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    President Donald Trump says he'll 'be looking into' the case of a U.S. financial adviser charged with killing a hotel worker while on a family vacation in Anguilla after the man's wife appeared on the 'Fox & Friends' morning show and urged Trump to intervene. Trump tweeted shortly after the segment that, 'Something looks and sounds very wrong.' He says: 'I know Anguilla will want to see this case be properly and justly resolved!' Scott Hapgood and his family were on vacation when they say a hotel worker showed up at their room unannounced and demanded money before attacking them on April 13. An autopsy report shows the victim, 27-year-old Kenny Mitchel of Dominica, died of positional asphyxia and received blunt force injuries to his torso and other areas.
  • Stocks are wobbling between small gains and losses in early trading on Wall Street Monday as investors remain cautious about the prospects of a full trade agreement between the U.S. and China. Technology stocks were posting some solid gains even as the energy sector fell because of a decline in the price of crude oil. Safe-play sectors like utilities held up relatively well. Bond markets and the U.S. government were closed for the Columbus Day holiday. Washington and Beijing agreed to a truce following talks last week. The U.S. held off on tariffs set to kick in this week and China agreed to buy more farm goods. But the U.S. has yet to cancel plans for more tariffs in December and the nations still have several complicated issues to negotiate. KEEPING SCORE: The S&P 500 index edged down 0.1% as of 10:16 a.m. Eastern time. The Dow Jones Industrial Average rose 20 points, or 0.1%, to 26,836. The Nasdaq fell 0.1%. Small-company stocks did worse than the rest of the market. The Russell 2000 index lost 0.7%. OVERSEAS: European markets fell. The European Union faces a potential trade war with the U.S. as the Trump administration readies trade sanctions on up to $7.5 billion worth of goods. They are set to go into effect Friday and stem from a dispute over subsidies to the airplane maker Airbus. Meanwhile, Britain is still heading toward its Oct. 31 exit from the European Union without a deal on trade. TRADE UNCERTAINTY: Investors applauded the progress made by the U.S. and China last week, but uncertainty remains over whether they can ink a broader deal. The U.S. agreed to suspend a planned hike in tariffs on $250 billion of Chinese goods that had been set to kick in Tuesday. Beijing, meanwhile, agreed to buy $40 billion to $50 billion in U.S. farm products. The truce was a result of the 13th round of negotiations between the nations since the trade war began well over a year ago. The key sticking point of intellectual property and trade secrets still hangs over the dispute. The overall picture hasn't changed for companies, which are still holding off on forecasts and investments because of the uncertain trade situation. 'There is not yet a viable path to existing tariffs declining and tariff escalation remains a meaningful risk,' Michael D. Zezas, a Morgan Stanley strategist, wrote in a note to clients. 'Thus, we do not expect a meaningful rebound in corporate behavior that would drive global growth expectations higher.' Trump and Chinese President Xi Jinping are due to attend an economic conference in Chile in mid-November. That is raising hopes a face-to-face meeting might produce progress. SAPPED ENERGY: Energy companies fared worse than most of the market in the early going as crude oil prices slid 3%. Oilfield services company Halliburton fell 4.4%.
  • A homemade, remote-controlled bomb intended to 'kill or to harm' riot control officers was detonated as they deployed against renewed violence in Hong Kong over the weekend, police said Monday, in a further escalation of destructive street battles gripping the business hub. The 'loud thud' Sunday night close to riot officers who had been clearing away a protester-built road block marked the first known use of an explosive device during protests that started in June over a contested extradition bill and have snowballed into an anti-government, anti-police and anti-China movement. 'It exploded less than 2 meters (yards) away from a police vehicle. We have reason to believe that the bomb was meant to target police officers,' Deputy Commissioner Tang Ping-keung said at a news conference, speaking through a translator. But despite spiraling violence, widespread vandalism and gasoline-bomb attacks by black-clad hardcore protesters, and repeated government appeals for people not to take their side, the protest movement is still rousing determined support from more moderate demonstrators, broadly worried about the future of the semi-autonomous Chinese territory and its freedoms, unique in China. A peaceful rally in central Hong Kong's swanky business district on Monday night drew a giant crowd tens of thousands strong, a chanting, singing throng so massive that demonstrators filled side streets and broad boulevards. Holding aloft lit cellphones, the crowd looked like a galaxy of stars. Organizers said they drew 130,000 participants. Many waved U.S. flags. The rally appealed for the U.S. Congress to press on with legislation that would require the secretary of state to annually review Hong Kong's special economic and trade status, providing a check on Beijing's influence over the territory. A banner where speakers whipped up the crowd appealed for President Donald Trump to 'liberate Hong Kong.' Another read, 'Make Hong Kong great again.' The majority of demonstrators wore face masks, a practice first adopted by many to protect their identities amid profound distrust of the police and government but now also a symbol of dissent since Hong Kong's leader, Carrie Lam, made the wearing of masks at rallies punishable by a year in jail. Widespread defiance of the mask ban and the solid turnout for Monday's rally suggested that Lam's government is barely making headway with its efforts to get demonstrators to turn their back on the movement's more radical and destructive hardcore. Tang, the deputy commissioner, sought again to swing opinion at his news conference, saying violence against police has reached 'a life-threatening level.' 'If members of the public continue to remain silent and condone and tolerate such behavior they will go from bad to worse,' he said. 'Please cut ties with these criminals and rioters.' No casualties were reported from the detonation Sunday night on a usually busy thoroughfare in Kowloon that was among dozens of protest hotspots. 'There was a loud thud,' Chin-chiu Suryanto, an officer with the police force's bomb-disposal unit, said through a translator. He held up a photo taken from a police vehicle dash-cam that showed a blurry spot of light, circled in yellow on the picture. 'The intent (was) to kill or to harm the police officers at the scene,' Suryanto said, although he also said the explosion was 'not a very strong' one, leaving burn marks. The 'improvised explosive device that was controlled by a mobile phone' was concocted with a 'highly effective' explosive and placed in plants, he said. He likened its use to 'terrorist events' seen elsewhere in the world. Switching tactics, small groups of hardcore protesters wreaked havoc by popping up Sunday in multiple locations across the city, overwhelming the fanned-out police deployment. Violence stretched into the night. Police said they arrested 201 people, aged 14 to 62, on Saturday and Sunday. They said 12 officers were injured, one of them slashed in the neck with a sharp object, severing a nerve. Tang said two plainclothes officers were beaten bloody by rioters. A black-clad protester was also caught on video dropping a riot officer with a flying kick. Four men were arrested in those cases, Tang said. Rioters also set a police vehicle aflame with a gasoline bomb and threw more than 20 gas bombs at a police station. 'They are crazy,' Tang said.
  • The Latest on the United States and the military withdrawal from northern Syria (all times local): 9:40 a.m. Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Lindsey Graham says he'll meet with President Donald Trump on Monday and plans to discuss sanctions against Turkey over its invasion into Syria. The South Carolina senator last week was critical of Trump's announcement about removing U.S. troops from Syria. On Monday, Graham blamed Turkey for the turmoil in Syria, saying Turkish leader Recep Tayyip Erdogan (REH'-jehp TY'-ihp UR'-doh-wahn) 'made the biggest mistake of his political life' and 'brought this on himself.' Graham tells Fox News Channel's 'Fox & Friends' there will be 'crippling sanctions' from Congress that will 'break' Turkey's economy and 'crush Erdogan until he stops the bloodshed.' Graham says Republicans, Democrats and the Trump administration will hit Erdogan 'like a ton of bricks.' Syrian Kurdish forces previously aligned with the U.S. say they've reached a deal with Syrian President Bashar Assad to help fend off Turkey's invasion. Graham says the alliance between the Kurds and Assad is 'not good' for the United States. He says 'Assad equals Iran' and 'The last thing you want to do is to let Iran become more powerful in northeastern Syria.' ___ 12:30 a.m. The United States appears to be heading toward a full military withdrawal from Syria amid growing chaos , cries of betrayal and signs that Turkey's invasion could fuel a broader war. Defense Secretary Mark Esper said Sunday that President Donald Trump had directed U.S. troops in northern Syria to begin pulling out 'as safely and quickly as possible.' He did not say Trump ordered troops to leave Syria, but that seemed like the next step in a combat zone growing more unstable by the hour. Esper, interviewed on two TV news shows, said the administration was considering its options.
  • Police in Guinea fired tear gas and bullets Monday to disperse thousands of opposition supporters, civil society groups and trade unionists gathering in the capital to protest the president's bid to extend his time in office. President Alpha Conde's mandate ends in December 2020 but he seeks a referendum to allow a third term in the West African nation. Residents in the Wanindara district of the capital, Conakry, told The Associated Press that two young men were wounded by bullets shot by men in National Gendarmerie uniforms. 'Young people and gendarmes were fighting. The gunshots that hit them were fired from the van of these gendarmes. Both young people fell,' said resident Ousmane Sow. He said one was hit in the foot and the other in the back. Sporadic shooting could be heard in other suburbs. Demonstrators burned tires and barricaded roads as police deployed around the capital. Most businesses were closed and residents stayed indoors. Babanou Timbo Camara, a protester in the Matoto municipality, said police used tear gas and arrested a number of demonstrators. Guinea's army chief of staff, Gen. Namory Toure, ordered soldiers to remain in their barracks. The National Front for the Defense of the Constitution, the coalition group that called for the demonstration, said six of its leaders were detained over the weekend and it demanded their release. The group, anticipating a crackdown by security forces, encouraged youth to protest in their districts instead of gathering all in one place. It also called on security forces, which have had a history of violence, to show restraint. 'We are appealing to all our brothers and sisters in uniform to stand on the side of the truth defended by the people of Guinea, whose exalted task they are to defend in all circumstances,' it said in a statement that encouraged peaceful opposition to a constitutional amendment 'for the sole purpose of maintaining a person in power for life.' Conde was elected in December 2010 for a five-year term, the country's first democratic transition of power since independence from France in 1958. In 2015 he was re-elected. The government has warned against demonstrations. 'The Guinean Government, concerned about the social tranquility and security of citizens and their property, warns all troublemakers in any form of actions or interventions that attempt to undertake to harm,' Minister of Territorial Administration and Decentralization Bourema Conde said in a statement last week. Guinea's security forces have historically clamped down on demonstrations. While Conde's government has been more tolerant than past administrations, Human Rights Watch has said it has banned dozens of planned protests this year. ___ Follow Africa news at https://twitter.com/AP_Africa
  • The United Nations' food agency says around 14% of the food produced globally is lost and is urging action to address the causes of food loss as part of efforts to protect the environment. In a report Monday, the U.N. Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) stressed the need to reduce food loss as 'firmly embedded in the 2030 agenda for sustainable development.' However, it noted that a combination of causes — including harvesting and handling practices, a lack of infrastructure, agricultural blights and climatic conditions — keep fueling large food losses around the world. FAO said its estimates focus on losses between harvest and markets. It said Central and Southern Asia have the highest levels of food losses at over 20%, followed by North America and Europe at more than 15%. Food is also wasted at the retail and consumer levels.
  • The Vatican's latest leaks scandal claimed its first victim Monday, as Pope Francis' chief bodyguard resigned over the leak of a Vatican police flyer identifying five employees who were suspended as part of a financial investigation. The Vatican said its police chief, 57-year-old Domenico Giani, bore no responsibility for the leaked flyer but resigned to avoid disrupting the investigation and 'out of love for the church and faithfulness' to the pope. The person who leaked the document to the Italian newsweekly L'Espresso remains unknown. Giani, a 20-year veteran of the Vatican's security services, has stood by Francis' side and jogged alongside his popemobile during hundreds of public appearances and foreign trips. He also was the chief bodyguard for Pope Benedict XVI, and the Vatican took pains to stress his 'unquestionable faithfulness and loyalty' to the Holy See. Giani had signed the Oct. 2 police flyer after his agents raided two Holy See offices — the secretariat of state and the Vatican's financial intelligence unit — as part of an investigation by Vatican criminal prosecutors into alleged financial irregularities surrounding a money-losing London real estate deal. The deal — which reportedly resulted in a loss to the Holy See of tens of millions — has itself raised questions about the Vatican's murky finances and poor investment decisions during Benedict's papacy. Recently, Francis ordered cost cuts to relieve a structural deficit estimated at some 70 million euros. But the raids and related suspensions, apparently launched due to more recent efforts to recover some of the lost money, were highly unusual for the Vatican and sparked fresh speculation about its Machiavellian turf battles, power struggles and score-settling. That the alleged leaker remains unknown has added to the mystery surrounding the case, which has implicated high-ranking Vatican cardinals. In this instance, officials have spoken openly of an institutional crisis, particularly over the raid on the financial intelligence unit known as the Financial Information Authority. The office shares financial information with counterparts in dozens of countries as part of global efforts to crack down on money laundering, tax evasion and terrorist financing. National financial intelligence units might be unwilling to share sensitive information with the Holy See if raids were executed without sufficient cause. To date, the Vatican hasn't said what, if any, evidence it has of the agency's wrongdoing. Giani's Oct. 2 flyer was sent to all Swiss Guards and members of the Vatican gendarmes police force as an internal directive barring entry to the Vatican by the five employees, who were suspended from their jobs as a precaution. Featuring the employees' photographs, names and job titles, the directive resembled a wanted poster, even though none of the five was placed under investigation. L'Espresso and its daily newspaper, La Repubblica, published the directive and it was widely redistributed online. In a statement announcing Giani's departure, the Vatican said the publication of the document greatly harmed the employees' dignity as well as the image of the Vatican gendarmes. Giani himself said he was ashamed by the publication and that he felt personally for the five employees. 'Having always said that I would be willing to sacrifice my life to defend the pope, I took the decision to resign with the same spirit, and to not in any way harm the image and activities of the pope,' he told Vatican media. Francis met with Giani in recent days and thanked him for his service, professionalism and willingness to step aside as 'an expression of freedom and institutional sensitivity,' the Vatican said. Giani joined the Vatican police force as the deputy police chief in 1999 after a stint in Italy's financial police and the information department of the Italian premier's office. He was named director of Vatican security services in 2006. Giani said he was leaving at a difficult time, but was looking forward to spending more time with his wife and two children. ___ This story has been corrected to show the spelling of the chief's surname to Giani, not Giano.
  • The Latest on Poland's election (all times local): 4:50 p.m. Official returns from 99.5% percent of the votes counted in Poland's parliamentary election suggest the country's ruling right-wing party might have lost its majority in the upper chamber, the Senate. According to the State Electoral Commission on Monday, the Law and Justice party won just under 45% of votes Sunday for the 100-seat Senate, which translates to 49 senators, down from the 61 senators it now has. Opposition parties seem to have won 51 seats. Returns from voting abroad still need to be counted, but they are not expected to change the breakdown of the seats. Law and Justice Sen. Jan Maria Jackowski said Monday the party has found itself in a 'new situation' in the Senate that means it will have to negotiate more to pass laws. The Senate has the power to block or amend proposed legislation that has been approved by the lower chamber. ___ 2:55 p.m. The Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe says 'clear media bias as well as intolerant rhetoric' by politicians detracted from a weekend election in Poland that was otherwise well run. The assessment from the OSCE, a democracy organization made up of 57 countries, came a day after Poles voted in an election to the 460-seat lower house of parliament and the 100-seat Senate. Jan Petersen, the head of the election observation mission, said that there was high-level polarization in the public and private media. He said the ability of voters to 'make an informed choice was undermined by a lack of impartiality in the media, especially the public broadcaster.' Under the ruling, the Law and Justice party, which won the election according to nearly complete results, used state media as a mouthpiece to praise its own and cast opponents in a negative light. Petersen also said the discriminatory rhetoric used by 'a number of leading political figures is of serious concern in a democratic society.' He did not give examples but the election took place in an extremely divided society. Recently the ruling party has used anti-gay rhetoric to shore up its conservative base. ___ 10:35 a.m. Nearly complete results in Poland's weekend election confirm that the conservative ruling party Law and Justice capitalized on its popular social spending policies and social conservatism to do better than when it swept to power four years ago. Poland's state electoral commission reported Monday that Law and Justice got nearly 45% of the vote, up from 38% in 2015. Around 91% of the votes have been counted. The results point to a Law and Justice majority in parliament. The centrist Civic Coalition is running second with almost 27%, while a left-wing alliance is trailing with 12%. The conservative agrarian Polish People's Party got nearly 9%, while Confederation, a new far-right group that is openly anti-Semitic and homophobic, is set to enter parliament after winning 6.8% of the vote.
  • Next stop Tokyo for Simone Biles. With Usain Bolt and Michael Phelps both retired since the last Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, the U.S. gymnast will be the face of the games for much of the world. In gymnastics, no one else comes close. Biles won five of the six gold medals at last week's world championships and broke the all-time record of 25 medals by any gymnast, male or female. 'She's just above anything else that we have seen in the sport,' five-time Olympic gold medalist Nadia Comaneci said of Biles on Sunday, praising 'the domination that she has toward all the other gymnasts that competed here.' Biles has not just got the talent. She's got the character of an Olympic star. There's the laser-like focus on training, the same easygoing humor which endeared the world to Bolt, and — crucially in the modern era — a savvy social-media style. International Olympic Committee president Thomas Bach said Sunday that Biles' star status would make gymnastics a must-see event at the Tokyo Olympics. 'You can have legends confirming their status as we have just seen with Simone Biles, this amazing performance there on the beam, but you also have new stars,' he said. 'Gymnastics has all the ingredients to be top another time, I must say. A top Olympic event in Tokyo.' Despite its dispute with Biles over the scoring for her new double-double beam dismount — its grade was lessened in part so as not to encourage less-skilled gymnasts to attempt the risky move — the International Gymnastics Federation knows Biles is crucial to the sport. Labeling her 'wonder woman' and 'a hero,' FIG president Morinari Watanabe is keen for Biles not to retire after the Tokyo Olympics. 'I hope she will continue after 2020, because she is an excellent athlete,' he said Sunday. Biles is certainly the only athlete who could pull off her look in training at the U.S. nationals in August. She caused a stir with a leotard bearing her surname and a goat's head picked out in sequins, a nod to 'Greatest Of All Time.' Few disagree, but Biles hasn't yet won everyone over. 'There's no need to turn her into some unbeatable queen. If I was 15 years younger, I'd definitely take the fight to the American,' the Russian gymnast Svetlana Khorkina said in comments on the Russian Olympic Committee website Thursday. Khorkina won 20 world championship medals between 1994 and 2001 and held the women's record until Biles overtook her Tuesday. One record is likely to remain out of Biles' reach, however. Soviet gymnast Larisa Latynina won a record 15 Olympic medals between 1956 and 1964. Biles won five Olympic medals in Rio de Janeiro, and could add six more next year in Tokyo, but appears highly unlikely to stick around until the 2024 Olympics. However, there's another record to aim for. Matching her world championship performance from last week would make Biles the first female gymnast to win five gold medals at a single Olympics, and the first female athlete to do so in any sport since East German swimmer Kristin Otto in 1988. After Biles pioneered a new beam dismount and triple-double on the floor this season, her coach Laurent Landi says he favors refining her existing routines for the Olympics over adding yet more upgrades. 'I can find plenty of (upgrades), but you need to be realistic and only the medals count at the end,' he said. 'We don't need to show off everything we can do.' ___ More AP sports: https://apnews.com/apf-sports and https://twitter.com/AP_Sports
  • European Union nations vented outrage Monday at Turkey's military offensive in northern Syria against the Kurds and joined France and Germany in banning arms sales to Ankara, a rare move against a NATO ally for many of them. Many EU foreign ministers were looking beyond a strong statement condemning the military operation that has destabilized the whole region and wanted to make sure their move would carry some sting. They also prepared sanctions against Turkish companies and individuals involved in the gas drilling in the Mediterranean Sea close to EU member Cyprus and were poised, if necessary, to implement that at short notice. France and Cyprus are conducting naval maneuvers there now. Over the years, Turkey has become increasingly less dependent on European nations for its defense needs and it was unclear what the impact of such a measure would be beyond applying diplomatic pain. 'There is a strong commitment by all members of the council to take the actions required to stop selling arms to Turkey,' Josep Borrell, the Spanish foreign minister who is slated to become EU foreign policy chief next month, told The Associated Press. Relations between the bloc and Turkey under Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan have steadily worsened over the years, especially after he likened some German moves to Nazi practices. And even though both sides agreed upon a deal in 2016 to stop migrants from traveling westward from Turkey to the European mainland, Erdogan is now wielding that like a cudgel. Since his operation in northern Syria began last week, he has sought to quell Europe criticism of it by warning that he could 'open the gates and send 3.6 million refugees your way.' Dutch Foreign Minister Stef Blok said Monday that 'we should not cave in to blackmail.' Despite such abrasive relations, Turkey's links with most EU nations are cemented through the NATO alliance and its commitment to stand by each other's side in times of need. NATO's Article 5 says an attack on one member of NATO is an attack on all. Erdogan on Monday criticized his European allies, saying 'We are a NATO ally. Please note that these countries are all NATO countries.' He added 'Whose side should they be on, according to Article 5?' Still, many think Turkey crossed more than just a physical border when it went into northern Syria last week to attack Syrian Kurdish strongholds — it also endangered the fight against Islamic State militants. NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg made that point Monday, telling NATO's Parliamentary Assembly in London that he expects 'Turkey to act with restraint and in coordination with other allies so that we can preserve the gains we have made against our common enemy:' the Islamic State group. 'These gains must not be jeopardized,' Stoltenberg said. French Foreign Minister Jean-Yves Le Drian said the Turkish military operation had already displaced 130,000 people. 'The Turkish offensive has the risk of bringing (Islamic State) to the fore again in different ways,' Le Drian said. 'It is especially grave since it will engender a real humanitarian disaster.' Le Drian urged the United States to call for a meeting of the international coalition against the Islamic State group, given that the chaos caused by the Turkish offensive was reviving the threat of IS in Syria. Syria's Kurds, who Turkey is now going after, were key allies in a U.S.-led coalition against the Islamic State group. Borrell criticized U.S. President Donald Trump's administration for allowing Turkey to invade Syria. If 'American troops would not have withdrawn (from Syria), the attack would have been impossible,' Borrell said. ___ Angela Charlton contributed from Kyiv, Ukraine and Suzan Fraser from Ankara, Turkey.