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The Latest Story From The Trial

  • One of the co-conspirators in a fraud scheme that involved then-Northeast Florida Democratic Congresswoman Corrine Brown, is getting out of federal custody this month. Her release comes about three months shy of the full term she was sentenced to serve. WOKV confirmed that Carla Wiley was actually released from Federal Prison Camp Alderson in West Virginia on June 5th. At that time, she was transferred to a Residential Reentry Center, or halfway house, according to the Bureau of Prisons. The BOP says these centers provide assistance to inmates who are nearing release, including employment counseling, job placement, financial management assistance, and more. The BOP confirms she will be released from federal custody on July 25th, although court records show her sentence calls for supervised release once she’s out. FULL COVERAGE: Former Congresswoman Corrine Brown’s fraud case Wiley surrendered January 29th, 2018, for her one year and nine month sentence, which would have put her release date at the end of October, had she served the full sentence. The US Attorney’s Office says this July release date reflects roughly 85% gain time. Wiley’s attorney, D. Gray Thomas, tells WOKV that a slightly shortened sentence like this will generally happen with an inmate that has not had disciplinary violations. With Wiley specifically, he says this sentence is consistent with one a compliant inmate would receive, and reflects that she poses no risk of disciplinary violations. Thomas declined to comment on what Wiley plans to do after her release. Wiley was the founder and leader of “One Door For Education”, a sham charity that brought in hundreds of thousands of dollars in donations, but that Wiley, Brown, and Brown’s Chief of Staff Ronnie Simmons used for events and their own expenses. Wiley was the first to plead, and then helped the US Attorney’s Office build their case against Brown and Simmons, who were jointly indicted. Simmons later pleaded guilty as well and cooperated in the case. Because of this cooperation, prosecutors recommended leniency in their sentencing, although District Judge Timothy Corrigan gave Simmons a term that’s longer than what the advisory guidelines called for. Brown went to trial, and was found guilty in May 2017 on 18 of 22 charges. Brown surrendered for her five year prison sentence on January 29th, 2018. She is serving her sentence at Federal Corrections Institution Coleman’s minimum security satellite camp in Sumterville. Her convictions represent both the fraud scheme and filing false tax returns and financial disclosures. Prosecutors had sought up to nine years in prison for Brown. Simmons surrendered January 8th, 2018 for his four year sentence at Federal Corrections Institution Cumberland’s minimum security satellite camp in Maryland. In addition to a fraud count, he had also pleaded to theft of government funds for getting his sister a “ghost” government job and taking some of the salary she collected. Brown continues to appeal her convictions and sentence, saying she mismanaged her finances and put too much trust in Simmons. Her appeal centers on whether it was proper to remove a juror from deliberations after they had begun. The US Attorney’s Office declined to comment on Wiley’s release.

Recent Headlines

  • One of the co-conspirators in a fraud scheme that involved then-Northeast Florida Democratic Congresswoman Corrine Brown, is getting out of federal custody this month. Her release comes about three months shy of the full term she was sentenced to serve. WOKV confirmed that Carla Wiley was actually released from Federal Prison Camp Alderson in West Virginia on June 5th. At that time, she was transferred to a Residential Reentry Center, or halfway house, according to the Bureau of Prisons. The BOP says these centers provide assistance to inmates who are nearing release, including employment counseling, job placement, financial management assistance, and more. The BOP confirms she will be released from federal custody on July 25th, although court records show her sentence calls for supervised release once she’s out. FULL COVERAGE: Former Congresswoman Corrine Brown’s fraud case Wiley surrendered January 29th, 2018, for her one year and nine month sentence, which would have put her release date at the end of October, had she served the full sentence. The US Attorney’s Office says this July release date reflects roughly 85% gain time. Wiley’s attorney, D. Gray Thomas, tells WOKV that a slightly shortened sentence like this will generally happen with an inmate that has not had disciplinary violations. With Wiley specifically, he says this sentence is consistent with one a compliant inmate would receive, and reflects that she poses no risk of disciplinary violations. Thomas declined to comment on what Wiley plans to do after her release. Wiley was the founder and leader of “One Door For Education”, a sham charity that brought in hundreds of thousands of dollars in donations, but that Wiley, Brown, and Brown’s Chief of Staff Ronnie Simmons used for events and their own expenses. Wiley was the first to plead, and then helped the US Attorney’s Office build their case against Brown and Simmons, who were jointly indicted. Simmons later pleaded guilty as well and cooperated in the case. Because of this cooperation, prosecutors recommended leniency in their sentencing, although District Judge Timothy Corrigan gave Simmons a term that’s longer than what the advisory guidelines called for. Brown went to trial, and was found guilty in May 2017 on 18 of 22 charges. Brown surrendered for her five year prison sentence on January 29th, 2018. She is serving her sentence at Federal Corrections Institution Coleman’s minimum security satellite camp in Sumterville. Her convictions represent both the fraud scheme and filing false tax returns and financial disclosures. Prosecutors had sought up to nine years in prison for Brown. Simmons surrendered January 8th, 2018 for his four year sentence at Federal Corrections Institution Cumberland’s minimum security satellite camp in Maryland. In addition to a fraud count, he had also pleaded to theft of government funds for getting his sister a “ghost” government job and taking some of the salary she collected. Brown continues to appeal her convictions and sentence, saying she mismanaged her finances and put too much trust in Simmons. Her appeal centers on whether it was proper to remove a juror from deliberations after they had begun. The US Attorney’s Office declined to comment on Wiley’s release.
  • Former Northeast Florida Democratic Congresswoman Corrine Brown has surrendered to start her five year prison sentence. Brown was found guilty last year of 18 of 22 federal fraud-related charges, and she was denied her efforts to stay out of prison on bond while appealing those convictions and sentence. She turned herself in just ahead of a noon deadline today at Federal Corrections Institution Coleman’s minimum security satellite camp in Sumterville. While we first received confirmation of her surrender from a bishop who was with Brown and spoke after to our partner Action News Jax, WOKV has since confirmed with the Bureau of Prisons as well. A federal judge agreed to honor Brown’s request to recommend to the Bureau of Prisons that she serve her time in a facility close to Northeast Florida. The Bureau of Prisons website says FCI Coleman’s satellite camp has 391 inmates. It’s part of a larger complex, which includes two high security penitentiaries and a low security federal correctional institution, in addition to the medium security correctional institution that’s adjacent to the satellite camp.  The Admissions and Orientation Handbook says there are five counts on weekdays at the satellite camp, during which inmates are required to be in their room, and inmates and their property can be searched for contraband at any time. For visitation, inmates can have up to 30 people on their approved list- 20 family members and 10 friends and associates. Visitors are subject to a dress code and other requirements. Telephone calls by the inmate are subject to monitoring and recording, except for legal calls. Mail is allowed, and the facility is part of an electronic mail pilot as well, but inmates must apply for access to that. There are television rooms, and personal radios are allowed, but must be played with headphones and at a volume that doesn’t disturb others. There are also table games in the activities/recreation room, including cards, checkers, dominoes, billiards, and shuffleboard. “Quiet time”- which also includes lights going out- begins at 10:30PM, and the Handbook says excessive noise after that is not tolerated. Inmates can apply to be a part of the “Hobby Craft Program”, with any completed crafts being mailed out of the institution. There are also leagues for sports at varying competitive levels, including basketball, soccer, softball, and volleyball. The facility includes areas for worship services, prayer, study, and a religious library. There are full-time Chaplains available, and both personal counseling and religious services take place. Every inmate there is assigned a job in the prison complex once they complete orientation and are medically cleared. Inmates can establish a savings account, but money can’t be withdrawn from that while the inmate is in prison, except for in emergencies. “Performance pay” and “meritorius good time” are available for inmates who have exceptional work performance, according to the Handbook. Inmates are issued green shirts and pants to wear at most times. Basic hygiene items are issued by the facility, and more can be purchased at the commissary. Inmates can spend up to $275 per month at the Commissary, if they have the funds available in their inmate account. Food is served cafeteria style, and inmates are encouraged to complete their meal within twenty minutes, because of space and time limitations. FULL COVERAGE: The case against former Congresswoman Corrine Brown Brown, her former Chief of Staff Ronnie Simmons, and the President of the sham charity they funneled money through Carla Wiley, were all involved in scheme that solicited hundreds of thousand of dollars from donors who believed they were giving to education, scholarship, and similar purposes- but instead, the money was used for personal expenses and lavish events. Brown was also found guilty of over-reporting charitable donations and under-reporting income on tax and financial disclosure forms. She continues to say she’s innocent, claiming she mismanaged her office and finances. Brown’s ongoing appeal is based largely on the dismissal of a juror during deliberations. That juror said at the outset of deliberations that the “Holy Spirit” told him Brown was not guilty. The judge ultimately ruled that while praying for guidance is within the right of a juror, receiving instruction from an outside force was not. The judge further said that while it appeared the juror was trying to participate in deliberations, the fact that he made this statement in the beginning showed he was not following court instruction to withhold final judgement until full deliberations took place. Simmons has already surrendered for his four year prison sentence that is being served in Maryland. Wiley also surrendered Monday, but she is serving her one year nine month sentence at Federal Prison Camp Alderson in West Virginia, which is minimum security. Both of them pleaded guilty ahead of Brown’s trial and cooperated with the government’s case, including testifying against Brown. Our partner Action News Jax reports Brown spent the beginning of Sunday at Bethel Baptist Church, where she is a member. The pastor reportedly held a prayer for Brown, and church members say they’re praying for her as well. WOKV will have continuing coverage through Monday. Action News Jax is in Sumterville, and you can get updates on CBS 47 and Fox 30 throughout the day.  Comment on our Facebook post with your reaction to her prison sentence:
  • The request had already been denied by the District Court in Jacksonville, but now the 11th Circuit Court of Appeals has rejected former Congresswoman Corrine Brown’s motion to remain out of prison pending her appeal. Brown must surrender to the Bureau of Prisons to start serving her five year sentence next Monday, January 29th. FULL COVERAGE: The trial of former Congresswoman Corrine Brown Brown was convicted on 18 of 22 fraud-related charges for her role in soliciting hundreds of thousands of dollars to a sham charity and using the money on personal expenses instead. The convictions also include that Brown under-reported income and over-reported charitable donations on tax filings and financial disclosure forms. Two other people pleaded guilty in the case- the President of the sham charity, Carla Wiley, and Brown’s former Chief of Staff, Ronnie Simmons. Simmons surrendered earlier this month to serve his four year prison sentence, while Wiley must turn herself in Monday as well, to serve a sentence of one year and nine months. Through this process, Brown has maintained she is innocent, saying she mismanaged her office and finances but never knowingly participated in the fraud. She is appealing her convictions and sentence, saying a juror was improperly dismissed during deliberations. The District Court has already denied her motions for a new trial and judgement of acquittal. Brown asked the Court to allow her to continue to remain out of prison on bond, pending the appeal. After the District Court rejected that, Brown’s defense formally filed in front of the appellate court last month. The 11th Circuit Court of Appeals today denied her request as well. Brown’s attorney had filed an additional motion in District Court today requesting a 30 day extension for Brown to surrender. That has been denied by District Judge Timothy Corrigan as well, with his order saying Brown should direct that request to the 11th Circuit instead.

The Latest On-Air Coverage

The Trial of Corrine Brown

Former congresswoman Corrine Brown has returned to Duval county to answer federal charges of conspiracy and fraud. We go in-depth to dissect the latest from inside the courtroom

Jax Evening News Special - Corrine Brown sentencing

Topics: Anchors Mark Jackson, Stephanie Brown, and WOKV legal expert Mark Rubin discuss the particulars of former Congresswoman Corrine Brown's 5-year federal prison sentence.
Posted: December 04, 2017

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The Latest News Headlines

  • A self-identified California survivalist was sentenced Monday to three consecutive life sentences, without the possibility of parole, in the murders of a couple sleeping on a beach in 2004, as well as the 2017 murder of his own brother. Shaun Michael Gallon, 40, pleaded no contest last month to the murders of Lindsay Cutshall, 22, and Jason Allen, 26, who were shot to death between Aug. 14 and Aug. 16, 2004, as they slept on Fish Head Beach near Jenner in Sonoma County. The case remained unsolved until 2017, when Gallon was accused of using a rifle to kill his younger brother, 36-year-old Shamus Gallon, in the Forestville home they shared with their mother. Following his arrest, Shaun Gallon confessed to the Allen-Cutshall homicides. He pleaded no contest June 13 to all three killings. At the time, Sonoma County officials said there was no apparent motive for Gallon to shoot his brother. “There doesn’t appear to be an altercation of any significance that led to the shooting,” Sgt. Spencer Crum told the Press Democrat. Even prior to his brother’s slaying, Shaun Gallon’s name had long been on law enforcement’s radar. The San Francisco Chronicle reported he was well-known for his erratic behavior, and his rap sheet was a long one. He was convicted in 2009 of assault with a deadly weapon for shooting an arrow at a man in Guerneville, the Chronicle reported. His Facebook page shows multiple photos of homemade bows and arrows, as well as a photo of hiself with a spear he made. “Further, Gallon was also alleged to have attempted to kill a Monte Rio man in June 2004 by using a disguised homemade explosive device, and seriously injuring a second unintended victim when it detonated,” a news release from the Sonoma County District Attorney’s Office read. Gallon was charged in 2017 with felon in possession of a firearm and ammunition, as well as possession of an illegal assault rifle, the district attorney said. The charges to which Gallon pleaded no contest are lengthy, court records show. “There were multiple special allegations and enhancements alleged against Gallon, including that he murdered multiple victims, that he committed great bodily injury on those victims, that he used a firearm to inflict great bodily injury on each of his murder victims and that he had suffered a prior ‘strike’ conviction in 2009 for assault with a deadly weapon,” Ravitch’s news release said. “In his change of pleas, Gallon admitted all charges and enhancements.” Gallon waived all rights of appeal by entering into the plea agreement. Ravitch said the agreement was reached after a review of the records, a review of mitigating material offered by the defense and talks with the victims’ families, as well as the surviving victims of Gallon’s prior crimes. Photos recovered from their camera shows they took photos of one another in front of the Golden Gate Bridge and Alcatraz, the newspaper reported. They then headed north in Cutshall’s red 1992 Ford Tempo for the Sonoma coast, where they found themselves in Jenner, a village Allen had visited a few years earlier. Several witnesses, some conflicting, reported seeing the couple along the way as they stopped for gas and other items. A front desk clerk at the Jenner Inn told police the couple showed up there either Friday, Aug. 13, or the following night. Though the couple ate at the inn, there were no available rooms, so they said they would camp outdoors instead, the Chronicle said. The manager, who declined to give her name, said she chatted with the couple again the following morning when they came in for breakfast. “I asked them if they were having fun,” the woman told the newspaper. “They said they stopped in San Francisco. They were just a happy couple trying to get away for the weekend.” Various accounts indicate Allen and Cutshall were told Fish Head Beach would be a good spot to camp, even though it was illegal to sleep on the beach there.  Police believe it was the night of Aug. 14, 2004, when the couple parked Cutshall’s Tempo in a pullout along nearby Highway 1 before setting up their gear on the beach. According to Sonoma magazine, both made notations in a visitor’s log kept near the beach. “As I stir this mac and cheese, I think to myself, ‘What a wonderful life,’” Allen wrote. “I’ve just spent two awesome days with my fiancée, Lindsay. Can life ever be so perfect? Only with a person who is so great. God gives me this privilege in life and He has given me a wonderful woman to enjoy it.” “The sun is going down in the horizon,” Cutshall wrote, according to the magazine. “All I see is the beams shining on the cliff face. And I know that God is awesome. I look around and I see his creation all around me.” Authorities believe the couple was killed, each by a single rifle shot to the head, that night or early the following morning as they slept in their sleeping bags, their Bible nearby. Family and friends grew concerned when the couple had not turned up back at the Christian camp by Sunday. According to the Chronicle, Lindsay was due to fly home a week later to begin planning her wedding. A missing person report was filed Monday, Aug. 16, by friends at the camp. The couple's bodies were found two days later, first spotted by deputies in a Sonoma County Sheriff’s Department helicopter sent up to search for a man stuck on a cliff near Jenner, the Chronicle reported. Instead, the spotters saw two bodies in bloodstained sleeping bags. With no apparent motive -- there were no signs of robbery or sexual assault at the scene -- detectives were stymied for years. It would take another 13 years before investigators learned what happened or why. ‘I went crazy’  A Sonoma County Probation Department report, obtained by the Press Democrat, paints a disturbing portrait of Gallon’s life and shows ways in which his family shielded him from arrest before he killed his brother. Gallon’s father, David Gallon, admitted to police he got rid of his son’s guns in 2004, a week after Allen and Cutshall were found slain. Shaun Gallon, who had been arrested on unrelated weapons charges, called his father and asked him to dispose of the weapons. David Gallon told investigators he did so “because he feared (Shaun) Gallon was unstable,” the document says. The records show Shaun Gallon became a potential suspect in the double homicide on the beach after deputies found him near a beach in Guerneville with a loaded, stolen gun in the pocket of his camouflage jumpsuit.
  • Unionized campaign organizers employed by Sen. Bernie Sanders are demanding an increase in pay, saying the presidential candidate is not paying them fairly, according to a story in The Washington Post. Campaign staffers have complained to Sanders’ campaign manager that they are receiving “poverty wages,” and they are asking for pay equivalent to a $15-an-hour average wage.  Sanders, I-Vermont, has for years advocated for a federal minimum wage of at least $15 an hour. The staffers union has been negotiating with Sanders’ campaign manager Faiz Shakir, according to the Post story. The conflict over pay, according to the story, “dates back to at least May and remains unresolved.” The newspaper’s reporting came from emails exchanged between the employees, the union and Shakir. The documents, the story said, were provided to the Post “on the condition of anonymity because of the sensitivity of the private talks.” >> Read more trending news  Late Thursday, Shakir issued this statement in response to the story: “We know our campaign offers wages and benefits competitive with other campaigns, as is shown by the latest fundraising reports. Every member of the campaign, from the candidate on down, joined this movement in order to defeat Donald Trump and transform America. Bernie Sanders is the most pro-worker and pro-labor candidate running for president. We have tremendous staff who are working hard. Bernie and I both strongly believe in the sanctity of the collective bargaining process and we will not deviate from our commitment to it.” The union representing Sanders' campaign workers, United Food & Commercial Workers Local 400, did not comment on the negotiations, according to the Post story. Four Democratic campaigns – those of Eric Swalwell, who left the race last week, Elizabeth Warren, Julian Castro and Sanders – announced that their staffs would be represented by a union, a first for presidential campaigns. “We’re honored that his (Sanders) campaign will be the first to have a unionized workforce,” Shakir said in a statement in March. Everyone on Sanders’ campaign under the rank of deputy director would be represented by a union, per the agreement first announced in March. Field organizers were to be paid not by the hour, but by a straight salary of $36,000 a year, according to their original employment agreement. According to a draft of a letter to Shakir from the staffers, field organizers were working at least 60 hours per week, putting their average hourly pay at less than $13. “Given our campaign’s commitment to fighting for a living wage of at least $15 an hour, we believe it is only fair that the campaign would carry through this commitment to its own field team,” the letter reads. The U.S. House of Representatives passed a measure this week that would raise the national minimum wage to $15 per hour. The bill has been sent to the Senate. Sanders has introduced a bill on the Senate floor that would make the federal minimum wage at least $15 an hour. According to the Post story, in May, Shakir recommended raising the pay for field organizers to $42,000 and changing the workweek specifications. According to the union, Shakir was seeking to extend the workweek to six days. The union is asking for health care benefits to be increased and for reimbursement of mileage at 58 cents per mile.
  • President Donald Trump plans to nominate lawyer Eugene Scalia, son of late Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia, to serve as his next labor secretary, according to an announcement posted Thursday on Twitter. >> Read more trending news  Scalia, 55, is a partner in the Washington office of Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher, where he specializes in administrative law and handles cases related to labor and employment, according to The Washington Post and NPR. He previously served as solicitor of the U.S. Department of Labor under President George W. Bush. He also served as special assistant to Attorney General William Barr during his previous tenure as Bush's attorney general. 'I am pleased to announce that it is my intention to nominate Gene Scalia as the new Secretary of Labor,' Trump wrote Thursday in a Twitter post.  'Gene has led a life of great success in the legal and labor field and is highly respected not only as a lawyer, but as a lawyer with great experience working with labor and everyone else.'  Scalia has long represented companies that have pushed back against unions and strengthening labor laws, The New York Times reported. In 2005, he was hired by Walmart after former employees sued the company, claiming they had been illegally fired for whistle-blowing, according to NPR. His nomination is likely to get some pushback from Democrats, though he's expected to be easily confirmed in the Republican-controlled Senate, according to the Times and the Post. If confirmed, Scalia will replace outgoing Labor Secretary Alex Acosta, who announced his resignation last week amid criticism of his handling of a secret 2008 plea deal with Jeffrey Epstein. The deal, which came under renewed scrutiny after federal authorities revealed new sex trafficking charges against Epstein last week, allowed the 66-year-old to avoid significant jail time and federal prosecution after he was accused of molesting teenage girls. Acosta's deputy, Patrick Pizzella, will serve as acting secretary of labor after his resignation goes into effect Friday. The Associated Press contributed to this report.
  • Today will be hot and humid with highs in the lower to mid 90’s inland and near 90 at the coast. There will be scattered afternoon thunderstorms today. Feels-like temps will once again be 100-103 inland and 100+ at the coast.  Showers and storms may dampen some early tailgaters for The Rolling Stones concert (2-5 pm).  Showers and any thunderstorms should either be out of Duval County or loosing steam by 6 pm.  CONTEST:  Pick what song you want to hear The Stones play This weekend the heat and humidity stick around with highs in the mid 90’s with only a few widely scattered showers and storms. The mid 90’s hang around on Monday.  INDEPTH:  What you need to know if you are going to the concert
  • An airman was reportedly shot in the leg Thursday night at Nellis Air Force Base. >>Read more trending news The airman was taken to a hospital with survivable injuries, Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department Lt. Adrian Beas told The Las Vegas Review-Journal. The circumstances surrounding the incident are unclear. Police were called shortly after 9:30 p.m. and found the injured airman near the O’Callaghan Federal Hospital, Beas said. Police and base personnel are investigating how the shooting happened, KVVU-TV reported.

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