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    Kevin Love's troubled season has twisted again. The Cavaliers All-Star forward, who has battled injuries and criticism while revealing he suffered panic attacks in the past, may have to sit out Game 7 of the Eastern Conference finals after injuring his head Friday night during the first quarter of Cleveland's 109-99 win over the Boston Celtics. Love was kept out of the second half of Game 6 following his violent collision with Celtics rookie Jayson Tatum. Cleveland's medical staff checked Love for a concussion, and the team announced at halftime the 29-year-old would not return to the game as a precaution. Love has not been placed in concussion protocol, but that could change if he has an onset of symptoms — headaches, dizziness, sensitivity to light — in the hours ahead. He will be re-examined Saturday before the team flies to Boston. Cavs coach Tyronn Lue did not know if he would have his second-best player for the season's biggest game as the Cavs try to win their fourth straight conference title. Following Game 6, Love told a reporter it was 'a toss-up' whether he would be able to face the Celtics. Love is Cleveland's most reliable scoring option after LeBron James, who scored 46 points in another tour-de-force performance in Game 6 — possibly his last game with the Cavs. James, too, is hurting. Teammate Larry Nance Jr. fell into James' right leg in the fourth quarter, and the three-time champion said there was a moment when he feared his injury was serious. 'I felt some pain throughout my entire right side of my ankle into my leg,' said James, who played 46 of 48 minutes. 'I was just hoping for the best, obviously, because I've seen so many different injuries, and watching basketball with that type of injury, someone fall into one's leg standing straight up. Luckily, I was able to finish the game.' James doesn't have much time to recover, and sleep will be imperative. 'It'll be around-the-clock treatment, and we'll see what happens,' he said. James walked slowly, almost shuffling his feet as he left Quicken Loans Arena early Saturday morning. Love and Tatum inadvertently collided midway through the quarter and both immediately dropped to the floor. Love, who has a history with concussions, raised his left arm as if to signal he needed help. He stayed down for several minutes and sat rubbing his head before he was pulled to his feet. Love walked unsteadily to the bench with guard George Hill holding one of his arms. He spent a few moments on the bench before heading to the locker room for further evaluation. Love didn't score and had five rebounds before getting hurt. Tatum was checked on the bench and stayed in the game. 'I didn't see him coming, it was bad,' Tatum said. 'I have a knot on the back of my head, I should be all right. I wish the best for Kevin Love because he's a great player, and it's been a long season.' The Cavs appeared to be in big trouble when he went out in Game 6, but Cleveland got 20 points from Hill, 14 from Jeff Green and 10 from Larry Nance Jr. to offset losing Love. 'Very encouraging,' Lue said of the contributions. 'I think when you lose an All-Star like Kevin and our second go-to guy, pivotal part of what we try to do, and when he goes down and then you help your brother up, that's what they did. Kevin left the game. He didn't come back, and guys got together and they played. They played for Kevin. They played for each other and were able to get the win.' For Love, who missed most of the 2015 playoffs with a separated shoulder, the head injury is the latest blow in what has been a challenging few months. In March, he disclosed that he had suffered a panic attack during a game in November, and he experienced a similar episode in January. Following the second incident, several players challenged Love in a team meeting that came shortly after he had left that game and missed a subsequent practice. Love, who has suffered at least two prior concussions, was also sidelined seven weeks with a broken left hand. He's had a fairly steady 2018 postseason, averaging 14.8 points and 10.4 rebounds but his critics have often insisted he should be doing more. Now he may not be able to do anything. ___ More AP baseball: https://apnews.com/tag/MLBbaseball
  • Official counting is set to begin Saturday morning in Ireland's historic abortion rights referendum, with two exit polls predicting an overwhelming victory for those seeking to end the country's strict ban. The Irish Times and RTE television exit polls suggest the Irish people have voted to repeal a 1983 constitutional amendment that requires authorities to treat a fetus and its mother as equals under the law. That effectively bans abortions, and currently, terminations are only allowed when a woman's life is at risk. The exit polls are predictions only, with official results expected to be announced Saturday afternoon. Paper ballots must be counted and tallied. If the projected numbers hold up, the referendum would be a landmark in Irish women's fight for abortion rights and a key turning point for a largely Catholic nation that has seen a wave of liberalization in recent years. It would also likely end the need for Irish women to travel abroad — mostly to neighboring Britain — for abortions. Prime Minister Leo Varadkar, who campaigned for repeal, did not claim victory based on the exit polls but seemed very confident late Friday night. 'Thank you to everyone who voted today. Democracy in action. It's looking like we will make history tomorrow,' he said in a tweet after the exit polls were released. Both exit polls project that the 'yes' vote to repeal the ban to be nearly 70 percent. They also suggest that supporters of more liberal abortion laws may have triumphed throughout the country, not just in the cosmopolitan capital, Dublin, where a strong youth vote had been anticipated. The magnitude of the predicted victory exceeds the expectations of abortion rights activists, but prominent opponent of repeal Cora Sherlock said the exit polls, if accurate, 'paint a very sad state of affairs.' She said the 'pro-life movement will rise to any challenge it faces' and resist what she called the trend toward abortion on demand. If the 'yes' forces seeking a constitutional change prevail, Ireland's parliament will be charged with coming up with new abortion laws. The government proposes to allow abortion in the first 12 weeks of pregnancy with later terminations allowed in some cases. If confirmed by the official tally, the large margin of victory predicted by the exit polls would greatly strengthen the government's hand when dealing with abortion opponents in parliament.
  • A look at what's happen around the majors today: FLIGHT PLAN The Yankees plan to activate first baseman Greg Bird from the DL before a game against the Angels, forcing New York to make a difficult roster decision. Bird has been sidelined since having right ankle surgery on March 27. New York likely will decide whether to cut from eight relief pitchers to seven or option Tyler Austin to Triple-A Scranton/Wilkes-Barre despite his strong performance in Bird's absence. ODD-MAN OUT Boston is moving on without slugger Hanley Ramirez after designating him for assignment Friday to clear space for Dustin Pedroia to come off the DL. The Red Sox are responsible for the $15.25 million remaining on Ramirez's contract, but avoided triggering a $22 million salary for 2019 by cutting him loose. The move clears the way for Mitch Moreland to be the team's everyday first baseman, with J.D. Martinez a regular at DH and Blake Swihart picking up at-bats as a platoon partner at first base, catcher and DH. Pedroia is expected to make his first start of 2018 in a game against Atlanta. WELCOME ABOARD Denard Span and Alex Colome are expected to arrive in Seattle after the Mariners acquired them from Tampa Bay in the season's first major trade Friday. Span will hold down left field regularly with Guillermo Heredia sliding to center and Dee Gordon taking over at second base for suspended star Robinson Cano. Colome led the major leagues with 47 saves last season and will help solidify a bullpen that's been relied on heavily early in the season. Seattle is set to continue a series against Minnesota. HOMECOMING Sean Newcomb, born in Massachusetts and raised about 45 miles from Fenway Park, returns with the Atlanta Braves to pitch against Boston. The 24-year-old lefty, a 2014 first-round draft pick by the Angels out of the University of Hartford, is 5-1 with a 2.39 ERA. He's won all four starts this month, allowing only one run and nine hits in 25 innings. Newcomb is 5-0 in eight outings since losing his first game of the season on April 2. Drew Pomeranz (1-2, 5.97) goes for the Red Sox. BIRTHDAY BOY Bartolo Colon makes his first start since turning 45 on Thursday when the Texas Rangers take on Kansas City. Pitching for his 11th major league team, the portly Colon (2-2, 3.51 ERA) is the oldest active player in the majors. His teammates honored him before Thursday's game, and his face ended up in the birthday cake during the celebration. Big Sexy has 242 career wins and needs one more to match Hall of Famer Juan Marichal for the most by a pitcher from the Dominican Republic. BARRIA IS BACK Angels rookie Jaime Barria has yet to allow more than two runs in any of his five career starts, a streak the 21-year-old will test against New York at Yankee Stadium. Barria pitched one-run ball for seven innings against Houston in his last start but got a no-decision in a 5-3 loss, then was optioned briefly back to Triple-A. He'll oppose RHP Sonny Gray (3-3, 5.48), who is coming off eight dominant innings against Kansas City in his previous start. ___ More AP baseball: https://apnews.com/tag/MLBbaseball
  • As Alvaro Uribe, Colombia's most powerful politician, was making his rise to the presidency more than two decades ago, U.S. officials were repeatedly told that the up-and-coming politician had ties to the nation's drug cartels, according to newly declassified State Department cables. The cables were obtained and released Friday by the National Security Archive, a non-profit group, as Uribe's handpicked candidate, Ivan Duque, is the frontrunner in polls to win Sunday's presidential election. They describe meetings between 1992 and 1995 between American officials and Uribe as well as other Colombian politicians in his then Liberal Party. In one 1993 cable, then Senator Luis Velez told a U.S. Embassy political officer that Uribe was a cousin of the Ochoa crime family that partnered with Escobar and had financed his political campaigns. Velez, then a close Uribe ally, explained that because of those ties Escobar demanded he meet with his wife to try and facilitate the kingpin's peaceful surrender at a time he was the world's No. 1 fugitive. 'Escobar, through the Ochoas, is now demanding Uribe return the favors by trying to open a communications channel to Gaviria,' an embassy political officer wrote in the confidential cable, referring to then President Cesar Gaviria. Allegations of links to drug cartels and paramilitaries have dogged Uribe since the start of political career in the early 1980s, when the civil aviation agency he led was accused of giving air licenses to drug traffickers. But he's always denied them and while president from 2002-2010 was a staunch U.S. ally in the war on drugs, extraditing a record numbers of suspected drug traffickers to the U.S. and aggressively expanding a U.S. program to aerially spray illegal coca crops with chemical herbicide. Uribe, in a video posted on social media, dismissed the allegations as 'fake news, in electoral periods and without proof.' Duque, whose father was governor of Uribe's home state of Antioquia when his political career kicked off, didn't comment. In the turbulent 1980s and 1990s, at the peak of the Medellin cartel's power, almost all Colombian politicians were suspect in the eyes of U.S. officials. A previously declassified U.S. Defense Intelligence Agency report from 1991 listed Uribe as one of 100 suspected Colombian 'narcopols,' calling him a 'close personal friend' of Escobar who was 'dedicated to collaboration with the Medellin cartel at high government levels.' The newly released cables provide a more nuanced look at some of the evidence underlying that assessment, and even some backhanded praise for the politician who would go on to decimate leftist FARC rebels on the battlefield, paving the way for their disarmament under a 2016 peace deal. For example, after one meeting with U.S. Embassy officials in 1992, Deputy Chief of Mission David L. Hobbs said Uribe comes across as a rising political leader and 'serious interlocutor' who wanted to draw close to the U.S. government. 'With each meeting we become less inclined to believe the narco ties attributed to him,' he wrote. Still, throughout this period, U.S. Embassy officials appeared to waver in their judgement. In another cable from March 1993, Ambassador Morris Busby states he believes there is 'substance to the rumors,' if no hard evidence, that Uribe and future President Ernesto Samper, whose campaign he was backing in Medellin, had ties to drug traffickers. Prosecutors would later determine that the Cali cartel spent millions of dollars on Samper's campaign and the U.S. would go on to revoke his visa and withdraw all support for his government. Today, scandal continues to engulf Urube, so far to little effect. Despite an ongoing Supreme Court investigation against Uribe in a witness-tampering case involving a paramilitary group he was allegedly covering for, he was the most voted candidate in March elections for the Senate. Meanwhile his brother, Santiago Uribe, is awaiting trial on charges he was a leader in a death squad called the Twelve Apostles that was run from his cattle ranch.
  • Dry pine needles and dead wood snapped under fire prevention officer Matt Engbring's boots as he hiked a half-mile into the woods in search of a makeshift campsite that had served as one man's home until this week when the area was closed because of the escalating threat of massive wildfires. Engbring walked past small ravines where wind quickly could carry embers and by the charred remains of a campfire, finally reaching the spot where John Dobson had been living among ponderosa pines in Arizona's Coconino National Forest. He spotted Dobson earlier as he was leaving the forest with his bicycle and issued a warning that he'll likely repeat over the busy Memorial Day weekend as tourists flock to Arizona's cooler mountainous areas to hike, bike, camp and fish. 'The area is closed now, and I can't allow you to go back in,' he said. Many parts of the West are dealing with drought, but nowhere else has more state and federal land been closed to recreation than in Arizona where conditions are ripe for large-scale wildfires. Portions of the Apache-Sitgreaves, Coconino, Kaibab and Tonto national forests are closed because the dry vegetation quickly can go up in flames, firefighters would have a hard time stopping it, and homes and water resources are at risk. In neighboring New Mexico, fire restrictions are in place, but no forests have closed. Forest officials in the western part of that state have suspended woodcutting permits, including ceremonial wood gathering by Native American tribes. They've also warned the public to look out for hungry bears. Forests in southern Colorado and southern Utah are open but officials are limiting campfires to developed areas. 'A lot of our rural, small communities depend on recreation and access to public land, so it's on the table but really an option of last resort,' said Holly Krake, a spokeswoman for the U.S. Forest Service region that includes Colorado. Weather over the next six weeks is expected to be in line with the typical onset of fire season: increasingly hot, breezy and dry. Then the monsoonal system that carries heavy rain should kick in. 'The bottom line is it's going to get worse before it gets better,' said Rich Naden, fire weather meteorologist with the Southwest Coordination Center. 'But this time of year is always like that. It's almost like clockwork.' Widespread forest closures in Arizona are rare. The 1.8 million-acre Coconino National Forest shut down completely because of fire danger in 2006 for nine days. A 2002 shutdown lasted nine weeks, encompassing the Memorial Day and July 4 holidays. Other national forests had closures in 2002 as well. The current closures are affecting a small percentage of national forests in Arizona, and the general guidance for tourists is to check ahead of time to see what's open and whether campfires are allowed. In Flagstaff, Los Angeles residents Pauline and John Barba had hoped to barbeque this week while staying at a commercial campground, but charcoal grills were wrapped in yellow caution tape. Nearby, a bright yellow sign on the barbed wire fence warned that no one is allowed in the forest. 'We love the outdoors and the pine trees and everything,' she said. 'It's just a shame people are destructive and not careful.' Beyond inconveniencing campers and hikers, the drought's effects and forest closures are being felt by ranchers who can't graze cattle in the forest and researchers who can't conduct studies. Forest thinning projects also are delayed. At a ski resort outside of Flagstaff, 50 people are out of work, and hundreds of tickets for pre-booked activities have been canceled. The Arizona Snowbowl, which operates under a special permit in a closed forest area, had hoped to run its scenic chair lift and debut family activities this weekend. Those who left camping trailers in now-closed areas of the Coconino National Forest to stake out a spot for the busy holiday weekend will have to call forest officials to unlock the gate to let them out. Others have tried avoiding officials patrolling the forest or sneaking in when no one is looking. The biggest fear is that a campfire sparks a wildfire. The Coconino National Forest recorded 700 abandoned campfires last year, and 121 built illegally during fire restrictions, setting a record. Target shooting, drones, cigarettes and sparks from vehicle exhausts also are concerns. At his campsite, Dobson said he used a butane stove to cook rather than light campfires. He heard about the closure a few days earlier at a local food bank, saying he was in a tough spot with nowhere to take his dishes, books and clothing. Engbring called for help from his colleagues to haul Dobson's belongings out of the forest. After loading up Dobson's bike in the back of a pickup truck, they headed for the food bank. ___ Associated Press writer Susan Montoya Bryan in Albuquerque, New Mexico, contributed to this report.
  • A baby panda born in a Malaysian zoo five months ago made her public debut Saturday. The female, which has not yet been named, is the second offspring of giant pandas Liang Liang and Xing Xing, both of which are on a 10-year loan to Malaysia since 2014. The first cub, a female called Nuan Nuan born in August 2015, was sent back to China last November as part of a deal with Beijing to return cubs born in captivity at age 2. Members of the media watched and filmed the cub in an air-conditioned enclosure at the national zoo through a glass shield. Zoologists said the healthy cub weighs 9 kilograms (19.8 pounds) and will face the public later Saturday. Zoo officials have said the giant panda pair broke the world record for a second baby in four years via natural reproduction. Malaysia's national zoo has invested hundreds of thousands of dollars on a panda complex including bamboo trees mimicking their natural habitat, after China loaned the cub's parents to mark 40 years of diplomatic relations with Malaysia. According to WWF, there are 1,864 giant pandas in the wild, living mainly in bamboo forests high in the mountains of western China and subsisting almost entirely on bamboo. The pair arrived just weeks after a Malaysian plane carrying 239 people, mostly Chinese citizens, disappeared in March 2014 while flying from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing. Chinese media at the time criticized the Malaysian government and Malaysia Airlines over their handling of the tragedy. The jet still hasn't been found.
  • President Donald Trump's legal team wants a briefing on the classified information shared with lawmakers about the origins of the FBI investigation into Russia's meddling in the 2016 presidential election. And they may take it to the Justice Department as part of an effort to scuttle the ongoing special counsel probe. Rudy Giuliani, one of Trump's attorneys, told The Associated Press on Friday that the White House hopes to get a readout of the information next week, particularly about the use of a longtime government informant who approached members of Trump's campaign in a possible bid to glean intelligence on Russian efforts to sway the election. Trump has made unproven claims of FBI misconduct and political bias and has denounced the asset as 'a spy.
  • President Donald Trump has long made immigration a top priority. He has spent recent weeks publicly hammering Congress to crack down on 'legal loopholes' he says allow criminals to enter the country illegally. But behind the scenes, Trump has shown little interest in jumping into an intensifying Capitol Hill debate over immigration legislation that many believe is unlikely to ever reach his desk. House Republicans — from both the right and the center — drive an effort to force votes on immigration proposals. That includes legislation that would provide young 'Dreamer' immigrants a path to legal status and beef up border security, but may fall short of funding Trump's promised wall along the southern border.
  • Senior Environmental Protection Agency officials have been working closely with a conservative group that dismisses climate change to rally like-minded people for public hearings on science and global warming. Recently released emails show they also recruited help to counter negative news coverage and tout Administrator Scott Pruitt's stewardship of the agency. John Konkus, EPA's deputy associate administrator for public affairs, repeatedly reached out to senior staffers at the Heartland Institute. Emails show Konkus and the Heartland Institute mustering scores of potential invitees known for rejecting scientific warnings of man-made climate-change. The emails were released after a lawsuit by environmental groups under the Freedom of Information Act.
  • Everybody plays games,' President Donald Trump declared as he suggested the potentially historic North Korean summit he had suddenly called off might be getting back on track. His sights set on a meeting that has raised hopes for a halt in North Korea's nuclear weapons development, Trump welcomed the North's conciliatory response to his Thursday letter withdrawing from the Singapore summit with Kim Jong Un. Rekindling hopes as quickly as he had doused them, Trump said it was even possible the meeting could take place on the originally planned June 12 date. 'They very much want to do it; we'd like to do it,' he said. Later Friday, Trump tweeted that the two countries were 'having very productive talks.' He wrote that the summit, 'if it does happen, will likely remain in Singapore on the same date.' The sweetening tone was just the latest change in a roller-coaster game of brinkmanship — talks about talks with two unpredictable world leaders trading threats and blandishments. On Thursday, White House officials had noted that Trump had left the door open with a letter to Kim that blamed 'tremendous anger and open hostility' by Pyongyang but also urged Kim to call him. By Friday, North Korea issued a statement saying it was still 'willing to give the U.S. time and opportunities' to reconsider talks 'at any time, at any format.' Trump rapidly tweeted that the statement was 'very good news' and told reporters that 'we're talking to them now.' Confident in his negotiating skills, Trump views the meeting as a legacy-defining opportunity and has relished the press attention and the speculation about a possible Nobel Peace Prize. He made a quick decision to accept the sit-down in March, over the concerns of many top aides, and has remained committed, even amid rising concerns about the challenges he faces in scoring a positive agreement. Asked Friday if the North Koreans were playing games with their communications, Trump responded: 'Everybody plays games. You know that better than anybody.' While the president did not detail the nature of the new U.S. communication with the North on Friday, Defense Secretary Jim Mattis said at the Pentagon, 'The diplomats are still at work on the summit, possibility of a summit, so that is very good news.' He characterized the recent back-and-forth as the 'usual give and take.' A previously planned trip by White House aides to Singapore this weekend to work on logistics for the trip remained on schedule, said two White House officials, who were not authorized to speak publicly. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo spoke Friday with a top official from South Korea, whose leaders had appeared to be taken aback when Trump withdrew from the summit. Spokeswoman Heather Nauert said Pompeo and South Korean Foreign Minister Kang Kyung-wha reaffirmed their 'shared commitment to the denuclearization of the Korean peninsula' and pledged to coordinate 'in all of their efforts to create conditions for dialogue with North Korea.' South Korea's government said in a statement released Saturday that it was relieved about the revived talks for a summit. The U.S. and North Korea do not have formal diplomatic relations, complicating the task of communicating between the two governments. Under the Trump administration, the CIA, where Pompeo served as director before becoming secretary of state, has taken an unusually prominent role in back-channel negotiations. Pompeo last year assembled a working group at the CIA called the Korea Mission Center, which gradually assumed the lead role in talks with the North Koreans, and the group's director, a retired senior CIA official with deep experience in the region, became the main U.S. interlocutor with Pyongyang. The group did not supplant the State Department's traditional mode of communication with the North, which is known as the 'New York Channel' and involves U.S. diplomats and their North Korean counterparts posted to the United Nations. But it did play the major role in organizing Pompeo's two trips to Pyongyang, once as CIA director and once as secretary of state. Trump's comments Friday came after days of mixed messages on the summit. Trump, in his letter to Kim on Thursday, objected specifically to a statement from a top North Korean Foreign Ministry official. That statement referred to Vice President Mike Pence as a 'political dummy' for his comments on the North and said it was up to the Americans whether they would 'meet us at a meeting room or encounter us at nuclear-to-nuclear showdown.' Trump then said from the White House that a 'maximum pressure campaign' of economic sanctions and diplomatic isolation would continue against North Korea — with which the U.S. is technically still at war — though he added that it was possible the summit could still take place at some point. A senior White House official said the North had reneged on its promises ahead of the summit, including a pledge to allow international inspectors to monitor its explosive destruction of its nuclear test site. The official spoke on the condition of anonymity to avoid overshadowing Trump's comments Thursday. Trump's aides had warned that merely agreeing to the summit had provided Kim with long-sought international legitimacy and, if Trump ultimately backed out, he risked fostering the perception that the president was insufficiently committed to diplomatic solutions to the nuclear question. U.S. defense and intelligence officials have repeatedly assessed the North to be on the threshold of having the capability to strike anywhere in the continental U.S. with a nuclear-tipped missile — a capacity that Trump and other U.S. officials have said they would not tolerate. Russian President Vladimir Putin chimed in from St. Petersburg, saying that 'if you don't behave aggressively and if you don't corner North Korea, the result that we need will be achieved faster than many would think, and at less cost.' Trump, speaking Friday to graduates at the U.S. Naval Academy, did not mention North Korea directly, but he stressed the United States' military might. He said, 'The best way to prevent war is to be fully prepared for war.' ___ Associated Press writers Matthew Lee and Robert Burns contributed to this report.