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    Ed Arends grabbed what he could in the night and fled his 5-acre property, lava oozing from a crack in his neighborhood on Hawaii's Big Island. That was more than two weeks ago. He hasn't been able to stay at his house since. 'It's disconcerting not being home, being displaced,' Arends said. 'I'm sleeping on a sofa in a guy's living room.' As uncertainty drags on over what the Kilauea volcano will do next, those who were forced to leave their homes weeks ago are growing weary. More than 300 people were staying at three different shelters as of Saturday, Hawaii County mayor's spokeswoman Janet Snyder said. Some 2,000 people who live in the Leilani Estates neighborhood, including Arends, and nearby areas were still evacuated after a lava fissure opened May 3. Officials ordered more people to evacuate Saturday when lava crossed a highway and flowed into the ocean, creating new health hazards. Lava has consumed more than 40 buildings. Those who live in the remote, rural Puna district on the slopes of the Kilauea volcano know the lava risks. Leilani Estates sits in a zone that the U.S Geological Survey deems to have the highest risk of a lava flow. Residents are allowed to return during the day to check on their homes. Some 25 miles (40 kilometers) away at the summit, there are intermittent explosions that send ash wafting over communities. It's not known whether lava flows will keep advancing or stop, and new flows are likely. Steve Clapper stood in the rain outside a shelter where he and his mother have been staying since evacuating Leilani Estates. He sleeps in his truck with his dogs while his mother sleeps inside the shelter. The uncertainty has made Clapper want to get his 88-year-old mother, who has dementia and is on oxygen, off the island. 'We don't have any control over it, and this could go on for years,' he said. Don Waguespack, who co-owns Cajun Paradise Farms down a hill from where fissures have opened, evacuated to a small hotel room on the opposite side of the island. 'We evacuated to Kona and felt so helpless over there, I think it was worse mentally for us than being here,' he said. So Waguespack returned, relieved to find his home on his 10-acre property still standing. Arends and his brother Mike Arends, who also evacuated from Leilani Estates, were grateful their houses were still safe. 'It's pretty early to tell what's going to happen, things change on almost a daily basis,' Ed Arends said. Yet living out of bags, not knowing where your toothbrush might be at a given moment, is tiring and stressful for the brothers. 'It's easy to go two or three days with it, but I think after two weeks, it grates on you a little bit,' Mike Arends said. 'You start to get weaker, you start to get more tired, you're not quite sleeping right, you're not eating right.
  • Forget the gray, green and brown dinosaurs in the 'Jurassic Park' movies. Paleontologist Jack Horner wants to transport people back in time to see a feathered Tyrannosaurus rex colored bright red and a blue triceratops with red fringe similar to a rooster's comb. Horner, who consulted with director Steven Spielberg on the 'Jurassic Park' films, is developing a three-dimensional hologram exhibit that will showcase the latest theories on what dinosaurs looked like. He is working with entertainment company Base Hologram to create an exhibit that will let people feel as though they're on an archaeological dig, inside a laboratory and surrounded by dinosaurs in the wild. 'I'm always trying to figure out a good way to get the science of paleontology across to the general public,' Horner said in a recent interview with The Associated Press. 'Like taking them into the field or taking them into my laboratory and then using the technology that we have to show people what dinosaurs were really like.' That understanding of what dinosaurs looked like has changed a lot since the original 'Jurassic Park' in 1993. For example, researchers now believe dinosaurs were much more bird-like than lizard-like, and scientists studying dinosaur skulls have found keratin, a substance that gives birds their bright colors. 'We can see at least areas that could be vividly colored, very much like birds, and there's no reason to make them different from birds,' Horner said. Horner and Base Hologram workers have been developing the exhibit's story line for a couple of months, with plans to have multiple traveling exhibits ready to launch by spring 2019. The company wants to place them in museums, science centers and other institutions where they might spur debate among scientists who don't share the theory that dinosaurs were colorful, feathered creatures. 'The controversy is OK because it makes people talk,' said Base Hologram executive vice president Michael Swinney. Live performances using holograms have gained attention in recent years, notably through concerts that feature likenesses of dead performers such as Michael Jackson and Tupac Shakur. Until now, Base Hologram, a subsidiary of the live entertainment company Base Entertainment, has used the technology to put on concerts by late singers Roy Orbison and Marie Callas. As the field becomes more competitive, the company is seeking new areas to apply the technology, such as science, CEO Brian Becker said. Horner previously worked with Microsoft to create his dinosaur holograms that can be used with virtual and augmented reality technologies. He noted the technology used in the exhibit can be applied even more broadly, including by paleontologists in their labs. 'What we do now is, when we want to envision something, we get an artist to paint it,' Horner said. 'Now, we're going to be able to create a 3-D immersive experience a lot better than a painting.
  • Deadpool and his foul-mouthed crew of misfits and malcontents have taken down the Avengers. Fox's 'Deadpool 2' brought in $125 million this weekend, giving it the second-highest opening ever for an R-rated movie and ending the three-week reign of Disney's 'Avengers: Infinity War' at the top of the North American box office, according to studio estimates Sunday. 'Deadpool 2,' with Ryan Reynolds returning as the title character and co-writing this time, fell somewhat short of the $130 million the studio predicted and the $132.4 million that its predecessor earned two years ago. Analysts and the studio said the difference can be attributed to the first film opening on a holiday weekend, and could easily be made up with Memorial Day coming, despite the looming competition from 'Solo: A Star Wars Story.' 'I think with a holiday on our second weekend we'll catch 'Deadpool' if not exceed it,' said Chris Aronson, distribution chief for 20th Century Fox. The film grossed $176.3 million worldwide and opened better overseas than the first, especially finding audiences in Latin America. The Avengers are hardly hurting. Disney and Marvel's 'Avengers: Infinity War' brought in an estimated $29 million in North America for a four-week take of $595 million domestically and $1.2 billion internationally. It's now the fifth highest grossing film of all time worldwide. In a whole different corner of the cinematic universe, 'Book Club' was third with a $12.5 million weekend that exceeded expectations. It was a successful piece of counter-programming for Paramount, which used the modestly budgeted comedy starring Jane Fonda, Diane Keaton and Candice Bergen to find older audiences and women while 'Deadpool 2' dwelled overwhelmingly on young men. 'There are definitely audiences out there for whom superhero movies are not their cup of tea,' said Paul Dergarabedian, senior media analyst for comScore. 'Deadpool 2' follows the proudly foul formula of the first, mixing the usual superhero set pieces with gore, gross-out jokes, 80s power ballads and frequent fourth-wall violations. The box office of the second film suggests that formula can become a long-term franchise, and builds its possibilities with the addition of antihero teammates from Marvel Comics for the title character, including Josh Brolin's Cable and Zazie Beetz's Domino. 'The source material is so vast and rich that I don't think there's any question that it just opens the door for more,' Aronson said. Along with the earnings and acclaim for last year's R-rated 'Logan,' Fox has made itself the early leader in the burgeoning subgenre. 'The R-rating may be restrictive in terms of the audience make-up, but it's certainly not restrictive in the creative freedom it offers, so when movies like these hit, they can hit big,' Dergarabedian said. 'There is a place for the R rating. In the superhero genre it offers endless and really cool possibilities.' 'Deadpool 2' next faces off with 'Solo,' but the two films along with the still-earning 'Avengers' ought to make for a major Memorial Day for the industry. 'This marketplace is big enough for all these films,' Dergarabedian said. Estimated ticket sales for Friday through Sunday at U.S. and Canadian theaters, according to comScore. Where available, the latest international numbers for Friday through Sunday are also included. Final domestic figures will be released Monday. 1. 'Deadpool 2,' $125 million. 2.'Avengers: Infinity War,' $28.6 million. 3. 'Book Club,' $12.5 million. 4. 'Life of the Party,' $7.7 million. 5. 'Breaking In,' $6.4 million. 6. 'Show Dogs,' $6 million. 7. 'Overboard,' $4.7 million. 8. 'A Quiet Place,' $4 million. 9. 'Rampage,' $1.5 million. 10. 'I Feel Pretty,' $1.2 million. ___ Universal and Focus are owned by NBC Universal, a unit of Comcast Corp.; Sony, Columbia, Sony Screen Gems and Sony Pictures Classics are units of Sony Corp.; Paramount is owned by Viacom Inc.; Disney, Pixar and Marvel are owned by The Walt Disney Co.; Miramax is owned by Filmyard Holdings LLC; 20th Century Fox and Fox Searchlight are owned by 21st Century Fox; Warner Bros. and New Line are units of Time Warner Inc.; MGM is owned by a group of former creditors including Highland Capital, Anchorage Advisors and Carl Icahn; Lionsgate is owned by Lions Gate Entertainment Corp.; IFC is owned by AMC Networks Inc.; Rogue is owned by Relativity Media LLC. ___ Follow Andrew Dalton on Twitter at: https://twitter.com/andyjamesdalton .
  • The Latest on the Texas school shooting (all times local): 11:50 a.m. A church where one of the victims of a Texas school shooting attended services is providing a licensed counselor during its worship to offer advice on how to deal with tragedy. Angelique Ramirez attended Santa Fe's Dayspring Church along with her family. Senior Pastor Brad Drake said before Sunday's worship that the church's objective is to 'offer hope and healing that we understand only comes through a relationship with Jesus Christ.' He said he had not planned anything special to say to the some 150 people who normally attend. He was wearing a green T-shirt with gold lettering —the Santa Fe High School colors— printed Saturday night by the wife of the church's youth pastor. Drake said all the church leaders were wearing the shirts Sunday. He said Ramirez was a member of the Santa Fe church's youth ministry and had occasionally accompanied a younger brother to the ministry. ___ 11:40 a.m. The National Rifle Association's incoming president is blaming the latest deadly school shooting on youngsters 'steeped in a culture of violence.' Retired Lt. Col. Oliver North tells 'Fox News Sunday' that authorities are trying 'like the dickens' to treat symptoms instead of going after the disease. He says the disease isn't the Second Amendment and that depriving law-abiding citizens of their constitutional right to have a firearm won't stop shootings like Friday's near Houston that left 10 people dead. North identifies the 'disease' as youngsters growing up in a culture where violence is commonplace. He listed such things as violent movies and TV shows and drug use, specifically Ritalin, which is used to treat hyperactivity disorder. Investigators haven't linked the suspect to Ritalin or other drugs. ___ 10:55 a.m. Texas Gov. Greg Abbott has arrived at Arcadia First Baptist Church in Santa Fe, where he hugged grieving parishioners reeling two days after a teenage gunman killed 10 people in his high school. Monica Bracknell, an 18-year-old senior who survived the shooting, told the governor Sunday morning that she doesn't think the shooting should be turned into a political battle over gun control. The teenager was surrounded by dozens of television cameras, photographers and reporters, as she shook her governor's hand and said she didn't believe guns were to blame for the shooting she survived. She arrived at church a day after returning to her school to collect belongings left behind in the chaos of the shooting. She said she and her classmates are 'shaken up' but coping. The governor spoke privately to worshippers as they arrived but did not speak to the media. ___ 9:20 a.m. The first funeral for one of the 10 people fatally shot at a high school outside Houston is set for Sunday afternoon. The Islamic Society for Greater Houston says services for 17-year-old Pakistani exchange student Sabika Sheikh are scheduled for a mosque in suburban Houston. She'd been attending classes at Santa Fe High School since last August when she was killed Friday. Her father, Abdul Aziz Sheikh, has described his daughter as a hard-working and accomplished student who aspired to work in civil service and hoped one day to join Pakistan's Foreign Office. Her body is to be returned to her family in Karachi, Pakistan. ___ 9:05 a.m. Texas Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick is urging a 'hardening' of school buildings in the wake of a shooting that killed 10 people at a Texas high school. Patrick blames a U.S. 'culture of violence' and says more needs to be done to keep shooters away from students, such as restricting school entrances and arming teachers with guns. He tells CNN's 'State of the Union': 'When you're facing someone who's an active shooter, the best way to take that shooter down is with a gun. But even better than that is four to five guns to one.' Appearing on the Sunday talk shows, Patrick did not address details of the law enforcement investigation into Friday's shooting at Santa Fe High. A 17-year-old student is being held on murder charges. Patrick tells ABC's 'The Week' he supports background checks for gun purchasers but stresses 'gun regulation starts at home.
  • Three Iraqi natives and a Syrian woman have been enlisted as guides to share a modern cultural perspective with visitors to new Middle Eastern galleries at the Penn Museum in Philadelphia. The guides intersperse personal stories with historic content as they lead groups through the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology's new galleries that tell tales going back 10,000 years. 'People really have trouble understanding and connecting with objects from the ancient past,' said Ellen M. Owens, Penn Museum's Merle-Smith director of learning programs. 'People who come from these places, even in contemporary times, can find a connection with the objects and they provide an interesting window into what it's like to walk through these magnificent ancient ziggurats or visit a marketplace where traditions go back thousands of years.' On a recent tour, guide Abdulhadi Al-Karfawi pointed out cuneiform tablets used for accounting, legal text and, in one case, a school boy's recounting of an argument with his father. Using a blunt reed on a clay tablet, the boy detailed how his father had scolded him, saying 'Why are you wasting time? Get to school! Apply yourself at school!' 'I read that and think of my father, who was a tough person who had 15 boys and girls but was on top of everything,' said Al-Karfawi, 40, a former translator for the U.S. Army in Baghdad who settled in the U.S. with his wife and children last year. 'Today, as a father, I have the same argument with my kid. I never thought it was happening thousands of years ago.' In another part of the galleries, Moumena Saradar, 41, paused in front of bronze and brass balance scales and weights dating back to the 1800s. The scales are similar to the ones used at the market near her home in Damascus. Saradar remembers when, as a teenager, her mother taught her to use the scales so she could double check the weights of the fruits and vegetables she'd purchased from a vendor. 'Because if he cheats her, everyone in the town would know,' Saradar said, drawing laughter. Rusty Baker, executive director of the non-profit advocacy group PA Museums, said programs like the Penn Museum's Global Guides provide visitors with a richer experience and could help grow audiences. At Philadelphia's Eastern State Penitentiary historic site, former prisoners and guards lead tours, he said, while some tribal museums feature Native Americans guides. 'Museums have been looking at demographics and asking, 'Who is not here and how do we do something about that?'' Baker said. 'These programs are an opportunity to provide a more authentic experience as opposed to a typical tour with a docent who is knowledgeable and passionate but not culturally connected.' Penn Museum will continue to expand the Global Guides program, Owens said, as it opens two new galleries showcasing Mexico/Central America and Africa in the next year. The museum is working with two organizations that help new immigrants to find trainees. Part of that training includes discussing provenance and how guides feel about seeing objects from their home countries on display in the U.S. Guides in the current group say they are happy to have pieces of their old homeland in their new one 'Every time I go through the gallery, I feel like this is Iraq,' Al-Karfawi said. 'My grandma wore a headpiece like (Queen Puabi). . The dishes are so lovely and they remind me of my sister serving food.' Saradar said she saw the exhibit as a way to build cultural understanding. 'This is the best thing I could do, being a messenger for my culture. I wouldn't be able to do that without these objects,' she said. 'I'm finding connections between your people and my people.' After taking Al-Karfawi's tour, Lalaine Little said she enjoyed hearing his personal story of sleeping on rooftop mattresses with his family during the hottest nights. 'There's something universal about a family camping out, looking at the stars,' said Little, director of the Pauly Friedman Art Gallery at Misericordia University. 'This experience felt very authentic. Sometimes you go on these tours and there are somewhat canned responses (from guides), but his were very heartfelt. He's not repeating what he learned in training. He's talking about his heritage because he's very proud of it.
  • Yellowing court records from the arrests of Rosa Parks, Martin Luther King Jr. and others at the dawn of the modern civil rights era are being preserved and digitized after being discovered, folded and wrapped in rubber bands, in a courthouse box. Archivists at historically black Alabama State University are cataloguing and flattening dozens of documents found at the Montgomery County Courthouse, and Circuit Clerk Tiffany McCord hopes electronic versions will be available for viewing as early as late June. Once the records are added to Alabama's online court system, historians and others will be able to read the original pleadings filed by Parks' attorneys following her refusal to give her seat to a white man on a Montgomery city bus on Dec. 1, 1955. Parks' arrest led to the Montgomery Bus Boycott, which launched a young King to prominence as a civil rights leader while the Atlanta-born pastor was working at his first church in downtown Montgomery. The records being preserved include a bail document signed in black ink by King, who was arrested in March 1956 with Parks and more than 100 others on charges of boycotting the city bus system in protest of Parks' treatment. 'I think the public ought to be able to see that,' said McCord. 'It's exciting that it's happening.' Alabama State archivist Howard Robinson said the records are important because they provide texture and depth to the story of the early days of the movement. Rather than just containing the familiar names of Parks and King, Robinson said, the records include the names of lesser-known people like witnesses who saw Parks' arrest; bus boycott participants; attorneys; and those who put up bond to free people from jail. 'These papers allow us to understand who those folks were,' said Robinson. Parks was convicted of violating the city's segregation laws; a federal court deciding another case outlawed segregation on public buses while her case was being appealed. That same ruling effectively ended King's appeal after he was convicted with others of violating an anti-boycott law. McCord said she found documents from the cases, which include records from trial and appeals courts, after taking office in 2013. 'They were in an envelope box. They were all bent and folded with rubber bands on them probably dating back to the 1950s. The bands were sort of disintegrating into them,' she said. After looking at options, including feeding the papers through a scanner that sometimes jams, McCord said she decided to provide them on a 10-year loan for scanning and research by Alabama State, where fliers announcing the boycott were made more than 60 years ago. Some records and photos relating to Parks' arrest already are on display at Montgomery City Hall, and school officials sounded skeptical when first contacted about the boxful of court records, McCord said. 'When they came over and saw what it was their mouths dropped open,' she said. Robinson said he hopes to locate some of the people mentioned in the documents. 'In order to understand the past and all the events that have occurred, particularly as part of the modern civil rights movement, we reduce the bus boycott to Rosa Parks refusing to relinquish her seat and Martin Luther King leading the bus boycott,' he said. 'But these records sort of indicate that it was much more ... than that, that there were far more people involved and that the city of Montgomery and the state of Alabama mounted a pitched battle to maintain segregation.
  • A nearly 80-year-old statue depicting a European settler with a weapon in his hand towering over a Native American that some say celebrates white supremacy has been dismantled by crews in southwestern Michigan's Kalamazoo. And at the University of Michigan, regents have voted to strip a former school president's name from a campus science building because he lent his scientific expertise to groups that were in favor of selective reproduction, also known as eugenics. Vestiges of racism and intolerance are slowly being moved and removed in Michigan and other northern states. In some cases, the efforts are being led by students and faculty at prestigious universities, community leaders and elected officials taking harder looks at their history and potentially divisive issues while being spurred by more widespread efforts in the South to erase the nation's slave past. 'I think it's very much in line with the things we're seeing happen across the country,' said Josh Hasler, a recent University of Michigan graduate who worked as a student with some faculty members to have Clarence Cook Little's name scraped off the building on the school's Ann Arbor campus. Little was the school's president from 1925 to 1929. He supported sterilization of what eugenics referred to as the 'unfit' and also backed immigration restrictions and laws against the mixing of racial groups, including in marriage. He was scientific director of a tobacco research advisory board in the 1950s and was accused of sowing doubt about smoking and cancer. The vote to take down Little's name came in March along with one by regents to remove late science professor Alexander Winchell's name from a residence hall wing. Winchell wrote a book that is cited by white supremacist groups. 'No one is trying to erase history,' Hasler said. 'It goes to show that remembering and commemorating aren't the same thing.' Monuments honoring Confederate soldiers have been targeted for removal from courthouses, statehouses, schools and public parks since the racially motivated killings of nine African-American parishioners in 2015 at a church in Charleston, South Carolina, and after last year's violent protests at a white supremacist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia. Charlottesville leaders have voted to remove statues of Confederate Gens. Robert E. Lee and Thomas 'Stonewall' Jackson. Earlier this year, Tulsa Public Schools removed a monument dedicated to Lee and rescinded the school's name. Meanwhile, the North Carolina Historical Commission is considering a formal request from late last year by Democratic Gov. Roy Cooper to move three monuments from the state's Capitol grounds to a historic battlefield site. But such statues and monuments aren't just being mothballed down South. Last year, Helena, Montana, removed a memorial to Confederate soldiers that had been in a public park since 1916. And in the Detroit suburb of Dearborn, a statue of former Mayor Orville Hubbard — who spent decades trying to keep the city all white — was socked away for more than a year after leaders decided it didn't belong outside a new City Hall. The Hubbard statue now stands beside a small museum. Kalamazoo's Fountain of the Pioneers is expected to be stored away until officials decide on a new home for the monument. Some residents say the piece is racist toward Native Americans. Others argue that it is art and can teach people about history. Only time will tell if calls to remove monuments will continue to grow, according to Paul Brest, professor emeritus and former law school dean at Stanford University. 'I think it has more to do with a moment in history when there is a lot of consciousness of people's conduct ... a period where people are socially conscious about this behavior in the past,' Brest said. 'The Civil War monuments are a particular example of that. 'The things that may seem innocuous today may — 100 years from now — seem like bad deeds. It calls for a degree of caution.' Brest chaired a committee that developed principles and procedures for renaming buildings at the northern California school. The committee was put together after some students and faculty demanded that Junipero Serra's name be removed from campus buildings and signage. Serra was the Roman Catholic founder of nine California missions, and many of the missions were built on land native to the Ohlone Indians. Stanford says it will consider renaming buildings, streets, monuments, endowed positions and prizes when there is strong evidence that retaining the name is inconsistent with the university's integrity or is harmful to its research and teaching missions and inclusiveness. Other schools' approaches have varied. Yale University in Connecticut said last year that it would change the name of a residential college that honors John C. Calhoun, a 19th century alumnus and former U.S. vice president, who was an ardent supporter of slavery. However, Princeton University in New Jersey declined to remove Woodrow Wilson's names from its public policy school following calls from black students that the ex-U.S. president was a segregationist. Wilson also served as Princeton's president from 1902 to 1910. Despite, the University of Michigan's decision to drop Clarence Cook Little's name from its Ann Arbor campus, the University of Maine has no plans to remove it from a lecture hall. Little was Maine's president from 1922 to 1925. 'You just can't do these ad hoc,' Brest said. 'It's really important to have some criteria, so when you consider removing a name it's not just a one-off. It's certainly safer to name (a building) after a tree or a flower than a person, but there still may be good reasons for a university to want to name something after a historical person or even a living person.' At the University of Michigan, Little's name has been replaced on the building with the location's address. The Winchell House sign will be taken down over the summer. The school established a new review process in January 2017 about historical names in and on campus buildings. School president, Mark Schlissel, has said the review principles include that anyone requesting changes 'carry a heavy burden' to justify it. Schlissel said that in the Little and Winchell cases he believes 'that burden has been met.
  • The Latest on the school shooting in Texas (all times local): 11:10 a.m. The National Rifle Association's incoming president is blaming the latest deadly school shooting on youngsters 'steeped in a culture of violence.' Retired Lt. Col. Oliver North tells 'Fox News Sunday' that authorities are trying 'like the dickens' to treat symptoms instead of going after the disease. He says the disease isn't the Second Amendment and that depriving law-abiding citizens of their constitutional right to have a firearm won't stop shootings like Friday's near Houston that left 10 people dead. North identifies the 'disease' as youngsters growing up in a culture where violence is commonplace. ___ 10:55 a.m. Texas Gov. Greg Abbott has arrived at Arcadia First Baptist Church in Santa Fe, where he hugged grieving parishioners reeling two days after a teenage gunman killed 10 people in his high school. Monica Bracknell, an 18-year-old senior who survived the shooting, told the governor Sunday morning that she doesn't think the shooting should be turned into a political battle over gun control. The teenager was surrounded by dozens of television cameras, photographers and reporters, as she shook her governor's hand and said she didn't believe guns were to blame for the shooting she survived. She arrived at church a day after returning to her school to collect belongings left behind in the chaos of the shooting. She said she and her classmates are 'shaken up' but coping. The governor spoke privately to worshippers as they arrived but did not speak to the media. ___ 9:20 a.m. The first funeral for one of the 10 people fatally shot at a high school outside Houston is set for Sunday afternoon. The Islamic Society for Greater Houston says services for 17-year-old Pakistani exchange student Sabika Sheikh are scheduled for a mosque in suburban Houston. She'd been attending classes at Santa Fe High School since last August when she was killed Friday. Her father, Abdul Aziz Sheikh, has described his daughter as a hard-working and accomplished student who aspired to work in civil service and hoped one day to join Pakistan's Foreign Office. Her body is to be returned to her family in Karachi, Pakistan. ___ 9:05 a.m. Texas Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick is urging a 'hardening' of school buildings in the wake of a shooting that killed 10 people at a Texas high school. Patrick blames a U.S. 'culture of violence' and says more needs to be done to keep shooters away from students, such as restricting school entrances and arming teachers with guns. He tells CNN's 'State of the Union': 'When you're facing someone who's an active shooter, the best way to take that shooter down is with a gun. But even better than that is four to five guns to one.' Appearing on the Sunday talk shows, Patrick did not address details of the law enforcement investigation into Friday's shooting at Santa Fe High. A 17-year-old student is being held on murder charges. Patrick tells ABC's 'The Week' he supports background checks for gun purchasers but stresses 'gun regulation starts at home.
  • Criminal investigators are getting their first look at materials gathered from raids on the home and office of President Donald Trump's personal lawyer as a process to separate items subject to attorney-client privilege appears to be meeting a judge's demand that it occur speedily and efficiently. The progress comes just days before U.S. District Judge Kimba M. Wood will preside over a fourth hearing resulting from Michael Cohen's efforts to gain influence over what potential evidence seized in the April 9 raids can be deemed subject to the privilege and blocked from the view of criminal prosecutors. Prosecutors say they are investigating possible fraud as they study Cohen's personal business dealings. Wood last month designated a former federal judge, Barbara Jones, to serve as a neutral party — known as a special master — and resolve disputes over what items can be kept secret and out of the view of investigators. Twice, Jones has filed letters updating the status of the privilege search, most recently a week ago. She said she will provide Wood with a timeline for concluding the privilege review once she has received enough of Cohen's electronic property. In a letter to the court on Friday, Cohen's lawyers indicated they were encouraged by the system that was set up, noting the 'careful review procedure that is currently being overseen by the special master.' The letter was filed as they sought to exclude Michael Avenatti, an attorney for porn star Stormy Daniels, from joining the court case. The first materials to face the scrutiny of Jones and lawyers for Cohen, Trump and the Trump Organization, were likely the easiest to study: eight boxes of paper documents. The majority of what was seized, though, was contained on over a dozen electronic devices, including computers, cellular phones and an iPad. The paper documents, numbering in the hundreds or thousands, were processed over a two-week period, enabling criminal prosecutors in recent days to begin scrutinizing raid materials for the first time. But it is likely that the electronic documents, containing a much larger volume of materials, will take longer to process. Jones said in a letter to the court a week ago that the government was expected to produce all of the content from the raids except for the electronic contents of a single computer by Friday. Then, lawyers for Cohen and Trump will designate items they think are subject to attorney-client privilege as the same time Jones is making her own designations. At hearings last month, Wood said she wanted the process to move much faster than the more than a year that it took lawyers to resolve privilege disputes after a civil rights attorney was arrested in a terrorism probe in 2002. Joanna Hendon, a lawyer for Trump, said last month that even the president was ready to 'make himself available, as needed' to aid the attorney-client privilege search. Lawyers for Cohen had pledged that they were ready to work around around-the-clock, if necessary, to ensure there was no delay. Last month, Cohen's lawyers revealed that his three clients in 2017 and 2018 were Trump, Elliott Broidy — a Trump fundraiser who paid $1.6 million to a Playboy Playmate with whom he had an extramarital affair — and Fox News host Sean Hannity. In court papers, prosecutors have said the searches 'are the result of a months-long investigation into Cohen, and seek evidence of crimes, many of which have nothing to do with his work as an attorney, but rather relate to Cohen's own business dealings.' The raids were authorized by a federal magistrate judge based on factual information presented by federal prosecutors in New York. They were triggered in part by a referral from special counsel Robert Mueller, who separately is looking into Russian interference in the 2016 U.S. presidential election.
  • Actress Meghan Markle and Britain’s Prince Harry got married Saturday in a highly anticipated, star-studded ceremony in St. George’s Chapel at England’s Windsor Castle.  >> Read more trending news Follow along with highlights from Saturday’s event: Update 6:21 a.m. EDT Sunday: The British royal family took to Twitter late Saturday to congratulate Prince Harry and Meghan Markle and thank their guests for attending their wedding. “Thank you to everyone who came to Windsor and those who followed from around the UK, the Commonwealth, and the world today,” the tweet said. “Congratulations once again to the newly-married Duke and Duchess of Sussex.” >> See the tweet here Update 8:39 p.m. EDT: The couple drove to their reception in style. Prince Harry sat behind the wheel of a 1968 Jaguar E-Type with bride Meghan Markle in the passenger seat. The couple had changed from their wedding attire to attend the evening reception at Frogmore House.  The car, which had been converted to electric power, had license number E190518, their wedding date, according to Metro. Update 1:51 p.m. EDT: Meghan Markle’s dad, Thomas, told TMZ that he hopes his relatives “will just shut up about everything” on Saturday after his daughter and Prince Harry exchanged vows in England on Saturday. >> Meghan Markle confirms dad will not attend royal wedding Earlier Saturday, the celebrity news site reported that Thomas Markle watched his daughter get hitched from his hospital bed after he had to undergo heart surgery earlier this week. He said he will “always regret” not being able to attend. 'When you watch your child get married, every thought goes through your mind, every memory from the first day she was born, the first time I held her,' Thomas Markle told TMZ. 'Now I pray that Harry and Meghan can go on a nice honeymoon and rest and relax, and all of my relatives will just shut up about everything.' Update 1:05 p.m. EDT: Saturday’s wedding included a performance from a gospel choir, an unusual choice for a royal wedding that was apparently spurred by Prince Charles. Karen Gibson, the leader of the Kingdom Choir that performed for Markle and Prince Harry’s wedding Saturday, told The Guardian that the choir was first contacted by representatives of Clarence House, Prince Charles’ home. “I understand that Prince Charles really likes gospel music,” she said. “The couple were very intentional about what they wanted sung and how they wanted it sung, but the actual idea came from Prince Charles.” >> Royal wedding: 6 things to know about 19-year-old cellist Seku Kanneh-Mason She told The Guardian that the variety of music played Saturday, which also included a performance by 19-year-old cellist Sheku Kanneh-Mason, was “reflective of what society looks like today. “We live in a multi-cultural society, so we had classical music, contemporary classical music as well as gospel music, because you’ve got many cultures living here,” she said. Update 12:42 p.m. EDT: Kensington Palace officials announced Saturday that Markle planned to speak at a lunchtime reception following her marriage to Prince Harry earlier in the day, but The Guardian reported she would actually be speaking at a second, evening reception. >> Royal Wedding photos: The kiss, the ring and more highlights Update 12:15 p.m. EDT: Elton John performed songs including 'Tiny Dancer,' 'Circle of Life,' and 'Your Song' on Saturday at the reception following Prince Harry and Markle's wedding, according to the British tabloid the Daily Mail. >> Photos: Oprah, Elton John among guests for royal wedding Kensington Palace officials said earlier Saturday that Prince Harry asked John to perform and that the artist agreed “in recognition of the close connection he has with Prince Harry and his family.” Update 11:35 a.m. EDT: Kensington Palace has suggested a donation to charity rather than buying a gift for Prince Harry and Meghan Markle. Update 9:50 a.m. EDT: Markle’s father, Thomas Markle, was supposed to walk his daughter down the aisle Saturday, but he changed his plans after suffering a heart attack and while facing criticism for posing for paparazzi photos. >> Photos: Meghan Markle’s wedding dress stuns at royal wedding Thomas Markle told celebrity news site TMZ that he watched Saturday’s ceremony live as he continued to recover from heart surgery. “My baby looks beautiful and she looks very happy,” he told TMZ. “I wish I was there and I wish them all my love and all happiness.” Update 9:20 a.m. EDT: The queen will be holding a lunchtime reception Saturday after Prince Harry and Markle exchanged vows earlier in the day. Prince Harry and his new bride will both make speeches, royal family officials said. >> Meghan Markle selects Givenchy dress for royal wedding The couple’s wedding cake, made using elderflower syrup created from the elderflower trees at the queen’s Sandringham House, will be served at the reception. The sponge cake features an Amalfi lemon curd and elderflower buttercream filling and is topped with Swiss meringue buttercream and 150 fresh flowers. Update 8:45 a.m. EDT: The royal family shared congratulations Saturday for Prince Harry and Markle after the pair wed Saturday. Officials shared several videos of Saturday’s ceremony on social media: Update 8:09 a.m. EDT: Prince Harry and Markle have left St. George’s Chapel. The crowd could be heard shouting 'Hip hip hooray,' as they left, a 'very English tradition,' according to The Guardian.  Update 7:40 a.m. EDT: Markle and Prince Harry have exchanged vows and been pronounced husband and wife. Update 7:30 a.m. EDT: See scenes from the royal wedding as the ceremony continues Saturday: Update 7:15 a.m. EDT: Prince Harry and Markle have exchanged “I will”s, to the laughter of those gathered in St. George’s Church Saturday. As they stood at the altar, Harry said to Meghan: 'You look amazing.' >> Photos: Prince Harry and Meghan Markle marry at Windsor Castle Markle arrived to a fanfare and walked down the aisle accompanied part of the way by Prince Charles, and by 10 young page boys and bridesmaids. The children include 4-year-old Prince George and 3-year-old Princess Charlotte, children of Prince William and the Duchess of Cambridge. Update 7:01 a.m. EDT: Markle has arrived at St. George’s Church. Update 6:58 a.m. EDT: More members of the royal family have arrived at the church. Update 6:41 a.m. EDT: Prince Harry has arrived at St. George’s Chapel along with his brother, Prince William. William, who was married to commoner Kate Middleton at a ceremony in 2011, is carrying his brother's rings. Saturday's ceremony is supposed to last about an hour. Update 6:23 a.m. EDT: Markle has left her hotel for St. George’s Chapel. >> Photos: First glimpse of Meghan Markle’s wedding dress Update 5:45 a.m. EDT: Famous guests who have already arrived for Prince Harry and Markle’s wedding include actor George Clooney and his wife, attorney Amal Clooney, singer James Blunt, Oprah Winfrey, actor Idris Elba and the Beckam family. The stars are among celebrities, royalty, athletes and family friends in the 600-strong congregation invited to St. George's Chapel in Windsor. Kensington Palace officials announced Saturday morning that Markle and Prince Harry’s wedding rings were made by Cleave and Company. Markle’s is made of Welsh gold while the prince’s will be made of a platinum band with a textured finish. Original report: Queen Elizabeth II conferred the titles of Duke and Duchess of Sussex on Prince Harry and Meghan Markle on the morning of the royal wedding. >> Harry and Meghan’s new titles: Duke and Duchess of Sussex Harry will hold several titles: His Royal Highness The Duke of Sussex, Earl of Dumbarton and Baron Kilkeel. Markle will be known as Her Royal Highness The Duchess of Sussex. Check back for updates to this developing story. The Associated Press contributed to this report.