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National

    Officials have euthanized a mountain lion that attacked a toddler on a trail at a California park, Orange County officials said. According to CNN and the Desert Sun, the attack happened after 4 p.m. local time Monday as a family visited Whiting Ranch Wilderness Park. “The mountain lion came out of somewhere and grabbed the 3-year-old by the neck and dragged him a short distance,” Capt. Tony Bommarito of the Orange County Fire Authority told the Desert Sun. The child’s father then sprang into action, hurling a backpack at the mountain lion, Bommarito said. The animal set the boy free and went for the backpack before climbing a tree, the outlets reported. After the family fled to safety, the boy was treated at a hospital, authorities said. Orange County deputies said the boy is “OK,” the Desert Sun reported. Officials euthanized the cougar with permission from the state’s Department of Fish and Wildlife, the outlets reported. Read more here or here.
  • Georgia-based fast food chain Krystal filed a petition Monday for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection, multiple news outlets are reporting. According to the Chattanooga Times Free Press, the Southeastern slider chain, founded in Chattanooga, Tennessee, in 1932, announced the news in a statement after the petition was filed in U.S. Bankruptcy Court in Georgia’s Northern District. 'The actions we are taking are intended to enable Krystal to establish a stronger business for the future and to achieve a restructuring in a fast and efficient manner,' read the statement from Krystal Holdings Inc., according to the newspaper. Court documents said the company, which has been headquartered in Dunwoody, Georgia, near Atlanta, since 2013, has $50 million to $100 million in debts, the Times Free Press and WDEF-TV reported.  Company leaders have tapped Jonathan Tibus, of the consulting firm Alvarez and Marshal, to head restructuring efforts, according to the Times Free Press. Krystal, which employs 6,500 people, has 300-plus restaurants in 10 states, the newspaper reported. Read more here or here.
  • At least two people are dead and five hurt after gunfire erupted at a club in San Antonio on Sunday night, authorities said. Here are the latest updates: Update 3:37 a.m. EST Jan. 21: San Antonio police have identified the suspect arrested in connection with the deadly bar shooting as 19-year-old Kiernan Christopher Williams, according to the San Antonio Express-News. He will be charged with capital murder, authorities said. Update 5:01 p.m. EST Jan. 20: San Antonio police said a suspect was arrested in connection with the shooting at a RiverWalk bar shooting that killed two people and injured five, the San Antonio Express-News reported. Police did not release the suspect’s name, the newspaper reported. Officials said the suspect faces charges of capital murder for the deaths of 20-year-old Robert Jay Martinez III and 25-year-old Alejandro Robles, the News-Express reported. Update 11:24 a.m. EST Jan. 20: The Bexar County Medical Examiner’s Office on Monday identified the two men who were killed as 20-year-old Robert Jay Martinez III and 25-year-old Alejandro Robles, the San Antonio Express-News reported. Robles was critically injured and taken to an area hospital, where he was pronounced dead, KENS-TV reported. “Let’s pray SAPD catches this evil coward that took away our family and left a 5-year-old son without a daddy,” Christopher McQuade, Robles’ uncle, told KENS. Martinez died at the scene, police told the television station. The shooting occurred around 8 p.m. during a concert around at Ventura, a live music venue and bar along the city’s RiverWalk, Police Chief William McManus told reporters at a news conference. According to McManus, an argument broke out inside of the club, and one person pulled out a gun and started shooting, KSAT reported. Original report: According to The Associated Press, the shooting happened about 8 p.m. local time during an argument at the Ventura, a club along the city’s River Walk. At least seven people were shot, including a 21-year-old man killed inside the venue and another person who died en route to the hospital, police told WOAI-TV. Investigators have not yet released a description of the suspect, who was still on the run, the outlets reported. Read more here or here.
  • A suspect is still on the loose after shooting at a house and killing a 10-year-old Memphis, Tennessee, boy playing outside Sunday. That 10-year-old was identified as Jadon Knox. WHBQ spoke to Jadon’s aunt, Twanda, who said the family wants justice. “Jadon was the life of our family. Very, very funny. He loves to keep everyone laughing,” Twanda said. A friend of Jadon’s said they were sitting on a front porch when someone pulled in front of the house and began firing. “This is murder. You killed him. You took his life. He was only 10. His life had not even started,” said Twanda. This investigation is still ongoing. If you have any information about this shooting, call Memphis police at 528-CASH. A GoFundMe has been started to help the family with Jadon’s funeral arrangements, according to the GoFundMe page. If you would like to donate, click here. A candlelight vigil will be held Tuesday at 5:30 p.m. at Josephine and Carnes.
  • An Atlanta woman has spent every Martin Luther King Jr. Day wondering this: Who was the baby sitting next to her as she sat on King's lap as a young child? Sonya Milner shared the picture with WSB-TV’s Matt Johnson that shows her, another baby, King and his father, taken at the historic Ebenezer Baptist Church in northeast Atlanta. Milner said she is one of millions of Americans who have been touched by the words of Dr. King, but not everyone can say they have shared a picture with the legendary civil rights activist. “He touched me. He was that close to me. He was actually my first official minister,” Milner said. The Atlanta woman said she is the newborn seen on the left in the picture being held by Dr. King’s father during her christening ceremony at Ebenezer Baptist Church. Every MLK Day she admires the picture from March 5, 1967. And every year she wonders about the other baby with whom she shared the special moment. “It’s a picture I’ve looked at my entire life, for 53 years. And every time I look at it, I wonder who that baby is,” Milner said. “It would just make the circle complete for me.” An MLK Day isn't complete for many families without a visit to the Martin Luther King Jr. National Historic Park. “Because he made our world a better place,” said Jachobi Burston, 8. The Burston family told Johnson they made it a priority to make sure their kids understand Dr. King's legacy. “My children have to know who he was and what he was about so they can live a better life,” Michael Burston said. People from all over Georgia and beyond braved near-freezing temperatures to absorb history. “Kind of gives me chills, honestly, and not just the weather,” said Kyle Womelduff, who came from Kansas City. For Milner, every year she's reminded of how her photo with Dr. King has always captured her imagination. “His life was cut so short. What would he have achieved in 39 more years?” Milner asked. Milner told Johnson that she hopes her story will end up connecting her with the other baby in picture in time for next year when they can catch up together.
  • Americans who want to follow President Donald Trump's impeachment saga and Hollywood mogul Harvey Weinstein's rape trial through the media will sit in obstructed seats. Both events begin in earnest this week — with Senate arguments over Trump's impeachment beginning Tuesday and opening statements in the Weinstein case Wednesday. Both have been the subject of behind-the-scenes wrangling over media access. Far from an esoteric exercise, the limited media access affects what the public is able to see and, just as importantly, who controls the narrative. C-SPAN, joined by the other major television networks, objects to the Senate's plan to essentially allow only two camera views of the impeachment trial from the Senate floor. One would focus on whoever is speaking at the time and the other would be a wider shot of the Senate itself, said Terry Murphy, C-SPAN's vice president of programming, on Monday. More camera shots are generally permitted during special events, but not in this case, he said. It means, for example, that pictures of how individual senators are reacting to testimony, what groups gather together for informal confabs, or any demonstrations that may take place will generally go missing. The Senate will be the arbiter of what pictures go out, Murphy said. “The citizen who gets to sit in the gallery gets a lot better view than the person sitting inside the living room at home,” Murphy said. “All we ask is that the person watching from home get the same view.” Restrictions on reporters who sit in the press gallery, including having to go through metal detectors to enter and not being allowed to transmit messages electronically while there, may minimize the immediate value of having those eyes on sight. “Can anyone name a time when free flow of information is more important than when impeachment is the issue and the nation is bitterly divided?” said Tom Bettag, a veteran news producer who now teaches journalism at the University of Maryland. 'For any one side to try to control the news can only inflame the situation.” Typically, reporters have generous access to politicians in the hallways outside. Most senators are keen to talk, although the reaction of Arizona Sen. Martha McSally last week, who called CNN's Manu Raju a “liberal hack” when he tried to ask her a question, illustrate these are fraught times. For the public and politicians, information gleaned from these conversations can fill in the blanks about what is happening behind the scenes and how testimony was being taken. So journalists were alarmed when initial rules were put in place that would pen in reporters directly outside the Senate chamber and chill attempts at conversations. There's been some progress loosening those rules; reporters were assured Monday that Capitol police would no longer try to break up any interviews they saw in Capitol hallways, as happened late last week, said Sarah Wire, a reporter for the Los Angeles Times and chair of the Standing Committee on Correspondents, which is responsible for credentialing reporters. “It is one of the most important moments in American history,” Wire said. “Having reporters speak to senators is important, and not just the senators who choose to speak to reporters.” Christopher Isham, Washington bureau chief for CBS News, said discussions are “still fairly fluid” in terms of making it easier for senators who want to talk. He's optimistic that the public will ultimately have roughly the same access to the impeachment trial through the media as it did for President Bill Clinton's trial. A spokesman for Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell did not immediately return a message seeking comment. The American Civil Liberties Union, which together with several other groups sent a letter to the Senate last week, urged the leaders not to slide back to 20th Century technology at a time more can be done to let the public know what the politicians are up to. Bettag, once executive producer at ABC's “Nightline,” said any differences in news coverage of the impeachment trial caused by media restrictions is likely to be so subtle that most viewers won't notice. But it's important for news organizations to fight them, since without that things are likely to tighten even further in the future. Cable news networks CNN, Fox News Channel and MSNBC are expected to cover every minute of the impeachment trial, mirroring coverage of the House hearings. ABC, CBS and NBC will also have extensive coverage but haven't committed to showing each minute of the hearings. By comparison, the much-anticipated Weinstein trial will be much harder for the public to follow. The once-powerful Hollywood producer, whose behavior gave rise to the #MeToo movement, is on trial in a New York courtroom on charges that he raped a woman in a hotel room in 2013 and forced oral sex on another in 2006. New York state courts infrequently allow or are equipped to provide television coverage, and despite efforts by Court TV, state Supreme Court Justice James Burke is not permitting cameras in this case. Any depiction of Weinstein listening to testimony in the trial will come from sketch artists. Reporters permitted in the courtroom will not be allowed to have phones or any recording devices; they won't be allowed to text, tweet or email anything to the outside world, according to rules issued by Burke. News organizations have also been unsuccessfully pushing for an “overflow” room at the state Supreme Court, which would allow more reporters room on site.
  • A man suspected of stabbing a woman and killing two Hawaii police officers would record neighbors with a camera mounted to his hat and rig a barbecue grill to blow thick smoke directly into their windows, a lawyer for residents said. Jaroslav “Jerry” Hanel, facing eviction, stabbed a woman in the leg Sunday before he fired on responding authorities, killing Officers Tiffany Enriquez and Kaulike Kalama, police said. A fire at Hanel's residence then spread in a normally peaceful neighborhood at the far end of famed Waikiki Beach, an area where attorney David Hayakawa has represented three neighbors in restraining orders against Hanel since 2014. “It was pretty clear he was out of control,' Hayakawa said. Authorities did not respond to repeated requests for comment Monday. Police had said Hanel is missing but they're almost certain he is inside the burned house. Honolulu Police Chief Susan Ballard had said it could take days to process evidence and recover any remains. Two women were also missing after the fire. Hanel's lawyer, Jonathan Burge, says property owner Lois Cain's sister told him Cain was unaccounted for. 'She was trying to see whatever information we had because they can’t reach Lois,' Burge said. The sister told him she spoke with the woman who was stabbed, who was one of the tenants of the house, he said. Cain had recently sought to evict Hanel, who lived in the home for free in exchange for his work, according to court records and his lawyer. Hanel has been described as paranoid and unhinged. Neighbors complained of bizarre and annoying behavior including Hanel chasing cars down the street, confronting their guests and workers who came to their homes, recording them with a camera mounted to his hat and forcing thick smoke from his barbecue grill directly into their windows, Hayakawa said Monday. “Just crazy things,” he said. He would hide in bushes and watch people and he yelled at tourists who were lost while trying to get to Diamond Head, Hayakawa said. “He was kind of, in his own mind, block security,” Hayakawa said. When a woman who lived in the area would walk her dog or jog past Hanel's home, “he focused on her and would take her picture,” Hayakawa said. A judge sided with his clients “every step of the way,” Hayakawa said. “The court granted our motions, listened to us and ruled properly. But there’s only so much a piece of paper can do.” The homes of two of Hayakawa's clients were gutted in the fire. He recalled one client telling him Sunday, “nothing that happened to me is anything compared to what happened to these police officer’s families. But when your house is gone and all your possessions, I don’t know how to describe that.” Burge has represented Hanel since 2015 in various disputes with neighbors, including temporary restraining orders that three obtained against him. Hanel, a native of the Czech Republic who used Czech interpreters in court, faced a hearing next week on a charge of misusing 911 services, Burge said Sunday. Burge said he never knew Hanel to be violent, but that “he’s kind of a quirky guy and had problems.” Hanel believed the government was watching him and tapping his phone, Burge said. Cain was supportive of him in his disputes with neighbors, Burge said, but she wanted him to move out so she could move into the home. Burge said their relationship also soured because Hanel’s dog had died and Cain wouldn’t let him get a new one, and the eviction might have set Hanel off. In the complaint for Hanel's eviction, Cain said Hanel did not have a rental agreement and that despite repeated demands, he refused to vacate the premises. ___ Associated Press freelance photographer Marco Garcia contributed to this report.
  • The chief doctor of infectious diseases at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston is sending out a warning about the coronavirus which is spreading fast in China. And, with the Chinese New Year, and millions of people traveling, doctors in Boston want you to be aware. Chinese health officials are working to contain the new outbreak of coronavirus, a form of viral pneumonia. Dr. Daniel Kuritzkes described symptoms of the virus. “They might have fever, aches and pains,” said Kuritzkes, chief of infectious diseases at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and a Harvard professor. The outbreak started last month in Wuhan, China, at a seafood wildlife market. Coronavirus typically infects animals, like camels and bats, and small animals. Periodically, it causes human disease, like SARS, and a coronavirus epidemic. It has infected at least 200 people. Patients reported having a fever, shortness of breath and coughing. Since the outbreak started, it has now spread to South Korea, Thailand and Japan. “It seems the vast majority of cases have occurred with some contact with one of two seafood markets. The seafood market also sell lots of other kinds animals, like bats and are carriers of coronavirus,” Kuritzkes said. The outbreak comes during the busiest time of the year, as millions are traveling across China and overseas for the Chinese New Year. “They should stay away from animal markets, and live or dead animals. If there are people with respiratory illness, try to minimize contact with them as well,” Kuritzkes said. Federal health officials have even started screening passengers across the country who are arriving from China. Some passengers are asked how they’re feeling, and they get their temperatures taken. On Wednesday, the World Health Organization will hold an emergency meeting, trying to figure out how to stop this virus from spreading. Wuhan health authorities said Monday an additional 136 cases have been confirmed in the city, raising the total to 198. Three have died. Other Chinese cities also confirmed cases for the first time. Coronaviruses cause diseases ranging from the common cold to SARS, or severe acute respiratory syndrome. SARS first infected people in southern China in late 2002 and spread to more than two dozen countries, killing nearly 800. The Chinese government initially tried to conceal the severity of the SARS epidemic, but its cover-up was exposed by a high-ranking physician. “In the early days of SARS, reports were delayed and covered up,” said an editorial in the nationalistic Global Times. “That kind of thing must not happen again in China.” The Associated Press contributed to this story.
  • A gun buyback program at Holy Cross Episcopal Church in Pittsburgh, held in conjunction with Martin Luther King Jr. Day ran out of money in less than an hour, paying out over $5,000. Program officials said they were offering $100 per gun turned in, with no questions asked. Church leaders were partnering with the Pittsburgh Bureau of Police and Homewood Ministries to put on the program. Last November, there was a double homicide right outside of the church. Program officials said the doors were open through the afternoon with the hope they received more donations in order to buy back more guns. They are planning to host another similar event soon. The church is asking for more donations, but you cannot donate online. You’d have to go to the church directly. Here’s the address: The Church of the Holy Cross Episcopal 7507 Kelly Street Pittsburgh, PA 15208
  • A Charlotte Navy veteran is battling brain cancer and her husband is showing his love by comforting her with serenades. Newlyweds Ray and Roslyn Singleton are embracing the journey they weren’t expecting. “To me, cancer is a blessing, because it’s my way of telling people that no matter what it is, it’s going to be OK,” Roslyn Singleton said. She said it’s her second bout with cancer. She started to notice something was wrong in 2008, while she was serving in the Navy. She was diagnosed in 2013. “The first round was more aggressive. The tumor was the size of an orange,” Singleton said. She was cancer-free by the time the couple met in 2018. But cancer returned last October. “I wasn't expecting for it to come back, because I was young, and I was taking care of myself,” she said. “I don’t eat pork. I was, like, ‘I'm doing good.’” [VIDEO: Singletons talk about when they met] Ray Singleton began using his love for music to encourage his wife before her second brain surgery. “I was nervous, and I was bored,” he said. “When she comes out, I don’t know if she’ll be able to see this, but I want to make something for her that will make her smile after having her head cut open.” A video of Ray Singleton serenading his wife went viral on Instagram with 17 million views. The song was from Grammy-nominated artist Daniel Caesar, whose managing team contacted the couple to tell them how the video inspired him. Caesar’s management team also invited them to the international music festival Coachella. “I told my pastor and God in front of a lot of people, I’m with her through sickness and health, and this is just a part of that,” Ray Singleton said.