. It will take place at 4:30PM agaisnt Cumberland. St. Johns River State College campuses will be closed Friday, September 8. The College and classes will resume Monday, September 18. Flagler College closed Friday, September 8. Residence halls was opening Sunday, September 16th, and classes are resuming Monday, September 18th. TRANSPORTATION The County Road 218 Bridge east of Blanding in Clay County is closed for emergency repairs. The Roscoe Boulevard Bridge in St. Johns County is closed for emergency repairs. The Heckscher Drive Bridge at Browns Creek has reopened following emergency repairs. All of Duval County’s major bridges are now open, including Jacksonville’s Intracoastal bridges- Wonderwood, Beach, Atlantic, and JTB- the Acosta, Main Street, Dames Point, Hart, Mathews, and the Buckman Bridge have reopened, but you still need to drive with caution. The Black Creek Bridge on 218 in Clay County is back open. All St. Johns County bridges have reopened as of 11 am, Tuesday, September 12. Everyone is asked to be cautious of standing water hazards and debris obstructions. The Jacksonville International Airport ended operations Saturday 9/9 at 7pm. The airport reopened Tuesday. Flight ops are expected to gradually ramp up, and you should contact your airline for the most up-to-date flight information The Skyway will close at 9 p.m. on Friday, September 8 and reopen Wednesday, September 13th. The St. Johns River Ferry is scheduled to close after normal service on Thursday, September 7th, to relocate the boat inland. Service is resuming Thursday, September 14th. All JTA Bus Routes are back in service as of Wednesday, September 13. There may still be some detours. St. Johns County Council on Aging (COA) will resume normal paratransit tomorrow, September 14th. COA Sunshine Bus Service will resume today, Wednesday, September 13th beginning with the regularly scheduled afternoon runs on the following lines: Red, Blue, Purple, Orange, Green, Teal and Connector. Full hours of service on the above listed lines will resume Thursday, September 14th. The Hastings Circular will not run until the roads are deemed safe for travel. All construction work by the Florida Department of Transportation has been suspended temporarily because of the storm. Northeast Florida Regional Airport closed at 6PM Saturday. The airport opened to fixed wing aircraft Tuesday, September 12th. It’s also open and operational for helicopter traffic. Cargo operations at JAXPORT owned terminals ended at 11:59PM Friday. The Port of Jacksonville in its entirety- including private terminals- closed Saturday at 8PM. JAXPORT terminals and gates are now open, and the Coast Guard has cleared the entire Port of Jacksonville. GOVERNMENT All State of Florida offices will be closed on Friday, September 8. FDLE offices in Nassau and St. Johns are closed Wednesday, September 13. The Nassau County office remains closed Thursday, September 14th. All City of Jacksonville offices will be closed Friday, Monday, and Tuesday. Non-essential city services are also called off for those days.City services resume as normal Wednesday. All Jacksonville Public Library branches resume operations on Wednesday, Sept. 13. Overdue fines will be waived for items due when the library is closed. All St. Johns County library branches are open and available for residents and visitors to enjoy air conditioning, outlets to charge phones and devices, and other media services. The Clay County Animal Shelter evacuated because of Black Creek flooding. It will remain closed until further notice. If you need Animal Control assistance, call 904-269-6342 or email animalcontrol@claycountygov.com. The Florida Department of Corrections is canceling weekend visitation at all institutions for Saturday, September 9, and Sunday, September 10. All Duval County Tax Collector branch locations will close at noon on Thursday, September 7th. They reopened with limited staffing Wednesday, September 13th. All administrative offices in St. Johns County, the City of St. Augustine, and the City of St. Augustine Beach will be closed Tuesday, September 12. St. Johns County Administration Offices resume standard operations Thursday. The City of St. Augustine will open as power is restored. All administration offices, libraries, pet center, and recreational facilities will be open for standard business hours. The Duval County Clerk of Courts closed on Friday, September 8. The Chief Judge has ordered the Courthouse remain closed the rest of the week, as well as the Clerk’s Office. Regular hours should resume Monday, September 18th. The Fourth Circuit State Attorney’s Office is reopening Thursday, September 14th. Nassau County courts are closed through Thursday, September 14th. All perspective jurors who received summons to report to the Robert M. Foster Justice Center on Friday September 15, 2017 are excused and should not report. The summons will not be reissued.  Baker County courts closed through Tuesday, September 13th, and reopened Wednesday, September 13th. St. Johns County Courts closed Friday September 8th, and reopen Thursday, September 14th. The Clay County Courthouse and all Clerk of the Circuit Court branch offices in Clay County closed on Friday, September 8th. Court dates and services originally scheduled for these dates are impacted and have been rescheduled. Courts plan to reopen Thursday, September 14th. The United States Bankruptcy Court Jacksonville Division will be closed on Friday, September 8 and Monday, September 11, 2017. Naval Station Mayport is open to unrestricted traffic as of noon Wednesday, through the main gate. The Emergency Assistance Center is open at the base Fleet and Family Support Center (Bldg 1). You can also contact the Fleet and Family Support Center at 270-6600. The off base commissary and Navy Exchange are open at their normal hours. NAS Jax is opening for normal working hours Wednesday, September 13th. Members of the Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Southeast Regional Call Center (RCC) are headed to Naval Air Station (NAS) Pensacola Sept. 8, to relocate operations before Hurricane Irma reaches the Jacksonville, Florida area. NAS Jacksonville is telling personnel to shelter in place from 7PM Sunday through noon Monday. PARKS AND BEACHES Clay County is closing all boat ramps until Monday, September 18. The Jacksonville Zoo will open Thursday, September 14th. The St. Augustine Alligator Farm is opening Thursday, September 14th. The Castillo de San Marcos in St. Augustine is closed from Thursday, September 7, until further notice. Fort Matanzas in St. Augustine is closed from Thursday, September 7, until further notice. The Jacksonville Beach Golf Course will reopen Thursday, September 14th. The driving range remains closed. The large dog park at Paws Dog Park in Jax Beach has reopened. The small dog park previously reopened. Due to significant damage, erosion, and debris, as a result of Hurricane Irma, St. Johns County is urging all residents and visitors to avoid the beach, beach access points, and walkovers until further notice. Swimming in the ocean is also discouraged due to high surf, rip currents, and debris The following St. Johns County Parks and Recreation Facilities are closed pending inspections due to Hurricane Irma: Alpine Groves Park, Shands Pier, Riverdale Picnic Area, Bird Island Park, Canopy Park, Vail Park, Palmo Dock, Collier-Blocker-Puryear Park, Solomon Calhoun Center, Ketterlinus Gym, St. John's County Ocean and Fishing Pier, Nease Beachfront Park Jacksonville’s beaches are open, but you’re urged to use extreme caution and not go in the water at this time because of rough conditions and debris. The St. Johns Golf Club will reopen Friday, September 15th. The Slammer & Squire at World Golf Village is closed until further notice. The Solomon Calhoun Community Center and pool will remain closed through Wednesday, September 20 as it remains a post-impact shelter for residents affected by Hurricane Irma. The main parking garage in St. Augustine open Thursday, September 14th. $12/day fees will apply. The following Florida Park Service state parks remain closed- St. Johns County: Faver-Dykes State Park EVENTS The Ponte Vedra Auto Show has been rescheduled for Sunday, September 24 and will take place at the Nocatee Town Center. It was originally planned for September 10. The Riverside Arts Market on September 9th has been canceled. The market is anticipated to return to normal operations on September 16.  The Bryan Adams show at Daily's Place on Saturday, Sept. 9 has been postponed. Sing Out Loud Festival dates have been canceled on September 8th, September 9th, and September 10th. The Sing Out Loud festival scheduled for September 15 through 17 will continue as planned this weekend with minimal stage relocations or show cancellations. Please see the updated schedule below for concert venue details. For more information regarding the Sing Out Loud festival, please visit www.singoutloudfestival.com. The Adam Ant: Anthems Tour at the Florida Theatre on Sunday, September 10 has been postponed. Florida Theatre shows scheduled for Saturday September 23rd and beyond will continue as planned. Events scheduled in Jacksonville Beach this weekend of 9/9 have been canceled, including BRUVAL, Chemo Noir 1K Run, and the Travis Manion 9/11 Heroes Run. The Jax Armada is canceling the match on Saturday, September 9th. It's being rescheduled for September 27. St.Augustine Amphitheatre is canceling the Modest Mouse concert set for Thursday, September 7. The Blackberry Smoke concert on Friday, September 8, has been postponed. This Friday-Sunday,  9/15-17, Widespread Panic concerts at the St. Augustine Amphitheatre will proceed as originally scheduled. The Jacksonville Jumbo Shrimp will not host any playoff games. Playoff tickets already purchased can be refunded. The FSCJ Artist Series kickoff event for Wednesday, September 13, has been canceled. Thursday September 7 night concerts at The Landing has been postponed. The Jacksonville Humane Society’s Toast to the Animals has been canceled. The International Coastal Cleanup scheduled for Saturday, Sept. 16, is cancelled. The Clay County Sheriff’s Office Zone 4 (Middleburg/Clay Hill) SheriffsNET Meeting for 9/14 has been canceled. In the aftermath of Hurricane Irma and to help affected Creators, One Spark and Bold Events are postponing the One Spark 2017 Innovation Festival until the spring of 2018. This year’s event has been rescheduled to take place on Friday, April 6 and Saturday, April 7, at EverBank Field, with a kickoff concert to be hosted by Bold Events at the new Daily’s Place amphitheater on Thursday, April 5. The St. Augustine Amphitheater has canceled the September 8 Blackberry Smoke and Chris Robinson Brotherhood concert event. Refunds will be granted at point of purchase. BUSINESSES All First Coast YMCA’s are now open, YMCA Afterschool prorams will resume when schools reopen, but some locations are offering camp: Duval County 9/14-15, duPont YMCA Youth Development Campus; in Clay County 9/13-15, Barco-Newton Family YMCA and Dye Clay Family YMCA; in Nassau County 9/14, Callahan Center and Yulee Kids Campus; in St. Johns County 9/14-15, Ponte Vedra YMCA. All SMG Jacksonville Box Offices & Administrative Offices are closed. They will resume normal business hours on Tuesday, September 13. All Florida Blue Centers in Jacksonville- Town Center, River City Marketplace, and Winston YMCA will be closed on Saturday, September 9. MOCA Jacksonville and NOLA MOCA will close at 9pm Thursday, September 7 and will remain closed until further notice. Jacksonville Symphony administrative and ticket office in the Times-Union Center for the Performing Arts closed 2pm today, Thursday, Sept. 7th. The office opened Wednesday, September 13.  All VyStar Credit Union branch locations, call center, and operations will be closed Saturday, Monday, and Tuesday. The Jacksonville Humane Society is closing 1PM Saturday through Monday. They are reopening Thursday, September 14. JIA USO closed 11:00 AM Thursday, September 7.  NAS USO close at 5:00 PM Thursday, September 7, and Mayport USO closed at 9:00 PM Thursday, September 7. They opened Tuesday, September 12 and Wednesday, September 13. SAPA Extrusions is closing their plant in St. Augustine Friday at 3pm. Jax Federal Credit Union branches will be closed Saturday, September 9 through Tuesday, September 12. All Clay Electric district offices will be closed to the public Monday, Sept. 11 and Tuesday, Sept. 12 so personnel can focus on restoration efforts after Hurricane Irma. Northrop Grumman employees impacted by Hurricane Irma who need assistance or information can call 1-800-995-4318, or continue to visit www.northropgrumman.com/emergency for updates. The Northrop Grumman site in St. Augustine is closed on Tuesday, Sept. 12, 2017.  HOSPITALS AND MEDICAL OFFICES Both Baptist Beaches and Nassau Medical Center ERs and hospitals have reopened after they were evacuated because of the storm. Both will resume full operations by Wednesday, September 13th, at 8AM. St. Vincent's Riverside facility transferred their most clinically appropriate patients to St. Vincent's Southside and St. Vincent's Clay County on September 11, due to flooding in the area. Alignment Healthcare at 3520 St. Johns Bluff, which serves Florida Blue Preferred HMO Medicare members, will reopen tomorrow, Sept. 14. The location at 5500 Blanding Road will be closed the remainder of this week due to flooding and anticipates reopening next week. All patient appointments are being rescheduled or relocated to the St. Johns Bluff location. UF Health Jacksonville remains open. They have sent medical staff to shelters to help as needed. PRE-STORM EVACUATIONS ALL CURFEWS IN NORTHEAST FLORIDA HAVE NOW BEEN LIFTED Jacksonville’s Mayor has issued a mandatory evacuation for anyone living in Zone A or Zone B evacuate. The mandatory evacuation has also been extended for people living in mobile homes, or in low-lying areas. Nassau County has issued mandatory evacuations for anyone in Zones A,C, or F, with the order going into effect Friday, September 8, at 6 PM. St. Johns County has mandatory evacuations for anyone in Zones A and B, which includes St. Augustine and Hastings. Clay County has a mandatory evacuation for Zones A, B, and C as well as low lying, modular, or vulnerable homes for Saturday at 6AM. Baker County has issued a mandatory evacuation of all residents of Steel Bridge Road- east of the collection site, all residents of Webb Haven Road, Persimmon and Ash Road in the Turkey Creek II neighborhood, Myrtle, Camphor, Chestnut, and Gum Roads, all residents on the west side of Aspen Road, all residents on Lil Dixie Trail, all residents on River Oak Circle, all residents on River Oak Drive, all residents on Confederate Drive East, all residents of Cedar Creek Farms Road. You’re also encourages to seek shelter if you’re in a mobile home or compromised shelter. The Florida Department of Corrections has evacuated Bridges of Jacksonville. Tolls have been lifted across the state to aid in evacuations. PRE-STORM RESOURCES The City of Jacksonville has opened 12 shelters. Find locations HERE. Baker County opened two shelters, one for the general population and one for special needs. More details HERE. Clay County has announced the opening of four shelters. Find locations HERE. St. Johns County is opening five shelters on Saturday morning at 6 AM. Info posted HERE. Nassau County is open five shelters, starting 6 PM Friday. More info HERE. City Rescue Mission currently provides shelter for 250 people. They are providing accommodations for 100 additional people at City Rescue Mission's New Life Inn, 234 W. State Street, Jacksonville, FL 32202, Friday at noon. The Salvation Army’s Towers Center of Hope at 900 W. Adams Street in downtown Jacksonville will open its shelter to the homeless. The shelter will open as weather dictates and will remain open as long as needed. JTA has three designated locations for anyone evacuating from the beaches who doesn’t have transportation: Fletcher High School, Mayport Middle School, and Jacksonville Beach Elementary School.  Florida Governor Rick Scott has ordered all K-12 public schools, state colleges, state universities, and state offices to be closed Friday through Monday so the facilities can be used for sheltering and emergency management operations. Nassau County Emergency Management says the Town of Callahan is out of fuel and all gas station will be closed until Tuesday. Airbnb activated its Disaster Response Program to aid Floridians forced to evacuate from their homes in connection to Hurricane Irma as well as relief workers arriving to provide assistance.   Beginning at 12:01 a.m. Eastern on September 9 and running through midnight on September 11, Verizon is giving postpaid customers talk, text and data relief while prepaid customers receive an extra 3 GB for talk, text and data. Through the storm period for our area, St. Vincent's HealthCare is offering FREE 24-hour non-emergency virtual care via video chat through our new service called St. Vincent's On Demand.  Because of how the St. Vincent's On Demand system is set up, patients will need to pay the $49.99 fee up front, but their credit cards will be refunded 2 - 3 days after the visit if it's within the storm period. As Hurricane Irma continues to make its way north we’re automatically issuing credits and waiving additional fees to give unlimited data, talk and texts to AT&T wireless customers and unlimited talk and texts to AT&T PREPAID customers across all of Florida, through at least Sept. 17.
  • Another Disaster Recovery Center is standing up on the First Coast.  Soon after Irma moved through our area, a DRC opened in St. Johns County. Since there, there have been several disaster recovery and relief events taking place, but now seven-day-a-week help has been established in Clay County. FULL LIST: Disaster relief and recovery events and centers in Northeast Florida  A Mobile Disaster Recovery Center opened Sunday around 1:30PM and will operate through 8PM. Normal operating hours begin Monday, September 25th of 8AM through 8PM seven days a week. The DRC is at the Clay County Fairgrounds, building 3- 2497 State Road 16, Green Cove Springs. This center offers you in person support and assistance for both individuals and businesses. That includes helping you register for federal disaster assistance, applying for Small Business Administration loans, giving you updates on your specific case, processing appeals, and connecting you with state program information.  The DRC was initially going to open Monday, but Clay County Emergency Management tells WOKV the DRC arrived early, so they decided to get started sooner than expected. There are four other DRC’s open in Florida- the on at the Wind Mitigation Building in St. Augustine, as well as locations in Boynton Beach, Riverview, and Ft. Myers. The Small Business Administration also opened a Business Recovery Center in Jacksonville, at the Beaver Street Enterprise Center, 728 Blanche Street, building 2.  You can also register directly for federal assistance on your own. All First Coast counties are eligible for individual assistance, under the federal disaster declaration.

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