On Air Now

Listen Now

Weather

cloudy-day
66°
Sunny
H 84° L 56°
  • cloudy-day
    66°
    Current Conditions
    Sunny. H 84° L 56°
  • clear-day
    66°
    Afternoon
    Sunny. H 84° L 56°
  • clear-day
    70°
    Evening
    Sunny. H 74° L 56°
Listen
Pause
Error

The latest top stories

00:00 | 00:00

Listen
Pause
Error

The latest traffic report

00:00 | 00:00

Listen
Pause
Error

The latest forecast

00:00 | 00:00

National

    When Rocky Friedman of Port Townsend, Washington gathered with his sisters last year to plan for their mother’s 100th birthday celebration March 31, she serendipitously sent a one-sentence email. “Don’t forget to invite Amal and George Clooney.” Friedman said his mother, Miriam, “lives on her own, walks for exercise, reads voraciously, can tell you far more about professional sports than her son will ever know, and rocks my world with her unconditional love.” Friedman, who owns the historic Rose Theatre in Port Townsend, wondered what was possible. He shared the story Tuesday in an email to Rose Theatre supporters “because in the challenging times that we live, I think it will make you smile, and we all need that.” Through a little research and four intermediaries, Friedman was encouraged to write to Clooney with his request. “I asked if he would please consider writing a short congratulatory note to my mom on reaching this milestone. I emphasized - with less than subtlety - that at nearly 100 she was very likely his oldest fan. How could he refuse?” He didn’t. “Dear Miriam,” Clooney wrote. “They tell me you’re 100! I don’t believe it. Here’s hoping you have a fantastic birthday.” Friedman shared a photo of his mother with the signed photo on her birthday. “When I received the photograph from him that my mom is holding, and read the personal inscription, I couldn’t stop smiling. As my daughter said, ‘In the midst of the coronavirus, George Clooney comes through.’” “Thank you, George.” For more information on the Rose Theatre & Starlight Room, follow this link.
  • A bleary-eyed Chris Cuomo, saying he wanted to be a cautionary tale for his audience, anchored his CNN show from his basement Tuesday after testing positive for the coronavirus. Via remote link, he interviewed Illinois Gov. J.B. Pritzker, an emergency room nurse and CNN medical correspondent Dr. Sanjay Gupta, who expressed worry about one of Cuomo's symptoms. “Brace yourself,” Cuomo told viewers, “not for a hoax. But for the next few weeks of scary and painful realities. This is a fight. It's going to get worse. We're going to suffer.” Cuomo looked pale, his eyes watery and red-rimmed. He took a few deep breaths to compose himself. He repeated himself. Even Gupta said he didn't look good, and said he'd call later to talk about a tightness Cuomo was feeling in his chest. The 49-year-old newsman, whose brother, New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo, has logged just as much television airtime lately with daily briefings on how the disease is affecting his state, said earlier that he knew it was a matter of time because of how often he was exposed to people. He said he's staying in the basement of his Long Island home to protect himself from his wife and children. The New York governor, who appeared with his brother on CNN by remote link the night before, also used the personal story to warn others during his press briefing Tuesday. He noted that he had scolded Chris for having their 88-year-old mother, Matilda, visiting Chris' home two weeks ago. “It's my family, it's your family, it's all of our families,' he said. “This virus is so insidious, and we have to keep that in mind.” Chris Cuomo said he thought his mom would be safer at his house than in her New York City apartment, but his brother persuaded him to have her stay at his sister's place in Westchester County. Some competitors, including Sean Hannity and Geraldo Rivera of Fox News Channel, and Joy Reid and Ali Velshi of MSNBC, sent best wishes to Cuomo through social media Tuesday. He said he appreciated the sympathy from well-wishers but tried to deflect it. “Hopefully, I'll be able to keep doing the show,” he said. “But who knows?” One of the most unsettling things about the disease, he said, is hearing from doctors that there really isn't much he can do now except “suck it up.” “The best medicine is not to get it — prevention,” he said in a pre-show discussion with colleague Anderson Cooper. Most people who get the virus have mild to moderate symptoms and recover. But for older people, and those with underlying medical conditions, the disease can be dangerous. More than 3,000 people have died in the U.S. alone. Andrew Cuomo, 62, and the CNN anchor are sons of the late New York Gov. Mario Cuomo, and that teasing big brother-little brother dynamic often enlivens their appearances together. The governor called him his best friend. “He is going to be fine,” he said. “He's young, in good shape, strong — not as strong as he thinks he is, but he will be fine.” Chris got a measure of revenge Tuesday night, referring to his brother as “Captain Banana Hands.”
  • An earthquake struck north of Boise Tuesday evening, with people across a large area reporting shaking. The U.S. Geological Survey reports the magnitude 6.5 temblor struck just before 6 p.m. It was centered 73 miles (118 kilometers) northeast of Meridian, near the rural mountain town of Stanley. There were no immediate reports of damage or injuries. More than 2 million live in the region that could feel the Idaho quake, according to the USGS, with reports of shaking coming in from as far away as Helena, Montana, and Salt Lake City, Utah. Marcus Smith, an emergency room health unit coordinator at St. Luke's Wood River Medical Center, said the hospital, about 65 miles (104 kilometers) south of the epicenter, shook but the quake didn't interfere with the treatment of any patients. The hospital in Blaine County is on the front line of Idaho's coronavirus outbreak, in a region with the nation's highest per-capita rates of known COVID-19 cases outside of New York City and its surrounding counties. “It felt like a wave going through the ground, so I knew right away what it was. It just felt like waves going through the ground,” he said. The earthquake added stress during an already tense time for the region, but Smith said everything seemed fine, for now. “Until the next one, I guess,” Smith said. “I mean, that’s what we do. We’re all good.” Brett Woolley, the owner of Bridge Street Grill in Stanley, said he heard the earthquake coming before he felt it. “I heard the roar, and at first it sounded like the wind but then the roar was tremendous,” Woolley said about 10 minutes after the earthquake. “The whole house was rattling, and I started to panic. I'm sitting here perfectly still and the water next to me is still vibrating.” Dr. Lucy Jones, a seismologist at Caltech and the founder of the Dr. Lucy Jones Center for Science and Seismology, said the Idaho region has an earthquake of about this size every 30 or 40 years. The most recent one, a magnitude 7.0 earthquake near Borah Peak in 1983, killed two children in Challis and caused an estimated $12.5 million in property damage across Challis and Mackay. That quake was along what scientists call a “normal fault,” with the quake causing vertical movement, she said. Tuesday's quake appeared to be on an unmapped “strike-slip fault,' causing mostly horizontal movement along the fault line. “This is one that wasn't obvious enough to be mapped before now,” Jones said. Unmapped faults of this size are rarer in highly populated areas like California, she said, but in sparsely populated and remote regions like central Idaho they're less likely to cause damage and less likely to be a focus of geologists and seismologists. Residents in the region will likely continue to feel aftershocks, she said. The area had already recorded five aftershocks within the first hours after the 6.5 earthquake. “An aftershock is just an earthquake, but it happens at a time that doesn't surprise us,” she said. “They do every bit as much damage.” People in an earthquake should drop to the floor and cover their heads with their arms, she said. “Get to the floor before the earthquake throws you there, and if you have a table nearby, get under it and hold onto it,' Jones said. “Running in an earthquake is incredibly dangerous — people die from running in an earthquake. Just get down and try to cover.” ___ This story has been corrected to show the temblor struck just before 6 p.m. ___ Associated Press writer Lisa Baumann in Seattle contributed to this report.
  • Billions of dollars are set to flood into the United States as the coronavirus stimulus plan means checks will soon arrive for most Americans. All that money could mean Christmas for crooks looking to steal your cash. One former FBI agent is looking to protect your stimulus check and bank account It’s the largest stimulus package in American history. Roughly 80% of Americans will see hundreds or thousands of dollars sent their way. “There’s a small segment of our society thinking, ‘How can I scam my way into this and take other people’s money,’” said former FBI Special Agent Michael Tabman. Tabman knows bad actors are now hard at work. “Despite all my years working scams and frauds, someone is coming up with a plan where I will say, ‘gee, I didn’t see that coming,’” Tabman said. Unfortunately, crisis is an opportunity for crooks, and plenty of people are struggling now. “People are worried about their physical well-being as well as their financial well-being,” Tabman said. As a former FBI special agent in charge, this is something Tabman has seen before, back in 2008 when President George W. Bush signed the last package. Crooks and scam artists were on the attack back then too. Technology has come a long way since then and in many ways its actually gotten easier. “A scam we saw under Bush, we saw this come up often, ‘for a small fee we are going to find out what [the amount of] your check is going to be,’” Tabman recounted. Then, like now, crooks will call to try and lure you in, looking to move in on your money online. “The sad reality is though, if you are caught up in one of these scams, the FBI is not going to be able to help you,” Tabman said. “They are going to take notes and statistics, but that money is gone.” Here’s some guidance from attorneys general from across the country: The federal government will not ask you to confirm personal or banking info by email, phone or text or demand a procession fee to expedite your stimulus payment. Do not click on links in email or text messages related to stimulus checks and do not provide your personal information.
  • Because many restaurants are closed, many families’ across the Mid-South spend more time at home, cooking. During the COVID-19 pandemic, health officials constantly urge people avoid large group gatherings. That can be hard if you have to go to the grocery store. Jennifer Presson is a nutritionist at St. Francis Hospital in Memphis and said it’s best that people stock up on frozen foods and canned foods since they have a longer shelf life than fresh produce. “Don’t focus right now on buying the fresh produce and lettuces, stuff that goes bad pretty quickly,” Presson said. Presson recommends stocking up on frozen vegetables, frozen and canned fruits, and whole wheat pastas. Depending on what you have purchased or what you may already have in your freezer, Presson said there are a lot of meal options you can make for your family that is still healthy. “Instant brown rice, instant quinoa, things that we can cook really quickly,' she said. 'Add some canned beans to frozen vegetables and make kind of a grain bowl on a whim.” Presson stressed it’s important to know what you’re putting in your body and watching how much you consume. Presson mentions that nutrition is like stress or losing sleep, it can weigh down your body and impact your immune system. “Pay attention to the times that you’re eating, the quantity that you’re eating, if you’re mindlessly snacking and things like that,” Presson said. Another way you can keep track of your meals, Presson suggested to write it down in a journal. She also recommends that you take some kind of vitamin everyday to keep you healthy and give your immune system a boost.
  • A 6.5-magnitude earthquake has reportedly hit central Idaho. The quake was felt in Boise, around 70 miles from the epicenter, 44 miles west of Challis, Idaho. The U.S. Geological Survey reports the magnitude 6.5 temblor struck just before 6 p.m. MDT. It was centered 73 miles northeast of Meridian, Idaho. The depth of the quake was 10 kilometers according to the USGS. The earthquake was felt in 7 states and Canada according to KTVB. No damage has been reported in Boise. There was a delay in reporting from the University of Washington because of social distancing, according to KTVB. The earthquake was followed by M 4.8 aftershock in the same region. Marcus Smith, an emergency room health unit coordinator at St. Luke’s Wood River Medical Center, said the hospital, about 65 miles (104 kilometers) south of the epicenter, shook but the quake didn’t interfere with the treatment of any patients. The hospital in Blaine County is on the front line of Idaho’s coronavirus outbreak, in a region with the highest per-capita rates of known COVID-19 cases in the nation outside of New York City and surrounding counties. “It felt like a wave going through the ground, so I knew right away what it was. It just felt like waves going through the ground,” he said. The earthquake is added stress during an already stressful time for the region, but Smith said everything seemed fine, for now. “Until the next one, I guess,” Smith said. “I mean, that’s what we do. We’re all good.” Brett Woolley, a restaurant owner in Stanley, said he heard earthquake coming before he felt it. “I heard the roar, and at first it sounded like the wind but then the roar was tremendous,” Woolley said about 10 minutes after the earthquake. “The whole house was rattling, and I started to panic. I’m sitting here perfectly still and the water next to me is still vibrating.” The Associated Press contributed to this story.
  • A woman is facing several charges after an incident Sunday afternoon, in which she allegedly coughed on a Pennsylvania State Police trooper and claimed she had the coronavirus. An off-duty police officer encountered Jessica Harvey, 37, of Houston, while she was walking down a street, WPXI reported. Harvey was “disheveled and bleeding,” and also appeared to be intoxicated, according to a police report. When troopers responded to the call from the off-duty officer, they learned there were multiple warrants out for Harvey’s arrest, the television station reported. As they were putting her into the back of the patrol car, Harvey coughed in the trooper’s face and said: “I have the coronavirus and I hope that you have it now,” according to the police report. Harvey continued to cough on him and claim she had it, the police report said. She was taken to the Washington County Jail and is charged with terroristic threats, harassment, disorderly conduct and public drunkenness, WPXI reported.
  • California power regulators are weighing a recommendation to back off plans to fine Pacific Gas and Electric an additional $462 million over a series of deadly Northern California wildfires rather than risk that the harsher punishment might scuttle the utility's plan to get out of bankruptcy. The state's Public Utilities Commission is mulling whether to pare the penalties faced by PG&E as the result of a proposed revision floated by one of agency's five commissioners, Clifford Rechtschaffen. A document detailing the proposal was made public Monday. In another development, PG&E announced it took steps to ensure it will not have to tap into a $13.5 billion fund set up for wildfire victims to pay a separate $4 million fine that will be imposed for the company's guilty plea to 84 felony counts of involuntary manslaughter stemming from a 2018 inferno triggered by its outdated electrical grid. Last week, PG&E disclosed its bankruptcy plan required that financial penalties for the crimes would come from the victims' fund. Now that it has avoided that potential public relations challenge, PG&E is trying to clear another hurdle that could block its attempt to emerge from one of the most complex bankruptcy cases in U.S. history by June 30. In documents made public Monday, Rechtschaffen made a case for the public utilities commission to reverse a decision issued last month requiring PG&E to pay a $2.1 billion fine for neglecting the maintenance of equipment blamed for causing the wildfires that killed nearly 130 people and destroyed thousands of homes in Butte and Sonoma counties and other parts of the utility's sprawling service territory during 2017 and 2018. The proposed penalty added $462 million to a roughly $1.7 billion settlement that PG&E negotiated with regulators in December. The utility's critics argued that deal was too lenient, prompting the public utilities commission to impose an additional $200 million fine and other measures costing the company another $262 million. But requiring PG&E to come up with the extra $200 million to deposit in California's general fund would violate agreements that the company struck with investors earlier this year to secure commitments to sell $9 billion worth of its stock to help fund $25.5 billion in settlements reached in its bankruptcy proceedings. The settlements include the $13.5 billion victims fund to be used to pay more than 81,000 claims for losses suffered in the the wildfires that drove PG&E into bankruptcy last year. PG&E warned that requiring the company to pay the additional $200 fine would set off a chain of financial dominoes and upend its entire bankruptcy plan, depriving wildfire victims of a chance to be paid from its $13.5 billion fund. Rechtschaffen recommended that the public utilities commission permanently suspend the plan to fine PG&E the extra $200 million. “This is appropriate due to the unique situation of PG&E’s bankruptcy, its indebtedness to hundreds of wildfire claimants for loss of life and property, and the current upheaval in the financial markets,' .Rechtschaffen wrote in a five-page explanation. Like most companies, PG&E's stock has fallen sharply over the last several weeks amid the economic damage caused by the coronavirus. PG&E's stock sank 68 cents to close Tuesday at $8.99, less the half of what the shares were worth on Feb. 11 when they reached a six-month high of $18.34. The recommendations also propose revisions to the tax benefits that PG&E could claim from its original settlement with regulators. If adopted, those changes could further chip away from last month's proposal to force PG&E shareholders to shoulder a heavier burden. An administrative law judge has set an April 9 deadline for comments about Rechtschaffen's recommendation. A final decision is expected later in the spring. PG&E managed to avoid using the wildfire victims fund to pay its $4 million criminal fine by negotiating a deal with 110 insurers receiving a $11 billion cash settlement as part of its bankruptcy fund. The insurers will pay the $4 million fine using interest income and other investment gains generated from the $11 billion that PG&E is paying them. In a regulatory filing Tuesday, PG&E disclosed CEO Bill Johnson received a pay package valued at $18.5 million last year. That was roughly double the $9.3 million that Johnson's predecessor, Geisha Williams, received during her final year on the job in 2018. Most of Johnson's package consisted of a previously disclosed $3 million bonus paid to him as part of his hiring last April in addition to long-term incentives designed to push him to improve the company's safety record while also boosting its stock price.
  • It has become a grim ritual outside New York City’s hospitals: workers in protective gear loading the bodies of coronavirus victims into refrigerated trailers. A surge in deaths in the epicenter of the crisis in the U.S. has overwhelmed the city’s permanent morgues and filled storage spaces in many hospitals to capacity. The Federal Emergency Management Agency is sending 85 refrigerated trucks to serve as temporary morgues, the city said. It’s been that way for days at Brooklyn Hospital Center, where a worker Tuesday wheeled out a gurney carrying a body covered in white plastic, a forklift operator carefully raised a body into the trailer and undertakers came to claim the remains of yet another of the city’s nearly 1,000 coronavirus dead. The hospital said in a statement that the “unprecedented crisis calls for extraordinary measures” and that extra storage is needed “to accommodate the tragic spike in deaths, placing a strain on the entire system of care — from hospitals to funeral homes.” “Grieving families cannot quickly make arrangements, and their loved ones who have passed are remaining in hospitals longer, thus the need for this accommodation,” the hospital in Brooklyn’s Fort Greene neighborhood said. The city's medical examiner's office has also started operating a makeshift morgue, as it did after the Sept. 11 attacks, to provide emergency capacity as the city’s permanent facilities fill up. The city's coronavirus death toll more than doubled in the past four days, surging from 450 on Friday to 932 as of Tuesday morning. For most people, the coronavirus causes mild or moderate symptoms, such as fever and cough. But for others, especially older adults and people with existing health problems, the virus can cause severe symptoms like pneumonia and can be fatal. The city and FEMA have delivered refrigerated trucks to various hospitals, while the Office of Chief Medical Examiner has been guiding them on how to properly move and store bodies, officials said. “To see the scenes of trailers out there and what they're doing with those trailers — they're freezers, and nobody can even believe it,” President Donald Trump said Tuesday. At some hospitals, like Lenox Hill in Manhattan, the trailers are being parked on city streets, along sidewalks and in front of apartments. Cars and buses passed by as bodies were loaded Tuesday outside Brooklyn Hospital Center. Cellphone videos posted on social media over the weekend drew attention to hospitals using trailers to store bodies. An image from one video of the activity outside Brooklyn Hospital Center appeared on the front page of Tuesday’s New York Post. “It's hard to believe this, but this is for real,” said the man shooting the video, his voice quaking. “Lord have mercy, help us Lord, this is for real.”
  • A New York man who was exposed to coronavirus and was feeling ill hid his symptoms so he could join his expectant wife in a hospital maternity ward, officials said. The man admitted he was sick after his wife had COVID-19 symptoms after giving birth last week at Strong Memorial Hospital in Rochester, WROC reported. The man confessed to masking his symptoms at that point, the Democrat and Chronicle reported. “That’s when the significant other admitted his potential exposure and that he was feeling symptomatic,” hospital spokesman Chip Partner told the newspaper. “Now we’re adding the temperature check.” “It was purely an honor system before,” Partner said. “Now we’re adding the temperature check.” University of Rochester Medicine and Rochester Regional Health officials said Tuesday universal masking procedures were put into effect after the incident, WROC reported. Barbara Ficarra, a spokeswoman for UR Medicine, told NBC News that a nurse who assisted the family was tested for the virus and the results came back negative. The mother has returned home, Ficarra told the network.