On Air Now

Listen Now

Weather

cloudy-day
71°
Partly Cloudy
H 85° L 74°
  • cloudy-day
    71°
    Current Conditions
    Partly Cloudy. H 85° L 74°
  • cloudy-day
    83°
    Afternoon
    Partly Cloudy. H 85° L 74°
  • cloudy-day
    81°
    Evening
    Partly Cloudy. H 85° L 73°
Listen
Pause
Error

The latest top stories

00:00 | 00:00

Listen
Pause
Error

The latest traffic report

00:00 | 00:00

Listen
Pause
Error

The latest forecast

00:00 | 00:00

    The American Film Institute is honoring Julie Andrews with its Life Achievement Award. The organization said Friday that Andrews will receive the award at the Gala Tribute on April 25 in Los Angeles. It will be broadcast on TNT. Andrews' acting career has spanned several decades, winning an Academy Award in 1965 for her starring role in 'Mary Poppins.' She also starred in 'The Sound of Music' and 'The Princess Diaries.' Andrews received a Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award in 2011. She also won two Grammys through 'Mary Poppins' and 'Julie Andrews' Collection of Poems, Songs and Lullabies.' The 83-year-old actress will be the 48th recipient of the prestigious honor from the AFI, joining Mel Brooks, Robert De Niro, Meryl Streep and George Clooney. This year's honoree was Denzel Washington .
  • The former chief makeup artist at Charlie Rose's interview show is suing him, saying the disgraced television journalist ran a 'toxic work environment' for women. Gina Riggi said in her harassment lawsuit filed Thursday that she worked for 22 years for Rose and Bloomberg, the company where his Manhattan studio was located. She lost her job in 2017 after Rose was fired by PBS and CBS News for sexual misconduct. Her lawsuit seeks unspecified damages 'and equitable relief for the harm she has endured,' it says. Riggi charges that Rose treated his studio as a sexual hunting ground for attractive young women. She says he groped and pawed female staff members, stared at their breasts, and dangled job prospects to wine and dine women. 'Far from being an advocate for their careers, Mr. Rose treated them as sexual targets, using his power and influence to serve his personal desires,' Riggi says in the lawsuit. His attorney, Jonathan Bach, did not immediately return messages seeking comment. But he told Variety that Rose denied the charges and would vigorously contest them. The lawsuit was inconsistent with friendly messages that Riggi had sent to Rose, he said. Riggi said Rose would demean and humiliate women who rejected him and once swatted at her. Many women who were shaken by encounters by Rose would use her makeup room as a refuge, she said.
  • Jennifer Lopez won Milan Fashion Week on Friday, wowing the crowd at Versace when she emerged wearing a version of the jungle dress that nearly broke the internet almost 20 years ago. Building up to the big reveal, Donatella Versace announced from backstage a Google search for 'Versace jungle dress,' and a dome ceiling above the circular runway filled with images of J-Lo wearing the 2000 Versace dress at the Grammys. Then Versace intoned: 'The REAL jungle dress,' and Lopez appeared in an updated version of the iconic gown, which maintained the plunging neckline but in a sleeveless version and with a train that billowed below the open back. Not a smart phone remained dormant as the fashion crowd jostled to catch video of the fashion ah-ha moment. The original jungle dress made not only fashion history, but Google history. According to Versace's press notes, millions of people searched Google in an effort to see the dress, inspiring tech giant to create Google Images. 'The world had the same reaction: jaw-dropping,' Versace said in show notes. 'Today we live in a technological world, but back then, one event promoted the creation of a new tool that now has become part of our lives.' Highlights from the third day of Milan Fashion Week womenswear previews for Spring /Summer 2020: ____ VERSACE RETURNS TO THE JUNGLE For next spring and summer, Donatella Versace did what she does best: Make fun and cheeky fashion. Versace started low-key with a series of little black dresses, revealing in a business-like way, worn with strappy, nearly invisible sandals, some wrapping up the leg gladiator-style. The collection played with the tailored silhouette, enlarging the shoulders in an apparent ode to the 1980s, and keeping the waist cinched. The real star was the jungle print, as the fashion house celebrated the 20th anniversary of the iconic jungle dress worn by Jennifer Lopez. A street version of the same dress, with a bandeau top to break up the plunging neckline, appeared in standard green and eye-popping orange and red, both worn with psychedelic tights. More subtly, the print over-laid a very masculine gray Prince of Wales check jacket, giving a slight acid-wash effect, and accented tie-dye T-shirts. Palm motif also appeared as pins and metal mesh, while leaves adorned plastic sliders and the laces on some Roman-sandals, like a creeping vine. The styling was strong on trademark Versace hardware. Tiny metallic bags were worn like jewelry, three at a time. And golden bangles worn off belt loops were very tongue-in-cheek, including pill packs, a tape dispenser and an open matchbook. Eyewear resembled welding glasses. Closing the show was Amber Valletta, the model who wore the original Jungle dress for the Spring/Summer 2000 collection. For the Spring/Summer 2020 collection, she wore a sculpted black dress with deep leg slit. ____ MARNI'S JOYOUS PROTEST On a day when thousands of people marched worldwide to combat climate change, Marni took a first step toward making the collection more sustainable. Designer Francesco Risso said the season 'marks a new beginning,' as the fashion house is both trying to raise awareness about plastics through artistic collaborations and work with more organic and recovered textiles in the runway collections. Marni also did not send out physical invitations this round. 'When I hear sustainable, I get a bit itchy, because it is easy to promote that word and not really be sustainable,' the designer said after the show. This season's Marni print is hand-painted, by Risso and his team. The collection of all skirts and dresses -- there were no trousers -- had a raw, almost post-industrial feel, as if they were constructed from a memory of a peasant blouse and skirt or twisted Tahitian skirts. While the looks had a primitive touch, emphasized by the hand-painting and the mud-slicked hair, muslin skirting under dresses gave a couture edge. 'The process was a lot about freeing silhouettes,' Risso said. 'This is our joyous progress.' _____ MARCO DE VINCENZO'S RAINBOW Marco De Vincenzo set his runway show against the watery backdrop of Milan's Darsena, linking the city's major canals, for a collection that was a study of color and motion. The collection was titled 'The Wave.' And movement was evident in the knitwear molded into three-dimensional patterns, tight pleats on dresses with laser-cut detailing, clingy dresses with a wavy pattern beneath sheer organza shirt and skirt, metallic fringe on a shimmery crop top and skirt combination and tiered chiffon dresses. De Vicenzo said he used techniques like laser-cutting to modify classic textiles: organza, knitwear, chiffon and lurex. It was his first monochrome collection and he put it to good effect. Each of the 47 garments was a different color, even if just a shade off the one before, so that when the models completed the finale, they posed briefly on the arching bride over the canal, forming a fleeting fashion rainbow. ____ ANTONIO MARRAS Antonio Marras has woven a yarn about an unlikely romance between a Sardinian shepherd and Japanese princess as the backstory for his collection for Spring/Summer 2020, centering around interpretations of the kimono. 'The collection is a meeting between two worlds that in many ways are opposite, but they amalgamate, which gives novelty to this collection,' Marras said. Japanese prints are the starting point for the looks, and kimonos are deconstructed and reinterpreted as dresses, jackets and skirts worn with collared shirts. One kimono dress was constructed out of contrasting materials -- lace, plaid cotton and jacquard -- and fastened with a long, trailing karate belt. The collection was presented in a theater, with a Japanese theater performance in the background. The arrival of the Japanese princess, wrapped in a regal red robe, signaled the close of the show.
  • Robert S. Boyd, who shared a 1973 Pulitzer Prize with colleague Clark Hoyt for coverage of Democratic vice presidential candidate Thomas Eagleton's exit from the campaign due to mental health issues, has died. He was 91. The journalist died of congestive heart failure at a retirement home in Philadelphia, Hoyt said. Boyd spent 20 years as Washington bureau chief of Knight Ridder, once the nation's second-largest newspaper chain with properties like The Philadelphia Inquirer and Miami Herald. He witnessed the secret U.S. bombing of Cambodia during the Vietnam War and received a tour of the Bay of Pigs from Cuban leader Fidel Castro. At 65, Boyd became a science writer and traveled with a scientific expedition to the South Pole. He is survived by his wife and five children.
  • Suzanne Whang, whose smooth, calm voice provided the narration for HGTV's 'House Hunters' for years, has died. She was 57. Her Tuesday death was confirmed Friday by her longtime agent, Eddie Culbertson. Whang first gained fame as the on-screen host of the show, where anxious home buyers are shown trying to choose between three potential options. Later, she was moved to the narration role only, but her recognizable voice was as much a draw as the homes. Culbertson says Whang was diagnosed with breast cancer in 2006 and in 2011 was told she would not live a year. She beat the disease for years until it returned in October 2018. Culbertson says Whang — who was also a comedian and actress— included her cancer battle in stage performances. 'Her courage, humor, determination and optimism, with which she notably confronted the disease, emboldened and gave hope to countless others facing serious life challenges,' he said in a statement. 'She remained a loving spirit, and in the end she passed away peacefully at home with her great love by her side, having been true to herself and the journey she chose.'  She is survived by her parents and a sister.
  • Colson Whitehead's brutal narrative of a boys' reform school, 'The Nickel Boys,' and Marlon James' fantasy epic 'Black Leopard, Red Wolf' are among the works chosen by judges for the fiction longlist of the National Book Awards. Others on the list of 10 include Taffy Brodesser-Akner's acclaimed comic novel 'Fleishman Is in Trouble' and the immigrant stories 'The Other Americans,' by Laila Lalami, and 'On Earth We're Briefly Gorgeous,' the first novel by the poet Ocean Vuong. Friday's announcement caps a week in which the National Book Foundation also unveiled longlists for nonfiction, translation, young people's literature and poetry. The lists will be narrowed to five in each category on Oct. 8. Winners will be announced during a Nov. 20 dinner ceremony in New York City, when author Edmund White and the CEO of the American Booksellers Association, Oren Teicher, will receive honorary awards. Based on a real Florida institution, Whitehead's novel is his first since the acclaimed historical fantasy 'The Underground Railroad,' which came out in 2016 and won the National Book Award and a Pulitzer Prize. James is a native of Jamaica and is known for his Booker Prize-winning 'A Brief History of Seven Killings,' centered on the attempted 1976 assassination of reggae great Bob Marley. He has said that 'Black Leopard, Red Wolf' is the first of a planned trilogy. The other books on the fiction longlist were Susan Choi's 'Trust Exercise,' Kali Fajardo-Anstine's 'Sabrina & Corina: Stories,' Kimberly King Parsons's 'Black Light: Stories,' Helen Phillips' 'The Need' and Julia Phillips' 'Disappearing Earth.' This week's longlists featured works ranging from Iliana Ragan's memoir 'Burn the Place' to books for young people by Kwame Alexander and Jason Reynolds. The lists also were notable for some of the books that didn't make them, from Saeed Jones' memoir 'How We Fight for Our Lives' to Ta-Nehisi Coates' novel 'The Water Dancer.' Others omitted include Jacqueline Woodson's novel 'Red at the Bone,' Jia Tolentino's essay collection 'Trick Mirror' and Casey Cep's investigative 'Furious Hours: Murder, Fraud, and the Last Trial of Harper Lee.
  • The Latest on the state visit to the U.S. by Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison (all times local): 10:30 p.m. American and Australian luminaries gathered under the stars in the White House Rose Garden on Friday, resolutely 'celebrating' even as serious matters of national security and presidential politics combined to cast a cloud over President Donald Trump. The president and first lady Melania Trump welcomed Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison and his wife, Jenny, to the White House for just the second state dinner of the Trump administration. Guests included several Cabinet secretaries, members of Congress, White House staff and an Australian delegation that included pro golfer Greg Norman. Meanwhile, Defense Secretary Mark Esper was announcing the deployment of additional U.S. troops to the Persian Gulf region in response to a recent attack on the Saudi oil industry. And the controversy intensified over a conversation Trump had with Ukraine's president. __ 7:40 p.m. The White House says First Lady Melania Trump is wearing an aqua silk chiffon gown by J. Mendel to Friday's state dinner for Australia. It is adorned with inserted pleats and bias cut waves. The gown was first seen when Mrs. Trump and President Donald Trump greeted Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison and his wife, Jenny, as they arrived at the White House as the honored guests of the second state dinner hosted by Trump. The couples enjoyed private time in the White House residence before they came downstairs to the Blue Room to greet more than 170 guests, including Australian pro golfer Greg Norman, Trump attorney Rudy Giuliani and Maria Bartiromo of Fox Business Network. __ 7:35 p.m. A glittering array of American and Australian luminaries is streaming into the White House Rose Garden for a rare dinner under the stars, even as serious developments unfold for President Donald Trump at home and abroad. Tuxedoed and sequined guests include golfer Greg Norman, U.S. Attorney General William Barr and presidential adviser Kellyanne Conway. None of the arriving guests, Republican members of Congress among them, are acknowledging that Trump is sending more U.S. forces to Saudi Arabia to protect it after an attack on oil installations. They are also silent on the scandalous storm clouds hovering over Trump, who urged the new leader of Ukraine this summer to investigate the son of former Vice President Joe Biden, according to a person familiar with the matter. That's the heart of a whistleblower complaint against the president. North Carolina Republican Rep. Mark Meadows says he looks 'forward to celebrating tonight.' __ 7:05 p.m. Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison has arrived for a glitzy White House state dinner honoring the land Down Under. President Donald Trump and first lady Melania Trump greeted Morrison and his wife, Jenny, with handshakes and kisses on the Pennsylvania Avenue side of the mansion Friday evening. Morrison is on a state visit to the U.S., and earlier in the day he received a spirited welcome on the White House South Lawn. A day of meetings, a joint news conference with the president and other honors was being capped with a rare open-sky dinner in the Rose Garden. The menu features Dover sole entree and apple tart a la mode. The U.S. military is providing the entertainment. __ 4:30 p.m. President Donald Trump and first lady Melania Trump have given Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison and his wife, Jenny, gifts to celebrate their U.S. state visit. The White House says the Trumps gave the Morrisons a custom-made leather photo album hand-inscribed with 23-karat gold and a Tiffany & Co. pewter bowl engraved with the presidential seal and the signatures of both Trumps. Trump gave Morrison a model of the USS Canberra, which is currently being built at an Alabama shipyard, and a framed map of the Battle of the Coral Sea, a World War II battle in which the U.S. and Australian naval and air forces fought together against the Japanese. Mrs. Trump's choice for Jennifer Morrison was a sterling silver and 18-karat gold Tiffany & Co. 'Infinity' cuff bracelet. ___ 11:40 a.m. President Donald Trump says he would love to attend the 2019 President's Cup golf tournament in Australia in December, but it depends upon what his schedule will allow. The event features an international team competing against a United States team and is held every two years. Trump, an avid golfer, says the PGA Tour has invited him to attend, and he described the tournament as 'exciting.' Trump spoke about the President's Cup during a meeting Friday with Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison, who notes he'll talk about the event with Trump during a State Dinner in the evening. Trump notes that golfer Greg Norman of Australia is a good friend and will also be at the White House dinner. __ 9:35 a.m. President Donald Trump says in a welcoming ceremony for Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison that 'today we celebrate the long-cherished and unwavering friendship between the United States and Australia.' Trump and Morrison will participate in a day filled with meetings, a joint press conference and a lavish state dinner, the second one of Trump's presidency. Trump says tonight's Rose Garden state dinner 'will be quite something.' Morrison told the president in reply, 'thanks mate.' Morrison says the Australian delegation brings with it the thanks and respect of 25 million Australians for the U.S. The two leaders are seeking to demonstrate a strong alliance with Morrison saying the world is a better place with the United States and that the two nations 'see the world through the same lens.' The welcoming ceremony included Marine Band performances of the national anthem of both countries and a 19-gun salute and inspection of troops. ___ 12:30 a.m. President Donald Trump and first lady Melania Trump are welcoming Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison and his wife, Jenny, to the White House with a pomp-filled military arrival ceremony on the South Lawn Friday morning. Morrison is just the second world leader to be granted the high diplomatic honor of a state visit during the Trump administration. The leaders will meet for talks and face journalists at a joint news conference in the White House East Room. Morrison will also be treated to lunch at the State Department. They will cap the night with an opulent state dinner beneath the stars in a Rose Garden arrayed in shades of green and gold in tribute to his Australia's national colors.
  • The largest multinational oil consortium in South Sudan is 'proactively participating in the destruction' of the country, the actor George Clooney and co-founder of The Sentry watchdog group told The Associated Press this week. A new report released on Thursday by the Washington-based group that reports on links between corruption and mass atrocities says it found that Dar Petroleum provided direct support to deadly militias. 'And it has paid for government officials to live lavishly while the rest of the population suffers the consequences of a brutal civil war that has cost hundreds of thousands of lives,' Clooney said. The report explores how a variety of international individuals and businesses are linked to armed conflict, corruption and atrocities during the country's five-year civil war that ended with a peace deal a year ago. The oil consortium is the most prominent example. South Sudan is the most oil-dependent country in the world, and Dar Petroleum is one of the country's most important entities. It is comprised of China's state-owned China National Petroleum Corporation, Malaysia's state-owned Petronas, Chinese state-owned Sinopec, the private Egyptian-based firm SSTO and South Sudan's state-owned Nile Petroleum. While most of the country's oil rigs were shut down or destroyed during the war, the oil consortium continued operating. Emails shown to the AP by The Sentry show that the South Sudan government directed Dar Petroleum to deliver drums of diesel to the 'community Oil Protection Forces,' armed groups with close links to the oil industry including members of the Padang militia, known for committing atrocities such as burning villages, targeting civilians and attacking the United Nations protection site in Malakal in 2016. The report says the petroleum ministry requested 251 barrels of diesel to be delivered to military and militia forces in Upper Nile state in 2014 and 2015. Dar Petroleum has strong ties to South Sudan's national security apparatus. Its vice president is a major general in the service and the company has used funds earmarked for community development to support the lifestyles of senior politicians, the report said. Last year the consortium agreed to pay more than $686,000 to a hotel in the capital, Juba, to cover bills for the former petroleum minister Ezekiel Lol Gatkuoth. Some letters collected by The Sentry raised concerns about whether the oil ministry and Dar Petroleum were wrongfully allocating oil revenues earmarked by the state for community development. In one letter dated March 2018, the government authorizes the consortium to use $80,000 from the community development fund to purchase a 'white armored V8' vehicle. Dar Petroleum said it was not able to speak to the media, and CNPC did not respond to a request for comment. South Sudan's oil minister, Awow Daniel Chuang, called the report misleading, saying that 'what is being reported is a mere misunderstanding of how the oil companies operate in south Sudan or elsewhere.' The Chinese Embassy in South Sudan said that 'we have always required companies in South Sudan to operate in compliance with laws and regulations.' One oil expert said the international companies can't be seen as neutral bystanders. 'They respond to pressure from what South Sudan's government dictates and do not miss the opportunity to profit from the risk of engaging in such an unstable climate,' said Luke Patey, senior researcher at the Danish Institute for International Studies and author of 'The New Kings of Crude.' Weak governance and years of conflict have made South Sudan's resources easier to exploit. A U.N. report in April noted a 'degree of informality that limits meaningful controls and oversight' of oil revenues. As South Sudan emerges from years of fighting, some in the international community are pushing for more transparency and accountability. 'It needs to become more profitable to pursue peace here than to pursue war,' said Chris Trott, the British ambassador to the country. 'We need to ensure that the money that's made from the resources of this country are invested in this country's future.' ___ Follow Africa news at https://twitter.com/AP_Africa
  • Swedish climate change activist Greta Thunberg has two books coming out in the United States, including an English-language edition of her memoir. Penguin Press announced Thursday that it will release Thunberg's memoir 'Our House Is On Fire' and a collection of her speeches, 'No One Is Too Small to Make a Difference,' that will include her upcoming address at the U.N. Climate Action Summit in New York. 'No One Is Too Small to Make a Difference' is scheduled for November. Her memoir, co-written with her parents and sister, will be released next year. The 16-year-old Thunberg has quickly become an international force for urgent climate action. She has been in Washington for several days of rallies and lobbying efforts ahead of Friday's planned global climate strike.
  • A ballad that Chris Cornell produced for his daughter Toni when she was just 12 is now being released. 'Far Away Places' was written by Toni three years ago, and was one of the last songs that Cornell recorded before his death in May 2017. The song was released on iTunes on Thursday and is available on other streaming services. It is featured in a short film, also titled 'Far Away Places,' by Tatiana Shanks, a family friend. The movie has been featured in international film festivals, and the song itself has won awards at various film festivals. Proceeds from the single's sales will be donated to The New York Society For the Prevention of Cruelty to Children.

The Latest News Headlines

  • As the city prepares to demolish the Jacksonville Landing, a team is working to salvage some of the items inside. The biggest item Annie Murphy and her team at Eco Relics have salvaged so far from the building is the bar top from Hooters. It's for sale at their shop on Stockton Street.  'We're all about keeping stuff out of landfills, that's our mission,' Murphy said.  They expect to salvage up to 160 items from the iconic landmark before it is torn down, from doors and windows to artwork and lighting.  'It is really cool to see people recognizing certain things, longtime Jacksonville residents,' Murphy said.  She said they were able to salvage some items inside the buildings along the river earlier this month. They can't access the rest of the building until the last tenant moves out in October.  A city spokesperson said over the next couple of weeks, the contractor will be stripping out items not attached to the building structure and then heavy equipment will begin the demolition.  It's expected to be complete by June 2020.  Murphy said the pieces of Jacksonville history her team pulls from the building will be for sale as they're salvaged.
  • A North Carolina sheriff stands accused of urging the murder of a former deputy who had a recording of him using racially offensive language, authorities say. Granville County Sheriff Brindell Wilkins was indicted Monday on two counts of felony obstruction of justice, according to court records. Wilkins is accused of trying to get another man to kill former Deputy Joshua Freeman, who he believed was going to expose his racist talk. >> Read more trending news  Wake County District Attorney Lorrin Freeman, who is prosecuting the case, said Wilkins' Aug. 12, 2014, phone conversation with the 'well-known' man who threatened Joshua Freeman's life was caught on tape, according to The News & Observer in Raleigh. Lorrin Freeman and Joshua Freeman are not related. Joshua Freeman worked for the Sheriff's Office from November 2011 to August 2014 but was let go in the days leading up to Wilkins' alleged crimes, WRAL in Raleigh reported. Wilkins, who was reelected in 2018 for a third four-year term, is accused of advising the unnamed man to kill Joshua Freeman, 'whom the defendant knew to have expressed his intention to soon publicly reveal a purported audio recording of the sheriff using racially offensive language to authorities in Raleigh,' the indictment states. The court records do not detail what Wilkins is alleged to have said, or what ultimately happened to the recording of his words. The indictment against the sheriff alleges Wilkins encouraged the man to 'take care of it' and said, 'The only way you gonna stop him is kill him.' According to the indictment, Wilkins counseled the would-be gunman on how to kill Joshua Freeman in a way to avoid getting caught. He offered two tips, according to the document: Get rid of the murder weapon and keep quiet. 'You ain't got the weapon, you ain't got nothing to go on,' Wilkins allegedly told the man, the court records allege. 'The only way we find out these murder things is people talk. You can't tell nobody nothin', not a thing.' Wilkins and the individual discussed a time in which to kill Joshua Freeman and a location that would ensure it would be Wilkins' own Granville County Sheriff's Office investigators who would get the case, the indictment says. Wilkins assured the man he would not tell investigators of his prior knowledge of the crime. The indictment accuses Wilkins of failing to prevent harm to Joshua Freeman or warn him of the 'credible threat' to his life. It alleges the sheriff also failed to seize the gun the other man planned to use, despite the person showing him the weapon at one point. 'The defendant failed to properly execute his duties because of his personal animosity towards Joshua Freeman,' the indictment states. Joshua Freeman was never harmed, though the indictment offers no indication why the alleged plot failed. Wilkins went before a magistrate Monday and was released on $20,000 unsecured bond. Court records show he was ordered to have no contact with anyone named in the indictment. He was also ordered to surrender his passport, if he has one. Read the indictment against Granville County Sheriff Brindell Wilkins below.  Brindell Wilkins Indictment by National Content Desk on Scribd 'No one is above the law,' Lorrin Freeman said Monday, according to WRAL. 'It is always painful when someone who has the public trust faces these types of allegations for voters who put them in that place. 'Any time you have someone who is sworn to uphold the public trust, to protect their community, to investigate and report crimes, allegedly engage in this type of conduct, it is something that needs to be brought to justice, and so we will continue to follow the evidence in this case.' Several followers of Wilkins' public Facebook page offered support in the wake of the indictment. 'You will always have our support,' one woman wrote. 'Praying for you and your family.' 'Our friendship goes back 30 years or more and you have always been a great friend to me,' another woman wrote. 'You were there for me many times. I believe in you and you have my support, always.' Lorrin Freeman said Wake County is handling the case because Mike Waters, her counterpart in Granville County, could potentially become an important witness at trial. Waters, who addressed the case in a statement on his office's Facebook page, wrote to Lorrin Freeman in November to ask her to look into the case. Watch Wake County DA Lorrin Freeman discuss the case below, courtesy of the News & Observer. WRAL reported that Joshua Freeman, who Waters represented in 2014 while in private practice, gave the future prosecutor the tape recording of Wilkins' conversation with the man who talked of killing the former deputy. It was not clear Friday how Freeman obtained the recording. Waters said he immediately turned the tape over to the FBI. The Washington Post reported that Waters met with North Carolina State Bureau of Investigation agents about the recording in January 2017, but nothing happened. 'Quite frankly, it did not get to the top of their investigative list,' Lorrin Freeman told WRAL about SBI agents. Waters gave the recording to a different SBI agent in October 2018, but still, no investigation was initiated, the Post reported. That is when Waters turned to Lorrin Freeman to initiate a probe into the sheriff. She agreed. 'I have reviewed this recording,' Lorrin Freeman wrote to SBI agents, according to the Post. 'It contains a conversation between two individuals, one of whom appears to be the Granville County sheriff, about a former deputy sheriff and culminates in a discussion about committing a homicide.' In his Facebook statement, Waters expressed frustration at the amount of time it took to get an investigation going. 'At all times since (turning over the recording), I have provided assistance to investigators, and once Ms. Freeman opened a criminal investigation, have urged that this matter be given investigative priority,' Waters wrote. 'I understand it is a matter of great importance to the people of Granville County, and it has been a point of frustration that the investigative process has not been more expeditious.' He wrote that any allegations of wrongdoing by law enforcement are troubling, particularly when they involve a sheriff elected by the community. 'Over the next few months, my office will continue to lend assistance to the ongoing investigation as requested, while we continue to do our daily work of protecting victims, prosecuting those who violate the law and seeing that justice is administered,' Waters said. WRAL reported Lorrin Freeman said she worked to obtain obstruction charges against Wilkins because obstruction would be easier to prove in the five-year old case than solicitation of murder or conspiracy. The Granville County Board of Commissioners met Tuesday to discuss the indictment, but County Attorney Jim Wrenn said the board has no authority to remove Wilkins, an elected official, from office as his criminal case winds its way through the court system, WRAL reported. Lorrin Freeman confirmed that fact to the News & Observer. 'Technically, he can continue to serve if he chooses, until convicted,' Freeman told the newspaper. Spectrum News' Charlotte bureau reported that Wilkins has indicated he will not step down. Wrenn said he is considering trying to get Wilkins out of office through the courts but wants to hear the recording himself before making that decision. Gerry Cohen, former special counsel to the North Carolina General Assembly, said state law has a provision allowing a judge to suspend a sheriff and allow a county commission to appoint a temporary replacement pending the outcome of a criminal case. 'The statute is there to allow removal of sheriff,' Cohen told Spectrum News. 'One of six causes is, in fact, conviction of felony. Others are some of the things in his indictment, like willful misconduct, corruption, willful neglect or refusal to perform duties of his office. Some of them match the charges in his indictment.' The News & Observer reported that the probe into Wilkins' alleged actions against Joshua Freeman has led to investigations of the Granville County Sheriff's Office's accounting practices, as well as the operations of its drug unit. Freeman was a member of the drug unit when he was with the agency. 'Part of this investigation has centered on why this sort of conversation would have occurred, what the underlying motivation would have been,' Lorrin Freeman said Tuesday, according to the newspaper. 'Additional information has come to light regarding operations and accounting practices of the Granville County narcotics interdiction team.' Those investigations remain ongoing.
  • President Donald Trump called reports that a U.S. intelligence official filed a whistleblower complaint against him last month 'a ridiculous story' while speaking Friday to reporters in the Oval Office. >> Read more trending news  According to the Washington Post, the president made an unspecified 'promise' to an unidentified foreign leader that concerned the intelligence official. The official filed a complaint Aug. 12, two anonymous former U.S. officials told the newspaper, though lawmakers said Thursday they had yet to see the complaint. The intelligence community's inspector general, Michael Atkinson, appeared before the House Intelligence Committee behind closed doors Thursday but declined, under administration orders, to reveal the substance of the complaint. Update 7:40 p.m. EDT Sept. 20: Former Vice President Joe Biden has released a statement on the whistleblower's complaint against President Trump. In it, Biden describes Trump's alleged behavior as 'abhorrent' and calls on him to release a full transcript of the call 'so that the American people can be judged for themselves.' The entire statement reads: Update 4:40 p.m. EDT Sept 20: The Wall Street Journal reported Friday that Trump pressured Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky to investigate the son of Democratic presidential hopeful Joe Biden, citing unidentified people familiar with the matter. The Journal reported Trump asked Zelensky to work with Rudy Giuliani to determine whether Biden 'worked to shield from investigation a Ukrainian gas company with ties to his son, Hunter Biden.'  Trump made the request about eight times during a phone call in July, according to the Journal. Trump was asked Friday if be brought up Biden in the call with Zelenskiy, and he answered, 'It doesn't matter what I discussed.' But then he used the moment to urge the media 'to look into' Biden's background with Ukraine. Trump and Zelenskiy are to meet on the sidelines of the United Nations next week. Update 1 p.m. EDT Sept. 20: President Donald Trump told reporters Friday that the person behind the complaint filed against him was a 'partisan whistleblower' who 'shouldn't even have information,' though he added that he did not know the person's identity. 'I don't even know exactly who you're talking about,' Trump said. 'I don't know the identity of the whistleblower. I just hear it's a partisan person, meaning it comes out from another party.' Trump said Friday that he's spoken with several world leaders and that his conversations with them were 'always appropriate.' Details surrounding the complaint remained unclear Friday afternoon, though The Washington Post and The New York Times reported at least some of the allegations centered on Ukraine. Both newspapers cited unidentified sources. Asked if he knew if the whistleblower's complaint centered on a July 25 phone call with Ukrainian president Volodymyr Zelensky, the president responded 'I really don't know' but continued to insist any phone call he made with a head of state was 'perfectly fine and respectful.' Update 9:50 p.m. EDT Sept. 19: The whistleblower complaint against Donald Trump centers around Ukraine, two anonymous sources confirmed to The Washington Post Thursday evening. The New York Times and ABC News are also citing anonymous sources, saying the complaint involves Ukraine. It's not clear exactly how Ukraine fits into the allegations. However, Trump spoke on the phone with Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky two and a half weeks before the complaint was filed, the Post reported. That call was already under investigation by House Democrats, who are looking into whether Trump and his attorney, Rudy Giuliani, tried to manipulate the Ukrainian government into helping with Trump's re-election campaign, according to The Post. Update 1:45 p.m. EDT Sept. 19:  The chairman of the House Intelligence Committee suggested Thursday that lawmakers could ask a judge to compel White House officials to share with Congress a whistleblower complaint allegedly filed last month against Trump. The complaint was filed Aug. 12 and involved an undisclosed 'promise' made by the president to an unidentified foreign leader, CNN reported Atkinson declined to share details of the complaint during a closed meeting of the House Intelligence Committee on Thursday, citing a lack of authorization. 'We do know that the Department of Justice has been involved in the decision to withhold that information from Congress,' Schiff told reporters Thursday. 'We do not know -- because we cannot get an answer to the question -- about whether the White House is also involved in preventing this information from coming to Congress.' He said lawmakers had yet to see the complaint by Thursday afternoon. 'We do not know whether press reports are accurate or inaccurate about the contents of the complaint,' he said. Earlier Thursday, the president denied having done anything inappropriate. Update 1 p.m. EDT Sept. 19: Trump on Thursday denied any wrongdoing after reports claimed a whistleblower had come forward with a complaint about the president making an unspecified promise to a foreign leader. 'Another Fake News story out there - it never ends!' Trump wrote Thursday in a tweet. 'Virtually anytime I speak on the phone to a foreign leader, I understand that there may be many people listening from various U.S. agencies, not to mention those from the other country itself. 'Knowing all of this, is anybody dumb enough to believe that I would say something inappropriate with a foreign leader while on such a potentially 'heavily populated' call. I would only do what is right anyway, and only do good for the USA!' Original report: The promise occurred during a phone conversation with the leader, one source told the Post. Details about the alleged pledge and the leader's identity was not immediately available. Although Michael Atkinson, the intelligence community's inspector general, believed that the whistleblower complaint warranted 'urgent concern,' acting Director of National Intelligence Joseph Maguire so far has declined to provide information about the communication to the House Intelligence Committee, the Post reported. A closed hearing with Atkinson is slated for Thursday, the committee said. Maguire is expected to testify publicly Sept. 26, according to the committee's chairman, U.S. Rep. Adam Schiff, D-Calif. The Associated Press contributed to this report.
  • A Massachusetts man in his 70s has died after contracting Eastern equine encephalitis, or EEE, state health officials said Friday. >> Read more trending news  Authorities said the man was a resident of Freetown, a town about 50 miles south of Boston, according to WFXT. 'Our most sincere sympathy, thoughts and prayers go out to the victim, to their family and their loved ones,' town officials said in a news release. The man was identified as having the 10th confirmed human case of EEE in the state. Officials said eight other cases of EEE have been confirmed in animals, including seven horses and a goat. The man's death was the second reported in the state from EEE. At least two other EEE-related deaths have been reported in recent weeks in Rhode Island and Michigan. 'We continue to emphasize the need for people to protect themselves from mosquito bites,' Massachusetts Public Health Commissioner Monica Bharel said Friday in a news release. “The unusually warm weather expected this weekend will increase outdoor activity among people and mosquitoes. It is absolutely essential that people take steps to avoid being bitten by a mosquito.” Officials with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said several cases of EEE are reported each year, most often in states along the Gulf Coast. The mosquito-borne virus is rare, but serious, and can affect people of all ages, Massachusetts health officials said. Boston25News.com contributed to this report.
  • Here is a look at what impeachment is and why it doesn’t necessarily mean removal from office. How does impeachment work? Impeachment was established by the framers of the Constitution as a way to accuse a president of a crime and to hold a trial to determine if he is guilty of that crime. The Constitution lays out two specific actions, treason and bribery, that could lead to impeachment and removal of a president from office. The system also allows for a broader category to accuse a president of crime, although that category is more vague. A president can also be charged with and found guilty of “high crimes and misdemeanors.” What exactly constitutes high crimes and misdemeanors is not defined in the Constitution, making impeachment on that basis more difficult. By design, it is not easy to get rid of a president. Here are the steps in the process for impeaching a president: First, an impeachment resolution must be introduced by a member of the House of Representatives. The speaker of the House must then direct the U.S. House Committee on the Judiciary (or a special committee) to hold a hearing on the resolution to decide whether to put the measure to a vote by the full chamber and when to hold such a vote. A simple majority of the Judiciary Committee must approve the resolution. If the Judiciary Committee approves the resolution, it moves to a full vote on the House floor. If a simple majority of the those present and voting in the House approve an article of impeachment, then the president is impeached. The procedure then moves to the Senate where a “trial” is held to determine if the president committed a crime. There is no set procedure for the trial. How it is conducted would be set by the Senate leadership. Members of the House serve as “managers” in the Senate trial. Managers serve a similar role as prosecutors do in a criminal trial, they present evidence during the procedure. The president would have counsel to represent him at the Senate process. The chief justice of the U.S. Supreme Court presides over the trial. Senators listen to the evidence presented, including closing arguments from each side and retire to deliberate. Senators then reconvene and vote on whether the president is guilty or not guilty of the crimes he is accused of. It takes a two-thirds vote of the Senate to convict. If the president is found guilty, he is removed from office and the vice president is sworn-in as president. The hearing in the Senate, along with a charge in the House that the president has committed a crime is not a legal one. No penalty, other than removal from office, is brought against a president in an impeachment hearing. Impeachment trials have been held twice in the country’s history -- for President Andrew Johnson and for President Bill Clinton -- and both ended in acquittals: meaning the presidents were impeached by the House, but not convicted and removed from office by the Senate. One vote kept Johnson from being convicted of firing the secretary of war in 1868, which went against a tenure act. In 1999, the Senate was 22 votes shy of convicting Clinton of perjury and obstruction of justice stemming from a sexual harassment lawsuit filed against him by Paula Jones.

The Latest News Videos