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    Christian Bale remembers hunkering down in front of a television set with his father to watch Formula One races, back in the glory days of Alain Prost, Jacques Laffite and Nelson Piquet. They even went to Brands Hatch before F1 left the circuit near Kent, England. So the actor who's been behind the wheel of the Batmobile read a script about the infamous 1966 showdown between Ford and Ferrari at Le Mans, the racing aficionado jumped onboard. And when Matt Damon learned that Bale was already circling the project, the actor — no stranger to high-speed car chases from his Jason Bourne films — likewise jumped at the opportunity. The result is 'Ford v Ferrari,' a film that comes out later this year focusing not only on the American manufacturers' unlikely upset of the Italian juggernaut but on those who made it happen. Bale portrays Ken Miles, an engineer and driver, and Damon plays Carroll Shelby, one of the most famous American car builders in history. Together, they took the financial backing of Ford and created the GT40, a car that not only conquered Le Mans but swept the 1966 podium. 'Racing is not just about oil and gasoline. It's about blood and sweat as well as the people inside those cars as well, and that's what makes it so thrilling,' Bale said Saturday at Indianapolis Motor Speedway, where he will join Damon in waving the green flag for the Indy 500. 'Ken Miles was a purist,' Bale said. 'He's someone that would try to win every single battle but often lose the war, and he'd shoot himself in the foot again and again and again. And it wasn't until Shelby came along and gave him an opportunity that he finally made it on the world stage.' While Miles was the British-born driver with the sardonic sense of humor, Shelby was essentially his foil: a down-to-earth Texan who had a successful driving career of his own before reaching iconic status as the creator of the Shelby Cobra, a series of Ford muscle cars and, yes, the GT40. His relationship with Miles serves as the centerpiece of Ford's dogged pursuit of Ferrari. 'He was a really, kind of a bigger-than-life guy,' said Damon, 'but I didn't know this story about their friendship, and that's why I wanted to do the movie. It's such a great underdog story.' The story, the subject of a 2016 documentary entitled 'The 24 Hour War,' began in the early 1960s, when Enzo Ferrari expressed interest in selling his company. Henry Ford II spent considerable resources doing background work on a potential deal, only for Ferrari to suddenly shut down negotiations. That chapped Ford, who ordered his racing division to build a car to beat Ferrari, the Italian sports car company that had come to dominate endurance racing. But despite pumping untold sums of money into its program, Ford kept running into problems with its project. So it ultimately turned it over to Shelby, who in turn sought out Miles, and together they not only got the program on track but also got it to victory lane in their first try at Le Mans. 'There's that relationship, right? And the friction in that relationship. They're opposites in so many ways,' Damon said. 'But they have the qualities the other needs. Carroll was great about politics and diplomacy. He could sell you anything. He understand that was a big part of putting a winning team on the grid, was the politics of it. Whereas Miles was horrible at that stuff.' The film, directed by James Mangold, went through several rewrites before Bale and Damon signed onto the project. It was filmed primarily in California, but Bale said the group went to Le Mans for some of the local scenes, and he even took a course at Bob Bondurant's racing school. Walt Disney Studios is due to release it Nov. 15 under the 20th Century Fox banner. Meanwhile, its leading men are preparing to wave the green flag over the 103rd running of the Indy 500 on Sunday. Other famous actors have had the honor, including Jack Nicholson, who famously refused to come down from the flag stand and wound up watching more than 30 laps up there. It's the first time either of them will witness the pageantry of the Indy 500 in person. 'I've heard about it. Read about it. Watched it on TV,' Damon said. 'This is bigger than anything we do in the country sports-wise, and we're going to be right in the thick of it.' ___ More AP auto racing: https://apnews.com/apf-AutoRacing and https://twitter.com/AP_Sports
  • Elle Fanning, the youngest juror ever at the Cannes Film Festival, said she's been transformed by her experience at the French festival. The 21-year-old actresses' jury service came to an end Saturday with the Cannes closing ceremony. She wanted the festival to keep going. 'I didn't know how I would come out of this experience. I do feel like I see films in a different way. I learned so much,' Fanning said after the ceremony. 'I will never forget these ten days. I don't want it to be over.' Fanning was part of the nine-person jury that elected Bong Joon-ho's 'Parasite' the Palme d'Or winner. Mexican director Alejandro Inarritu, president of the jury, praised Fanning for bringing a younger perspective to the jury. 'Having Elle in the jury was a gift,' said Inarritu. 'Elle is an old soul in a way. She has been doing films forever. But to have the fresh ideas, it really grounded us.' 'We saw it through her young eyes,' he added. 'We learned a lot from her too.' Throughout the French film festival, Fanning was one of the standouts of the red carpet, regularly drawing praise for her glamorous and varied looks. The only downside of her Cannes may have been when she collapsed at the Chopard Trophee dinner on Monday. She later posted on Instagram a thumbs-up photo and said she had fainted because her Prada gown was too tight.
  • A former business manager of Stan Lee was arrested Saturday on elder abuse charges involving the late comic book legend. Keya Morgan was taken into custody in Arizona on an outstanding arrest warrant after being charged by Los Angeles County prosecutors earlier this month. Morgan faces felony charges including theft, embezzlement, forgery or fraud against an elder adult, and false imprisonment of an elder adult. A misdemeanor count also alleges elder abuse. Authorities say Morgan sought to capitalize on the Marvel Comic mastermind's wealth and exert influence over Lee even though he had no authority to act on his behalf. Police say Morgan pocketed more than $262,000 from autograph signing sessions Lee did in May 2018. Authorities say Morgan at one point also took Lee from his Hollywood Hills home to a Beverly Hills condominium 'where Morgan had more control over Lee.' Lee's daughter said in a request for a restraining order last year that Morgan was manipulating the mentally declining Lee, preventing him from seeing family and friends, and trying to take control of his money and business affairs. Attorney Alex Kessel has said Morgan has never abused or taken advantage of Lee. Kessel said in an email on Saturday that he had been in contact with prosecutors to arrange for Morgan to surrender on Tuesday. 'It is unfortunate that the DA and police did not honor our commitment to surrender next week and arrested him,' Kessel said in an email. Lee died in November at the age of 95. Morgan's bail has been set at $300,000. He will eventually be extradited to Los Angeles to face the charges.
  • The Latest on the Cannes Film Festival (all times local): 8:25 p.m. South Korean director Bong Joon-ho's social satire 'Parasite,' about a poor family of hustlers who find jobs with a wealthy family, has won the Cannes Film Festival's top award, the Palme d'Or. The win for 'Parasite' marks the first Korean film to ever win the Palme. The awards were handed out in a ceremony Saturday after being chosen by a jury presided over by filmmaker Alejandro Inarritu. The festival's second place award, the Grand Prize, went to French-Senegalese director Mati Diop's 'Atlantics.' Diop was the first black female director in competition at Cannes. Best actor went to Antonio Banderas for Pedro Almodovar's 'Pain and Glory' and best actress went to Emily Beecham of Britain for 'Little Joe.' Belgian brothers Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne won best director for 'Young Ahmed.' ___ 8 a.m. History could be made when the top award of the Cannes Film Festival, the Palme d'Or, is handed out Saturday night. The Palme d'Or is decided by a nine-person jury, headed this year by the filmmaker Alejandro Inarritu. Their deliberations are done in secret but milestone victories could occur if some of the festival's most acclaimed films were to win. If French director Celine Sciamma's period love story 'Portrait of a Lady on Fire' won, it would be the first time a female filmmaker has won the Palme d'Or outright. Pedro Almodovar could make personal history by winning the Palme for 'Pain and Glory.' Though he's been one of Europe's pre-eminent filmmakers for decades, the 69-year-old Spanish director has never won Cannes' top award despite being in the running five times before. Also in the mix is Bong Joon-ho's class satire 'Parasite,' about a poor family of hustlers who find jobs with a wealthy family. A win for 'Parasite' would mark the first Korean film to ever win the Palme d'Or. ___ Follow AP Film Writer Jake Coyle on Twitter at: http://twitter.com/jakecoyleAP
  • A Wisconsin judge has ordered Anheuser-Busch to stop suggesting in advertising that MillerCoors' light beers contain corn syrup, wading into a fight between two beer giants that are losing market share to small independent brewers. U.S. District Judge William Conley for the Western District of Wisconsin on Friday granted a preliminary injunction sought by MillerCoors that temporarily stops Anheuser-Busch from using the words 'corn syrup' in ads without giving more context. MillerCoors sued its rival in March, saying St. Louis-based Anheuser-Busch has spent as much as $30 million on a 'false and misleading' campaign, including $13 million in its first commercials during this year's Super Bowl. However, the ruling did not affect all of Anheuser-Busch's advertising targeting MillerCoors, allowing the commercials that premiered at the Super Bowl to keep airing. Anheuser-Busch's ad drew a rebuke from the National Corn Growers Association, which thanked MillerCoors for its support. In its lawsuit, MillerCoors said it's 'not ashamed of its use of corn syrup as a fermentation aid.' Corn syrup is used by several brewers during fermentation. During that process, corn syrup is broken down and consumed by yeast so that none of it remains in the final product. Bud Light is brewed with rice instead of corn syrup, but Anheuser-Busch uses corn syrup in some of its other beverages, including Stella Artois Cidre and Busch Light beer. MillerCoors applauded the ruling and said Anheuser-Busch should be trying to grow the beer market, not 'destroy it through deceptive advertising.' 'We are pleased with today's ruling that will force Anheuser-Busch to change or remove advertisements that were clearly designed to mislead the American public,' said MillerCoors CEO Gavin Hattersley. Anheuser Busch, however, called the ruling a 'victory for consumers' because it allows the brand's 'Special Delivery' Super Bowl ad to continue airing. That ad showed a medieval caravan pushing a huge barrel of corn syrup to castles for MillerCoors to make Miller Lite and Coors Light. The commercial states that Bud Light isn't brewed with corn syrup. Anheuser Busch said the ad would air as early as this weekend. 'As the number one selling beer in the U.S., Bud Light remains committed to leading the alcohol industry by providing more transparency for consumers including letting them know about the ingredients that are used to brew their beer,' said Cesar Vargas, Anheuser-Busch vice president of legal and corporate affairs. Judge Conley ordered Anheuser Busch to temporarily stop using advertisements that mention corn syrup without references to 'brewed with,' ''made with' or 'uses,' or that describe corn syrup as an ingredient in the finished products. The ruling affects two Bud Light commercials and billboards that describe Bud Light as containing '100 percent less corn syrup' than Miller Lite and Coors Light. Anheuser Busch said those ads are no longer up and the company had no plans to continue using them. Judge Conley also denied an Anheuser Busch motion to dismiss the case, saying it was likely to succeed in proving misleading statements and some harm to the reputation of MillerCoors. Chicago-based MillerCoors and Anheuser-Busch have the biggest U.S. market share at 24.8 percent and 41.6 percent, respectively, but they've been losing business in recent years to smaller independent brewers, imports, and wine and spirits, according to the Brewers Association. MillerCoors maintains Anheuser-Busch is preying on health conscious consumers who have negative connotations of corn syrup, sometimes confusing it with the high-fructose corn syrup in sodas. The feud threatens to disrupt an alliance between the two companies to work on a campaign to promote the beer industry amid declining sales.
  • South Korean director Bong Joon-ho's raucous social satire 'Parasite,' about a poor family of hustlers who find jobs with a wealthy family, won the Cannes Film Festival's top award, the Palme d'Or, on Saturday. The win for 'Parasite' marks the first Korean film to ever win the Palme. In the festival's closing ceremony, jury president Alejandro Inarritu said the choice had been 'unanimous' for the nine-person jury. The genre-mixing film, Bong's seventh, had arguably been celebrated more than others at Cannes this year, hailed by critics as the best yet from the 49-year-old director of 'Snowpiercer' and 'Okja.' 'It's the 100th anniversary of the cinema in Korea this year. To celebrate the 100th anniversary of the Korean cinema, I think the Cannes Film Festival has offered me a very great gift,' Bong told reporters after the ceremony. It was the second straight Palme victory for an Asian director. Last year, the award went to Japanese filmmaker Hirokazu Kore-eda's 'Shoplifters,' also a compassionate parable about an impoverished family. 'We shared the mystery of the unexpected way this film took us through different genres, speaking in a funny, humorous and tender way of no judgement of something so relevant and urgent and so global,' Inarritu told reporters after the ceremony. Many of the awards on Saturday were given to social and political stories that depicted geopolitical dramas in localized tales, from African shores to Paris suburbs. The festival's second place award, the Grand Prize, went to French-Senegalese director Mati Diop's feature-film debut, 'Atlantics.' The film by Diop, the first black female director ever in competition in Cannes, views the migrant crisis from the perspective of Senegalese women left behind after many young men flee by sea to Spain. Sylvester Stallone presented the honor. Although few quibbled with the choice of 'Parasite,' some had expected Cannes to make history by giving the Palme to a female filmmaker for just the second time. Celine Sciamma's period romance 'Portrait of a Lady on Fire' was the Palme pick for many critics this year. Instead, Sciamma ended up with best screenplay. In the festival's 72-year history, only Jane Campion has won the prize in 1993 for 'The Piano,' tying with Chen Kaige's 'Farewell My Concubine.' Best actor went to Antonio Banderas for Pedro Almodovar's reflective drama 'Pain and Glory.' In the film, one of the most broadly acclaimed of the festival, Banderas plays a fictionalized version of Almodovar looking back on his life and career. 'The best is still to come,' said Banderas, accepting the award. The Belgian brothers Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne, who have already twice won the Palme d'Or, took the best director prize for 'Young Ahmed,' their portrait of Muslim teenager who becomes radicalized by a fundamentalist imam. The third-place jury prize, presented by Michael Moore, was split between two socially conscious thrillers: The French director Ladj Ly's feature-film debut 'Les Miserables' and Brazilian director Kleber Mendonça Filho's 'Bacurau.' Ly has called his film an alarm bell about youths living in the housing projects of Paris' suburbs. Filho viewed his feverish, violent Western about a rural Brazilian community defending itself from a hard-to-comprehend invasion as a reflection of President Jair Bolsonaro's Brazil. British actress Emily Beecham won best actress for her performance in Jessica Hausner's science-fiction drama 'Little Joe.' The jury also gave a special mention to Palestinian director Elia Suleiman's 'It Must Be Heaven.' The Camera d'Or, an award given for best first feature from across all of Cannes' sections, went to César Díaz's 'Our Mothers,' a drama about the Guatemalan civil war in the 1980s. The ceremony Saturday brought to a close a Cannes Film Festival riven by concerns for its own relevancy. It had to contend, most formidably, with the cultural force of 'Game of Thrones,' which concluded during the festival. The continuing rise of streaming was also a constant subject around Cannes. Two years ago, Bong was in Cannes' competition with 'Okja,' a movie distributed in North America by Netflix. After it and Noah Baumbach's 'The Meyerowitz Stories' — another Netflix release — premiered at Cannes, the festival ruled that all future films in competition needed French theatrical distribution. Netflix has since withdrawn from the festival on the French Riviera. (Indie distributor Neon will open Bong's 'Parasite' in North American theaters later this year.) Bowing to pressure from 5050x2020, the French version of Time's Up, the festival this year released gender breakdowns of its submissions and selections. Cannes said about 27% of its official selections were directed by women. The 21-film main slate included four films directed by women, which tied the festival's previous high. Cannes had its share of red-carpet dazzle, too. Elton John brought his biopic 'Rocketman' to the festival, joining star Taron Egerton for a beachside duet after the premiere. And Quentin Tarantino unveiled his 1960s Los Angeles tale 'Once Upon a Time ... in Hollywood,' with Brad Pitt and Leonardo DiCaprio, 25 years after the director's 'Pulp Fiction' won the Palme d'Or. Tarantino, who attended the closing ceremony, didn't go home empty handed. On Friday, a prominent pooch in his film won the annual Palme Dog, an award given by critics to Cannes' best canine. ___ Follow AP Film Writer Jake Coyle at: http://twitter.com/jakecoyleAP
  • Professional gambler James Holzhauer continues to beat the odds on “Jeopardy!” >> Read more trending news  The 34-year-old became the second contestant in the television game show’s history to top $2 million in winnings, earning $74,000 in an episode that aired Friday night to win for the 27th consecutive time, The New York Times reported. Holzhauer is still $455,000 behind all-time earnings champion Ken Jennings, who cashed in with $2,520,700 during a 74-game winning streak in 2004. But Holzhauer is quickly closing in. Holzhauer now has $2,065,535 in total winnings, People reported. Holzhauer, who entered Final Jeopardy with $39,400, wagered $35,000 of it and answered “What is Sun Valley?” after the final clue -- “Astronomy buffs visit Idaho for the USA’s first Dark Sky Reserve. Oddly, part of it is this resort area with a bright name.” >> Blackjack: Pro gambler James Holzhauer wins 21st straight game on ‘Jeopardy!’ Holzhauer uses a method called the “Forrest Bounce,” in which he chooses tiles out of order and goes for the higher cash values early, CNN reported. Holzhauer is averaging $76,500 per episode, the Times reported. At that rate, Holzhauer would top Jennings’s earnings in six more episodes. If Holzhauer matched Jennings’ streak of 74 games and continues his current average of cash won, he would win more than $5,6 million, the newspaper reported. His next game will be aired Monday, CNN reported.
  • The Botswanan government has enlisted a public relations firm with deep ties to Hollywood to push back against the bad publicity generated by the southern African nation's decision to lift its ban on elephant hunting. 42 West, a firm mostly known for its work with celebrities and the film industry, notified the U.S. Justice Department last week that it will be working with Botswana's tourism ministry, according to a filing made under the Foreign Agents Registration Act. The firm will be paid $125,000 over the next two months — with the possibility of more work to come — for developing talking points and a communications plan that 'articulates Botswana's policy on elephant hunting' that will be delivered to 'key U.S. and other Western audiences,' according to its filing. That puts 42 West in an awkward spot. Big-game hunting is a deeply divisive issue, particularly in Hollywood, and numerous celebrity activists have spoken out against killing the world's largest land mammal for sport, including some calls for a tourism boycott of Botswana. Among the firm's clients is actress Meryl Streep, who has been a vocal opponent of the sale and importation of ivory, which in 2014 she called a 'product of horrific cruelty to elephants, who could very well become extinct within decades if we don't act now.' Allan Mayer, a principal with 42 West who is leading the effort, declined to comment on Friday. Streep publicist Leslee Dart, a 42 West co-CEO who is named in the filing, did not immediately respond to a request for comment. Botswana has been a relatively safe refuge for elephants on a continent where illegal poaching and habitat loss has sent their numbers into sharp decline. The country is home to an estimated 130,000 African elephants — about a third of all that remain. After its initial announcement on Thursday was met with social media blowback, the Botswanan government clarified on Friday that it plans to issue no more than 400 elephant hunting permits per year. Elephant hunting is already legal in Namibia, Zimbabwe, Zambia and South Africa. With a population of just over 2 million people, Botswana has more space than some of its more densely populated neighbors for elephant herds to roam. Still, the government said there have been a growing number of conflicts between elephants and humans — especially farmers. Groups lobbying in favor of trophy hunting, such as U.S.-based Safari Club International, have long argued that the fees paid by well-heeled American and European hunters provide essential revenue for cash-strapped African governments to fund anti-poaching and conservation programs. A licensed two-week elephant hunting safari can cost more than $50,000 per person, not including airfare, according to advertised rates. The African elephant has been classified as threatened under the U.S. Endangered Species Act since 1978. Though President Donald Trump has decried big-game hunting on Twitter as a 'horror show,' his administration has reversed Obama-era restrictions on the importation of elephant trophies from Zimbabwe and Zambia. Elephants have long been hunted for their hides and tusks, either for taxidermy trophies or ivory used for carving and jewelry making. Botswana's hunting ban was put in place under a previous president, Ian Khama, an outspoken conservationist. But the current president, Mokgweeti Masisi, has advocated for reopening the nation to hunting, and the decision to lift the ban comes ahead of general elections in October. Masisi raised eyebrows earlier this month when he gave stools made of elephant feet to regional leaders while hosting a meeting on the animals' fate. The American talk show host Ellen DeGeneres tweeted Tuesday: 'President Masisi, for every person who wants to kill elephants, there are millions who want them protected. We're watching. #BeKindToElephants.' ___ Associated Press writer Cara Anna contributed to this report from Johannesburg, South Africa. ___ Follow Slodysko at http://twitter.com/brianslodysko and Biesecker at http://twitter.com/mbieseck
  • The publisher of Naomi Wolf says it is discussing possible corrections in her new book after an interviewer challenged some of her conclusions. Wolf's 'Outrages: Sex, Censorship, and the Criminalization of Love,' coming out from Houghton Mifflin Harcourt next month, describes severe punishment for gays in the 19th century. But her contention that dozens in England were executed under sodomy law was questioned during a recent BBC conversation with historian Matthew Sweet, author of 'Inventing the Victorians.' Sweet noted that sodomy laws didn't only refer to gays, but also to the abuse of children. He also pointed out that Wolf had misinterpreted the term 'death recorded,' which the author had assumed meant the accused was executed. 'Death recorded' meant the sentence was documented, but not carried out. In a statement Friday, Wolf's publisher said that 'While HMH employs professional editors, copyeditors, and proofreaders for each book project, we rely ultimately on authors for the integrity of their research and fact-checking. Despite this unfortunate error we believe the overall thesis of the book 'Outrages' still holds. We are discussing corrections with the author.' Publishers rarely fact-check books, citing time and expense. Wolf is known for best-sellers such as 'The Beauty Myth' and 'Misconceptions.' She responded on the air to Sweet by saying he had made an 'important point' and later tweeted that she had fixed passages referring, erroneously, to two men being executed. She has also defended herself on Twitter, linking to a 1978 article in The Historical Journal that refers to over 50 executions in Britain under sodomy law in the early 19th century. (The author of that piece, A.D. Harvey, later became notorious for fabricating a meeting between Dickens and Dostoevsky). As of midday Friday, Sweet had not responded, but in an earlier tweet praised her for being 'generous enough to revisit her research.
  • Old Town Road' is coming to the Stanley Cup Final. Lil Nas X will perform the top song in the world Monday in Boston as part of the pregame festivities before the series between the Bruins and St. Louis Blues gets underway. The NHL announced Friday Lil Nas X and country singer Chase Rice as the artists who will play at Boston's City Hall Plaza before Game 1. 'The place is going to go berserk, I'm pretty sure,' NHL chief content officer and executive vice president Steve Mayer said. 'Everybody knows the song. The song is played in all our arenas, and the reaction to the song has been just incredible.' 'Old Town Road' has spent seven weeks as the top song on the Billboard Hot 100 chart. Mayer said the artist's representatives reached out several months ago to promote the song for in-arena use, which led to the league getting him for the final. Rice, whose song 'Eyes On You' peaked at No. 3 on the country music chart, will open the musical act part of the show around 6 p.m. The game starts at 8 p.m. A longtime hockey fan, Rice performed during player introductions at the NHL All-Star Skills Competition in Tampa last year. Mayer said Lil Nas X's manager is a 25-year New York Rangers season ticket holder and that the rapper will wear a Bruins jersey on stage and attend the game. 'Just to have him in the building for a Stanley Cup Final, I think he'll fall in love,' Mayer said. 'If you're going to see your first hockey game, that's a pretty good game to go to.' When the series shifts to St. Louis for Game 3 on June 1, Mayer said, the NHL is planning an outdoor sing-along of Laura Branigan's 'Gloria,' which has become the Blues' victory song. St. Louis native and former contestant on 'The Voice' Kennedy Holmes will lead it at 5:49 p.m. — a time specially picked because it's the Blues' first trip to the Stanley Cup Final in 49 years. Grammy Award-winning R&B artist Gary Clark Jr. is set to be among the performers in St. Louis, with other NHL announcements to come. Mayer said five blocks of Market Street between the arena at the Gateway Arch will be closed and local officials estimate a crowd of at least 20,000 before the first Cup Final game in the city since 1970. ___ Follow AP Hockey Writer Stephen Whyno on Twitter at https://twitter.com/SWhyno ___ More AP NHL: https://apnews.com/NHL and https://twitter.com/AP_Sports