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    The 'Buresh Blog' will be on vacation :) for a few days.... next update will be the week of Aug. 26th.... Of course, the tropics could always have different ideas.  Every single day through the hurricane season I update the 'Talking the Tropics With Mike' * here *. Speaking of the tropics.... it was 15 years ago that a blitzkrieg of sorts developed over the Atlantic Basin.  From the first week of Aug. through the end of Sept., 9 named storms formed, 5 of which hit Fl. Tropical storm Bonnie made landfall in the Panhandle on Aug. 12th dropping an F-2 tornado on the northwest side of Jacksonville... Cat. 4 hurricane Charley followed the next day on the SW coast of Fl... hurricanes Frances & Jeanne (more than 3,000 deaths in Haiti) made landfall at the exact same spot on the east coast just a few weeks apart.... & mighty hurricane Ivan hit Pensacola & ravaged the Western Panhandle later in Sept.  To say the 2004 hurricane season had a lasting impact on Fl. would be an understatement.  Consider: (1) hurricane days (like snow days up north) were added to school district calendars & remain a fixture for all school districts to this day. (2) the hurricane deductible was born & is maintained by most Fl. insurance companies to this day. The implication: if a named storm does damage to one's property, a hurricane deductible has to be paid (usually far higher than the standard deductible) before insurance kicks in & pays. (3) the '04 season was the first time since hurricane Andrew that upgraded building codes were tested.  The results were very positive.  And it was 50 years ago the weekend of Aug. 17-18, 1969 - that intense Cat. 5 hurricane Camille hit the Central Gulf Coast roaring ashore near Bay St. Louis, Mississippi during the middle of the night. The relatively small but violent hurricane is one of only 4 (in addition to Labor Day hurricane, 1935... Andrew, 1992... Michael, 2018) Cat. 5 hurricanes to ever make landfall on U.S. soil. The Mobile N.W.S. has an informative online write-up * here *.... vintage photos from the Times-Picayune * here *.   Speaking of El Nino, '04.... NOAA has officially called it 'over'.  There is still some water left near the Western & Central equatorial Pacific but water has noticeably cooled to the east as can be seen in the image below.  So we will need to watch for a potentially more active mid to late hurricane season given this scenario IF all other things are equal (favorable for development).   Forecasts below for a neutral state vs. El Nino & vs. La Nina into spring, 2020 with a model trend of slightly positive ENSO state but still generally below the El Nino threshold: The mid August skies have delivered recently! First pic below from Lauren Jackson Romeo, Vilano Beach - iridescent pileus clouds! The rainbow effect is caused by the ice crystals in the anvil/high level part of the 'thunderhead' (cumulonimbus cloud), reflecting & refracting the sunlight. Randy Harris, St. Augustine: Masyn Warner: 0 Lightning Sun. evening struck the runway at JIA!: 1 Jerome Smith, Jax Beach - Kelvin-Helmholtz clouds! These uncommon clouds are usually difficult to photograph because the formation does not last long.  Caused by differing wind speeds at different levels of the atmosphere. Erin Hires, Bryceville - crepuscular rays!  Caused by the clouds low on the horizon creating shadows as the sun rises. August/early Sept. night skies from Sky & Telescope:   Aug. 24 (dawn): The waning crescent Moon, in Taurus, is just 2° from the red giant star Aldebaran. Aug. 28 (dawn): The sliver of the waning crescent Moon is in or near the Beehive star cluster in Cancer.   Sep. 5 (evening): The first-quarter Moon and Jupiter hang in the south-southwest above Antares, the Scorpion’s heart. Sep. 6 (dusk): The Moon, brilliant Jupiter, and dimmer Saturn grace the sky above the tail of Scorpius. Sep. 7 (dusk): Saturn sits to the upper right of the waxing gibbous Moon, hanging above the Teapot of Sagittarius.   Moon Phases New Moon: July 31, 11:12 p.m. EDT First Quarter: August 7, 12:31 p.m. EDT Full Moon: August 15, 7:29 a.m. EDT (Full Sturgeon Moon; also Full Red Moon) Last Quarter: August 23, 10:56 a.m. EDT New Moon: August 30, 6:37 a.m. EDT
  • Dr. Phil Klotzbach, Colorado State University & NOAA have issued their Aug. seasonal update.  Not a whole lot of change. If accurate, the next few months - which includes the peak of the hurricane season - will have 12 more named storms.... 7 hurricanes & two 'major' hurricanes according to CSU with similar - though a pretty wide range - numbers from NOAA.  Of course, no telling at this juncture exactly where storms might go & how strong they might be at landfall but one should always be prepared.  I update 'Talking the Tropics With Mike' every day during the hurricane season. July rainfall numbers were mixed for the local area of NE Fl./SE Ga.  It's typical, of course, to have a wide range, but this rainy season has been especially fickle.  From our Jax N.W.S.: FL   JASPER                      4.45                    FL   BEAUCLERC                             7.54 FL   JACKSONVILLE BEACH                    3.46 FL   LAKE CITY                    12.96                  FL   LAKE CITY 2 E                   11.92        FL   GLEN ST MARY 1 W                5.59                  FL   SOUTH PONTE VEDRA BEACH SHOP     FL   PALM COAST 6 NE          7.49     FL   CRESCENT CITY                         7.19             FL   GAINESVILLE RGNL AP             4.27         FL   HASTINGS 4NE              7.63                                          FL   OCALA                    5.56                                                FL   WHITE SPRINGS 7N               4.28           FL   JACKSONVILLE CRAIG MUNI AP      4.88     FL   JACKSONVILLE INTL AP        5.29              FL   JACKSONVILLE NAS          4.41                                                                     FL   BUNNELL                 8.50                             FL   NW PALM COAST                         7.60 FL   NE PALM COAST                   6.95                           FL   FLAGLER BEACH                 6.07                     GEORGIA: GA   PRIDGEN                              4.51              GA   ALMA BACON CO AP        7.55                                               GA   NAHUNTA 6 NE            4.30                   GA   FARGO 17 NE            5.66                                    GA   BRUNSWICK             2.94                  GA   BRUNSWICK MALCOLM MCKINNON AP       1.72 GA   WOODBINE                     4.82 Doppler radar estimated rainfall for July: Percent of normal July rainfall: Jan. - July, 2019 precipitation is just about right on par for most of Florida, but there has been a large swath of above avg. precip. from the Southwest U.S. to parts of the Northeast U.S.: We're entering the time of year when our seasonal tides are higher than avg. largely dictated by the phase of the moon (full & new).  Any onshore flow (from the east) &/or heavy rain can make tides even higher causing at least minor flooding along & near the coast/intracoastal & the St. Johns River & its tributaries. From Al Sandrik, Jax N.W.S.: Oceanfront: The dates/heights indicated below are for the oceanfront and immediate estuary system near inlets within 2 miles of inlet entrances. Please consult NOAA NOS Tides and Currents for inland estuary points not covered by this document. * Saint Simons Island/Sea Island to Cumberland Island (Saint Simons Light tides +1.0 ft Above MHHW):  August 28-31 Peak 1.603 ft Above MHHW 8/30 September 1-2 Peak 1.248 ft Above MHHW 9/1 September 25-Oct 2 Peak 1.687 ft Above MHHW 9/28 October 25-31 Peak 1.741 ft Above MHHW 10/29 November 25-27 Peak 1.262 ft Above MHHW 11/26 * Amelia Island/Amelia River/Nassau Sound (Fernandina Beach tides +1.0 ft Above MHHW) Dates August 29-31 Peak 1.274 ft Above MHHW 8/30 September 1 Peak 0.999 ft Above MHHW 9/1 Sept. 26 – Oct. 2 Peak 1.431 ft Above MHHW 9/30 November 26 -31 Peak 1.329 ft Above MHHW 11/26 * Nassau Sound to Ponte Vedra Beach (Atlantic Beach tides +1.0 ft Above MHHW) Dates Peak Value August 30 Peak 1.010 ft Above MHHW 8/30 Sept. 27 – Oct. 2 Peak 1.327 ft Above MHHW 9/30 October 26 – 30 Peak 1.434 ft Above MHHW 10/28 November 25-27 Peak 1.137 ft Above MHHW 11/26 * Ponte Vedra Beach to Flagler Beach (St Augustine Beach tides +0.75 ft Above MHHW). Including the City of St Augustine and Davis Shores. Dates Peak Value Peak Date Aug. 28 – Sept. 2 Peak 1.230 ft Above MHHW 8/30 Sept. 25 – Oct. 3 Peak 1.367 ft Above MHHW 9/30 October 25-31 Peak 1.505 ft Above MHHW 10/29 November 24-28 Peak 1.232 ft Above MHHW 11/26 * River/Estuary Areas City of Brunswick (Howe St Pier +1.00 ft Above MHHW) Dates Peak Value Peak Aug. 28-Sept. 3 Peak 1.549 ft Above MHHW 8/31 Sept. 26-Oct. 2 Peak 1.902 ft Above MHHW 9/2 October 26-31 Peak 1.975 ft Above MHHW 10/28 November 24-28 Peak 1.537 ft Above MHHW 11/26 * St Marys/Kings Bay (KBNSB +0.75 ft Above MHHW) Dates Peak Value Peak Date Aug. 28-Sept. 1 Peak 1.137 ft Above MHHW 8/30 Sept. 27-Oct. 1 Peak 1.035 ft Above MHHW 9/30 October 27-30 Peak 1.155 ft Above MHHW 10/28 November 24-28 Peak 1.102 ft Above MHHW 11/26 December 24-26 Peak 0.846 ft Above MHHW 12/25 * St. Johns River. (Southbank Riverwalk +0.75 ft Above MHHW). Note: The St Johns River High astronomical tides go through cycles where the daily high tides are at or above MHHW for the period August 22nd to December 13th. So anytime during that cycle a northeaster or sustained heavy rainfall can influence water levels. The dates below are just the dates that have the highest astronomical tides in the river and thus the potential flooding is given a head start. Dates Peak Value Peak Date Sept. 25-Oct. 3 Peak 0.914 ft Above MHHW 9/27 October 8-13 Peak 0.822 ft Above MHHW 10/10 October 17-31 Peak 1.043 ft Above MHHW 10/28
  • Talking the Tropics With Mike' - updated every single day during the hurricane season! After a hot start to July - the avg. temp. was nearly 3 degrees above avg. in mid July.... a big turn-around with 9 straight days below avg. leveling the 'playing field' in what will end up being a July that was only slightly above avg.  Once again - there's no such thing as 'normal'  in the weather world :) So as we move into Aug..... two weather 'things' stand out in my mind.  The avg. high temp. dips below 90 degrees by late in the month & we LOSE 48 min. of daylight(!).  Averages at JIA for August: Low / High: 1st: 73 / 92 degrees..... 31st: 72 / 89 degrees Rainfall: 6.80' Sunrise / Sunset: 1st - 6:45am / 8:21pm.... 31st - 7:03am / 7:51pm > -48 min. Last week - week of July 24th - I examined building codes for Northeast Fl. as it relates to hurricanes.  Interestingly.... Jacksonville & nearby areas have some of the lowest building codes in Florida.  The million dollar question is 'are we tempting fate'?  Yes - we have the lowest percent chance in all of Fl. of being hit by a Cat. 3 or stronger hurricane BUT that chance is NOT zero.  My story begins at Florida International U. where there is a state of the art wind machine - WOW - 'Wall of Wind'.  The story ends with an examination of building codes as it relates to high winds.  It's often been said that mitigation & preparation is the key to resiliency after a storm.  You can find the story * here *. Florida wind speed building codes: For Jacksonville & the NE Fl. coastline.... a hurricane comes within 50 miles - on average - every 12 - 16 years.  The last hurricane to make such a close approach was Matthew when the eye's closest approach was 45 miles offshore of Jacksonville Beach.  The last hurricane with an eye that truly crossed our coast - 'Dora' in 1964 - 55 years ago(!). 'WOW' -  Wall of Wind: With talented videographer Joel Lotz.....
  • Talking the Tropics With Mike' - updated every day during the hurricane season. An unseasonable cool front will settle ove the Gulf of Mexico & Florida for several days bringing relief from the weeks of hot temps. in addition to some welcome rain. Cool fronts so far south are not common during late July.  This is the same front that 'busted' the heat wave at northern latitudes & helped spawn tornadic t'storms near Boston.   Locally.... the front will drop temps. into the 80s for highs.  So far in July.... only 2 days have fallen short of 90 degrees, but we'll add to that number with the front in the area. And the front will add to our daily rain & storms with widespread rain that will be heavy at times.  The beaches had recently gone dry as steering winds were not pushing sea breeze-generated storms toward the coast. As a whole, the U.S. remains as drought-free as the lower 48 has been in some 20 years: And we've seen marked improvement across NE Fl./SE Ga.  Maps below are the difference between mid June vs. mid July: The diagrams below show the dry/warm pattern going back to early May:
  • Daily updates on the tropics - 'Talking the Tropics With Mike'..... Our summer of discontent continues on.  As of July 16th, Jacksonville has officially had 20 days at or above 97 degrees which is 2nd most to 1998 when we already had 24 such days.  That stat might 'ring a bell' for long time First Coast residents as that was the year when Central & Northern Florida was literally burning up as wildfires roared deep into the summer as heat was combined with a very slow start to the wet season.  This year - while it's been hot - we've had relatively timely rains for the most part. El Nino Update: It appears the weak El Nino - ongoing since late last fall/winter - is on its way out.  The map below shows some lingering warm water over the West Pacific but either near avg. or even below average over the Central & especially Eastern Pacific. The forecast trend on the modeling - & it is JUST MODELS - is for a continued El Nino decline to neutral status into autumn. This has potentially great implications on the hurricane season.  El Nino seasons are often accompanied by an increase in shear which at least limits the number of tropical systems.  However, a neutral state might imply at least a somewhat more active season - especially later in Aug. through early Oct. - which, afterall, is essentially the peak of the hurricane season.  Pardon this public service announcement: one should always be prepared well in advance for the hurricane season. The week of July 15th marks the 50th anniversary of the amazing Apollo 11 landing on the moon & first walk by humans on the moon. Interesting Twitter feed * here *.  Action News Jax.com has an array of related articles/info./pics & video: Apollo 11: Events mark the 50th anniversary of the moon landing Former Navy seal first to welcome crew of Apollo 11 back to earth after historic moon landing [wftv] Apollo 11 mission control meticulously restored for 50th anniversary of moon landing Photos: Apollo 11 mission control rebuilt for 50th anniversary of moon landing Apollo 11 flight manual from historic moon landing could go for $9M at auction 11 things you probably didn't know about the historic moon landing  NCD VIDEO:  What You Need to Know - Buzz Aldrin NCD VIDEO:  Most Iconic NASA Moments   And - yes - I can clearly remember(!) watching the walk on the moon when I was 5 years old in the living room of my aunt's house on a black & white t.v. :) And .... lastly... not weather or space related but fun none-the-less - the movie remake of 'The Lion King'.  Somehow I'm not sure it will live up to its billing, but my daughters & I have plans for a big night to take it in.  We've seen 'The Lion King' on stage 7 times!  So we're not stopping now. :) 
  • For daily updates on the tropics: 'Talking the Tropics With Mike'.  All eyes on the Gulf of Mexico where slow tropical development will be possible this week.  Primary impacts on the local area - Jacksonville/NE Fl./SE Ga. - looks to be heavy rain with potentially greater impacts to the west.  Next name on the list: 'Barry'. July & early Aug. night skies courtesy 'Sky and Telescope': July 9 (all night): Saturn arrives at opposition, meaning it’s opposite the Sun in the sky. It rises at sunset and sets at sunrise. The magnificent ringed planet is upper left of the Teapot in Sagittarius and just below the Teaspoon asterism.   July 12–15 (dusk): Waxing gibbous Moon provides eye-catching pairings as it passes from Scorpius into Sagittarius. The first evening it forms a trio with Jupiter and Antares, sliding to the left side of Jupiter on July 13th, and ending up nestled against Saturn on the last evening, less than 2° separating the two.   July 16 (day): A partial lunar eclipse is visible over most of the globe; only North America and northeastern Asia will be excluded from viewing any of the phases.   July 20 (night): As the waning gibbous Moon rises in the east-southeast, contemplate the moment 50 years ago when humankind first stepped onto our closest celestial neighbor.   July 29–30 (all night): The Delta Aquariid meteor shower peaks, providing up to 25 shooting stars per hour from very dark locations. This shower lasts several nights, so the peak is not the only time to look. Best in hours before dawn.   Aug. 4–5 (dusk): Thin waxing lunar crescent is in Virgo. On the 4th when it’s some 3° right of star Porrima. On the 5th, it’s 7° upper right of Spica.   Aug. 9 (dawn): Mercury is farthest west of the Sun. Look for it for the next two weeks low on the east-northeastern horizon. Binoculars will improve the view.   Aug. 9 (evening): The waxing gibbous Moon and Jupiter are around 2° apart, with Antares to the pair’s lower right.   Moon Phases New Moon: July 2, 3:16 p.m. EDT (total solar eclipse) First Quarter: July 9, 6:55 a.m. EDT Full Moon: July 16, 5:38 p.m. EDT (Buck Moon; partial lunar eclipse) Last Quarter: July 24, 9:38 p.m. EDT
  • Updated every day through the hurricane season: 'Talking the Tropics With Mike'...... mid to late July should be a period where we see our first true activity of the Atlantic hurricane season.  Casting a wary eye on upward 'vertical velocities' that will be spreading across the Atlantic Basin the next few weeks which often correlates with an uptick in tropical activity.  Not a sure thing but something to watch. We're in another hot/dry stretch of weather to begin the month of July.  Our 'wet season' finally kicked in mid June only to sputter again late in the month.  In many spots, rainfall is more than 2' below avg. since June 1st - a big problem since avg. temps. are in the 90s daily.  Our avg. June temp. of 82.4 degrees was the 11th hottest on record for the month. July averages: Low / High - 1st: 72 / 91 degrees... 31st: 73 / 92 Rainfall: 6.55' Sunrise / Sunset - 1st - 6:28am / 8:33pm.... 31st - 6:44am / 8:21pm - lose 26 min. of daylight. June rainfall from our Jax N.W.S.: FL   JASPER                      6.66 FL   MAYO                                  9.13 FL   BEAUCLERC                             5.64 FL   JACKSONVILLE BEACH                    6.33 FL   FERNANDINA BEACH          8.10 FL   LIVE OAK                      2.04 FL   LAKE CITY                             6.24 FL   LAKE CITY 2 E                    5.06 FL   GLEN ST MARY 1 W                2.61                 FL   PALM COAST 6 NE          9.04         FL   CRESCENT CITY                         8.55             FL   GAINESVILLE RGNL AP             9.61     FL   HASTINGS 4NE              6.22                    FL   OCALA                    7.23                          FL   WHITE SPRINGS 7N               4.08           FL   JACKSONVILLE CRAIG MUNI AP      4.01  FL   JACKSONVILLE INTL AP        4.41           FL   JACKSONVILLE NAS          3.89 FL   JACKSONVILLE WHITEHOUSE FIELD         5.00   FL   BELL 4NW                 6.92             FL   FEDERAL POINT                7.87                                                                                            GA   PRIDGEN                              7.11 GA   ALMA BACON CO AP        3.87 GA   NAHUNTA 6 NE            7.75                   GA   FARGO 17 NE            3.31                GA   BRUNSWICK             6.58      GA   BRUNSWICK MALCOLM MCKINNON AP       5.25 GA   WOODBINE                     7.16 Just in time for the long Independence Day weekend, the Environmental Working Group just updated it’s Guide to Sunscreens with 150 more SPF products.   The link to the 2019 Sunscreens Guide: * here*.   Lists of products by category: Best Beach and Sport Sunscreens * here *   Best Moisturizers with SPF * here *   Best Lip Balms with SPF * here *   Best Sunscreens for Kids * here *   And remember, sunscreen is just one tool in the sun safety toolbox.   Dress in protective clothing, such as light cotton fabric with a tight weave and wide-brimmed hats that shade the face, scalp, neck and ears.   Choose a lotion instead of a spray. Sunscreen sprays pose inhalation risks and provide inadequate protection. If you must use a pump or spray, apply it to your hands first and then wipe it on your skin.      Avoid products that contain retinyl palmitate, a form of Vitamin A.   Select a sunscreen with an SPF greater than fifteen but less than 50.   Don’t forget to wear sunglasses to protect your eyes from harmful UVA and UVB rays.
  • For daily updates on the tropics: 'Talking the Tropics With Mike'.... The 'Buresh Blog' will not be updated again until the first week of July. After about a month of hot temps. & generally dry weather, our wet season 'switched' on about the 2nd week of June.  So temps. have not been as extreme & rainfall has become much more plentiful. Fri., June 21 is the summer solstice.  It's when the N. Hemisphere has its longest days of the year which will equate to more than 14 hours of daylight for Jacksonville/NE Fl./SE Ga.  Remember that the seasons are a result of the earth's tilt toward or away from the sun.  The sun's rays on the summer solstice are over the Tropic of Cancer - 23.5 degrees N. - the fartherst north with respect to the equator of the year.  For Jacksonville, it equates to our avg. high temp. at or above 90 degrees through mid August. Speaking of the sun.... there will be a full solar eclipse BUT NOT visible from the U.S. on July 2nd.  It's the S. Pacific's turn including Chile & Argentina.  The U.S. countdown is to April 8, 2024! Maps below from the 'Great Amerian Eclipse': The next U.S. total solar eclipse in 2024 (only about 60% of the sun will be blocked for Jacksonville & surrounding areas): The American GFS (global forecast system) forecast model has been upgraded to the 'FV3' (finite-volume cubed-sphere).  This is the first major overhaul of the GFS model since 2003.  Of course, the goal is more accurate forecast models but - remember - any forecast model is just that - a model & cannot nor will not be perfect.  A couple of the keys to better forecast models include better input (analysis) & higher resolution in 3-D of the earth's atmosphere.  More info. * here *..... a more technical explanation * here *. One of the unique - & potentially critical - aspects of the FV3 model is the ability to zoom in on critical weather events such as hurricanes.  The image below shows an example. The left is the zoomed in area - the right is where the model will then be more coarse away from the area of concern so as to not slow the model's output or compromise the overall model output.
  • May turned dry on us.... & hot.  Jacksonville finally broke - on Mon., June 10th - a streak of 17 straight days 90+ with 23 for the year already (annual avg. is 82 days). The drought monitor map (updated weekly every Thu.) shows a dramatic increase in the 'abnormally' dry area. The 'wet season' usually kicks in during June but can range anywhere from mid May to mid to late June as indicated by the last 10 years. The wet season accounts - on avg. - for more than half of Jacksonville's annual rainfall. If & when the clouds part enough, enjoy a good show put on by Jupiter.  Due to its 'close' proximity, you will even be able to make out 4 of the larger moons by simply using  binoculars or, of course, a telescope. Night skies below + Jupiter nfo: 'SkyandTelescope'   June 10 (all night): Jupiter arrives at opposition, rising in the east at sunset (“opposite” the Sun) and staying up all night. Throughout the month, the majestic planet will be somewhat brighter than in the past five years.   June 15 (night): The waxing gibbous Moon, Jupiter, and Antares form a triangle in the southeast shortly after sunset.   June 17 (dusk): Look low toward the west-northwest after sunset and tease Mercury and Mars out of the gloaming. The two planets, a mere ½° apart, stay less than 2° apart for a couple of evenings prior and several evenings afterward.   June 18 (evening): The Moon, one day past full, and Saturn rise in tandem 1° apart. The Moon actually covers Saturn from some locations in the Southern Hemisphere.   June 21 : Northern summer begins at the solstice, 11:54 a.m. EDT. It’s the shortest night of the year in this hemisphere.   June 23 (dusk): Mercury appears its farthest from the Sun, 25° away. Look for it low in the west about 45 minutes after sunset. Pollux and Castor, in Gemini, are to its right.   June 30 (dawn): A thin crescent Moon rises shortly before sunrise, cradled in the Hyades and below the Pleiades.   July 2 (day): A total solar eclipse occurs along a narrow band crossing parts of the Pacific Ocean, northern Chile, and central Argentina. It’s the first since the “Great American Eclipse” in 2017. Much of the rest of South America, a small section of Central America, and some Pacific islands will see a partial solar eclipse — but not anywhere in North America.   July 4 : Earth is at aphelion, its farthest from the Sun for 2019, at a distance of 94,513,221 miles (2% more than average).   July 9 (all night): Saturn arrives at opposition, meaning it’s opposite the Sun in the sky. It rises at sunset and sets at sunrise. The magnificent ringed planet is upper left of the Teapot in Sagittarius and just below the Teaspoon asterism.   Moon Phases New Moon: June 2, 6:02 a.m. EDT First Quarter: June 10, 1:59 a.m. EDT Full Moon: June 17, 4:31 a.m. EDT (Strawberry Moon; called Rose Moon in Europe) Last Quarter: June 25, 5:46 a.m. EDT
  • Talking the Tropics With Mike' updated every day through the hurricane season... watch 'Surviving the Storm'.... A dry last 3 weeks of May has made for a parched start to June for NE Fl./SE Ga.  The period from May 7th through June 3rd for Jacksonville was the driest such stretch on record with only 0.07' of rain compared to the avg. of 3.55'. Combine the lack of rain with hot temps. - longest stretch of 97+ degrees at 10 days - 2nd only to a July, 1875 heat wave!, & you have the ingredients for sudden drought conditions.  100 degrees on Memorial Day tied our all-time May record high. May rainfall courtesy our Jax N.W.S.: FL   JASPER                      3.60                    FL   BEAUCLERC                             2.41 FL   JACKSONVILLE BEACH                    1.52 FL   FERNANDINA BEACH              1.71 FL   LAKE CITY                     1.39                  FL   LAKE CITY 2 E                    0.82        FL   GLEN ST MARY 1 W                2.49                 FL   CRESCENT CITY                         3.45             FL   GAINESVILLE RGNL AP             2.65          FL   HASTINGS 4NE              3.63                    FL   OCALA                    5.56                                                FL   WHITE SPRINGS 7N               3.09           FL   JACKSONVILLE CRAIG MUNI AP      1.76     FL   JACKSONVILLE INTL AP        1.74              FL   FEDERAL POINT                3.64                                        FL   NE PALM COAST                         1.82     GA   PRIDGEN                              1.12 GA   ALMA BACON CO AP        1.21                                               GA   NAHUNTA 6 NE            2.20                   GA   BRUNSWICK MALCOLM MCKINNON AP       1.72 GA   WOODBINE                     4.00    But June typically starts our 'wet season' & all indications are that wetter is the direction were heading as we move toward the 2nd full week of June.  More than half our annual rainfall typically occurs from June through Sept. thanks to a combination of active sea breezes/high humidity & the occasional tropical disturbance.