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Tips for the elderly

Storms can be especially distressing for seniors. In addition to the preparation described elsewhere on this Web site, here are some important tips for seniors.

If you are a senior

 

  • You cannot count on help immediately following a storm. Make preparations now. If you have no one to assist you, local agencies such as the Red Cross can help. Call them now, not when a storm is threatening.
  • Make sure loved ones, especially if they’re long distance, know where you plan to be and how to reach you.
  • If possible, find relatives or friends who can take you in an emergency.
  • If you need to wait out the storm in a special needs shelter, make arrangements now.
  • If you’re single, find another single or singles and make plans to “buddy up.” Identify someone now who you will check on and who will check on you before and after the storm. If you live on a low floor of a high rise, suggest a neighbor who lives above the second floor, or anyone who has difficulty walking, to stay with you during the storm.
  • If you live in a senior center, attend, or even organize, meetings to coordinate emergency plans.
  • If you have special dietary requirements (low sodium, diabetic, kosher), stock up now. Mass meals delivered after storms probably won’t meet your needs.
  • Make sure you have enough of your medications before storms threaten. Have ice for those medicines that need refrigeration.
  • Seniors are tempting targets for post-storm gougers and scammers. Be wary.
  • After the storm, don’t be afraid to apply for aid. You will NOT be forced from your residence, unless it’s unsafe.
  • After the storm, with power out and debris everywhere, your health and safety must be a top priority. Don’t push yourself or act carelessly. When in doubt, seek help.

 

If you have a relative or friend who’s a senior

 

  • Make sure he or she has a storm plan.
  • Many seniors don’t have transportation or are disabled and will have difficulty stocking up before a storm and getting critical items afterward. Make sure they have everything they need, or get it for them.
  • If your loved one is disabled or in an assisted living facility, make arrangements for where he or she will go in an emergency.

 

CARING FOR ALZHEIMER’S PATIENTS

  • Dealing with an approaching storm is a special challenge for people with Alzheimer’s disease, or for those who care for them.
  • If you care for such a person, now is the time to create an action plan.
  • Besides all the other preparations all residents need to make, you also should talk to your patient’s physician about staying home during a storm.
  • Keep all medications in full supply and discuss ways of keeping them refrigerated if necessary.
  • Make sure to note any emergency phone numbers in case you need to reach your physician quickly.
  • Secure all car keys in a safe place so your loved one can’t get to them and leave the house alone.
  • Maintain as much of a routine as possible. Have a supply of books, magazines, newspapers, games and puzzles to keep your loved one engaged. Include a battery-operated CD player and a selection of  music.
  • Keep your loved one on a regular sleeping pattern.
  • Stay calm throughout the storm. An Alzheimer’s patient may take cues from your behavior.
  • If you plan to evacuate, know exactly where you are going. Call ahead to ensure a safe place to stay.
  • If possible, have a trusted friend or family member stay with you and your loved one. The extra help will allow you time to take care of your own needs.
  • If you do need to leave your home, always take your loved one with you, or have someone stay with him or her while you are gone. Never leave an Alzheimer’s patient unattended during a disaster.
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The Latest News Headlines

  • Six people were shot early Monday in a Florida neighborhood, the Sanford Police Department said. The shooting was reported shortly before 6:30 a.m. at a home on Hays Drive in Sanford, police said. >> Read more trending news Investigators said a gunman went to the home of someone he knows and shot two adults, an 8-year-old boy and a 7-year-old boy. One adult died. The other adult and the two children were taken to a hospital in critical condition, investigators said. Detectives said the gunman then fled the home and randomly shot two bystanders in the roadway, critically wounding them both. An officer who was in the area was able to subdue the gunman, who was arrested, police said. Authorities did not immediately identify the victims or the suspected gunman. Investigators said the initial shooting appeared to be domestic in nature. No other details were given. Check back at WFTV.com for updates.
  • A number of questions remain, after a woman was found dead on the Northside.   According to the Jacksonville Sheriff's Office, the woman was found dead inside a home off 59th Street, though they aren't revealing how she died or her identity at this time.   However, police tell us the woman's car is missing.   They're now trying to find the gold 2010 Buick Lacrosse, with Florida tag 275LLJ.
  • A couple has been indicted on accusations that they murdered their deaf teenage son and then burned down their house to cover up the crime, the Associated Press reported. >> Read more trending news  According to the Chenango County Sheriff’s Office in New York, Ernest F. Franklin II, 35, and his wife, Heather Franklin, 33, of Guilford, New York, were charged with second-degree murder, arson and tampering with physical evidence. The two were indicted Friday on charges of second-degree murder in the death of their adopted son, 16-year-old Jeffrey Franklin, People magazine reported. Following an investigation of a fire on March 1 at the family’s 1,300-square-foot home, the couple was arrested. Investigators believe they set fire to their home to cover up the killing of their son. An autopsy determined he died prior to the fire, according to the sheriff’s office. Local law authorities have not said how or when the boy was killed. The Franklins got married in 2011 and adopted Jeffrey six or seven years ago, the sheriff’s office said. According to People magazine, Ernest is an Iraq War veteran. Heather wrote in posts on her Facebook page that she is pregnant. The Franklins are being held without bail. They entered a plea of not guilty. “People are asking themselves, ‘How could this happen?'” Chenango County Sheriff Ernest Cutting Jr. told People magazine. “Certainly for the public here, it’s a mix of anger and frustration and disappointment.” Just days before Heather Franklin was arrested, she posted an update on her Facebook page about how much she missed her son, who she called JR. She also informed friends and family that she and her husband had added their “needs” and “wants” to the CheckedTwice.com Family Gift Registry because they lost everything in the fire. A GoFundMe page was also established, but it has been taken down. The Associated Press reported that police who responded to a 911 call about 1:15 a.m. on March 1 found the Franklin’s house, located about an hour away from Syracuse, engulfed in flames. Jeffrey was inside and unable to escape the fire, according to the sheriff’s office. Authorities initially said the cause of the fire appeared to be a wood stove, the residence’s main heating source. “People are wondering how anybody could do something so brutal to a developmentally disabled and handicapped 16-year-old boy,” Cutting told People. “There are a lot of people who would have taken him. There are organizations that would have taken care of him. Why resort to that? … It’s just a terrible, terrible tragedy.”
  • A beloved music teacher from San Jose Elementary will no doubt be on the hearts and minds of students and staff as they return from spring break. Deborah Liles was found dead in her Panama Park home on the northside late last week. Her car was recovered over the weekend not far from her home. Liles' gold 2010 Buick LaCrosse was found on Golfair Boulevard on Saturday and JSO is now asking for the public's help identifying who was driving it.  Neighbors said police found the car behind an abandoned house near Notter Avenue. Police call the case a murder, and Liles’ children said she'd been a victim of several crimes in the past. “I don’t know about the circumstances. I don’t know if they’re coincidences happening. I don’t know if there’s a connection between what happened then and what happened now,' Liles' daughter Rachel Sirmans said. 'We really want to find those answers.” 'Just the condolences, completely unknown numbers that text us…I was your mother's music student in third grade and I'm in high school now”, said Liles’ son Gerald. JSO says this is an active ongoing investigation.   Anyone who knows anything about this murder is asked to contact the Jacksonville Sheriff's Office at 904-630-0500 or email JSOCrimeTips@jaxsheriff.org. To remain anonymous and receive a possible reward up to $3,000 contact Crime Stoppers at 1-866-845-TIPS.
  • Hannah Eimers, 17, was driving her father’s car in November when she lost control of the vehicle and slammed into a guardrail on the driver’s side, killing her. Months later, Eimers’ father received a bill from the Tennessee Department of Transportation to replace the guardrail. According to the Knoxville News-Sentinel, Steven Eimers got the $3,000 bill four months after Hannah’s death but refused to pay it and called the model of the guardrail “horribly designed.” He told the News-Sentinel that he couldn't believe that the state would “bill my daughter for the defective device that killed her.” >> Read more trending news Rather than deflecting the car or absorbing its impact, the guardrail, which was removed from the department’s list of approved products a week before the crash, reportedly impaled the vehicle and struck Hannah in the head and chest, killing her instantly. “I’m shocked,” Eimers told the News-Sentinel. “The audacity. What bothers me is that they’re playing Russian roulette with people’s lives. They know these devices do not perform at high speeds and in situations like my daughter’s accident, but leave them in place.” Mark Nagi, a spokesman for the Tennessee Department of Transportation, insisted that the bill was sent as a result of a “mistake somewhere in processing' and apologized. He also said Eimers will not have to pay the bill, which covered both the cost of labor and materials. Read more here.

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