Coronavirus: :

What You Need to Know

What's Closed:

Updated List of Northeast Florida Closures, Cancellations, and Postponed Events

On Air Now

Listen Now

Weather

clear-night
73°
Sunny
H 91° L 69°
  • clear-night
    73°
    Current Conditions
    Sunny. H 91° L 69°
  • clear-day
    87°
    Afternoon
    Sunny. H 91° L 69°
  • clear-day
    89°
    Evening
    Sunny. H 94° L 70°
Listen
Pause
Error

The latest top stories

00:00 | 00:00

Listen
Pause
Error

The latest traffic report

00:00 | 00:00

Listen
Pause
Error

The latest forecast

00:00 | 00:00

Entertainment

    Actor John Callahan, known for playing Edmund Grey on “All My Children” and also starring on other soaps including “Days of Our Lives,” “Santa Barbara” and “Falcon Crest,” has died. He was 66. His ex-wife and former “All My Children” co-star Eva LaRue announced his death on her social media account on Saturday. The two, who played a married couple on the show, shared a daughter, Kaya, “May Flights of Angels Wing You to Your Rest my Dear Friend. Your bigger than life, gregarious personality will leave a hole in our hearts forever. We are devastated-My great friend, co parent partner, and loving father to Kaya,” she wrote on Instagram. “Kaya and I are beyond broken hearted, so stunned, sorry that my thoughts are a mess. You gave the best most beautifully written tributes, and I am at a complete loss for words right now for you.” Callahan starred on “All My Children” from 1992 to 2005.
  • Tourism officials in Memphis, Tennessee, say the Beale Street Music Festival and the World Championship Barbecue Cooking Contest have been rescheduled for the fall after they were postponed by the new coronavirus outbreak. Memphis in May officials said in a statement Saturday that the barbecue cooking competition has been reset for Sept. 30 through Oct. 3. The music festival will now be held Oct. 16 through Oct. 18. Both events are the cornerstones of the city's monthlong tourist event in May. They attract music fans and barbecue cooking teams from around the world. The Lumineers, Three 6 Mafia, The Avett Brothers, Lil Wayne and The Smashing Pumpkins were among the musical acts scheduled to perform at the music festival before the cancellation. It was not immediately clear if the performers who were set to appear on the original dates in May will be part of the lineup in September. The Great American River Run also had been postponed. It has been reset for Oct. 31. This Mississippi River city relies heavily on tourism revenue from Memphis in May. Organizers said earlier this month that they had been instructed by city officials that the events could not be held as originally scheduled. Meanwhile, Elvis Presley's Graceland said it is extending its closure through April 19. The Memphis tourist attraction is centered on the life and career of the late rock n' roll icon. It annually attracts about 500,000 visitors, including international travelers. For most people, the new coronavirus causes mild or moderate symptoms, such as fever and cough that clear up in two to three weeks. For some, especially older adults and those with existing health problems, it can cause more severe illness, including pneumonia and death ___ Follow AP coverage of the virus outbreak at https://apnews.com/VirusOutbreak and https://apnews.com/UnderstandingtheOutbreak.
  • There were the great fires of 1788 and 1794 and the multiple yellow fever outbreaks of the 1800s. Hurricane Betsy hit in 1965, Hurricane Katrina in 2005, and the memories linger in New Orleans like remnants of a bad dream. Now the city is one of the nation’s hot spots for coronavirus. As of Friday, New Orleans and neighboring Jefferson Parish had recorded more than 80 of the state’s 119 COVID-19 deaths and more than 1,700 of the state’s 2,700-plus known cases. The numbers have been climbing fast, in part because increased testing is revealing more people to have the disease. Why New Orleans has become a hot spot is uncertain, although medical experts and government officials openly speculate that the annual Mardi Gras celebration in late February was a factor. It draws more than a million tourists and locals to city streets each year. Gov. John Bel Edwards has repeatedly warned that the state’s health care system could be overwhelmed by early April. Louisiana is preparing for 2,000 to 4,000 patients above normal for this time of year, said Joseph Kanter, an assistant state health officer. Morial Convention Center, which sheltered Katrina refugees in sweltering squalor, is about to become an emergency hospital for a potential overflow of virus patients, which will once again test emergency preparedness in a city where rescue efforts were widely viewed as inadequate in 2005. The rush is on to corral protective masks and gowns for medical personnel and to gather lifesaving ventilators. Meanwhile, an economy largely built on the opposite of social distancing — tourism, crowded restaurants, music at bars and nightclubs — is being sacrificed to stay-home orders, business shutdowns and bans of gatherings of more than 10 people. Live music, which reverberates through the city’s history, is, for now, history itself. Bartenders, waiters and hotel staffers are out of work. And the city’s heralded musicians, who could at least travel the world looking for gigs after Katrina, have nowhere to go in a pandemic. “I’ve been playing music all my life, since I was a teenager,” said 78-year-old John Moore, better known as session guitar virtuoso, singer and band leader Deacon John. “I’ve never been unemployed. But now, all of a sudden, WHOP! The day the music died.” “It does feel like what we cherish about this city is being taken away from us,” said George Ingmire, a longtime DJ at the city’s famed roots music station WWOZ. “The reason that some of us came here and never left ... and those that are from here and take deep pride in ... That’s all unavailable right now. That’s really heartbreaking.” The city’s vulnerabilities include its poverty and low-wage jobs. “I worry very much that a lot of people in our city are operating ... on a paycheck-to-paycheck basis,” said John Clarke, a professor at Tulane University’s business school. He said the New Orleans economy lacks big companies that are often better positioned than smaller enterprises to weather financial ups and downs. The industries that New Orleans has in abundance — hospitality, gambling, tourism — have basically “come to a full stop.' A high poverty rate could also crimp the city’s ability to combat the disease. Drive-up testing, which allows symptomatic people to get tested while lessening their possible exposure, isn’t always an option for the poor. According to the Data Center, a New Orleans-based think tank, nearly 1 in 5 households do not have access to a car. Preexisting conditions, a risk for those who get COVID-19, are another problem in south Louisiana, Kanter said. “We know that our population has more other diseases, underlying, than perhaps other parts of the country do. We have a lot of diabetes, heart disease, renal disease and liver disease here. That puts us at risk for worst outcomes – very difficult to model for these,” Kanter said. For most people, the coronavirus causes mild or moderate symptoms, such as fever and cough that clear up in two to three weeks. For some, especially older adults and people with existing health problems, it can cause more severe illness, including pneumonia, and death. The vast majority of people recover. Meanwhile, medical workers are conserving protective masks and gowns by re-using them. A nurse at a suburban New Orleans hospital, who was not authorized to speak to reporters and spoke on condition of anonymity, said staffers have discussed using plastic rain ponchos, like the ones French Quarter tourists buy at souvenir shops on rainy days, as protective gowns. “People are handling it well and soldiering on,” the nurse said. “But there’s a lot of people worried about catching it and giving it to your family and all that stuff ... We want to help but we don’t want to be sacrificial lambs.' ___ Associated Press writers Janet McConnaughey and Melinda Deslatte in Baton Rouge contributed to this report.
  • Oprah Winfrey says she’s playing it safe when it comes to the rapidly spreading coronavirus. The 66-year-old entertainment icon told The Associated Press on Friday that she has been quarantining and practicing social distancing at her home — even if that means longtime partner Stedman Graham has to stay in the guest house. “I have now-grown girls from South Africa here (but) Stedman’s on lock down at the guest house. He’s still there, asking: ‘When can I come? When can I come to the main house?’ He’s still got, hmm, till Monday,” she said. Earlier this week Winfrey posted a video of her talking to Graham as he poked his head outside of the guest house window. She said he must stay in the guest house because he had been recently flying and they’re trying to be safe. “I’m getting ready to take him some food down there now for lunch. But I’m playing it as safe as I possibly can. Nobody goes out and nobody comes in,” she said. For most people, the new coronavirus causes mild or moderate symptoms, such as fever and cough that clear up in two to three weeks. For some, especially older adults and people with existing health problems, it can cause more severe illness, including pneumonia and death. Winfrey has been busy working despite being stuck at home. She interviewed actor Idris Elba, who tested positive for the coronavirus, through FaceTime for an episode of 'Oprah Talks: COVID-19' on Apple TV. When asked about how she’s continuing to do work from her home, she said: “What did we do before Zoom is what I’d like to know? How could we do it without Zoom? I don’t even know.” She also said she’s enjoying the downtime: “Don’t be hating because I’m having a really good time. I’m really OK in retreat from everyone. I’m really OK with it.”
  • A publicist for Joe Diffie says the country singer has tested positive for COVID-19. Scott Adkins released a statement to The Associated Press from Diffie that said he is under the care of medical professionals and is receiving treatment. “My family and I are asking for privacy at this time,” Diffie said in the statement. 'We want to remind the public and all my fans to be vigilant, cautious and careful during this pandemic.” The Grand Ole Opry member and Grammy winner is known for his hits in the '90s including, “Honky Tonk Attitude,” “Prop Me Up Beside The Jukebox,” “John Deere Green,” “Third Rock From The Sun” and “Pickup Man.' For most people, the new coronavirus causes mild or moderate symptoms, such as fever and cough that clear up in two to three weeks. For some, especially older adults and people with existing health problems, it can cause more severe illness, including pneumonia, and death.
  • The stars of the 2011 virus thriller “Contagion” — a prescient film these days — have reunited for a series of public service announcements to warn about COVID-19. Matt Damon, Laurence Fishburne, Kate Winslet and Jennifer Ehle have teamed up with scientists from Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health to offer four individual homemade videos. “Wash your hands like your life depends on it,” Winslet says in her PSA. “Because right now, in particular, it just might.” Ehle stresses that the coronavirus is novel, meaning no one is immune. “Every single one of us, regardless of age or ethnicity, is at risk of getting it,” she says. “Contagion,” directed by Steven Soderbergh, explores a scenario in which a lethal and fast-moving influenza is spreading around the world. Damon, who in the film played a character who was immune to the hypothetical virus, also stresses listening to experts and staying 6 feet apart. “That was a movie. This is real life,” he says. “I have no reason to believe that I'm immune to COVID-19. And neither do you.” Fishburne appeals to helping medical staff on the front line. “If we can slow this thing down, it will give our doctors and our nurses in our hospitals a fighting chance to help us all get through this thing together,” he says. For most people, the new coronavirus causes mild or moderate symptoms, such as fever and cough that clear up in two to three weeks. For some, especially older adults and people with existing health problems, it can cause more severe illness, including pneumonia and death.
  • Kristen Bell is hosting a Nickelodeon special with a “kid’s-eye view” of the coronavirus pandemic to address youngsters' concerns and help families weather the crisis, the channel said Friday. Bell and her guests practiced social distancing, using video to connect for the hourlong program airing 7 p.m. EDT Monday. Dr. Nadine Burke Harris, California’s surgeon general, and Dr. Vivek H. Murthy, former U.S. surgeon general, offer advice on how to be healthy, while kids and parents around the country share how they're coping with disruption. “I feel like right now, kids' questions and worries might be getting overlooked,” the 'Frozen' star said in explaining why she participated. “I wanted kids to feel empowered to ask questions, and create a place where they are heard.” Children need and deserve that, Bell said in an email to The Associated Press after taping '#KidsTogether: The Nickelodeon Town Hall' on Thursday. “I hope people see that kids' worries are just as important as every adults, and I hope people encourage their kids to ask vulnerable questions, and take their ideas of how to help seriously,” Bell said. “Some of these kids are getting some amazing work done helping people in their community!” Josh Gad, Kel Mitchell, Kenan Thompson, Charli D'Amelio and Russell and Ciara Wilson make appearances. Other celebrities contribute home videos, including YouTube personality Emma Chamberlin’s how-to on having housebound fun with your pet. Music artists JoJo Siwa and DJ Khaled also took part, Nickelodeon said. “With families everywhere focused on staying healthy and essentially every kid out of school, we immediately understood this is the time to act quickly and be there for the audience in a way that can hopefully help them better cope with what’s going on,” said Brian Robbins, ViacomCBS’ head of kids and family content. For most people, the new coronavirus causes mild or moderate symptoms, such as fever and cough that clear up in two to three weeks. For some, especially older adults and people with existing health problems, it can cause more severe illness, including pneumonia and death. The special, also showing on TeenNick and Nicktoons, is part of the #KidsTogether initiative that launched this month and enlists familiar Nick faces to help people stay healthy and active. SpongeBob SquarePants, for instance, demonstrates effective hand-washing and social distancing in videos shown on Nickelodeon’s cable and digital platforms. ___ Online: #KidsTogether: http://www.nickhelps.com/ ___ Lynn Elber can be reached on Twitter at http://twitter.com/lynnelber.
  • From finding ways to help others cope to sheltering in place to canceling events, here’s a look at some of the ways the entertainment industry is reacting to the spread of the coronavirus, which most people recover from but can cause severe illness in the elderly and those with preexisting medical conditions. TODAY SHOW'S KOTB BREAKS DOWN AFTER SEGMENT Hoda Kotb's emotions got the better of her on the “Today' show Friday as she concluded a segment with New Orleans Saints quarterback Drew Brees, who is donating money to help with the outbreak of coronavirus there. “Drew, we love ya,” Kotb said. Then she dissolved in tears, and co-anchor Savannah Guthrie jumped in to take over. Kotb was a news anchor and reporter at the CBS affiliate in New Orleans during the 1990s. “Hoda, I'm so sorry, hon,” Guthrie said. “I know where your heart is.” DISNEY RESORTS TO STAY CLOSED The Walt Disney Co. is indefinitely extending closures at its theme park resorts in Florida and California because of the coronavirus pandemic. The company had closed Disneyland in Southern California and Disney World outside Orlando in mid-March with plans to reopen at the start of April, but Disney said Friday the resorts would remain closed until further notice. It cited directions given by health and government officials. The company has been paying its employees during the closure, and Disney said it would continue to pay its tens of thousands of hourly workers through April 18. ‘BABY SHARK' CHALLENGE: WASH YOUR HANDS, DOO DOO Sorry parents, ‘Baby Shark’ is making a comeback — for a good cause. Pinkfong's 'Baby Shark' — that jingle earworm that every toddler seems to know — has been reworked to teach good hygiene to combat COVID-19. The company has debuted the 'Wash Your Hands With Baby Shark' video and started a dance challenge to encourage families to upload videos of their children washing hands to the song. “Wash your hands/doo doo doo doo doo/Wash your hands,” go the new lyrics. “Grab some soap/doo doo doo doo doo/Grab some soap.” Videos are tagged with #BabySharkHandWashChallenge. Pinkfong uploaded its original version of “Baby Shark” with an accompanying dance and colorful cartoon video to YouTube in June 2016. It has now been viewed over 4.6 billion times, making it one of YouTube’s top five watched videos of all time. EMMY SEASON ADJUSTS TO VIRUS SCRAMBLE The Television Academy has adjusted its calendar ahead of the Emmy Awards following disruption from the coronavirus. According to the calendar, June 5 will be the new entry deadline, nominations will be voted on from July 2-13 and nominations will be announced July 28. Final voting will take place from Aug. 21-31. There is also modification of the hanging episode rule for series and limited series. But the academy stressed that there are no changes to the Sept. 20 Emmy telecast or the Sept. 12 and Sept. 13 Creative Arts Emmy ceremonies.
  • All of the so-called “Big Five” publishers have dropped out of BookExpo, the industry's annual national convention. Hachette Book Group and Macmillan became the fourth and fifth to announce they would not attend the July gathering and the fan-based BookCon which immediately follows. 'With the impact of the coronavirus still an unknown, Hachette Book Group has decided to withdraw our participation in Book Expo and BookCon 2020 in the interest of the health and well-being of our employees and authors,' according to a statement Thursday from the publisher. “We’ll miss having the opportunity to engage with booksellers, librarians, and readers but are committed to finding new ways to connect these audiences with our books and authors.” Penguin Random House, HarperCollins Publishers and Simon & Schuster had already canceled even as the convention's organizer, ReedPOP, postponed BookExpo and BookCon from May to July. In a statement Thursday, show manager Jenny Martin said the gatherings, which traditionally attract tens of thousands, were still planned. The events are to be held at the Jacob Javits Convention Center, which New York state has converted to a medical facility. “No one is operating business as usual because business is not usual,” Martin said. “Our customers know the door is open and the dialogue will continue now through July about how we come together as an industry and survive this.
  • Richard Reeves, an author and syndicated columnist who wrote about politics for more than 50 years and published books on Richard Nixon, John F. Kennedy and other American presidents, has died at age 83. Reeves son' Jeffrey Reeves told The Associated Press that his father died Wednesday in Los Angeles and had been in failing health. Reeves was a New York City native who worked as a journalist for much of the 1960s, including several years with The New York Times. He released his first book, on then-President Gerald Ford, in 1975, and four years later began a weekly column that was syndicated for decades. He became a frequent commentator on PBS and even appeared on the “Tonight Show' with Johnny Carson. His point of view was clear. He opposed the Iraq War, faulted President Ronald Reagan for favoring the rich and wrote in a 2004 column: “I am always amazed when I get letters, many of them, accusing me of being a 'liberal' or, a lot worse, an 'elitist.' Yes, I am. Hello!” His other books included 'President Kennedy: Profile of Power,' “President Nixon: Alone in the White House” and “What The People Know: Freedom and the Press.” His most recent publication was “Infamy: The Shocking Story of the Japanese American Internment in World War II,” which came out in 2015. Reeves was married twice, and had five children.