ON AIR NOW

LISTEN NOW

Weather

clear-day
46°
Sunny
H 70° L 59°
  • clear-day
    46°
    Current Conditions
    Sunny. H 70° L 59°
  • clear-day
    66°
    Afternoon
    Sunny. H 70° L 59°
  • clear-night
    63°
    Evening
    Mostly Clear. H 70° L 59°
LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

The latest top stories

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

The latest traffic report

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

The latest forecast

00:00 | 00:00

Local

    The Florida recount for governor and senator has revived complaints about the state's long history of election trouble. Florida's reputation for bungling elections dates back to 2000, when it took more than five weeks for the state to declare George W. Bush the victor over Al Gore by 537 votes. Back then, punch-card ballots were punch lines. This year's glitches led a federal judge to ask why state officials have repeatedly failed to anticipate problems in elections. Judge Mark Walker even referred to Florida as 'the laughingstock of the world.' Mary Sanders disagrees. The 74-year-old volunteer with the League of Women Voters says the world doesn't see the normal side of Florida during times such as this. She says the election in Pinellas County has been well run.
  • A load of space station supplies rocketed into orbit from Virginia on Saturday, the second shipment in two days. And another commercial delivery should be on its way in a couple weeks. 'What an outstanding launch,' said NASA's deputy space station program manager, Joel Montalbano. Northrop Grumman launched its Antares rocket from Wallops Island before dawn, delighting chilly early-bird observers along the Atlantic coast. The Russian Space Agency launched its own supplies to the International Space Station on Friday, just 15 hours earlier. The U.S. delivery will arrive at the orbiting lab Monday, a day after the Russian shipment. Among the 7,400 pounds (3,350 kilograms) of goods inside the Cygnus capsule: ice cream and fresh fruit for the three space station residents, and a 3D printer that recycles old plastic into new parts. Thanksgiving turkey dinners — rehydratable, of course — are already aboard the 250-mile-high outpost. The space station is currently home to an American, a German and a Russian. There's another big event coming up, up there: The space station marks its 20th year in orbit on Tuesday. The first section launched on Nov. 20, 1998, from Kazakhstan. 'As we celebrate 20 years of the International Space Station,' Montalbano noted, 'one of the coolest things is the cooperation we have across the globe.' Then there's the U.S. commercial effort to keep the space station stocked and, beginning next year, to resume crew launches from Cape Canaveral. 'To me, it's been a huge success,' he said. This Cygnus, or Swan, is named the S.S. John Young to honor the legendary astronaut who walked on the moon and commanded the first space shuttle flight. He died in January. It is the first commercial cargo ship to bear Northrop Grumman's name. Northrop Grumman acquired Orbital ATK in June. SpaceX is NASA's other commercial shipper for the space station; its Dragon capsule is set to lift off in early December. Experiments arriving via the Cygnus will observe how cement solidifies in weightlessness, among other things. There's also medical, spacesuit and other equipment to replace items that never made it to orbit last month because of a Russian rocket failure; the two men who were riding the rocket survived their emergency landing. Three other astronauts are set to launch from Kazakhstan on Dec. 3.
  • The Paradise Jam tournament resumes Saturday with a pair of consolation-round games at the University of the Virgin Islands' Sports and Fitness Center. Old Dominion (1-2) will face Kennesaw State (1-3) in the opening game, while Northern Iowa (1-2) takes on Eastern Kentucky (2-2) in the second game. The semifinals will be played Sunday, with Oregon State (3-0) playing Missouri (2-1) in the opening game, followed by No. 12 Kansas State (3-0) facing Penn (4-0). The championship game, as well as the other placement games, will be Monday. ___ More AP college basketball: https://apnews.com/Collegebasketball and http://www.twitter.com/AP_Top25
  • If it has happened to Miami, it has happened to Manny Medina. The resumé of one of the city's most storied entrepreneurs reads like a history of the city's last 40 years: boom, bust and reemergence. Immigrant. Accountant. Real estate tycoon. Failure. Billion-dollar success. Tech cheerleader. Startup entrepreneur. And though he's in his seventh decade, Medina is no more finished reinventing himself than the city itself. In May 2017, Medina created Cyxtera, a Coral Gables firm whose mission is to help companies better protect their data, whether it sits in a server or in the cloud. It has already grown to more than 1,300 employees spread across the globe, with more than 100 located in Miami. 'This is bar-none the biggest undertaking we've ever had,' he said recently from Cyxtera's Miracle Mile corner office. 'This market is so huge. It's not going away anytime soon — not going away in our lifetime or grandkids' lifetime. It's a really big problem but a big, big opportunity.' The launch of Cyxtera takes Medina back into the business world at full speed. Six years ago, after he sold his real-estate-turned-data-center and services firm, Terremark, to Verizon for $1.4 billion, Medina was ready for a break. It didn't last long; he soon was back investing in other tech firms and creating eMerge Americas, now the region's premier tech conference. In the increasingly crowded data security field — expected to be worth $52 billion by 2020 according to Allied Market Research — the young Cyxtera is still relatively unknown. Still, Medina bristles at the idea that Cyxtera is a startup, even though it would fit the generally accepted definition of one. 'This is a train going 200 miles per hour,' he said. 'It didn't stop to pick me up — I had to jump on it with my hands, my teeth, everything. It wasn't like Terremark, building it organically and then went into M&A mode. We started with a significantly big company and critical size. It's a startup, but it's one big startup.' Already, Medina says he has an IPO in his sights. If realized, it would give Miami-Dade its first high-profile, publicly traded tech company. In many ways, Cyxtera is a next-generation Terremark. By the time of its 2011 sale, Terremark hosted more than a dozen data centers — large, bunker-type facilities that house thousands of computer servers — in addition to the Network Access Point of the Americas, through which all Internet traffic in the region is routed. In creating Cyxtera, Medina's team bought 57 data centers from telecom firm CenturyLink, which was looking to shift its business emphasis. Cyxtera also bought five different cybersecurity and data-management companies, most previously parts of Medina's Medina Capital investment firm portfolio. The total tab: nearly $3 billion. Ownership is held by Medina Capital and private equity group BC Partners, which owns the majority. The combination of so much physical infrastructure and cybersecurity software is unique in the marketplace, says Medina. 'You have data center companies — all physical data centers — and you have (cyber)security companies,' he said. 'We fundamentally started with...(cyber)security carved into the physical data center.' Cyxtera is banking on what Medina calls a software-defined perimeter. It's software that allows a company to control all of its data, regardless of the third-party software they're using (like Gmail), or the device used for access. Cyxtera reduces the available 'surface' a potential attacker can even see. (Think of it like a 'Star Wars' cloaking device.) And what hackers can't see, they can't attack. 'The basic concept is, users of a resource or an app should only be given access to what they're entitled to without seeing anything else,' he said. 'Everything else is obfuscated.' Philbert Shigh, head of Structure Research, a data center services analyst group, said that while Cyxtera is still relatively new, the acquisitions it has made give it a solid revenue base and a global data-center footprint. What makes Cyxtera unique, he said, is the combination of infrastructure — known as co-location — and security. 'They offer co-location services, but with a meaningful security wrapper around the surface...'It's a good way to differentiate.' Kerry Bailey, CEO of cybersecurity firm eSentire, found Cyxtera's offering so compelling that he has signed up as a customer. Unlike Equinix, the world's largest data-center provider, Cyxtera is marketing itself as a security-first firm. 'For us being a security company, it couldn't just be any old data center out in the wild,' he said. But other companies have a head start, noted Tim Crawford, founder of AVOA, an advisory group for chief information officers, and Cyxtera will need to prove its value. '(Name-brand recognition) makes a big difference when thinking about your core infrastructure needs,' he said. But Medina is moving quickly, thanks in part to his experienced leadership team. Many are Terramark veterans who learned the business of data storage and network services working at Terremark's NAP of the Americas, located in a downtown Miami building off I-395 topped by giant orbs. Cyxtera is also recruiting out-of-town experts including Greg Touhill, former president Barack Obama's Chief Information Security Officer, and Leo Taddeo, former Special Agent in Charge of the Special Operations/Cyber Division of the FBI's New York Office. One key hire was Dave Aitel, a former National Security Agency engineer who joined Cyxtera as chief security technical officer when Cyxtera acquired his security company Immunity Inc. The company was a pioneer in 'penetration testing, where good hackers try to break into an organization's network to expose potential holes & vulnerabilities that bad hackers/cybercriminals/nation-states could use to get in,' explained Kelly Jackson Higgins, executive editor of information security magazine Dark Reading. Aitel said he had received plenty of offers in the past. Medina's personality and background drew him to Cyxtera. 'The thing about Manny, like many successful executives, he doesn't have his 'fight or flight' instinct tuned correctly,' Aitel said. 'He can look at something that seems impossible and continue to find ways around all the problems...We don't look for people who have always had it good, we look to people who have overcome adversity.' Despite its spectacular $1.4 billion exit, Terremark didn't start out as a technology firm. Initially, it was a real estate company. Like many Cuban-Americans of his generation, Medina came to Miami in the 1960s. He was 13. Virtually penniless, his family first lived with relatives in a one-bedroom frame house in Liberty City. Medina's father was a cab driver, his mother a hotel maid. Medina delivered newspapers to help make ends meet. He bounced between schools before graduating from Miami Beach High School. After some convincing from his mother, he enrolled at Miami-Dade College. At Miami-Dade College, he said, his life changed forever. 'I found a nurturing environment that I had never known,' he told Ocean Drive Magazine in 2016. 'They give you that opportunity no matter what happened to you before.' After two years, he left for Florida Atlantic University, graduating with a bachelor's degree in accounting. He took a job with Price Waterhouse (now PriceWaterhouseCoopers) soon thereafter. In 1976, he formed his own accounting firm, concentrating on consulting work for Latin American investors. But real estate was hot at the time, and in 1980 he formed Terremark. Medina spent the next decade developing real estate, creating a footprint that stretched all the way to the Middle East but was mostly concentrated in Coconut Grove. As the 1980s progressed, the famously bohemian enclave suddenly became home to condos and offices. In 1985, Medina convinced the Miami City Commission to change the neighborhood's zoning so that his 22-story, 322,000-square-foot Terremark Centre (now a condo tower) could be built. Along the way, he clashed with residents who believed he was eroding the neighborhood's character. The tower 'will ultimately destroy our old established neighborhood in the North Grove,' MaryAnn Andrews, one of a number of Grove residents strongly opposed both to Terremark Centre and the Bayshore changes, told the Miami Herald in January 1985. 'It's going to be very glitzy, very fat on office space and parking.' Medina would typically respond to such concerns by reminding residents their property values would end up rising if he was successful. By 1989, according to the Miami Herald, some had come to calling the Grove 'Mannyland.' That year, Medina turned 36. Things changed practically overnight for Terremark as the new decade dawned: The collapse of Terremark Centre's principal tenant, an event that hit right as the 1990 recession bore down, plunged the company into turmoil. By 1991, lenders moved to foreclose on Medina's Star Island mansion. In response, Medina moved to the Middle East for several months to rebuild schools and housing after the Persian Gulf War. Upon his return, he settled a lawsuit related to Terremark Centre. Business picked up. One of his best known projects became the upscale but affordable Fortune House condo on Biscayne Bay in Brickell. It is now a hotel. By the late 1990s, Medina realized his commercial real estate tenants were demanding more IT infrastructure. Soon, what had been a real-estate play turned into a Terremark's full-scale conversion into a data center services provider. Medina also drew inspiration from seeing how his two children, Melissa (now president of eMerge Americas and the Technology Foundation of the Americas) and Manny Jr. (now bassist in country star Kip Moore's band) were using the Internet. 'He saw it through the eyes of his kids that all this technology was becoming available — that's kind of what triggered his interest, and how he knew it would be a big deal,' said Javier Avino, a partner at Miami law firm Bilzin Sumberg and a longtime family friend. Terremark began building data centers and connection hubs. That effort culminated in the Network Access Point of the Americas. And then came the dot-com bust. In January 2002, Terremark's stock dropped more than 90 percent. Debt and cash flow issues led some to wonder whether the company would survive. But three years later, the company was back on its feet again, thanks to the growing importance of the NAP. By then, about 90 percent of all Internet traffic into and out of Latin America traveled through the downtown Miami portal. Google and the State Department had come on as clients. By 2011, Terremark had almost completely shed its traditional real estate portfolio to become one of the leading data centers and IT companies in the world, with 13 network hubs worldwide. That year, Verizon came calling, paying $1.4 billion to absorb the firm Medina had started 31 years earlier. The acquisition 'immediately strengthens (Verizon's) role as a strategic supplier to the U.S. federal government and its position in a rapidly growing Latin American market, as well as adding key assets for the white-hot global cloud computing market,' analyst Nancy Wilson wrote at the time. Verizon sold Terremark's assets in 2017. Even without Cyxtera, Miami's tech scene would be less vibrant without Medina. Prior to founding Cyxtera, he created eMerge Americas in 2014. Today, it is the largest tech and startup showcase focused on the Americas. This year, the conference drew a reported 15,000 attendees. 'Emerge has for sure made a big impact on the community,' according to Brian Breslin, founder of Miami tech nonprofit Refresh Miami and now director of University of Miami's LaunchPad. 'All other conferences were temporary. His organization has managed to build something sustainable that lasts.' The conference has featured speakers from companies as large as Amazon, IBM, and Verizon. Michael Katz, a former president at Terremark, credits Medina with helping the city become a global hotspot. Katz is now a principal at S&K Realty in Miami. 'Manny has played a very prominent role in helping to form Miami into a much more mature community,' Katz said. 'Manny had foresight and vision to understand that Miami and South Florida should become the capital of internet technology for Americas.' Still, Miami has a ways to go. Medina acknowledges — and data confirm — that Miami continues to lose top tech talent to other regions and sometimes struggles to compete for talent globally. 'Competing against guys in Virginia, Silicon Valley, Dallas — you're competing with one hand tied behind your back,' he said. But while Miami has been talking about becoming a tech hub for decades now, Medina is convinced this time is different. He points to increases in venture capital activity; the Kauffman Foundation's ranking of Miami as the top city for startup activity in the U.S., and increasing tech-industry growth. 'With this momentum, I am confident that Miami will soon be known by all as a true tech hub,' he said. ___ Information from: The Miami Herald, http://www.herald.com
  • Debunking myths is mead maker Ann-Marie Willaker's toughest challenge. New customers perusing the menu at Abbey Bar on North Woodland Boulevard, which serves as the taproom for Willaker's Odd Elixir MeadWorks, often have never heard of mead. Others think they know all about it but are way off the mark. 'They had that one mead in Ireland that was too sweet, or their sister's cousin made it in the garage and it tasted like rocket fuel,' said Willaker, who also is Abbey Bar's general manager. The confusion is understandable. Mead isn't a supermarket staple or happy hour draft pick. It's hard to find outside of medieval festivals. Odd Elixir is the first and only meadery in Volusia County. The next nearest is in Interlachen, more than 70 miles away. Beyond that, a handful of others are sprinkled around Florida's fringes in Miami, Tampa, Jacksonville and Pensacola. Rocket fuel, for the record, is not an ingredient in Willaker's mead. And contrary to a viral Bud Light commercial that casts a mead-loving man as a persnickety craft beverage connoisseur, neither is malt. Malt actually is the one ingredient U.S.-made commercial mead can't contain. Malt is reserved for beer, and mead, for all technical and legal purposes, is wine. However inaccurate, But Light's marketing has given meaderies a 'huge boost,' said Vicky Rowe, executive director at American Mead Makers Association, a nonprofit industry advocate. 'They put mead in the public eye in the way nobody else has been able to do,' Rowe said. 'We're all very happy about it.' Just 30 meaderies operated in the U.S. 15 years ago. Now, there are more than 500, with new meaderies opening every two or three days, said Rowe. 'It's going crazy, and there's no sign of slowing down.' Still, misconceptions abound. At Abbey Bar, Willaker employs a don't-knock-it-until-you-try-it technique when engaging with inquiring customers. She even has a ready-made flier explaining in simple terms what mead is and, perhaps more importantly, what it isn't. No, it's not always sickeningly sweet. Nor is it honey beer or some other hip new beverage to hit the market. In fact, it's quite old. Yes, Scandinavian seafarers did enjoy mead, but they weren't the only ones. Cable series such as History Channel's 'Vikings' have boosted that last supposition — not that Willaker is complaining. 'I definitely can say that some of the TV references certainly help pique people's curiosity,' she said. Willaker can work with that. It allows her an opportunity to broaden their beverage horizons. Take the 'Song of Ice and Fire' fantasy novels on which HBO's smash hit 'Game of Thrones' is based. The books evoke images of bearskin-cloaked warrior types thumping their chests and raising rudimentary mead-filled mugs to celebrate victories big and small. But the heavy, high-octane mead Nordic warriors or fictional characters at icy outposts on the edge of the world enjoyed is a far cry from the meads Willaker makes in a closet-sized space hidden in Abbey Bar's back hallway. That wintry mead is more akin to Danish-made Viking Blod, a sweet, hearty 19-percenter that 'makes you forget you're freezing your butt off. The thing is, we have very few Nordic winters here in Florida,' said Willaker, 44. 'We've got beach days.' Most Odd Elixir meads are climate-appropriate — an antidote to the sticky summer sun. They have the 'lighter, sharp crispness of a cider or a fruity cocktail,' she said. In its most basic form, mead is the fermented product of honey, water and yeast. Willaker uses Florida honey, such as wildflower, orange blossom and black mangrove. The addition of fruit and spices can produce an endless range of flavors. That's where her artistic sensibilities have room to run wild. Willaker's an expert experimenter, and her passion for craft beverages is painted on her arms. Tattoos of barley, hops and honeycomb illustrate her journey — first making wine, then mead and beer. It all began with a 'crazy whim' after she was gifted some homemade fruit wine. It was terrible. 'I bet I can do better,' she recalls thinking after tasting it. She bought a kit and started making her own awful-tasting wine using fresh-picked oranges and store-bought frozen fruit. Eventually, Willaker said, 'I figured out how not to screw it up.' The mead-making happened by chance, too. She took her two boys, now 17 and 19, to an educational Renaissance festival. The mead booth there was barren. 'People were kind of making jokes like, 'Why is the mead always gone?' I was just really curious why everyone was so enamored with this thing I'd never heard of, or only (read about) in literature,' Willaker said. She searched for it in stores with no luck. The solution was clear — she would have to make her own. 'The first mead I tried is one I made myself,' she said. In January 2008, with her first batch of mead fermenting, she was invited to a craft beer home brewers' gathering. She went, and soon was making beer, too. She met her husband, Blair Willaker, through the brewers' group, and the techniques she learned there influence the mead she makes today. Ann-Marie Willaker took her mead to home brew meetings, sold it at beer festivals and built up a following. In 2014, she got her winery license, sublet a small space at Abbey Bar and went to work. Odd Elixir meads are inspired by events and ideas with personal meaning. On average they are 6 to 7 percent alcohol content and take 14 to 21 days to make. Ingredients are mixed in a fermenting tank, and then the yeasts go to work. She has four core and two rotating taps at Abbey Bar that range in price from $6.50 to $9 a glass. Peaches the Friendly Ghost, named for a presence that haunts Abbey Bar, is fruity, refreshing, smooth and always available. In October, Willaker tapped I Guava Dream, a guava- and lime-infused semisweet mead for LGBT history month, a subject nearer to Ann-Marie Willaker's heart since her oldest son came out as gay. The upcoming Madame Curie, made with blackened honey, is named for the Willakers' late French bulldog, Marie Curie. They're considering aging it in a Copper Bottom Craft Distillery rum barrel with ancho chile and vanilla to give it a spicy tingle. Getting the recipe just right isn't easy, and the boring business of licensing fees and tax filing is an added stressor. 'But then you make a product and people love it, and they come back for it and they gush over it,' said Willaker. 'It's nice to make something that makes people happy.' Odd Elixir MeadWorks is located inside Abbey Bar at 117 N. Woodland Blvd., DeLand. Call 386-734-4545 or go to oddelixir.com. ___ Information from: Daytona Beach (Fla.) News-Journal, http://www.news-journalonline.com
  • Officials say a Florida woman was killed in a crash at Sebring International Raceway. A statement from the raceway says 24-year-old driver Katarina Moller was driving a jet dragster Thursday night when it crashed during an exhibition run. The Highland County Sheriff's Office is investigating and asking for help from any spectators with video of the crash. Race officials say Moller was a regular, popular racer at local short tracks. She was in her fifth season driving for Larsen Motorsports.
  • Federal scientists say two archaeological artifacts have been found in the waters off the Florida Keys. A diver swimming near a reef off Key Largo found a cannon believed to be nearly 200 years old. A commercial fisherman spotted the wooden wreckage from a 19th century ship off Islamorada. In a statement to the Miami Herald , Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary Gena Parsons praised the citizens who reported their finds last month without disturbing the artifacts. Parsons said both pieces will remain in sanctuary waters. She said the cannon likely came from a sinking ship that crashed on the reef. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration maritime archaeologist Matthew Lawrence said Hurricane Irma may have made the shipwreck more visible. Coral has been growing on some of the wooden planks. ___ Information from: The Miami Herald, http://www.herald.com
  • A Florida man has been convicted in a drunken driving crash that left a motor scooter passenger dead. The Tallahassee Democrat reports that 35-year-old Andrew Weber was found guilty Thursday of DUI manslaughter and other charges. Authorities say Weber was driving his pickup truck on a Tallahassee road in December 2016 when he struck a scooter ridden by 35-year-old Stanley Chambless and 25-year-old Adrian Foushee. The truck and scooter caught fire, and Weber fled the scene. The crash left Foushee dead and Chambless seriously injured. Police say they found Weber behind some bushes about a half-hour after the crash. Records show he had a blood-alcohol level of 0.358 percent. Florida law considers a driver impaired at 0.08 percent. ___ Information from: Tallahassee (Fla.) Democrat, http://www.tdo.com
  • NASCAR's driver carousel will spin long after the season finale. Former Cup champions Kurt Busch and Matt Kenseth, and Daniel Suarez, AJ Allmendinger, Regan Smith and Jamie McMurray are among the drivers certain to start next season with new teams or new roles. Busch, the 2004 champion, is seemingly on his way out at Stewart-Haas Racing and his No. 41 Ford could be the landing spot for Suarez. Suarez, the 2016 Xfinity Series champion, was rushed to Cup to fill Carl Edwards' seat when he suddenly walked away from Joe Gibbs Racing. After two seasons and no wins, JGR cut ties with the 26-year-old Suarez. Suarez became expendable when Furniture Row Racing folded and 2017 champion Martin Truex Jr. suddenly became available. 'It's time to go somewhere else and try to win more races and championships,' Suarez said. Suarez, NASCAR's first Mexican champion in the Xfinity Series, declined to discuss his 2019 plans. 'I don't know if it's going to be NASCAR,' he said, chuckling. Busch also played coy with his plans, though many believe he's a lock to take his Monster Energy sponsorship to Chip Ganassi Racing. Busch, knocked out of championship contention last week at Phoenix, would not say that Sunday's race at Homestead-Miami Speedway would be his last at SHR. 'I don't know. We'll see how things play out,' Busch said. 'There are still things that have to be sorted through on the team side, manufacturer side, sponsorship side.' Busch won six times since he joined SHR in 2014 — including the 2017 Daytona 500 — and signed a one-year extension with the team last December. He was wrecked late by Denny Hamlin last week at Phoenix to deny him a shot at racing Sunday for the title. His consolation prize? Busch was invited by Monster to golf with Tiger Woods at a corporate function in the Bahamas. 'He goes, so what's your handicap? I go, my golf swing,' Busch said. Busch and Suarez will at least have rides in 2019. McMurray has lost his ride in the No. 1 Chevrolet and has been offered a leadership position with the team. McMurray has seven career victories in the Cup Series, including the 2010 Daytona 500. He has been with Ganassi since 2010. Ganassi also offered the 42-year-old McMurray a contract for the 2019 Daytona 500. McMurray is interested in both opportunities, but he hasn't ruled out racing for another team next season. 'I would have loved to tell everybody what I think I'm going to do next year, but I just don't have it finalized yet, so I'm just going to kind of wait,' he said. 'Maybe use Instagram or Twitter as my source of revealing what I'm going to do.' McMurray has leaned on Kenseth, his closest friend in the garage, for advice on what retirement and open weekends would feel like. Kenseth was nudged out of NASCAR last season by Joe Gibbs Racing to make room for Erik Jones. He returned on a part-time basis this season with owner Jack Roush at Roush Fenway Racing in the No. 6 Ford. He's had just one top-10 finish in 14 stars — 2011 Daytona 500 champion Trevor Bayne made the other 21 starts — and Kenseth is set to head into retirement without much fanfare. Kenseth has 39 wins and was a two-time Daytona 500 champion (2009, 2012). There's plenty of movement among the drivers who are usually in the rear of the fields. Ryan Newman was released from Richard Childress Racing and will replace Kenseth/Bayne at Roush. Daniel Hemric, who is racing for the Xfinity Series championship, will replace Newman in the No. 31 Chevrolet. Kasey Kahne took an early retirement because of illness and Smith filled in for the final 11 races for Leavine Family Racing. Matt DiBenedetto will drive the No. 95 Chevy for Leavine in 2019. Allmendinger is looking for work after JTG Daugherty Racing decided to release him after this season. Ryan Preece, who made five Cup starts in 2015, will replace him. ___ More AP auto racing: https://apnews.com/apf-AutoRacing and https://twitter.com/AP_Sports
  • Randolph Russell did not come to the Columbus Rotary Club empty-handed Tuesday. The Georgia businessman and musician brought with him two boxes of his self-published book and a saxophone. 'I brought the saxophone so that if you didn't like my talk you might like it,' he quipped as he ended the program with a rendition of 'America the Beautiful.' For Russell, both music and history are occasional occupations and full-time hobbies. On Tuesday, he focused mainly on the latter, sharing with the Rotarians the importance of learning history and what drove him to publish his own history book. It is called 'American History in No Time,' which covers the broad sweep of American history from the pre-Columbia era until the 2016 presidential election (in his second edition, published earlier this year). At just 120 pages, it might just as easily have been titled 'American History for Dummies.' It wouldn't be an inaccurate title. 'We've all seen those man-on-the-street interviews on the late night shows,' Russell said. 'Someone is asked the names of Christopher Columbus' three ships and he answers, 'The Nina, the Pina Colada and the Santa Margarita.' It's funny. What's not funny is what we see in the data. Just 12 percent of high school seniors tested as proficient in history, even lower than math or science, which has gotten a lot of attention, deservedly so. 'There was also a survey of seniors at 50 American colleges, a group that included Harvard and Yale,' he added. 'In that survey, the average score was an F. In a Freedom Foundation, only one in 1,000 adults could name the five freedoms listed in the First Amendment.' Russell is disturbed at that lack of knowledge. 'To me, it's proof that our connection to our history is fading,' he said. 'We're losing our collective national memory. We're not keeping faith with our Founding Fathers. Patrick Henry said, 'I know of no way of judging the future but by the past.' I agree with that.' Russell believes the way history is taught is much of the problem. 'High school history books are 700 pages. In college, they can be more than 1,000 pages. These books aren't cheap,' he said. 'Students don't want to read them and it's pretty clear that little is retained when they do. Several years ago, I realized my own children didn't know many things I assumed they had learned in school. That's what got me thinking about the book. Can this information be learned quickly and easily? That's what was missing — a short overview of our history where they can learn the basics.' Although children will benefit, the book is not written specifically for children, Russell said. 'For adults, it's a refresher,' he said. 'You'll find things you didn't remember or things that maybe you didn't have quite right and, hopefully, some things that you never knew. History is a story and everybody likes a good story. So that's what I've tried to do here.' For more information on the book, visit www.AmericanHistoryInNoTime.com ___ Information from: The Commercial Dispatch, http://www.cdispatch.com