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Latest from Mike Buresh

  • Saturday will largely uneventful for Jacksonville -- unseasonably warm and and breezy -- but Sunday promises to be another story.    Be wary for the potential for severe storms -- including tornadoes -- especially in the areas north of west of Jacksonville. Southeast Georgia needs to be on alert for severe storms by late Saturday and into Sunday. On Sunday, a squall line of severe storms will develop near the Big Bend of Florida in the morning and move rapidly northeast into and across all of Northeast Florida and Southeast Georgia. There is a high likelihood of damaging winds along with isolated tornadoes, but they will be gone by 6 p.m. Hurricane Matthew weakened a lot of trees, so branches and trees might come down more easily. There will be strong winds even without any thunderstorms, which could cause more tree damage and downed power lines. Be prepared for fast-changing conditions. There is a fine line late Saturday between nothing at all vs. very severe storms.  A similar storm has already caused multiple deaths in Mississippi. 
  • The 2016 Atlantic hurricane season will be remembered in NE Florida for the damage that Matthew left behind. But our area saw impacts from Colin, Julia, and Hermine.  Matthew was the costliest storm in NE Florida, and up the coast into the Carolinas. Action News Jax Chief Meteorologist Mike Buresh says, despite our close brush with disaster, many people living inland may grow complacent because they didn't see any damage. DOWNLOAD THE HURRICANE SEASON RECAP PODCAST  Hermine ended Florida’s 11-year hurricane-free streak when it made landfall in the Big Bend in September.   Tropical Storm Colin spun up a tornado on Jacksonville's westside in June.  The 2016 Atlantic hurricane season will go down as one of the longest on record.  Hurricane Alex formed in January deep in the north Atlantic Ocean.  Hurricane Otto in late November became the latest storm ever to form in the Caribbean.
  • An isolated microburst on Jacksonville's westside brought down trees around 103rd and I-295 Wednesday.  Action News Jax Chief Meteorologist Mike Buresh says winds were estimated at up to 60 mph.  He says hail reports approaching 1'' in diameter was also reported in Wednesday's storms.  Lightning caused a few small fires, too.  Buresh says we could be in for another stormy afternoon Thursday.  'That sea breeze will once again trigger some locally heavy afternoon storms. They'll be mostly inland, they will be hit and miss, but they'll be slow movers and where they hit, they hit hard', said Buresh.  LISTEN TO MIKE'S DAILY DISCUSSION PODCAST FOR INDEPTH WEATHER COVERAGE A lightning strike caused a garage to catch fire at a home north of Collins Road, Duval County Emergency Management reported. As many as 2,250 JEA customers were without power after heavy rain and hail hit. JEA said a tree was down on Shindler Drive and the utility fixed outages on the Westside.  The National Weather Service reported a tree fell on a house on Firestone Road and another tree reportedly fell near Herlong Airport.
  • Florida's ten year hurricane drought has brought a relative lack of concern, and that could lead to complacency. A poll by Mason-Dixon finds 60% of Floridians feel the state will once again avoid a major storm this season, and don't feel vulnerable to the damage one court cause. And nearly one in three people say they will not evacuate in the face of a Category 1 storm.  Among younger residents 18-34, only 28% think there is at least some chance for a hurricane, and 67% don't believe there is.  Among those 65+, a majority (51%) do feel a storm could develop and only 42% are doubtful.  Listen to Action News Chief Meteorologist Mike Buresh react to the poll results, and look ahead to what's currently brewing in the tropics.  
  • The WOKV Severe Weather Center worked through the night to update severe storms in NE Florida.  For many it may have been another rude awakening with loud claps of thunder, lots of bright lightning, and several inches of rain.  The National Weather Service in Jacksonville says rainfall estimates show between two and three inches of rain fell from central Clay County into Orange Park, downtown Jacksonville and to the northside of Jacksonville.  Now the focus is on cleanup, with debris scattered across lawns, and power is restored.  Action News Chief Meteorologist Mike Buresh says the stormy pattern continues today, and actually picks up in intensity through the week. 'Frequent thunderstorms late into the week, into the weekend and next week that will dump a lot of rain on most areas', said Buresh.   And that, Mike says, should really help extinguish the 40 wildfires burning across our area.
  • Heavy rain has cleared out making way for a cooler Thanksgiving weekend. The threat for significant flooding has ended. Action News Chief Meteorologist Mike Buresh says the Jacksonville International Airport broke the daily record rain of 1.45' for Nov. 25th with 1.61'.  Fleming Island recorded 2.36' and Green Cove Springs saw 2.15'. Buresh says clearing skies, breezy north winds and much cooler temperatures will follow by Wednesday afternoon but with highs only in the upper 50s to low 60s. Thanksgiving Day looks pretty nice but chilly to start.  Early morning temperatures in the 30s to low 40s will reach the lower 60s under sunny skies in the afternoon with a brisk north wind.
  • There were no tornado touchdowns reported and no  injuries from a strong storm front that moved through NE Florida Monday. We are still gathering damage reports, but so far we know of strong winds that blew down trees and damaged cars and porches, though at least one structure in Baker county sustained heavy wind damage and a mobile home was also damaged when a tree feel across it.  Action News Chief Meteorologist Mike Buresh we'll now see clear skies and plunging temperatures. Tuesday will be sunny and chilly with morning lows near 40 degrees and high temperatures only in the mid 50's.The coolest morning since last winter is expected Wednesday morning with a hard freeze expected with record-setting lows in the upper 20's. The record low temperature for Wednesday is 32 degrees (2008).Mike Buresh says it will be the first freeze at JIA since February 14th & for inland areas north and west of Jacksonville since February 28th.
  • It's feeling kind of raw Thursday morning with low wind chills and temps that will struggle to reach 50 in the afternoon.  Action News Chief Meteorologist Mike Buresh says unlike some of the recent glancing blows, we're in a pattern of cold that lasts into next week.  'Friday morning's lows will be dipping into the upper 20's and low 30's mainly to the west of I-95.  Saturday will be a little bit cooler, and then Sunday morning stays above freezing at the beaches but colder inland'.  Afternoons this weekend will be below the January average. Hear Mike Buresh describe the conditions through the weekend and into early next week here. 
  • We're in for an unseasonably warm weekend.   Action News Chief Meteorologist Mike Buresh says we could reach all-time December high temps on Sunday. We'll be sunny on Saturday and Sunday.  If you're going to the final Jaguars home game of the season it's going to be really toasty.  Mike is tracking a cold front for Monday which will bring some rain by the afternoon.  If you're traveling ahead of Christmas, nasty weather from Texas to Michigan could affect travel by car and plane. Listen to the weekend and five-day forecast from Action News Chief Meteorologist Mike Buresh here.
  • Mike Buresh

    Chief Meteorologist Mike Buresh anchors the 5,6, and 11 p.m. newscasts on WJAX-TV and the 10 p.m. newscast on WFOX-TV and can be heard daily on News 104.5 WOKV.

    Buresh is a self-professed "weather holic" and his  fascination with weather developed at a very young age while growing up in rural Iowa.  As  early as the second grade, Mike's mom says he was drawing weather maps and "always looking at the sky."

    Mike's passion for weather continues to this day as Mike eats, drinks, breathes and - yes - sleeps weather.  Or as he likes to call it: "All the Weather, All the Time!"

    Mike graduated from Iowa State University in 1987 but began his college studies at Oklahoma University where he became an experienced "storm chaser" in addition to working at the National Weather Service.

    Shortly after graduating, Mike earned the American Meteorological Society's "Seal of Approval" and has also achieved his Certification for Broadcast Meteorologist which certifies that Mike meets specific educational and experience criteria and has passed rigorous testing in his knowledge and communication of meteorology and related sciences needed to be an effective broadcast meteorologist.

    Buresh began his television meteorology career at WHO-TV in Des Moines, Iowa and most recently at WKRC-TV in Cincinnati, Ohio before coming to the First Coast. Mike has calmly, effectively and accurately warned, tracked and informed viewers about tornadoes, waterspouts, floods and many local tropical cyclones including Bonnie, Charley, Frances, Jeanne, Fay, Beryl, Debby and Andrea to name just a few.

    Jacksonville's Most Accurate Weather 

    Mike and his First Alert forecast have been rated as the "Most Accurate" in the Jacksonville television market according to the independent service "WeatheRate". 

    If you would like the most accurate Chief Meteorologist to visit your school, club or civic organization,  E-mail Mike » . Mike is also an active member of the Jacksonville Salvation Army Advisory Board.

    He has traveled extensively including trips to Australia, Asia, Central and South America, Galapagos Islands and twice to Africa.

    When Mike isn't forecasting your weather he enjoys golf, basketball, football, swimming, water skiing, the beach, reading, community outreach and, most of all, spending time with his lovely wife, daughters and "best friend", Opie, the dog.

    Mike is an avid writer and has a large following in the blog-o-sphere --  "Buresh Blog"  and  "Talking the Tropics With Mike" (hurricane season June 1st-Nov. 30th).

    Read More

The Latest News Headlines

  • Mayor Curry joined a clean up crew from the city’s public works department and joined in on the clean up efforts going on around Jacksonville. Its part of the mayor’s plan to clean up quickly and efficiently following Hurricane Irma.  “I want the people of Jacksonville to know, we have an aggressive plan to get this city cleaned up.” Mayor Curry says. The Mayor says the city has already supplied 38 trucks to help start getting the bigger storm debris out from your neighborhoods. He says it will take about 45 days for the first pass of the bigger items to take place and then another 15 days for a second pass.   “So 60 days of aggressive moving.” The Mayor says.  The city has supplied its own tips for storm clean up in Jacksonville. Regularly scheduled yard waste pick up will be limited to yard trash in bags and containers. The Five-cubic yard rule is still in effect.  Loose debris will be picked up by storm recovery crews and there is no volume limit. You should leave the debris loose and plied up by the curb even the stuff you would normally put in a container. Storm debris such as leaves, tree branches, and limbs should be separated from construction and demolition debris. The city says failure to do so may prevent workers from collecting your trash.  Make sure you place your yard trash at least 3 feet away from utility boxes, power poles, mailboxes, and any other obstacles that could prevent pick up.  Its prohibited to burn yard trash in the City of Jacksonville because it violates the city’s year round burn ban. The city says if you see this you can call 630-CITY or go to 630city.coj.net to report it.  “We know you want your neighborhoods cleaned up, these guys [public works employees] are working hard doing their jobs everyday” Mayor Curry says. 
  • To many of us, every day is pepperoni pizza day, but on the calendar of official “food days,” Wednesday is National Pepperoni Pizza Day. With pepperoni as the most ordered topping on pizza, you are going to want to celebrate, right? Who wouldn’t? Here are some some National Pepperoni Day (and other day) deals. Chuck E. Cheese: Chuck E. is offering a crispy pepperoni pizza Wednesday and Thursday when you buy any large regularly-priced pizza. Use coupon code #5485. >> Read more trending news Domino’s: You can get a free pepperoni (or any kind) in a buy one/get one deal. The BOGO is good through Sept. 24. Marco’s Pizza: Get an extra-large, 1-topping pizza for $8.99. Papa John’s: Get a free large 1-topping pizza when you buy any pizza using Visa Checkout. Order the pizza online, then you will get an email with a code for the free pizza. Papa Murphy’s: Get a large pepperoni pizza for $6 when you donate $4.25 or more to the Children’s Miracle Hospitals. Order online. Pizza Hut: Get a large pepperoni pizza for $1 when you buy a large pizza at menu price online. Use the code: PEPPEREONI1 at checkout.
  • A massive magnitude-7.1 earthquake in Mexico City has killed more than 200 people as of Wednesday morning. >> Read more trending news Volunteer rescue workers, along with officials and other ordinary citizens, dug through the debris of collapsed buildings, including a three-story primary and secondary school, where they found students dead after Tuesday’s quake. “We can hear small noises, but we don’t know if they’re coming from above or below, from the walls above (crumbling), or someone below calling for help,” volunteer rescue worker Dr. Pedro Serrano told the Associated Press. >> Related: Buildings damaged following large earthquake in Mexico City Tuesday’s earthquake is the deadliest in Mexico since the 1985 quake, which took place on the same date and left thousands dead. It is also the second devastating earthquake to hit the region in less than two weeks. A week and a half ago, a magnitude-8.1 quake killed about 90 people. Here’s how to help Mexico and those affected by the earthquake: 1. Donate clothes, water and food If you’re nearby the tragedy, donate canned goods to relief or collection centers listed here at Elfinanciero.com. You can also donate goods to nonprofits on the ground, including UNICEF Mexico, Red Cross Mexico, Save the Children Mexico, Oxfam Mexico, La Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico or Project Paz. 2. Make a monetary donation Consider donating to those nonprofits listed above (UNICEF Mexico, Red Cross Mexico, Save the Children Mexico, Oxfam Mexico, La Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico or Project Paz). Topos Mexico, a Mexican rescue brigade, is also accepting PayPal donations.  3. Use social media to spread awareness A simple retweet could get the right person where they need to be or the right information where it needs to go. While you’re on social media, consider retweeting aid accounts or locals to connect them to the appropriate resources. For example, Topos Mexico has been sharing lists of areas where they need professional medical care. Locals are also tweeting photos of areas where help is needed. Here, someone calls for help on Twitter for a collapsed building in Coquimbo, where many were trapped. Some have even tweeted about open hospitals and where victims can receive free treatment, such as the emergency room at Hospital Ángeles Pedregal below. There is also a Google spreadsheet of rescued individuals that’s being shared on social media.  4. If you’re around, volunteer Mexico City officials have put together a volunteer coordination site, asking those interested to head to the Emergency Rescue Squad (ERUM) building in Chimalpopoca. But officials warn volunteers to stick to their nearest disaster zones and avoid entering other zones.
  • After social media posts surface showing Naval Hospital Jacksonville staff members inappropriately handling newborns, the Navy Surgeon General is taking action. WOKV first told you about the social media posts yesterday- in one, a staff member appears to make a baby dance to rap music. In another, an employee is flipping off a newborn, saying it’s how she feels about “these mini Satans”. Naval Hospital Jacksonville posted on their Facebook page on behalf of their Commanding Officer, saying the posts were “outrageous, unacceptable, incredibly unprofessional, and cannot be tolerated”. At that time, they also confirmed the staff members involved had been removed from patient care and could face legal and military consequences.  Now, Navy Surgeon General Vice Admiral Forrest Faison has sent a message to Navy Medicine commanders worldwide, directing “immediate mandatory all-hands stand downs” at all commands, in order to review the oaths, pledges, and reasons for serving in Navy Medicine. There will also be a review of policy regarding use of personal phones and recording devices, and in the meantime person cell phones have now been prohibited in patient care areas.  “In an age where information can be shared instantly, what we say and post online must reflect the highest standards of character and conduct, in both our personal and professional lives. As health care professionals, we are entrusted with the lives and well-being of all those who have volunteered to defend our freedom, including their families. We owe them the best care and compassion our nation can offer. We owe them our unqualified respect,” says Faison’s statement.  Faison calls the social media posts “highly offensive”, saying it’s inconsistent with Navy Medicine’s core values and medical ethics.  “At every level of the enterprise, we must send a clear message that Navy and Navy Medicine leadership take every allegation of offensive and unacceptable online conduct seriously and will hold responsible individuals accountable for their actions,” the statement says.  All commanding officers have now also been instructed to ensure there are no additional patient photos on social media and to personally contact mothers and expectant mothers planning to deliver at one of their facilities to address any concerns.  Faison further commended those who brought forward the social media posts, instead of staying silent.  “This is what I expect of every member of the Navy Medicine team- from the deck plate to our senior leaders. Honor, service, caring and compassion- that is what the Navy Medicine team represents. Because of that, American families rest well at night knowing we have the watch and are committed to the best care for their loved ones. We cannot compromise the trust that has been placed in our hands. Our Sailors, Marines and their families deserve our best,” he says.  The two staff members involved have not been identified at this time, but Naval Hospital Jacksonville says they are not nurses.
  • Operators of a Florida nursing home where eight seniors died last week called Florida Gov. Rick Scott’s cell phone four times after Hurricane Irma knocked out the facility’s air conditioning, Scott’s office confirmed Tuesday — but the governor’s office said managers never indicated patients were in danger or needed to be evacuated. >> Read more trending news Every call from the Rehabilitation Center at Hollywood Hills to Scott’s phone was returned by a state official, said the governor’s office, which said nursing home managers were “advised by the state multiple times to call 911 if they had any reason to believe that any lives were in danger – something they failed to do.” Scott’s office late Tuesday released 159 pages of phone logs, emails and other records related to the state’s interaction with the facility, which is under criminal investigation for the deaths. A ninth victim died Monday, the Broward County Medical Examiner’s Office reported. The nursing home has blamed state officials and Florida Power & Light for the deaths and released its own timeline last week of calls to FP&L and state agencies. FP&L last week released a statement, saying it is “limited in what we can say” because of the investigation but adding that “there was a hospital with power across the parking lot from this facility and that the nursing home was required to have a permanently installed, operational generator…we urge our customers who have electricity dependent medical needs, and who don’t have power to call 911, if it is a life-threatening situation.” >> Related: Owner of nursing home where 8 died linked to Medicare fraud case With Republican Scott expected to challenge Democratic Sen. Bill Nelson next year, Democrats have intensified efforts to link the governor to the nursing home deaths. Nelson, in a Senate floor speech Monday, mentioned the nursing home deaths and “all the phone calls that had been made that were not answered, both to the government as well as to the power company.” The Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee on Tuesday accused Scott of a “failure to respond” to requests for help from the nursing home’s administrators. Scott is pushing back hard against his critics. “No amount of finger pointing by the Hollywood Hills Rehabilitation Facility and Larkin Community Hospital Behavioral Health Services will hide the fact that this healthcare facility failed to do their basic duty to protect life,” Scott said in a statement released Tuesday night. “This facility is failing to take responsibility for the fact that they delayed calling 911 and made the decision to not evacuate their patients to one of the largest hospitals in Florida, which is directly across the street.” Scott’s office said the governor gave a personal cell phone number before the hurricane to “mayors, sheriffs, police chiefs, county and city officials, nursing homes, ALFs and fuel and utility providers.” After Irma passed through Broward County on Sunday, Sept. 10, and knocked out the nursing home’s air conditioning, an aide to the governor retrieved a voice mail message at 7:35 p.m. on Monday, Sept. 11 from Natasha Anderson, the CEO of Larkin Community Hospital Behavioral Health Services, which is associated with the nursing home. The call was returned about about 9:50 p.m. by Department of Health Chief of Staff Alexis Lambert, the governor’s office said. “Chief Lambert advised Anderson to call 911 if there was any reason to believe that the health or safety of patients was at risk. The Rehabilitation Center at Hollywood Hills reported issues involving air conditioning but did not, at any time during the call, report or indicate that conditions had become dangerous or that the health and safety of their patients was at risk,” Scott’s office said. According to the nursing home’s timeline, on Monday night “the building was still cool and the spot coolers were in place maintaining required temperatures.” >> Related: After Irma: Sixty-four Florida nursing homes still without power The next day, Sept. 12, callers from the Rehabilitation Center left two voice mail messages on Scott’s cell phone that were retrieved at 10:25 a.m. Another voice mail was retrieved at 12:50 p.m., according to the governor’s office timeline. According to the nursing home’s timeline, it received additional spot coolers from Memorial Regional Hospital at 3:15 p.m. on Sept. 12. An Agency for Health Care Administration official returned one call to nursing home administrator Jorge Carballo at 4:17 p.m., the governor’s office said. Another AHCA official called Anderson at 4:41 p.m. Both Carballo and Anderson said the nursing home’s “chiller” wasn’t working but that spot coolers and fans were in place, according to the governor’s office, which said neither nursing home official indicated patients were in danger. About nine hours later, at 1:30 a.m. on Sept. 13, the nursing home says the first victim experienced an elevated heart rate and was taken to the hospital.

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