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    Universal Orlando appears to be making way for a new roller coaster in the Jurassic Park section of Islands of Adventure, according to documents reviewed. >> Read more trending news  Earlier this week, carnival games and vendor kiosks were removed, and construction walls went up around a portion of the old Triceratops Encounter area, which has been defunct for almost a decade.  That matches work described on a demolition permit filed with the city of Orlando in May for Project 791 in that 1.36-acre area. Contractor documents indicate the project includes construction of “a new attraction” and estimates that demolition and construction will take 18 months.  A document reviewed shows a roller coaster track layout for that area, which we’ve reproduced above. The document shows the queue starting on the southern edge of the waterfront by the Discovery Center.  Records indicate the Raptor Encounter attraction currently in that area will be relocated as part of the construction.  The demolition permit for the area is in the final stages of approval, according to the city website.  Permits to construct the actual coaster have not yet been filed, city records show.  Universal spokesman Tom Schroder declined to comment for this story.  In a tweet last week, Universal said in response to a question about the Jurassic Park section, 'We've got some exciting plans and look forward to more exciting details to come.
  • Bowling a perfect game is a tough feat, but to have two high school teammates do it during the same match -- back to back, on the same lanes -- is extraordinary. >> Read more trending news  La Salle High School senior Jacob Toelke rolled the second 300 game in the program’s history Thursday night -- he scored the first one two years ago -- and seconds later sophomore teammate Nolan Blessing wrapped up perfect game No. 3, WKRC reported. The two teammates shared the same lanes at Western Bowl against Oak Hills High School. Toelke preceded his perfect game with a 235 total, while Blessing rolled a 256, the television station reported. The Lancers improved to 11-2 after winning the match. Toelke is averaging 224.4 this season, while Blessing sports a 217.7 average, WKRC reported.
  • Holy heist, Batman! A thief zapped a South Florida collector by stealing a collection of comics of the Caped Crusader and the Boy Wonder worth $1.4 million, the Sun-Sentinel reported. >> Read more trending news  Randy Lawrence said his collection of 450 registered Batman and Detective comic books were stolen from an air-conditioned, double-locked storage unit in Boca Raton. Now, Lawrence is hoping officials can catch the joker who took the comics. But for now, the theft is a riddle. The Palm Beach County Sheriff’s Office is investigating the theft, which occurred sometime between Nov. 28 and Jan. 8, WFOR reported. Storage facility personnel were reviewing surveillance videos, the television station reported. The theft had all the elements of a Batman comic book plot. A wire was left hanging from the ceiling of the storage unit, so Lawrence believes the villain entered through the roof, the Sun-Sentinel reported. The locks were not broken and boxes were shifted around in the unit, the newspaper reported. Lawrence gave investigators a list of the missing Batman and Detective comic books and posted a list online with the certification numbers and pedigree names so the comic books can be traced. Lawrence took to social media, pleading with other collectors to keep a watchful eye for anyone trying to sell the stolen comic books, the newspaper reported. Lawrence said the comics are registered with the Certified Guaranty Company, a comic book grading service, WFOR reported. “I … really need you all to be aware and keep your eyes open,” Lawrence wrote online, according to the Sun-Sentinel. “They will probably be offered to some of you sooner than later. “For me this is a first and on such a high level it’s been devastating. This collection was my nest egg, and I had worked so hard and done without for so long to put this together that it being taken away from me this way has left me in a very bad way.”
  • Federal government employees affected by the government shutdown can get some free entertainment in New York. The Metropolitan Opera says it is offering free tickets to people with government IDs from Saturday through the end of the month. A pair of tickets per performance can be reserved in advance by telephone or in person at the Met box office. Twelve performances are available: for Bizet's 'Carmen,' Mozart's 'Don Giovanni,' Debussy's 'Pelleas et Melisande,' Cilea's 'Adriana Lecouvreur' and a double bill of Tchaikovsky's 'Iolanta' and Bartok's 'Bluebeard's Castle.
  • Multiple outlets have reported that Sony Music has dropped embattled R&B star R. Kelly from its roster. The announcement comes two weeks after the popular documentary series 'Surviving R. Kelly' drew fresh attention to the sex abuse allegations against R. Kelly, which have dogged him most of his career. The #MeToo and #MuteRKelly movements have held protests, demanding his music be dropped from streaming services and beyond. Representatives for Sony and RCA Records, where R. Kelly was signed to, didn't immediately return emails seeking comment. Lady Gaga and Celine Dion recently removed their duets with R. Kelly from streaming services and French rock band Phoenix apologized for collaborating with the singer in 2013. R. Kelly has denied all allegations of sexual misconduct involving women and underage girls. His first album on Sony, 1992's 'Born into the 90's,' was with the group Public Announcement. His massively successful solo debut, '12 Play,' was released a year later.
  • A man accused of threatening a father who says singer R. Kelly kept his daughter from her family has turned himself in. Henry County Sheriff's Office Maj. Bobby Sloan says Henry James Mason turned himself in around 8:30 a.m. Friday. A judge had issued a warrant for Mason on charges of terroristic threats and acts. Sloan says Mason was released on $10,000 bond. A phone number for Mason couldn't immediately be found. A Henry County police report from May says Timothy Savage told police Mason had called and threatened to kill him. Savage said he'd been trying unsuccessfully to reach his daughter. He told police Kelly was holding his daughter. The report doesn't say what the relationship between Mason and Kelly is.
  • The black box construction branded 'DIOR' was so big it obscured the view of the Eiffel Tower. The sheer scale of menswear designer Kim Jones' pop-up venue of 2,840 square meters (30,570 square feet) could only mean one thing: he was competing for show of the season on Friday at Paris Fashion Week. A high-tech conveyor-belt catwalk allowed models to parade before a starry Dior Men front row that included Kate Moss, Lily Allen and a tardy Robert Pattinson. Here are some highlights of the day's fall-winter shows. DIOR'S CONVEYOR-BELT COUTURE This is what a luxury supermarket might look like. At Dior Men, a snaking, meter-wide conveyer belt began moving to thumping music as models in dark, shimmering and couture-infused looks filed by. In the presentational style, Jones made a welcome ironic comment on the commercial nature of ready-to-wear. But this superlative display needed no gimmicks to please. A romantic sash was slung over a double-breasted charcoal suit at the chest and hip in a feat of accomplished styling — and one that harkened to couture draping. A contemporary version of 19th-century spats — banding across the ankles — and arm-length leather gloves added to the show's romantic, almost swashbuckling, mood. Jones added an edgy interpretation to the strict codes of Christian Dior, the designer who died in 1957, by translating his obsessions. Dior's love for big cats became a white tiger fur T-shirt hybrid. The late designer's penchant for superstition became charm bracelets, and his initials a 'CD' fastening on a safety pin. Dior's love of art became a sparkling print of a frowning Mona Lisa on a shirt, jacket and sweater. The entire display maintained a brooding quality, thanks to the insistence on couture-style cashmeres, silk-satin and furs. ___ BERLUTI FINDS ITS FOOTING After much creative change at the top of the LVMH house, Berluti — the one-time boot-maker — seems to have found its footing. Belgian Kris Van Assche replaced artistic director Haider Ackermann last year and Friday's standout show towed the line perfectly between vibrant and tasteful. Berluti, which started a clothes line in 2011, has cut a corner for itself in the menswear luxury market for its eye-popping hues. And Van Assche didn't let the fall-winter mood dampen any of this zest for color, all the while working in his signature minimalist touches. A shocking pink trench coat was kept tasteful thanks to the simplicity of its clean cut. It was paired with a crimson suit that gave the whole look a visual electricity. A bright yellow oversize coat had a 19th-century weight to it that evoked a Parisian dandy. To cap the collection, leather looks in black and dark blue provided a welcome contrast in color and sex appeal. A soft kinky hoody shimmered sensually. ___ JIL SANDER'S PRECISION The Milan-based fashion house Jil Sander, which was founded by a German designer, showed its menswear collection Friday in Paris. It's the kind of frontier-defying cross-pollination that's healthy in European fashion to keep styles fresh and force designers to constantly challenge their own ideas. Designer duo Lucie and Luke Meier demonstrated this in droves at their beautifully-executed minimalist show inside the grand Hotel Salomon de Rothschild. The silhouettes were geometric, layered yet lightweight. Coats were tailored. Materials were light with a subtle sheen. The color palette moved in a precise sequence from cream to gray, blue, burgundy and then black. The program notes said the Meiers aimed for 'parity between a tailoring which is sharp and precise and a softened modern wardrobe.' A narrow trench coat in rose red cut a fine style by being ever so slightly asymmetric with a square panel on one side of the chest, a sharp triangle on the other. Geometry continued via the straps of leather bags that crossed the body or in the paneled blocks of a knitted sweater. ___ JUUN J.'S CHECK It was intentional mismatching and deconstruction at the award-winning South Korean designer Juun J.'s fall display that riffed on the military. Giant black-and-white checks on skirts cut on the bias and on double-breasted woolen coats were used as contrasts to silver bubble jackets or camouflage print styles. Tartan and check insets were pieced together in visually arresting juxtapositions. This formula was employed alongside Juun J.'s signature oversize styles that were puffed up with voluminous layering. The one major impracticality in these ready-to-wear looks were some headdress-helmets in silver, white, black and electric blue that came down to the eye and might have caused their wearers to walk into traffic. ___ THE ART OF INVITATION The art of the chic invite is still very much a staple of Paris fashion. Houses compete to produce the most eye-catching, inventive, and often plain wasteful, hand-delivered show invitations. The little works of art often provide a hint as to what the collection has in store. Louis Vuitton's Virgil Abloh had guests second-guessing the meaning of a white bejeweled glove that arrived in the post. It was, of course, a reference to Michael Jackson, to whom he paid a fashion homage. South Korean Juun J.'s 'invitation' was a gargantuan black-and-white check woolen scarf — to set the winter scene and demonstrate the designer's penchant for oversize styles and checks. Berluti won the prize for the clunkiest invite: a hefty wooden block with the label's details on top. ___ ISSEY MIYAKE BRINGS THE WIND The Franco-Japanese house of Issey Miyake put on a collection in homage to the wind. In the fall-winter silhouettes, it was not the wind of an angry storm at work, but more a gentle breeze that served to curve and soften the clothes' shapes. The result was a low-key affair by designer Yusuke Takahashi. A welcome sharpness did appear in the collection via its print detailing, but its power was diluted by the rounded shapes. For instance, some jagged yellow diagonal motifs evoked the strong movement of wind — but the looseness of the suits and coats on which they appeared lessened the effect. The prints were conceived by an Asian wax resistant dyeing technique called batik that the house frequently uses. Issey Miyake is one house that cannot be faulted for its use of cutting-edge fashion-making methods. Elsewhere, another Asian technique, ikat — a sort of tie-dye — was employed to produce the collection's strongest pieces. A silk-wool series sported beautifully defused white horizontal bands across icy blue-gray pants and shimmering coats. ___ Thomas Adamson can be Twitter.com/ThomasAdamson_K
  • Former Marine Staff Sgt. R. Lee Ermey has been laid to rest months after he passed away at the age of 74.  The military man turned actor died on April 15, 2018, in California, but his cremains were interred Friday in section 82 of Arlington National Cemetery in Virginia, the Marine Corps Times reported. He succumbed to complications from pneumonia, USA Today had reported last year. >>Read: ‘Full Metal Jacket’ actor R. Lee Ermey dead at 74 Among those in attendance at the ceremony in the snow covered national cemetery, were his brothers Terry and Jack Ermey. “Ron always had that element of surprise,” Terry Ermey told the crowd of family and friends. Betty and Clinton Ermey, R. Lee Ermey’s children, related how Ermey tried to learn to ride a unicycle. Friends also shared when he bought a buffalo robe, complete with horns, and wore it on an airplane to bring it home, the Marine Corps Times reported.  “I can only imagine him getting on the plane with those buffalo horns on,” retired 12th Sgt. Major. of the Marine Corps Harold Overstreet said during the ceremony, which was attended by almost 100 people. Ermey was sent off with full military honors, including a Marine Corps bugler, a bagpiper and the firing of three volleys, the Marine Corps Times reported. >> Read more trending news  Ermey is survived by Marianila Ermey, his wife of 38 years, six children, 12 grandchildren and six great-grandchildren, the Marine Corps Times reported.
  • Wendy Williams is taking an extended break from her TV talk show to deal with health issues related to her immune system disorder, her family said Friday. The family wrote in a statement that Williams has suffered complications from Graves' disease in the past few days. Treatment is necessary and will include 'significant time' in the hospital, according to the family statement provided by show producer and distributor Debmar-Mercury. Williams has a strong desire to return to work but must focus on her 'personal and physical well-being,' the family said, adding a request that her privacy be respected. Williams, 54, is married to Kevin Hunter. She is on the mend from another health problem, a shoulder fracture she suffered in December, the statement said. The host revealed the Graves' disease diagnosis on her show last February, when she announced a three-week hiatus. Graves' disease leads to the overproduction of thyroid hormones and can cause wide-ranging symptoms and affect overall health. In October 2017, Williams fainted on stage during her show, saying later she became overheated while wearing a bulky Halloween costume. Debmar-Mercury said that it 'wholeheartedly' supports Williams' decision to take the time she needs. She will be welcomed back when she is ready, the company said. Repeats of 'The Wendy Williams Show' will air during the week of Jan. 21, to be followed by original episodes with guest hosts.
  • Actor Anthony Rapp said he came forward with sexual misconduct allegations against Kevin Spacey because he feared assaults could 'keep happening' if he said nothing. The younger actor spoke about the incident on the red carpet for the second season of his streaming series, 'Star Trek Discovery' on Thursday in New York. He said he hoped he did his part to 'change the culture.' In 2017, Rapp alleged that Spacey made an unwanted sexual advance during a house party in 1986 when he was 14 and Spacey was 26. Rapp sought legal counsel at the time, but no charges were filed. The incident was dormant until a flurry of sexual misconduct allegations surfaced about Harvey Weinstein, prompting Rapp to come forward. Spacey responded that he did not remember such an encounter but apologized if the allegations were true. More than a year later, Rapp is proud of the decision to tell his story. 'I know that it's something that needs continued movement forward and I'm going to keep doing my best to be a part of the movement forward,' Rapp said. 'I was just concerned that that it would be something that could keep happening, so if I could do something that could make a difference, I was eager to.' His 'Star Trek Discovery' co-star Wilson Cruz said Rapp was being humble. 'What he did was incredibly brave, and he really allowed countless men to be able to tell their stories. You know, for the most part we were hearing stories about women and those are important stories to tell,' Cruz said. 'But there's a lot of stigma around abused men, sexually abused men and sexual harassment of men, and it was going to take a brave person to be able to start that conversation.' More than a dozen accusers came forward after Rapp's allegations, causing Spacey to lose his starring role on the Netflix series 'House of Cards.' Earlier this month, Spacey was arraigned on felony indecent assault and battery charges after a Massachusetts man alleged that he was assaulted inside a Nantucket bar in July 2016. He was 18 years old at the time. ___ Follow John Carucci at http://www.twitter.com/jacarucci

The Latest News Headlines

  • After yet another day which featured no hints of progress in ending a funding fight that has to a partial government shutdown taking paychecks away from over 800,000 federal workers, President Donald Trump tweeted on Friday evening that he would make a ‘major announcement’ on Saturday about his push to get money to build a wall along the Mexican border, which has led to an ongoing standoff with Democrats in Congress. “I will be making a major announcement concerning the Humanitarian Crisis on our Southern Border, and the Shutdown,” the President wrote on Twitter, giving no details about what he might announce. With no indications that Democrats in Congress are ready to give in on their opposition to a border wall, some Republicans have continued to urge the President to declare a ‘national emergency’ under existing laws, and move money around in the military’s budget to build a wall. I will be making a major announcement concerning the Humanitarian Crisis on our Southern Border, and the Shutdown, tomorrow afternoon at 3 P.M., live from the @WhiteHouse. — Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) January 18, 2019 “He ought to go ahead and declare an emergency, and it would be over,” said Sen. Jim Inhofe (R-OK). “I don’t know why he is reluctant to do that.” Inhofe – who chairs the Senate Armed Services Committee – said Thursday that he would not oppose the President dipping into military construction funds to build the wall, though other Republicans have publicly opposed the idea. Democrats on Friday also pressed the Department of Homeland Security on another front – using eminent domain to take land away from landowners, in order to build the way – focusing on a case involving the Catholic Church in Texas, which owns land that the Trump Administration wants. “The federal government must exercise extreme caution when seizing private property,” wrote Senate Democratic Leader Charles Schumer to the Homeland Security Secretary. To @SecNielsen: The Trump Administration’s lawsuit against the Roman Catholic Diocese of Brownsville, Texas, raises important questions on the exercise of eminent domain to build a border wall. We ask you to respond to these questions by January 31: pic.twitter.com/MXcfoQib9E — Chuck Schumer (@SenSchumer) January 18, 2019 The President has asked for $5.7 billion in border security money for both fencing and a wall; Democrats in Congress have offered $1.6 billion – the original requests of the Trump Administration and Republicans – but Democrats want none of that to go to the wall.
  • Florida schools are seeing a critical shortage of certified science, English and math teachers. A new report by the Florida Department of Education says those subjects are among areas where substantial proportions of teachers who are not certified in the appropriate field are being hired to teach those courses. “We have a shortage because people aren’t entering the teaching profession like they used to because there’s no security in teaching,” Renna Lee Paiva said. Paiva is president of the Clay County Education Association. She said those who have been in the education field for years are extremely concerned about the teacher shortage. In Duval County, a district spokesperson said there are 146 total vacancies at schools, with 21 open positions in math and four in science. In St. Johns County, the district had 28 unfilled positions as of Jan. 7, including four in math and science. Clay County Schools says it has 14 vacancies overall, with five in math and science. “We start to see fewer freshman coming in and saying, ‘I want to be an elementary teacher or I want to be a biology teacher,’” Paul Parkison, chair of the University of North Florida’s childhood education program, said. He told Action News Jax that the university starts recruitment early, educating incoming freshman about teaching opportunities. “We didn’t used to have to have those conversations, we’d have freshman coming in that were already excited about being teachers,” he said. “We actually initiated a couple programs that are targeted toward particularly the secondary, our UNF graduates who didn’t consider teacher as their primary major. Maybe they’re a history major or a biology major.” Local education experts, including Jacksonville Public Education Fund President Rachel Tutwiler Fortune, said the focus needs to be on higher pay. “There are many potential solutions, including higher pay and more career advancement opportunities,” she said in a statement. “Our pay scales, our benefits is all in jeopardy and it’s up to the legislators to fix it so we can give quality education to our kids -- which is our primary goal,” Paiva said. Full statement from JPEF: “The teacher shortage is a problem in Duval County as well as across our state and the nation, and there are many potential solutions, including higher pay and more career advancement opportunities. The Duval County School Board recently discussed one of these promising solutions -- creating a program to help public high students work toward a degree in education, in order to increase the number of aspiring teachers. This would be a win for Duval County students now and in the future, and we applaud Duval County Public Schools for exploring how we could adopt this innovative model -- known as 'grow your own teacher' -- in Jacksonville.”
  • You've been hearing the buzz about autonomous vehicles for a while, now lawmakers in Florida are discussing the possibility of making the futuristic form of transportation a reality. A state representative from Duval County has filed legislation to allow the development and deployment of those autonomous vehicles.  State Rep. Jason Fischer (R-Jacksonville) says as an engineer by trade, he understands the benefits autonomous vehicles would bring with them. He says if Florida were to ban those types of vehicles, it would stunt the state's potential for growth.  'Those engineers aren't going to move here. Those planners aren't going to move here. Those are high paying jobs,' Fischer says.  He says he can imagine Jacksonville as a place where football fans will be able to hop on driverless vehicles to take them to Jaguars games at TIAA Bank Field. He says the Skyway, linking one side of the St. Johns River to the other in downtown, is a prime example of something that could be updated if his bill goes through.  'We have a public transportation component that's already looking to go that way,' he says. 'My legislation would help enable them to move in that direction.'  Fischer says autonomous vehicles would also be a major help to the blind community. Both AARP Florida and the Florida Council of the Blind have offered their support for the legislation, saying their members will have more mobility opportunities if the bill goes through.  “For blind people, people living with disabilities and some senior citizens, self-driving cars will mean greater independence,” President of the Florida Council of the Blind Sheila Young says in a statement.  Sen. Jeff Brandes (R-St. Petersburg) is sponsoring the companion measure in the Florida Senate. Fischer says he thinks the legislation should make it to the governor's desk within a couple months.
  • Two Florida fifth-graders are accused of plotting to kill an 11-year-old classmate and escape in a golf cart last month. The plot unraveled Dec. 14 at Roberts Elementary School in Tallahassee, where the alleged victim and the accused students, ages 10 and 11, all attend school. A 32-page police report obtained by the Tallahassee Democrat details the plot, which resulted in both students’ suspension and civil citations for conspiracy to commit battery and bringing weapons on school grounds.  The students are also being recommended for expulsion, the Democrat reported.  “This obviously is a very serious matter,” Leon County Superintendent Rocky Hanna said in a statement. “There is zero tolerance in our school system for violence or threats of violence. The individuals who participate in these types of behavior will suffer severe consequences, as (will) these two young boys.” The school’s principal, Kim McFarland, told investigators that the boys “planned and put into effect” a plot to kill their classmate, the Democrat reported.  >> Read more trending news According to the timeline laid out in the police report, one of the accused boys threatened the victim Dec. 10, telling him they would kill him. A few days later, a female classmate told the victim a secret and then went to the two suspected plotters and claimed the victim was spreading rumors about her.  The plotters again threatened the boy, saying they would “take care of him and kill him,” the Democrat reported.  Another student later told police investigators the boys drew a map of where on campus they would take the victim -- an area without security cameras, the newspaper reported. They ultimately changed their mind and planned to take the boy to the school’s garden instead, the police report said.  The day of the planned attack, one of the boys brought a backpack to school with what investigators believe was a murder kit: a wrench, adjustable clamp pliers, a multitool with a 3-inch blade on it and baseball batting gloves. According to police, the student showed the tools to classmates and one of the pair told them “snitches get stitches.” They also told at least one classmate they had the gloves so they would not leave fingerprints, the Democrat reported. They planned to use some of the tools to bust through a gate and flee on a golf cart.  During an after-school program on campus, the boys approached the alleged victim and asked if he wanted to go to the “secret hideout in the garden,” the police report said. He told investigators he refused because other students had told him the boys wanted to hurt him.  The alleged victim went to a teacher supervising the after-school program and told what the boys had planned, the newspaper reported. The boys were taken to the principal, who searched the backpack and found the tools, including the knife. The boys denied wanting to kill the victim, but admitted they planned to beat him up, the Democrat reported.  After the incident, McFarland sent parents an email, which was obtained by WCTV in Tallahassee. “Last Friday there was an incident, with alleged intent to harm a fellow student, that occurred in the afterschool program with a group of 5th grade students who had been developing a plan over a series of days,” McFarland said. “Some of you have reached out with concerns and questions. At this time, I cannot share details, but I can assure that your children are safe and the situation is being handled.” McFarland wrote that she met with the school’s fifth graders to discuss the importance of “see something, say something.”   “Many fifth grade students knew of the potential incident but did not tell teachers or their parents,” the principal said. “We discussed the importance of alerting adults when there is any concern for safety for themselves or their fellow students. Please discuss this with your children. It is imperative they learn this valuable skill now.”
  • The Clay County Sheriff's Office is inviting the community to a fundraiser next month called 'Shootin' with the Sheriffs.' Chris Padgett, the Public Information Officer with CCSO, says the event will essentially be a clay-shoot competition featuring Clay County Sheriff Darryl Daniels and other law enforcement members and the community.  Padgett says proceeds from the event will allow them to send about 30 people from their honor guard and members of their traffic section to Washington D.C., later this year for the police memorial service to honor one of their own.  '...In August 2018, one of our very close friends and deputies, Deputy Ben Zirbel, was tragically killed in a traffic crash on Blanding Boulevard. With that, his name will be getting placed on the law enforcement memorial's wall. And we want to make the sure the members of his direct team and the members of our honor guards go there and partake in that event,' says Padgett.  Padgett says it's important to send a team to be there to represent Zirbel's legacy and represent his wife and his child.  'And that is just so important to us, because they're [Zirbel’s family] going through some extreme hardships and there is one way we can help elevate them and be there as a support element,' says Padgett.  Padgett says the 'Shootin' with the Sheriffs' event will be family-friendly and everyone's invited to either watch or take part.  The event will be held February 25th, from 9 AM- 2 PM, at the Saltwaters Shooting Club located at 900 Big Oak Road in St. Augustine.  To register or help sponsor the event, you can contact Jimmy Stalnaker at (904) 813-9554 or by email at jstalnaker@claysheriff.com. You can also contact Charlie Goldsmith at (904) 838-3350 or by email at cgoldsmith@claysheriff.com.  You can also contact either of them to make a cash donation if you can’t make it out that day, but still want to help.

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