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    The Latest on Brexit negotiations (all times local): 11:45 a.m. Britain's besieged Prime Minister Theresa May is warning that a leadership change wouldn't make Brexit negotiations easier, as opponents in her Conservative Party threaten to unseat her. May insisted she hasn't considered quitting as furious Conservative rebels try to gather the numbers to trigger a no-confidence vote. She told Sky News in an interview that 'a change of leadership at this point isn't going to make the negotiations any easier and it isn't going to change the parliamentary arithmetic.' She added that the next seven days 'are going to be critical' for successful Brexit talks, and that she will be travelling to Brussels to meet with EU leaders before an emergency European Council summit on Nov. 25. Asked about the abuses hurled at her, she said: 'It doesn't distract me. Politics is a tough business and I've been in it for a long time.' ___ 10:45 a.m. Britain's former Brexit secretary has slammed Prime Minister Theresa May for lacking political will and resolve when dealing with the European Union over Brexit negotiations. Dominic Raab, who resigned Thursday, suggested that May failed to stand up to bullying EU officials. He told the Sunday Times: 'If we cannot close this deal on reasonable terms, we need to be very honest with the country that we will not be bribed and blackmailed or bullied and we will walk away.' Raab added that 'there is one thing that is missing and that is political will and resolve.' May is facing political chaos and open rebellion within her ranks, with Conservative opponents plotting to oust her after Britain struck a divorce agreement with the EU this week.
  • Britain's besieged Prime Minister Theresa May warned Sunday that a leadership change wouldn't make Brexit negotiations easier, as opponents in her Conservative Party threaten to unseat her and the former Brexit secretary suggested she failed to stand up to bullying from European Union officials. As furious Conservative rebels try to gather the numbers to trigger a no-confidence vote, May insisted she hadn't considered quitting. 'A change of leadership at this point isn't going to make the negotiations any easier and it isn't going to change the parliamentary arithmetic,' she told Sky News in an interview. May added that the next seven days 'are going to be critical' for successful Brexit talks, and that she will be travelling to Brussels to meet with EU leaders before an emergency European Council summit on Nov. 25. An announcement this week that Britain has struck a draft divorce agreement with the EU triggered a political crisis in Britain, with the deal roundly savaged by both the opposition and large chunks of May's own Conservatives. Two Cabinet ministers and several junior government members quit, and more than 20 lawmakers have submitted letters of no confidence in May. Forty-eight such letters are needed for a leadership challenge vote. Asked about the attacks directed at her, May said: 'It doesn't distract me. Politics is a tough business and I've been in it for a long time.' Dominic Raab, who quit Thursday as Brexit secretary, said 'there is one thing missing and that is political will and resolve.' 'If we cannot close this deal on reasonable terms, we need to be very honest with the country that we will not be bribed and blackmailed or bullied and we will walk away,' he told the Sunday Times. Many pro-Brexit Conservatives want a clean break with the EU and argue that the close trade ties between the U.K. and the EU called for in the deal would leave Britain a vassal state, with no way to independently disentangle itself from the bloc. The draft agreement envisions Britain leaving the EU as planned on March 29, but remaining inside the bloc's single market and bound by its rules until the end of December 2020. It also commits the two sides to the contentious 'backstop' solution, which would keep the U.K. in a customs arrangement with the EU as a guarantee that the Irish border remained free of customs checkpoints. Raab said the agreement was 'fatally flawed' — but that it's not too late to change that. 'I still think a deal could be done but it is very late in the day now and we need to change course,' he told the BBC.
  • French President Emmanuel Macron and German Chancellor Angela Merkel, both limping in the polls, are looking for common approaches to Donald Trump and fixing the flaws in the euro currency. Macron speaks in the German parliament Sunday on an annual day of remembrance for victims of war and dictatorship, a week after the 100th anniversary of the end of World War I, and then consults with Merkel on European and international issues. Merkel last week echoed Macron's call for a European army, a long-term prospect that drew tweeted criticism of Macron from Trump. Merkel said a European force would save money and agreed with Macron that Europe must be able to defend itself on its own. The two also face a December summit on limited reforms to the euro currency.
  • The Latest on the summit of Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation in Papua New Guinea (all times local): 5:05 p.m. Canada's Prime Minister Justin Trudeau says leaders at the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation meeting in Papua New Guinea were unable to agree on a final communique. Trudeau told reporters Sunday that the chair of the meeting, Papua New Guinea, will issue a statement instead. He says there were differences on trade issues among several countries including China and the U.S., which have been engaged in a tit-for-tat tariff war this year. ___ 2:05 p.m. A meeting of world leaders in Papua New Guinea has highlighted divisions between global powers the U.S. and China and a growing competition for influence in the usually neglected South Pacific. The 21 nations at the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation summit in Port Moresby struggled to bridge differences on issues such as trade protectionism, making it likely their final statement Sunday will be an anodyne document. U.S. Vice President Mike Pence and China's President Xi Jinping traded barbs in speeches on Saturday. Pence accused China of intellectual property theft, forced technology transfers and unfair trading practices. In Port Moresby, the impact of China's aid and loans is highly visible but the U.S. and allies are countering with efforts to finance infrastructure in Papua New Guinea and other island states.
  • Greenpeace says six of its activists boarded a tanker transporting Indonesian palm oil in the Gulf of Cadiz and were detained by its captain after unfurling 'Save our Rainforest' and 'Drop Dirty Palm Oil' banners. A ship tracking website shows the Stolt Tenacity, which Greenpeace says is carrying palm oil from Wilmar International linked to tropical forest destruction in Indonesia, was bound for Rotterdam. Greenpeace says the activists from Indonesia, Germany, Britain, France, Canada and the U.S. are being detained in a cabin on the ship. Palm oil is used in a huge array of consumer goods from makeup to snacks. Wilmar supplies Mondelez, the maker of Oreo cookies and Cadbury chocolate. Greenpeace said the Stolt Tenacity's captain was informed in advance that the protest, staged Saturday, would be peaceful.
  • The chief executive of J.Crew Group Inc. is stepping down. The clothing retailer said in an announcement Saturday that the departure of James Brett, a retail veteran who took the top job in 2017, was by mutual agreement between Brett and the company's board of directors. In a statement, Brett said that despite a recent brand relaunch which was showing positive results, he and the company's board were 'unable to bridge our beliefs on how to continue to evolve all aspects of the company.' The company said Brett's responsibilities will be assumed by four senior J.Crew executives, including Michael Nicholson, the company's president and chief operating officer. Brett, who had previously headed up furniture chain West Elm, had been hired in the summer of 2017 when Mickey Drexler, J.Crew's longtime top executive, stepped down. 'Returning J.Crew to its iconic status required reinventing the brand to reflect the America of today with a more expansive, more inclusive fashion concept,' Brett said in his statement. In its statement, the company said that Brett had brought new energy to J.Crew and had 'enhanced our ability to relate to a broad range of consumers.
  • Florida is suing the nation's two largest drugstore chains, Walgreens and CVS, alleging they added to the state and national opioid crisis by overselling painkillers and not taking precautions to stop illegal sales. Attorney General Pam Bondi announced late Friday that she has added the companies to a state-court lawsuit filed last spring against Purdue Pharma, the maker of OxyContin, and several opioid distributors. Bondi said in a press release that CVS and Walgreens 'played a role in creating the opioid crisis.' She said the companies failed to stop 'suspicious orders of opioids' and 'dispensed unreasonable quantities of opioids from their pharmacies.' On average, about 45 people die nationally each day because of opioid overdoses, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 'We will continue to pursue those companies that played a role in creating the opioid crisis,' said Bondi, who has been mentioned as a possible replacement by President Donald Trump for recently ousted U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions. 'Thousands of Floridians have suffered as a result of the actions of the defendants.' CVS spokesman Mike DeAngelis called the lawsuit 'without merit' in a statement Saturday. He said the company trains its pharmacists and their assistants about their responsibilities when dispensing controlled substances and gives them tools to detect potentially illegal sales. 'Over the past several years, CVS has taken numerous actions to strengthen our existing safeguards to help address the nation's opioid epidemic,' DeAngelis said. Walgreens said Saturday it doesn't comment on pending lawsuits. Until a law enforcement crackdown at the beginning of the decade, Florida was known for its so-called pain mills. Drug dealers from throughout the country would send associates to store-front clinics where unscrupulous doctors would write opioid prescriptions for bogus injuries and illnesses. At one point, 90 of the nation's top 100 opioid prescribers were Florida doctors, according to federal officials. After receiving the prescriptions, the phony patients would buy the pills from Florida pharmacies — state law says pharmacists must refuse to fill prescriptions they suspect are not for a valid purpose. Most of the opioids would then be taken out of state to be resold illegally at huge markups, creating a drug crisis in many communities throughout the Eastern United States. According to the lawsuit, Walgreens has dispensed billions of opioid dosages from its Florida pharmacies since 2006. The Illinois-based chain is the nation's largest drugstore chain and has more than 13,200 stores globally. The company distributed 2.2 million opioid tablets from its store in Hudson, a Tampa-area town of 12,000, and in one unidentified town of 3,000, sold 285,000 pills in a month, the lawsuit says. In some stores, its opioid sales jumped six-fold in two years. The company paid $80 million five years ago to resolve a federal investigation that centered on inadequate record keeping of its Florida opioid sales that allowed the pills to reach the black market. Florida's accusations against CVS were more general, saying it sold 700 million opioid dosages between 2006 and 2014, including outsized sales in Hudson and two other nearby towns. The Rhode Island-based chain has more than 9,800 stores.
  • Shawn Smith has heard the promises before. When new hotels sprang up near the public housing complex in Queens where he's lived for 17 years, residents were told they would bring jobs and economic opportunity. He hasn't seen any of it. So he's cynical about the announcement this week that Amazon will build a headquarters for 25,000 workers on the Long Island City waterfront, a half mile from his home. Elected officials gleefully promised that Amazon's presence will buoy all of western Queens. Smith is not so sure. 'The hotels here, they're not hiring nobody. They're bringing their own kind,' said Smith, who commutes to a construction job in New Jersey. 'That's how I feel about Amazon.' His wasn't the only skeptical voice among the roughly 6,400 residents of the Queensbridge Houses, the largest public housing complex in the U.S. Residents, most of whom are black or Hispanic, expressed hope that there might be something for them in Amazon's hiring bonanza to offset the pressures of neighborhood gentrification. But they are taking the promised opportunity with a grain of salt. 'Let's see if they hire from around here,' said Fontaine White, 54, who has lived in Queensbridge for eight years. 'I think it's a good idea, provided you remember we live here, too. If you put Amazon in Long Island City, we're part of Long Island City.' City and state officials promised at least $2.8 billion in tax credits and grants to lure Amazon to Queens, where it would occupy a new campus built around a formerly industrial boat basin. New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo and New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio, both Democrats, have heralded the deal as good for everyone. De Blasio, who won office on promises to address the widening gap between rich and poor in the city, said Amazon has pledged to give money for job training programs for public housing residents, provide space for a new school and pay into a city fund that will be used for projects that benefit the community. 'When you add that kind of number (of jobs) into our economy, you're opening a lot of opportunity for everyday people,' de Blasio said Friday during his weekly appearance on the Brian Lehrer Show on WNYC radio. He said Amazon's presence would lead to 'a lot of jobs for young people coming out of our public schools, coming out of public housing, coming out of city universities. And that's crucial to addressing inequality.' The big government incentives for Amazon have sharply split the Democrats who dominate state politics. U.S. Sen. Chuck Schumer issued a statement in support of the deal. The state's junior Senator, Kirsten Gillibrand, tweeted that 'one of the wealthiest companies in history should not be receiving financial assistance from the taxpayers while too many New York families struggle to make ends meet.' The city councilman and state senator representing Long Island City are exploring ways to try to block the subsidies. About 100 people attended a protest of the deal this week. New Yorkers who ride the subway through Queens have wondered how the neighborhood will handle additional commuters. The station closest to where Amazon would be located already has an average daily ridership of 23,672, making it among the system's busiest. Queensbridge Houses has also factored heavily in the public discussion. For decades, the 26-building housing project in the shadow of the Ed Koch Queensboro Bridge was known for being a rough place. It factored big in Hip Hop history, producing talents including Marley Marl, Roxanne Shante, Nas, and Havoc of the rap duo Mobb Deep. Crime has abated substantially in recent years. Queensbridge was celebrated for going nearly two years without a shooting before the streak ended in 2017. But like most New York City housing projects, residents complain of poor conditions, unreliable heat and hot water, and rats and roaches. The same week officials celebrated their willingness to let Amazon avoid billions of dollars in taxes, a federal judge rejected a consent decree that would have had the city pay $1 billion over four years and an additional $200 million annually for the following six years to fix deplorable conditions in public housing, saying it didn't go far enough. There are 'a lot of issues with housing not fixing things, not doing things,' said Lisa Cruz, 40, an office manager who has lived in Queensbridge for 12 years. 'It's really bad.' The area around Queensbridge has already been changing fast. Luxury condominiums have sprouted. JetBlue's corporate headquarters is a modest walk away. An artisanal brewery moved in. Hotels, once rare in outer boroughs, have sprouted, taking advantage of safe streets and quick access to Manhattan. A big waterfront park was spruced up. 'The neighborhood is a lot cleaner than it was. There's been a lot more changes. A lot more police officers around,' said Cruz, a mother of four. But prices have gone up in local grocery stores and increased congestion has made parking difficult. 'It's unfortunate that it has to take for new hotels to come in, and new buildings and new storage units for fancy-schmancy stuff,' Cruz said. 'The park has changed so much. That's something we enjoy, but how many years did it take for them to fix Queensbridge Park for us in the community to enjoy it?' Ashley Nieves, who has lived her entire 21 years in Queensbridge, was concerned that Amazon's arrival would make the neighborhood more expensive, but was hopeful it would lead to job opportunities. That would be a trade-off she was willing to live with. 'If you hire more people, especially people who live in the projects,' the mother of two said, 'it's kind of like opening doors to live better.' ___ Deepti Hajela covers issues of race, ethnicity and immigration for The Associated Press. Follow her on Twitter at https://twitter.com/dhajela. For more of her work, search for her name at https://apnews.com.
  • Hundreds of protesters have turned out in central London and blocked off the capital's main bridges to demand the government take climate change seriously. A group called 'Extinction Rebellion' encouraged sit-ins on the bridges Saturday as part of a coordinated week of action across the country. Metropolitan Police said emergency vehicles were hampered from getting across London because of the 'blockade' of five bridges. The force said it had asked all protesters to congregate at Westminster Bridge where officers can facilitate lawful protest. About two dozen people were arrested on Monday after protesters blocked traffic and glued themselves to gates outside the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy.
  • The Latest on protests in France against rising fuel taxes (all times local): 12:45 p.m. French interior ministry officials say that one protester has been killed and 47 injured as demonstrators block roads around France to protest gas price increases. Police say that three of the injured are in serious condition, according to the ministry. Officials say that 24 people have been arrested and 17 held for questioning. The protests over rising fuel taxes have drawn citizens upset about a host of problems like decreased buying power. An investigation was underway in the death of a protester in the eastern Savoie region, hit by a driver who apparently accelerated in a panic while caught in the demonstration, according to a regional official. Authorities didn't give a breakdown about how the 47 others were injured during the protests. ___ 8:20 a.m. Drivers in France are planning to block roads across the country to protest rising fuel taxes, in a new challenge to embattled President Emmanuel Macron. Protesters pledge to target tollbooths, roundabouts and the bypass that rings Paris on Saturday. The government is preparing to send police to remove protesters and threatening fines. The taxes are part of Macron's strategy of weaning France off fossil fuels. Many drivers see them as emblematic of a presidency seen as disconnected from day-to-day economic difficulties. The protesters have dubbed themselves the 'yellow jackets' because they wear fluorescent vests that all French drivers must keep in their vehicles in case of car troubles. Separately, ambulances briefly blocked Paris' Champs-Elysees on Friday to protest new rules on ambulance financing and put pressure on Macron's government.