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National

    Two armed men were detained after trying to walk into a Missouri Walmart to buy ammunition for target practice, police said. >> Read more trending news  The men were detained by police around 12:22 p.m., KCTV reported.  They were released shortly afterward. Investigators said the men did not break any laws.  'It makes me a little nervous given the fact that they had all these Walmart shootings, and I think people are starting to take it as a joke,' shopper Marya Smith told WDAF.
  • Nine people were injured Sunday when a lightning strike caused a tree to fall at a swim club in Pennsylvania. >> Read more trending news  Lightning flashed and then a tree fell onto a tent around 5 p.m., injuring two adults and seven children, WPVI reported.  Some of the victims were taken to a hospital. Three people were severely injured. Six people suffered minor injuries, WPVI reported. 
  • Former Louisiana Gov. Kathleen Babineaux Blanco, the first woman elected to head the state, died Sunday. She was 76.  >> Read more trending news  Blanco died from complications from ocular melanoma, her family said in a statement. “She was a woman of grace, faith and hope,” the family said in a statement. “She left an eternal mark on all who knew her, because she was generous and unconditional in her love, warm in her embrace and genuinely interested in the welfare of others.” In 2003, Blanco was the first woman elected governor of Louisiana. Just 20 months into her term, she faced the onslaught of Hurricane Katrina and later Rita, which left more than 1,500 people dead and damaged hundreds of thousands of homes.  She did not seek reelection.  After leaving office, she announced in 2007 that she was dealing with a rare type of cancer, The Advocate reported. “Kathleen loved this state and our people and was a shining example of what can be accomplished by hard work and determination. She led Louisiana through one of our darkest hours, when hurricanes and the failure of the federal levee system devastated much of our state,” current Gov. John Bel Edwards said in a statement. “Serving as this state’s first female governor, Kathleen was a trailblazer and broke many barriers, leading the way for others to follow. She stands among the giants who have helped shaped Louisiana’s history.
  • The military guards and fortified gates that keep intruders out of Naval Air Station Jacksonville didn't stop an alligator from scaling a roadside fence Saturday morning. >> Read more trending news  Christina Stewart stopped to film the gator as it clawed its way up a fence before belly-flopping onto the grass and continuing on its way. Officials with NAS Jacksonville said they don't plan on removing the alligator from the base unless he poses a danger to residents.
  • It's a small gesture, written on a napkin at a popular restaurant. But it carries a huge ask connected to one of the victims of the Dayton shooting in the Oregon District. >> Read more trending news  The note, left by Logan Turner's dad, asks people to hug each other.  Logan Turner, 30, of Springboro, was one of the nine people shot and killed by a gunman just outside Ned Peppers bar the morning of Aug. 4. At least 26 others were injured either by bullets or in the stampede that erupted at the sound of the gunfire. Dayton police shot and killed the gunman less than a minute after he opened fire.  Turner had just celebrated his 30th birthday that week and was out with friends in the district when he was gunned down.  Mike Turner began practicing the message well before he spread it on the napkin. The hugging crusade began at a car wash in Centerville.  'I just started hugging people,' he told News Center 7's Monica Castro on Friday night. 'The first seven, eight people I hugged, three of them knew Logan.'  That experience begat the napkin note at a Cracker Barrel, which begat his leaving notes everywhere he goes.  'I want everybody to do it,' he said, even taking the opportunity to hug Castro.  'It's an emotional moment. I can’t tell you how good it makes me feel,' he said.
  • Former Louisiana Gov. Kathleen Babineaux Blanco, who became the state's first female elected governor only to see her political career derailed by the devastation of Hurricane Katrina, has died. After struggling for years with cancer, Blanco died Sunday in hospice care in Lafayette. She was 76. 'Our hearts are broken, but we are joyful in knowing that she is rejoicing in her heavenly reunion with Christ. Please pray for God's peace to carry us through the coming days and months of sorrow as we mourn her absence from our lives,' Blanco's family said in a statement released by Gov. John Bel Edwards' office. Blanco had a rare eye cancer that she battled successfully in 2011, but it later returned and spread to her liver. Her death came more than a year after the Democrat who served in state government offices for more than two decades announced in December 2017 that she was being treated for the incurable melanoma. Blanco described being in a 'fight for my own life, one that will be difficult to win.' Blanco held Louisiana's top elected job from 2004 to 2008. Until her campaign for governor, she spent much of her political career moving steadily and quietly through state politics, rarely creating waves or controversy. Katrina raised her profile nationally and forever impacted her legacy. The devastating August 2005 hurricane killed more than 1,400 people in Louisiana, displaced hundreds of thousands and inundated 80 percent of New Orleans. Historians will continue to debate whether any governor could have been prepared for such a catastrophe, but Blanco shouldered much of the blame after images of thousands stranded on rooftops and overpasses were broadcast to the world, and the government was slow to respond. Blanco was criticized as unprepared, overwhelmed and indecisive. The recovery she guided moved ploddingly. 'While she knew that her name would forever be linked with Hurricanes Katrina and Rita, it was her dying wish that she be remembered for her faith in God, commitment to family and love of Louisiana,' Blanco's family said. As the devout Catholic asked in the letter announcing her terminal condition for prayers in her final months, she also thanked Louisiana residents for their 'abiding love' during her years of service, and described the challenges of responding to Katrina and the follow-up blow of Hurricane Rita a month later. She called it an 'honor and blessing' to lead Louisiana at the time. 'Katrina certainly left its mark and Rita left her mark on Louisiana. It made us tougher people though. It made us stronger,' the former governor said in July. In the immediate aftermath of the storms, Blanco said Louisiana's miseries were worsened by a Republican-led White House desperate to blame someone else for its disaster response failures. 'I just thought I could shout more loudly than the noise around me, but in the end I couldn't. There was just too much pain,' she once said. Edwards, a Democrat in his first term as governor, called Blanco a mentor to him and a trailblazer to women. He ordered flags at state buildings around Louisiana flown at half-staff through Blanco's funeral, scheduled for Saturday. A public service for the former governor will be held at the Louisiana Capitol on Thursday. 'She led Louisiana through one of our darkest hours, when hurricanes and the failure of the federal levee system devastated much of our state,' Edwards said in a statement Sunday. 'I hope history will remember Gov. Blanco as a tireless advocate for Louisiana, who fought fiercely for our state to rebuild.' A former high school business education teacher from the small Cajun village of Coteau, Blanco launched into politics as a consultant with her husband Raymond on local redistricting issues before going on to serve 24 years in elective office. Her first, in 1984, was a seat in the state House. Then came positions on the state utility regulatory commission and as lieutenant governor. Political insiders often dismissed Blanco as a lightweight — honest and hardworking but lacking in substance as a serious gubernatorial contender. She dropped out of the governor's race in 1991, then stunned many political prognosticators in the 2003 election by defeating Republican Bobby Jindal. She successfully attacked Jindal's record as a former state health official and made a memorable final debate appearance when — asked about a defining moment in her life — she tearfully recounted the 1997 death of her 19-year-old son Ben in an industrial accident. Jindal later succeeded Blanco as governor after Katrina stopped her plans to seek a second term. 'Kathleen loved Louisiana and served the state for decades. She faced every struggle, including her last, with good cheer and a strong will. She will be missed,' Jindal said on Twitter. More than a decade after the storms, views of Blanco are generally more sympathetic. She gets praise for running a corruption-free government and championing education. She helped raise K-12 public school teacher pay and plowed hundreds of millions of dollars into colleges. The nonpartisan Council For A Better Louisiana recently praised Blanco's successful push for a state takeover of failing public schools in New Orleans after Katrina, saying that has improved education for thousands of students. 'It's hard to overstate how politically risky that was,' the organization wrote. But Blanco's tenure also was marked by heightened partisanship at the Louisiana Capitol, party-line disputes that have only intensified since she left office. Though she stepped out of the spotlight, Blanco never entirely left Louisiana politics. She and her husband assisted Edwards in his campaigns and became close with him. Edwards called the ex-governor 'a strong woman of incredible faith, a deep and abiding love of Louisiana and all its people.' As she knew her end was near, Blanco described feeling 'blessed by God' and talked of her final months as a 'wonderful time for me, even though it is a time of a kind of countdown.' She talked of being surrounded by family and friends and old political foes having 'a chance to make up.' 'My life has been so charmed by so many events that were unexpected and challenged by many events that were unexpected,' she said in July as a Louisiana highway was named in her honor. 'But God puts you where he wants you to be.' ___ Follow Melinda Deslatte on Twitter at http://twitter.com/melindadeslatte
  • A man hunting alligators in a South Florida swamp Saturday was severely injured when he was bitten by an alligator, authorities said. >> Read more trending news  Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission officials said the man was on a johnboat with two other people when he was bitten around 8:40 p.m. as he tried to land the reptile in the Three Fork Marsh Conservation, Florida Today reported.  The hunters released the alligator, called 911 and returned to shore.  Palm Bay police arrived, saw the man with a mangled limb and applied a tourniquet to prevent further blood loss, Florida Today reported. He was taken to a hospital with non-life-threatening injuries.  Florida’s alligator hunting season started Aug. 15. 
  • Update 4:11 p.m. EDT Aug. 18: The Florida Department of Law Enforcement canceled the missing child alert for 4-year-old Tanner Swears from Coconut Creek, Florida. The Coconut Creek Police Department said Stephen Swears, who is the child's father and the companion adult the boy was believed to be with, dropped the Tanner off with a family friend Sunday afternoon. According to CCPD, that family friend brought the 4-year-old home unharmed, and he's being returned to his mother. The Coconut Creek Police said an investigation is ongoing regarding the child's disappearance. Original report: The Florida Department of Law Enforcement has issued a missing child alert for a 4-year-old from Broward County. >> Read more trending news  Tanner Swears of Coconut Creek was last seen in the 5300 block of Northwest 55th Boulevard wearing a diaper, according to the FDLE. He has curly black hair and brown eyes, weighs 39 pounds and is 3 feet, 4 inches tall, authorities said. Tanner may be with Stephen Swears, 55, also of Coconut Creek, the FDLE said. Swears has short, silver hair, weighs 190 pounds and is 5 feet, 11 inches tall, authorities said. The pair may be traveling in a silver convertible 2013 Ford Mustang with Florida tag number AIQZ45, according to the FDLE. The agency stresses that anyone who locates Swears should not approach him, but instead immediately contact law enforcement. If you have information concerning the whereabouts of Tanner or Stephen Swears, please call 911. You can also contact FDLE's Missing Endangered Persons Information Clearinghouse at 1-888-356-4774 or the Coconut Creek Police Department at 954-973-6700.
  • Update 3:50 p.m. EDT Aug. 18: Madison Elizabeth Yancy Eddlemon, the 16-year-old reported missing, has been found safe. The Chicago Sun-Times reported the Indianapolis division of the FBI confirmed the girl is safe. The division assisted the Lake County Sheriff’s Department and the FBI’s Little Rock division in the search for the teen. “She was recovered safely and a subject is in custody in connection with her disappearance,” FBI spokesperson Chris Bavender said. >> Read more trending news Authorities in Indiana said Madison was believed to be in extreme danger and was with 22-year-old Martin Alexander Curry-Fishtorn.  The FBI did not identify the person who was arrested. Original report: Police have issued a statewide Amber Alert for a missing teen girl in Indiana. WSBT reported that, according to a news release from the Lake County Sheriff’s Office, a 16-year-old girl named Madison Elizabeth Yancy Eddlemon is believed to be in extreme danger. Madison was last seen in her own car, according to the Crown Point Police Department. Her vehicle was found abandoned with a window cracked and some of her belongings inside. The victim is described as a white female who is 5 feet, 1 inch tall and 97 pounds with blonde hair and green eyes. She was last seen wearing a black hoodie with white tribal and blue jeans with tears and shin high boots with a black lace choker. The suspect is Martin Alexander Curry-Fishtorn, 22. WBBM reports Madison's family filed a protective order against him for stalking the teen, according to police. He is described as a white male, 5 feet,7 inches tall, 158 pounds with brown hair. Authorities say he has violated the order multiple times. The public is asked to be on the lookout for a dark gray 2009 Chevrolet Cobalt with Indiana license plate number 645RIS. It is believed to be the suspect's vehicle. Authorities say anyone who sees Curry-Fishtorn should not approach him but instead call 911 or the Lake County Indiana Sheriff’s Office.
  • A Florida man, upset his girlfriend was driving someone else’s car, dumped a pile of dirt from a front end loader on it, officials said. >> Read more trending news  Hunter Mills, of Crestview, asked his girlfriend to meet for a talk Wednesday, the Okaloosa Sheriff’s Office said. He got upset when she showed up in someone else’s car.  When she refused to answer a question he asked, he used a front end loader to dump a pile of dirt on the 2010 Cadillac, which had a window open.  Mills was arrested and charged with felony criminal mischief, according to the Sheriff’s Office.  He was released on $1,000 bond, according to jail records.