On Air Now

Listen Now

Weather

heavy-rain-night
66°
Cloudy
H 69° L 64°
  • heavy-rain-night
    66°
    Current Conditions
    Cloudy. H 69° L 64°
  • cloudy-day
    65°
    Morning
    Cloudy. H 69° L 64°
  • partly-cloudy-tstorms-day
    73°
    Afternoon
    Sct Thunderstorms. H 73° L 45°
Listen
Pause
Error

The latest top stories

00:00 | 00:00

Listen
Pause
Error

The latest traffic report

00:00 | 00:00

Listen
Pause
Error

The latest forecast

00:00 | 00:00

Entertainment

    Disney CEO Bob Iger, who steered the company through successful purchases of Star Wars, Marvel and Fox's entertainment businesses and the launch of a Netflix challenger, is stepping down immediately, the company said in a surprise announcement Tuesday. The Walt Disney Co. named as his replacement Bob Chapek, most recently chairman of Disney's parks, experiences and products business. Iger will remain executive chairman through the end of his contract Dec. 31, 2021. 'I will continue to conduct the company's creative endeavors while also leading the board,' Iger said on a conference call with reporters and analysts. His most recent coup was orchestrating a $71 billion acquisition of Fox's entertainment assets and launching the Disney Plus streaming service in November. That service gained nearly 29 million paid subscribers in less than three months. Iger said he wanted to focus on the creative side of the business after getting those assets and strategies in place. He said he could not do that while running Disney on a day-to-day basis. “It was not accelerated for any partiucalr reason other than I felt the need was now to make this change,' he said. 'Did not see this coming -- Wowza,' tweeted LightShed media analyst Rich Greenfield. Iger became chief executive of Disney in 2005 after a shareholder revolt by Roy E. Disney led to the ouster of longtime chief Michael Eisner. Iger steered Disney through successful acquisitions of Lucasfilms, Marvel, Pixar and other brands that became big moneymakers for Disney. Iger, a former weatherman, joined broadcaster ABC in 1974, 22 years before Disney bought the network. At ABC, Iger developed such successful programs as “Home Improvement,” “The Drew Carey Show,” and “America’s Funniest Home Videos” and was instrumental in launching the quiz show “Who Wants to Be a Millionaire.” He was also criticized for cancelling well-regarded but expensive shows such as “Twin Peaks,” “China Beach,” and “thirtysomething.” Iger, 69, was the second-highest paid CEO in 2018, as calculated by The Associated Press and Equilar, an executive data firm. He earned $65.6 million. The top earner was Discovery's David Zaslav who earned $129.5 million. Susan Arnold, the independent lead director of the Disney board said succession planning had been ongoing for several years. Chapek, 60, is only the seventh CEO in Disney history. Chapek was head of the parks, experiences and products division since it was created in 2018. He was previously head of parks and resorts and before that president of consumer products.
  • Works of fiction by Ben Lerner and Zadie Smith and an exploration of why women join the Islamic State group are among eight books contending for Britain’s Rathbones Folio Prize for literature. Lerner’s 1990s-set novel “The Topeka School” and Smith’s eclectic book of short stories “Grand Union” are on the shortlist for the multi-genre 30,000 pound ($39,000) prize, which was announced Tuesday. American-Iranian writer Azadeh Moaveni’s book about women drawn to ISIS, “Guest House for Young Widows” is also in the running, as is U.K. writer Laura Cumming’s family-secrets memoir “On Chapel Sands.” The list also includes British poet Fiona Benson’s “Vertigo & Ghost”; British author James Lasdun’s pair of novellas, “Victory”; Irish writer Sinead Gleeson’s collection of essays about women's bodies, “Constellations”; and Mexican writer Valeria Luiselli’s American road-trip novel “Lost Children Archive.” The winner, chosen by a jury of three other writers, will be announced March 23. Founded in 2013 to rival the prestigious Booker Prize, the Folio is open to fiction, nonfiction and poetry published in Britain.
  • Spain's Constitutional Court on Tuesday overturned a previous verdict that found a rapper guilty of exalting terrorism and humiliating victims of attacks in tweets. César Montana Lehmann of the Def Con Dos rock band had been sentenced to one year in prison by the country's Supreme Court for a series of tweets in 2013 and 2014 in which he talked about sending a cake bomb to former King Juan Carlos I on his birthday and said that some politicians made him long for a former armed leftist group. The singer, whose stage name is César Strawberry, was also banned from holding any public position for more than six years. The Constitutional Court said Tuesday that the guilty ruling violated the singer's free speech rights. Amnesty International and other rights groups had campaigned on Montana's behalf.
  • “Consent, Consent, Consent” flashed the neon set lights at Dior's latest ready-to-wear show in Paris. It signaled that the house's first ever female designer, Maria Grazia Chiuri, would continue to explore her touchstone of feminism for her fall-winter 2020 designs. The set, the fruit of a collaboration with artist Claire Fontaine, made a strong impact on VIP guests — including actress Sigourney Weaver and singer Carla Bruni. Some paused for thought, especially as the show was delayed, in discussions of the #MeToo era and its influence on art — one day after Harvey Weinstein was convicted of rape and sexual assault and led off to prison in handcuffs. The designs themselves cleverly riffed off the empowerment idea at the start: Such as the Dior signature bar jacket, re-imagined as ribbed and angular, and twinned with a men's shirt and business tie on a female model with a short pixie hairstyle. It was the show's strongest fashion statement. The feminist and androgynous musing sadly faded quickly in the 84-look show, suggesting that for Chiuri it was more of a marketing gimmick than a developed creative idea. The rest of the show featured diverse silhouettes that delved in and out of the rich Dior archives — checks, polka dots, knitwear in jackets, shirts and pants — with varying degrees of success. A 1970s boho vibe was captured with a leitmotif of the printed silk headscarves. The checks, which evoked Dior's longtime head Marc Bohan and designer during that retro era, appeared in beige and occasionally in a total look style. At times, twinned with fringing, it unfortunately did not look far off a luxury table cloth. Sandal flats, meanwhile, brought this ready-to-wear collection firmly down to earth. A reminder of the worries of daily life was enclosed in the program notes. While none of the fashion insiders, bar one, seemed to be wearing a mask against the new coronavirus that had shaken Milan Fashion Week, Dior wrote that “all our thoughts are with our teams, clients, friends and partners in Asia, Italy, around the world.”
  • A hospitalized Harvey Weinstein was “upbeat” and “energized” about appealing his sexual assault and rape conviction, one of his lawyers said Tuesday as one of Weinstein's accusers said the verdict made her feel grateful to be “heard and believed.” Weinstein remained in a jail unit at Bellevue Hospital, where he was taken after the verdict Monday to be checked out for heart palpitations and high blood pressure. Attorney Arthur Aidala on Tuesday called the hospitalization “a precautionary measure to take him here and make sure his vitals and everything were OK” and said it wasn't clear how long Weinstein would be at Bellevue. After Monday's verdict, he had been destined for jail to await sentencing, set for March 11. In the meantime, Weinstein greeted his lawyer, unhandcuffed, in a large hospital room with jail officers outside and was looking forward to visitors, Aidala said. “He’s in pretty good spirits. He’s energized,' the attorney told reporters. He said the 67-year-old former Hollywood studio boss was insisting on his innocence and “somewhat flabbergasted by the verdict,” but determined to fight on. “There is a portion of him where he’s just scratching his head and he doesn’t know how this happened, but he’s cautiously optimistic” about prevailing on appeal, Aidala said. His remarks came after Mimi Haleyi, a former production assistant who accused Weinstein of forcing oral sex on her in 2006, called the verdict “a huge relief.' “I just think that we’re being educated about the reality of sexual assault and sexual assault victims,” Haleyi said on “CBS This Morning.” “It’s not always just a stranger. It’s very often somebody that the person knows, and with that comes an entire other layer of processing,' she said. “Whatever the verdict had been, it wouldn’t have changed what happened to me, but obviously it was terrifying to think that I wouldn’t be believed,” she added later on MSNBC. Weinstein faces a possible sentence of five to 29 years after a Manhattan jury convicted him of sexually assaulting Haleyi and raping an aspiring actress in 2013. He was acquitted of first-degree rape and two counts of predatory sexual assault. Weinstein has maintained that any sex between him and his accusers was consensual. Asked about Weinstein on Tuesday, President Donald Trump called the disgraced producer's conviction a “great victory” for women that “sends a very strong message.' 'He was a person I didn't like,' Trump told reporters during a news conference in India. “The people that liked him were the Democrats. Michelle Obama loved him. Loved him. Hillary Clinton loved him.” Trump himself stands accused of sexual misconduct, including a rape allegation, by more than a dozen women when he was a private citizen. He has denied the allegations and has not been charged in any of the alleged sexual assaults. The Associated Press does not typically identify people who say they are victims of sex crimes unless they grant permission, as Haleyi did.
  • Books on Silicon Valley, the criminal justice system and the 2015 massacre at the Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in South Carolina are among the finalists for the J. Anthony Lukas Book Prize. The $10,000 award, announced Tuesday by the Columbia Journalism School and the Nieman Foundation for Journalism at Harvard University, is named for the late author and investigative journalist. The nominees are Jennifer Berry Hawes' “Grace Will Lead Us Home: The Charleston Church Massacre and the Hard, Inspiring Journey to Forgiveness,' Emily Bazelon's “Charged: The New Movement to Transform American Prosecution and End Mass Incarceration,' Jodie Adams Kirshner's “Broke: Hardship and Resilience in a City of Broken Promises,' Alex Kotlowitz's “An American Summer: Love and Death in Chicago' and Margaret O'Mara's “The Code: Silicon Valley and the Remaking of America.' The Columbia Journalism School and the Nieman Foundation announced shortlists for two other prizes. Finalists for the $25,000 Lukas Work-in-Progress Awards (two authors will be chosen) were Bartow J. Elmore's “Seed Money,' Shahan Mufti's “American Caliph,' Michelle Nijhuis' “Beloved Beasts,' Sarah Schulman's “Let the Record Show' and Lawrence Tabak's “Foxconned.' For the $10,000 Mark Lynton History Prize, nominees were Carrie Gibson's “El Norte,' Kerri K. Greenidge's “Black Radical,' Pekka Hamalainen's “Lakota America,” Daniel Immerwahr's “How to Hide an Empire' and Brendan Simms' “Hitler.' Winners will be announced March 18. The prizes were established in 1998 to honor “excellence in nonfiction that exemplifies ... literary grace and commitment to serious research and social concern.' Previous winners include Samantha Power, David Maraniss and Jane Mayer.
  • Oliver Jeffers worked on his new picture book with a child in mind — his own. Philomel Books, an imprint of Penguin Young Readers, announced Tuesday that “What We''ll Build' is the latest work from the bestselling author of “Here We Are' and illustrator of “The Day the Crayons Quit' and other books. “What We'll Build' comes out Oct. 6. “Here We Are,” published in 2017, was inspired by the birth of Jeffers' son. After his daughter was born, he decided to write and illustrate a book for her, too. In a statement issued through Philomel, he said he had been “contemplating the importance of raising a daughter in what will hopefully soon no longer be a man’s world.' “But more than that,' he added, his new book will also explore “the strength of the invisible bonds of any loving relationship through thick and thin. It is all about the pure potential of what will come, both good and bad, and how, ultimately, people need each other. Even if that is just for someone to listen to all your plans.”
  • An investigation into legendary singer Plácido Domingo by the U.S. union representing opera performers found more than two dozen people who said they were sexually harassed or witnessed inappropriate behavior by the superstar when he held senior management positions at Washington National Opera and Los Angeles Opera, according to people familiar with the findings. The investigation, conducted by lawyers hired by the American Guild of Musical Artists, concluded that the accounts from 27 people showed a clear pattern of sexual misconduct and abuse of power by Domingo spanning at least two decades, according to those who spoke to The Associated Press on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to disclose the findings. In response to a request for comment from the AP, Domingo issued a statement saying: “I have taken time over the last several months to reflect on the allegations that various colleagues of mine have made against me. I respect that these women finally felt comfortable enough to speak out, and I want them to know that I am truly sorry for the hurt that I caused them. I accept full responsibility for my actions, and I have grown from this experience.” The union's investigation was the first of two independent inquiries launched after multiple women accused Domingo of sexual harassment and abusing his power in two AP stories published last year. The second inquiry, still ongoing, was launched by LA Opera, where Domingo had been general director since 2003 before resigning in October. According to the people familiar with the contents of the union's investigation, lawyers from the firm Cozen O'Connor interviewed 55 people from September until late December. In addition to the 27 who said they experienced or witnessed sexually suggestive behavior on the part of Domingo in the 1990s and 2000s, 12 others said they were aware of the star's reputation and that it was common knowledge at the two companies. Mirroring AP's reporting last year, the investigation found that the allegations included unsolicited physical touching that ranged from kisses on the mouth to groping, late-night phone calls in which Domingo asked women to come to his residence, and inviting women to go out with him socially with such persistence that some felt they were being stalked. Two of the women told investigators that they had sexual relations with Domingo, saying they felt compelled to submit because of his position of authority and potential to damage their careers, according to the people familiar with the investigation. In the rest of his statement to the AP, Domingo said, “I understand now that some women may have feared expressing themselves honestly because of a concern that their careers would be adversely affected if they did so. While that was never my intention, no one should ever be made to feel that way. “I am committed to affecting positive change in the opera industry so that no one else has to have that same experience. It is my fervent wish that the result will be a safer place to work for all in the opera industry, and I hope that my example moving forward will encourage others to follow.” Union officials would not directly address the contents of the report, which has not been made public. But the union's national executive director, Leonard Egert, issued a statement to the AP saying, 'AGMA salutes the brave people across all our industries and encourages them to continue speaking out against wrongdoing. We call upon management, and pledge to work collaboratively with them, to get at the root causes that have allowed this behavior to occur, and go unaddressed, in opera, dance, and choral cultures for far too long.” Egert, other senior union leaders and the investigators briefed the union's Board of Governors on the findings Monday. The people familiar with the investigation said Domingo, now 79, had reiterated his denials of wrongdoing to investigators and contended that he did not occupy a position of power over his colleagues and their careers. They said he told investigators he had engaged in flirtatious behavior but did not cross a line into inappropriate touching or behavior like asking colleagues to meet privately in his residence. They said the investigators characterized Domingo's conduct as inappropriate workplace behavior under the norms of the 1990s or by today's #MeToo standards. The investigators said that they found the witness accounts to be credible based on the number of people who came forward, the similarities of their stories, corroborations of their accounts, and the common theme that Domingo's behavior and reputation were such widespread knowledge that women at his companies were warned to avoid being in close contact with him. The union announced its investigation in September, shortly after the publication of AP's stories, saying it did not trust the industry to police itself. Most of the harassment alleged in AP's stories occurred at LA Opera and at Washington opera, which has repeatedly declined to say if it would investigate the claims. LA Opera has not said when or if it will make its findings public. In the AP stories, more than 20 women accused Domingo of sexual harassment or other inappropriate behavior in encounters taking place from the late 1980s to the 2000s. Dozens more said his behavior was an open secret in the industry. A number of U.S. companies canceled Domingo appearances and he withdrew from others under pressure. But no European performances have been affected. Domingo has been one of the opera's most beloved and successful figures, admired as an ambassador for the art form and valued for his enduring talent and ability to attract sellout crowds in an era of diminishing ticket sales. He also was a prolific conductor and powerful administrator, which his accusers told the AP gave him the power to make or break careers and behave with impunity. In addition to heading Los Angeles Opera, he served as general director at Washington Opera from 2003-2011. Most of Domingo's accusers were young and starting their careers at the time. Several told the AP that he dangled job prospects as he tried to pressure them into sexual relationships, sometimes punishing them professionally if they rebuffed him. Soprano Angela Turner Wilson said that after weeks of pursuing her, Domingo forcefully grabbed her bare breast under her robe in a backstage room. The accusations in the union's report included multiple new accusers not interviewed by the AP, according to the people familiar with its contents. Investigators said most of the people they interviewed requested anonymity in the final report, fearing professional retaliation or personal embarrassment, highlighting the problem the industry faces in trying to convince victims to come forward.
  • AP: US opera union probe finds Placido Domingo abused power, prompting apology from legendary tenor.
  • Memorable moments from inside the memorial for Kobe Bryant and his daughter Gianna. BEYONCÉ, ALICIA, CHRISTINA AND ‘MARIA’ Practically everything about what would happen at Kobe Bryant's memorial was a mystery to nearly everyone watching, and when Beyoncé took the stage to open the celebration of life, a gasp went up among the until-then subdued crowd at Staples Center in Los Angeles. The big screen in the arena soon showed that many major entertainment figures were in the audience along with the expected NBA stars, including Jennifer Lopez, Kanye West and Kim Kardashian. The memorial's other musical moments would provide their own surprises. A harp and grand piano that a scrambling crew set up on stage between speakers led to speculation about who else would perform. The harp accompanied Christina Aguilera as she sang “Ave Maria,” a nod to the Bryant family's Catholic faith and to Kobe Bryant's Italian upbringing. The piano was for Alicia Keys, who used it to play Beethoven's “Moonlight Sonata,” which the crowd had just learned the usually non-musical Bryant had learned to play for his wife's wedding anniversary. SHAKEN KIMMEL SETS THE TONE The crowd was more perplexed than surprised moments after Beyonce's polished opening when the Staples Center announcer said a “good friend of the Bryants and the Lakers family is here to help guide us through this morning's celebration,” and introduced not a priest or pastor, but Jimmy Kimmel. The late-night host, professional prankster, and sometime Academy Awards emcee agreed he was an odd choice, but his shaken, tearful delivery set the tone for the deep emotions that were to follow. “You picked the wrong person to guide you through, I'm going to tell you that right now,” a choked-up Kimmel said. Even more tears came as he listed the names of the nine killed in the helicopter crash, and he was practically weeping when he said of Kobe and Gianna Bryant, “everywhere you look you see his face, his number, Gigi's face, Gigi's number.' He drew laughs from the tears when he said those places included ”Boston, for God's sake. In places where he would be booed on the court, Kobe was missed. Even the great Boston Celtic Bill Russell (who sat nearby in the crowd) wore number 24 and a Lakers jersey to yesterday's game. I knew he would come to us eventually.' A DAUGHTER, AND A FUTURE, LOST Vanessa Bryant would soon take the room to new depths of emotion as she paid tribute to the 13-year-old daughter and the husband she lost. Deep silence ran through the crowd of some 20,000 at Staples Center, broken only by sniffs that came even from the usually emotion-free press section of the arena, as she described the imagined future a mother would never know for her child. “We will not be able to see Gigi go to high school,” Vanessa Bryant said, her voice breaking. “We didn't get the chance to teach her how to drive a car. I won't be able to tell her how gorgeous she looks on her wedding day. ... Gigi would have most likely become the best player in the WNBA. She would have made a huge difference for women's basketball.' TAURASI AND IONESCU, KOBE AND GIANNA Everyone expected to see and hear from legends of the NBA game, but giants of the women's game showed viewers how much this side of basketball also shaped Bryant's life as he coached Gianna's team and fueled her future career. Both WNBA all-time great Diana Taurasi and collegiate all-time great Sabrina Ionescu said they learned and used Kobe's signature moves. “He taught me his step-back, he told me that if I could bring that to my game it would be over for any defender trying to guard me,” Ionescu said. 'He was giving me the blueprint. He was giving Gigi the same blueprint. A STAR AMONG STARS Even in an arena loaded with superstars from sports and entertainment, Michael Jordan taking the stage left the audience awestruck. The crowd had been growing a little restless after an unbroken string of speakers, and some headed for restroom and concession trips after 90 minutes of sitting still, but when the Chicago Bulls legend walked on to stage, Staples Center snapped back to full attention, and when Jordan was crying from his first words, the room knew it was witnessing a truly rare moment from the superstar. He even acknowledged that his tears invoked the photo meme that dominated social media several years ago. “Now he's got me,” Jordan said of Bryant. “I’m going to have to look at another crying meme for the next” and was cut off by laughs and howls from the crowd. BRYANT'S LAST TEXTS FROM THE AIR Kobe's best friend, former agent and current Lakers General Manager Rob Pelinka had the crowd riveted when he described the last messages Bryant sent him, moments before the helicopter crash that killed him. Pelinka said he was in church and Bryant was in the air when Bryant texted him to ask if he knew a baseball agent who could help a hard-working, ambitious girl get an internship. The story took a truly touching twist when Pelinka revealed that the girl was Lexi Altobelli, the surviving daughter of John Altobelli, who died in the crash with Bryant. 'Kobe's last human act was heroic,' Pelinka said. “He wanted to use his platform to bless and shape a young girl's future.” SHAQ OUT It was not clear when Shaquille O'Neal took the stage that he would be the final speaker, but in retrospect it could not have been more fitting that the man whose name will always be tied to Bryant's went last in the building where they built their legacy together. The always playful Shaq showed why he and the refined, serious Bryant were such an odd couple. “Sometimes like immature kids, we argued, we fought, we bantered or insulted each other,' O'Neal said. But, he added, ”when the cameras were turned off we threw a wink at each other and said, ‘Let’s go and whoop some ass.' And he showed Bryant wasn't above having the occasional outrageous moment himself. He recalled an early conflict with Bryant, who wasn’t passing as much as O'Neal would’ve liked. O'Neal said he told Kobe: “There’s no ‘I’ in team.” Kobe responded: “Yeah, but there’s an ‘M-E,’” followed by an F-bomb that broke the somber tone and made the crowd roar. ___ Follow AP Entertainment Writer Andrew Dalton on Twitter at: https://twitter.com/andyjamesdalton.