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    Bill Yoast, the former high school football coach who was portrayed in the 2000 film “Remember the Titans,” died Thursday, The Washington Post reported. He was 94. >> Read more trending news  Yoast died at an assisted living facility in Springfield, Virginia, his daughter, Dee Dee Fox, confirmed. No cause of death was provided, the newspaper reported. Alexandria City Public Schools also confirmed Yoast’s death in a news release. Yoast coached at T.C. Williams High in Alexandria from 1971 to 1996 as the football team’s defensive coordinator. Head coach Herman Boone, the first black high school football coach in the district, led the team in 1971 to an undefeated season and a state championship.  The team’s story was the inspiration behind “Remember the Titans,” in which Denzel Washington played Boone and Will Patton played Yoast. Yoast was the head football coach at all-white Francis Hammond High School, but in 1971 the Alexandria school district consolidated its three high schools, sending the upperclassmen to T.C. Williams and converting Hammond and George Washington into junior high schools, the Post reported. Boone and Yoast 'put aside personal pride and pulled together to solidify a diverse coaching staff and team into the most successful team in the state in 1971,' the school district said in its release. “No doubt, the beginning of our relationship was rocky,” Boone, who coached the Titans from 1971 to 1979, told the Post in a telephone interview. “I didn’t know Yoast. Yoast didn’t know me. I knew that Hammond had no black athletes and I didn’t know if coach Yoast had anything to do with that. But we got to (training camp) and became roommates and found a way to talk to one another. “I think that’s the formula for race relations throughout the world. People have to learn to talk to one another. You have to learn to talk to that individual, and when you talk to that individual, you learn to trust that individual, and that’s the greatest gift God gave to man.”
  • Rod Bramblett, the longtime “Voice of the Auburn Tigers,” and his wife were killed in a two-car accident Saturday night in Auburn, Alabama, the Opelika-Auburn News reported.  >> Read more trending news  According to Auburn police and Lee County Coroner Bill Harris, Bramblett, 53, and his wife, Paula, were killed when their 2017 Toyota Highlander was rear-ended by a Jeep Grand Cherokee driven by a 16-year-old, AL.com reported. Rod Bramblett was airlifted to a Birmingham hospital, where he later died, the News reported. Harris confirmed that Paula Bramblett, 52, was taken to a hospital in Opelika but died from her injuries, the newspaper reported. 'The fatality accident victims in Saturday's two vehicle collision in Auburn were 53-year-old Rod Bramblett and his wife, 52-year-old Paula Bramblett, of Auburn,” Harris said early Sunday morning. “Paula Bramblett died at 7:50 p.m. in the emergency room of East Alabama Medical Center from multiple internal injuries and Rod Bramblett, known as the 'Voice of the Auburn Tigers, died at UAB Hospital in Birmingham from a severe closed head injury.” While the university has not officially confirmed the Bramblett’s deaths, university president Steven Leath tweeted “Our hearts are full of grief,” and said he and his wife “offer our sympathy and support to the family of Rod and Paula Bramblett.” The teen was taken to the same hospital as Paula Bramblett, where he was listed in serious condition, according to the News. The crash happened around 6 p.m. at the intersection of Shug Jordan Parkway and West Samford Avenue in Auburn, WSFA reported. According to Auburn University’s website, Rod Bramblett graduated from the university in 1988 with a bachelor’s degree in history and a minor in political science. Bramblett has been the play-by-play announcer for Auburn football and basketball games since 2003. In 1993, he started his Auburn broadcasting career as the voice of the Tigers’ baseball team. Bramblett’s calls during games have been legendary to Southeastern Conference football fans, including “Go crazy, Cadillac” at the 2003 Iron Bowl and “Auburn’s going to win the football game,” when the Tigers returned a missed field goal 109 yards -- “Kick Six” -- to defeat archrival Alabama in the 2013 Iron Bowl. While attending Auburn, Bramblett began his broadcasting career in Lanett, working for the WZZZ/WCJM radio stations, according to the school’s website. He also worked at WAUD in Auburn from 1989 to 1991 and from 1993 to 1996 Earlier Saturday, Auburn University tweeted that the Brambletts “were involved in a serious car accident” in Auburn.  “We ask the Auburn Family to keep the Bramblett family in your thoughts and prayers,” school officials tweeted.
  • Three family members were injured -- one critically -- when a log ride at a California amusement park malfunctioned Saturday. >> Read more trending news  Officials said a girl and her parents were hurt at Castle Park in Riverside, with the mother in critical condition, KCBS reported. The incident occurred at 4:30 p.m. “We responded to a call that said an individual was trapped on the log ride underneath one of the cars,” Capt. Brian Guzzetta with the Riverside City Fire Department told the television station. “When we arrived on scene, we noticed that one of the rides had malfunctioned.” The three family members were thrown from the log-shaped car when it reached the bottom of a water slide, Riverside City Fire Department Battalion Chief Bruce Vanderhorst told KTLA. The ride was shut down, but the park remained open, Guzzetta told KNBC.
  • Elle Fanning, the youngest juror ever at the Cannes Film Festival, said she's been transformed by her experience at the French festival. The 21-year-old actresses' jury service came to an end Saturday with the Cannes closing ceremony. She wanted the festival to keep going. 'I didn't know how I would come out of this experience. I do feel like I see films in a different way. I learned so much,' Fanning said after the ceremony. 'I will never forget these ten days. I don't want it to be over.' Fanning was part of the nine-person jury that elected Bong Joon-ho's 'Parasite' the Palme d'Or winner. Mexican director Alejandro Inarritu, president of the jury, praised Fanning for bringing a younger perspective to the jury. 'Having Elle in the jury was a gift,' said Inarritu. 'Elle is an old soul in a way. She has been doing films forever. But to have the fresh ideas, it really grounded us.' 'We saw it through her young eyes,' he added. 'We learned a lot from her too.' Throughout the French film festival, Fanning was one of the standouts of the red carpet, regularly drawing praise for her glamorous and varied looks. The only downside of her Cannes may have been when she collapsed at the Chopard Trophee dinner on Monday. She later posted on Instagram a thumbs-up photo and said she had fainted because her Prada gown was too tight.
  • A former business manager of Stan Lee was arrested Saturday on elder abuse charges involving the late comic book legend. Keya Morgan was taken into custody in Arizona on an outstanding arrest warrant after being charged by Los Angeles County prosecutors earlier this month. Morgan faces felony charges including theft, embezzlement, forgery or fraud against an elder adult, and false imprisonment of an elder adult. A misdemeanor count also alleges elder abuse. Authorities say Morgan sought to capitalize on the Marvel Comic mastermind's wealth and exert influence over Lee even though he had no authority to act on his behalf. Police say Morgan pocketed more than $262,000 from autograph signing sessions Lee did in May 2018. Authorities say Morgan at one point also took Lee from his Hollywood Hills home to a Beverly Hills condominium 'where Morgan had more control over Lee.' Lee's daughter said in a request for a restraining order last year that Morgan was manipulating the mentally declining Lee, preventing him from seeing family and friends, and trying to take control of his money and business affairs. Attorney Alex Kessel has said Morgan has never abused or taken advantage of Lee. Kessel said in an email on Saturday that he had been in contact with prosecutors to arrange for Morgan to surrender on Tuesday. 'It is unfortunate that the DA and police did not honor our commitment to surrender next week and arrested him,' Kessel said in an email. Lee died in November at the age of 95. Morgan's bail has been set at $300,000. He will eventually be extradited to Los Angeles to face the charges.
  • The Latest on the Cannes Film Festival (all times local): 8:25 p.m. South Korean director Bong Joon-ho's social satire 'Parasite,' about a poor family of hustlers who find jobs with a wealthy family, has won the Cannes Film Festival's top award, the Palme d'Or. The win for 'Parasite' marks the first Korean film to ever win the Palme. The awards were handed out in a ceremony Saturday after being chosen by a jury presided over by filmmaker Alejandro Inarritu. The festival's second place award, the Grand Prize, went to French-Senegalese director Mati Diop's 'Atlantics.' Diop was the first black female director in competition at Cannes. Best actor went to Antonio Banderas for Pedro Almodovar's 'Pain and Glory' and best actress went to Emily Beecham of Britain for 'Little Joe.' Belgian brothers Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne won best director for 'Young Ahmed.' ___ 8 a.m. History could be made when the top award of the Cannes Film Festival, the Palme d'Or, is handed out Saturday night. The Palme d'Or is decided by a nine-person jury, headed this year by the filmmaker Alejandro Inarritu. Their deliberations are done in secret but milestone victories could occur if some of the festival's most acclaimed films were to win. If French director Celine Sciamma's period love story 'Portrait of a Lady on Fire' won, it would be the first time a female filmmaker has won the Palme d'Or outright. Pedro Almodovar could make personal history by winning the Palme for 'Pain and Glory.' Though he's been one of Europe's pre-eminent filmmakers for decades, the 69-year-old Spanish director has never won Cannes' top award despite being in the running five times before. Also in the mix is Bong Joon-ho's class satire 'Parasite,' about a poor family of hustlers who find jobs with a wealthy family. A win for 'Parasite' would mark the first Korean film to ever win the Palme d'Or. ___ Follow AP Film Writer Jake Coyle on Twitter at: http://twitter.com/jakecoyleAP
  • A Wisconsin judge has ordered Anheuser-Busch to stop suggesting in advertising that MillerCoors' light beers contain corn syrup, wading into a fight between two beer giants that are losing market share to small independent brewers. U.S. District Judge William Conley for the Western District of Wisconsin on Friday granted a preliminary injunction sought by MillerCoors that temporarily stops Anheuser-Busch from using the words 'corn syrup' in ads without giving more context. MillerCoors sued its rival in March, saying St. Louis-based Anheuser-Busch has spent as much as $30 million on a 'false and misleading' campaign, including $13 million in its first commercials during this year's Super Bowl. However, the ruling did not affect all of Anheuser-Busch's advertising targeting MillerCoors, allowing the commercials that premiered at the Super Bowl to keep airing. Anheuser-Busch's ad drew a rebuke from the National Corn Growers Association, which thanked MillerCoors for its support. In its lawsuit, MillerCoors said it's 'not ashamed of its use of corn syrup as a fermentation aid.' Corn syrup is used by several brewers during fermentation. During that process, corn syrup is broken down and consumed by yeast so that none of it remains in the final product. Bud Light is brewed with rice instead of corn syrup, but Anheuser-Busch uses corn syrup in some of its other beverages, including Stella Artois Cidre and Busch Light beer. MillerCoors applauded the ruling and said Anheuser-Busch should be trying to grow the beer market, not 'destroy it through deceptive advertising.' 'We are pleased with today's ruling that will force Anheuser-Busch to change or remove advertisements that were clearly designed to mislead the American public,' said MillerCoors CEO Gavin Hattersley. Anheuser Busch, however, called the ruling a 'victory for consumers' because it allows the brand's 'Special Delivery' Super Bowl ad to continue airing. That ad showed a medieval caravan pushing a huge barrel of corn syrup to castles for MillerCoors to make Miller Lite and Coors Light. The commercial states that Bud Light isn't brewed with corn syrup. Anheuser Busch said the ad would air as early as this weekend. 'As the number one selling beer in the U.S., Bud Light remains committed to leading the alcohol industry by providing more transparency for consumers including letting them know about the ingredients that are used to brew their beer,' said Cesar Vargas, Anheuser-Busch vice president of legal and corporate affairs. Judge Conley ordered Anheuser Busch to temporarily stop using advertisements that mention corn syrup without references to 'brewed with,' ''made with' or 'uses,' or that describe corn syrup as an ingredient in the finished products. The ruling affects two Bud Light commercials and billboards that describe Bud Light as containing '100 percent less corn syrup' than Miller Lite and Coors Light. Anheuser Busch said those ads are no longer up and the company had no plans to continue using them. Judge Conley also denied an Anheuser Busch motion to dismiss the case, saying it was likely to succeed in proving misleading statements and some harm to the reputation of MillerCoors. Chicago-based MillerCoors and Anheuser-Busch have the biggest U.S. market share at 24.8 percent and 41.6 percent, respectively, but they've been losing business in recent years to smaller independent brewers, imports, and wine and spirits, according to the Brewers Association. MillerCoors maintains Anheuser-Busch is preying on health conscious consumers who have negative connotations of corn syrup, sometimes confusing it with the high-fructose corn syrup in sodas. The feud threatens to disrupt an alliance between the two companies to work on a campaign to promote the beer industry amid declining sales.
  • South Korean director Bong Joon-ho's raucous social satire 'Parasite,' about a poor family of hustlers who find jobs with a wealthy family, won the Cannes Film Festival's top award, the Palme d'Or, on Saturday. The win for 'Parasite' marks the first Korean film to ever win the Palme. In the festival's closing ceremony, jury president Alejandro Inarritu said the choice had been 'unanimous' for the nine-person jury. The genre-mixing film, Bong's seventh, had arguably been celebrated more than others at Cannes this year, hailed by critics as the best yet from the 49-year-old director of 'Snowpiercer' and 'Okja.' 'It's the 100th anniversary of the cinema in Korea this year. To celebrate the 100th anniversary of the Korean cinema, I think the Cannes Film Festival has offered me a very great gift,' Bong told reporters after the ceremony. It was the second straight Palme victory for an Asian director. Last year, the award went to Japanese filmmaker Hirokazu Kore-eda's 'Shoplifters,' also a compassionate parable about an impoverished family. 'We shared the mystery of the unexpected way this film took us through different genres, speaking in a funny, humorous and tender way of no judgement of something so relevant and urgent and so global,' Inarritu told reporters after the ceremony. Many of the awards on Saturday were given to social and political stories that depicted geopolitical dramas in localized tales, from African shores to Paris suburbs. The festival's second place award, the Grand Prize, went to French-Senegalese director Mati Diop's feature-film debut, 'Atlantics.' The film by Diop, the first black female director ever in competition in Cannes, views the migrant crisis from the perspective of Senegalese women left behind after many young men flee by sea to Spain. Sylvester Stallone presented the honor. Although few quibbled with the choice of 'Parasite,' some had expected Cannes to make history by giving the Palme to a female filmmaker for just the second time. Celine Sciamma's period romance 'Portrait of a Lady on Fire' was the Palme pick for many critics this year. Instead, Sciamma ended up with best screenplay. In the festival's 72-year history, only Jane Campion has won the prize in 1993 for 'The Piano,' tying with Chen Kaige's 'Farewell My Concubine.' Best actor went to Antonio Banderas for Pedro Almodovar's reflective drama 'Pain and Glory.' In the film, one of the most broadly acclaimed of the festival, Banderas plays a fictionalized version of Almodovar looking back on his life and career. 'The best is still to come,' said Banderas, accepting the award. The Belgian brothers Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne, who have already twice won the Palme d'Or, took the best director prize for 'Young Ahmed,' their portrait of Muslim teenager who becomes radicalized by a fundamentalist imam. The third-place jury prize, presented by Michael Moore, was split between two socially conscious thrillers: The French director Ladj Ly's feature-film debut 'Les Miserables' and Brazilian director Kleber Mendonça Filho's 'Bacurau.' Ly has called his film an alarm bell about youths living in the housing projects of Paris' suburbs. Filho viewed his feverish, violent Western about a rural Brazilian community defending itself from a hard-to-comprehend invasion as a reflection of President Jair Bolsonaro's Brazil. British actress Emily Beecham won best actress for her performance in Jessica Hausner's science-fiction drama 'Little Joe.' The jury also gave a special mention to Palestinian director Elia Suleiman's 'It Must Be Heaven.' The Camera d'Or, an award given for best first feature from across all of Cannes' sections, went to César Díaz's 'Our Mothers,' a drama about the Guatemalan civil war in the 1980s. The ceremony Saturday brought to a close a Cannes Film Festival riven by concerns for its own relevancy. It had to contend, most formidably, with the cultural force of 'Game of Thrones,' which concluded during the festival. The continuing rise of streaming was also a constant subject around Cannes. Two years ago, Bong was in Cannes' competition with 'Okja,' a movie distributed in North America by Netflix. After it and Noah Baumbach's 'The Meyerowitz Stories' — another Netflix release — premiered at Cannes, the festival ruled that all future films in competition needed French theatrical distribution. Netflix has since withdrawn from the festival on the French Riviera. (Indie distributor Neon will open Bong's 'Parasite' in North American theaters later this year.) Bowing to pressure from 5050x2020, the French version of Time's Up, the festival this year released gender breakdowns of its submissions and selections. Cannes said about 27% of its official selections were directed by women. The 21-film main slate included four films directed by women, which tied the festival's previous high. Cannes had its share of red-carpet dazzle, too. Elton John brought his biopic 'Rocketman' to the festival, joining star Taron Egerton for a beachside duet after the premiere. And Quentin Tarantino unveiled his 1960s Los Angeles tale 'Once Upon a Time ... in Hollywood,' with Brad Pitt and Leonardo DiCaprio, 25 years after the director's 'Pulp Fiction' won the Palme d'Or. Tarantino, who attended the closing ceremony, didn't go home empty handed. On Friday, a prominent pooch in his film won the annual Palme Dog, an award given by critics to Cannes' best canine. ___ Follow AP Film Writer Jake Coyle at: http://twitter.com/jakecoyleAP
  • Professional gambler James Holzhauer continues to beat the odds on “Jeopardy!” >> Read more trending news  The 34-year-old became the second contestant in the television game show’s history to top $2 million in winnings, earning $74,000 in an episode that aired Friday night to win for the 27th consecutive time, The New York Times reported. Holzhauer is still $455,000 behind all-time earnings champion Ken Jennings, who cashed in with $2,520,700 during a 74-game winning streak in 2004. But Holzhauer is quickly closing in. Holzhauer now has $2,065,535 in total winnings, People reported. Holzhauer, who entered Final Jeopardy with $39,400, wagered $35,000 of it and answered “What is Sun Valley?” after the final clue -- “Astronomy buffs visit Idaho for the USA’s first Dark Sky Reserve. Oddly, part of it is this resort area with a bright name.” >> Blackjack: Pro gambler James Holzhauer wins 21st straight game on ‘Jeopardy!’ Holzhauer uses a method called the “Forrest Bounce,” in which he chooses tiles out of order and goes for the higher cash values early, CNN reported. Holzhauer is averaging $76,500 per episode, the Times reported. At that rate, Holzhauer would top Jennings’s earnings in six more episodes. If Holzhauer matched Jennings’ streak of 74 games and continues his current average of cash won, he would win more than $5,6 million, the newspaper reported. His next game will be aired Monday, CNN reported.

The Latest News Headlines

  • It's underway all summer. The Blue Star Museums 2019 program has kicked off, allowing the nation's active-duty military personnel and their families, including National Guard and Reserve, to visit participating museums free of charge.  The 2019 program officially started on Saturday, May 18th, which is Armed Forces Day, and will run through Labor Day on Monday, September, 2nd.  Locally, military families will be able to visit the following museums free of charge:  Jacksonville  -Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens  -Mandarin Museum & Historical Society  -MOCA Jacksonville  -Ritz Theatre & LaVilla Museum  Jacksonville Beach  -Beaches Museum  St. Augustine  -Lightner Museum  -St. Augustine Lighthouse & Maritime Museum  To find museums outside of Northeast Florida, click HERE. The Blue Star Museums program is a collaboration among the National Endowment for Arts, Blue Star Families, the Department of Defense, and participating museums.
  • A judge sentenced the man who admitted to killing a Wisconsin couple last year before holding their 13-year-old daughter captive for three months to life in prison without the possibility of supervised release. >> Read more trending news Jake Thomas Patterson, 21, appeared before a Barron County judge for sentencing in the killing of James and Denise Closs and the kidnapping of their daughter, Jayme, according to the Duluth News Tribune. He pleaded guilty in March to two counts of intentional homicide for gunning down James Closs, 56, and Denise Closs, 46, in the early morning hours of Oct. 15. He also pleaded guilty to one count of kidnapping for abducting Jayme. >> Man pleads guilty to kidnapping Wisconsin teen Jayme Closs, killing her parents Update 4:30 p.m. EDT May 24: A judge sentenced Patterson to life in prison without the possibility of parole for each of the intentional homicide charges to which Patterson pleaded guilty. The judge also gave Patterson the maximum sentence -- 40 years -- for kidnapping Jayme. Update 4:20 p.m. EDT May 24: In a brief, tearful statement in court, Patterson said he “would do like, absolutely anything to take back what I did.” “I would die,” he said. “I would.” Patterson’s attorneys asked a judge to sentence him to life in prison without the possibility of parole until 2072 for the killings of James and Denise Closs. The sentencing hearing is ongoing. Update 3:30 p.m. EDT May 24: In a statement read by an attorney Friday in court, Jayme said Patterson took many things from her but that, “He can never take my spirit away.” “He thought he could make me like him, but he was wrong,” she said. “He can’t stop me from being happy and moving forward with my life. I will go on to do great things in my life, and he will not. Jake Patterson will never have any power over me.” Chris Gramstrup, an attorney representing Jayme, read the victim impact statement in court. “He stole my parents from me,” Jayme said in the statement. “He stole almost everything I loved from me. For 88 days, he tried to steal me, and he didn’t care who he hurt or who he killed to do that. He should stay locked up forever.” Prosecutors said Jayme and her mother heard Patterson shoot and kill James Closs as they huddled together in a bathtub. Denise Closs called 911 as Patterson tried to batter down the bathroom door. Once he broke down the door, he wrestled the phone from Denise Closs and ordered her to tape Jayme’s mouth, hands and feet, prosecutors said. He told authorities that he thought she was doing a bad job, so he put down his shotgun to do it himself. Once Jayme was restrained, authorities said he picked up his shotgun again and, with Jayme feet from her mother, shot Denise Closs in the head. He then dragged Jayme to his car, threw her in the trunk and drove her to his home, where she was held captive for 88 days. Through Gramstrup, Jayme said her parents “did all they could to make me happy and protect me.” “He took them away from me forever,” Jayme said. “I felt safe in my home and I love my room and all of my belongings. He took all of that too. I don’t want to even see my home or my stuff because of the memory of that night. My parents and my home were the most important things in my life.” She said that since her escape in January, “It’s too hard for me to go out in public.” “I get scared and I get anxious,” she said. Prosecutors said Jayme escaped from Patterson’s home Jan. 10 after he left her alone. Original report: Barron County Sheriff Chris Fitzgerald said members of Jayme’s family are expected to give statements at Friday’s hearing, MPR News reported. The court proceeding is expected to last several hours, according to CNN. Under Wisconsin law, Patterson will face a mandatory life sentence for each of the homicide convictions, the Duluth News Tribune reported. The main question for Friday will be whether Patterson will eventually be eligible for parole, according to the newspaper. >> Who is Jake Thomas Patterson? Suspect in Jayme Closs kidnapping identified Authorities said Patterson admitted to targeting Jayme after seeing her get on a school bus while he was driving home from work one day. He told investigators he did not know the Closses before the attack. Jayme told authorities she woke early on the morning of Oct. 15 when the family dog started barking. She woke her parents and then hid with her mother in a bathroom. Investigators said Patterson shot and killed James Closs before he found Jayme and Denise Closs in the bathroom. >> Jayme Closs kidnapping: Suspect charged in Closs murders, bail set at $5 million Jayme said Patterson killed her mother before dragging her to his car and driving her to what would turn out to be his home in Douglas County. He was arrested after Jayme escaped Jan. 10 from his home and flagged down a woman walking her dog. >> Jayme Closs to be given $25K reward after she saved herself from accused kidnapper Jayme told investigators Patterson made her hide under the bed in his bedroom for as many as 12 hours at a time without food, water or bathroom breaks. She escaped after Patterson left her alone in the home 88 days after he first abducted her. Jayme is living with her aunt and uncle, the Stevens Point Journal reported.
  • The Jacksonville Sheriff's Office is actively investigating on the Westside, after a man called 911, claiming he had just shot someone attempting to break into his home. Police say this happened on North Dover Cliff Drive in the Pilgrims Trace neighborhood.  When officers arrived, they say they found a man dead in a nearby roadway. He has not yet been identified, but he's described by JSO as a black male between 30 and 40-years-old.  The investigation is still in its early states, but JSO says it does not appear that the two knew each other. We're told the homeowner is being cooperative with investigation.  Police are asking anyone with information on what happened to come forward.
  • House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerry Nadler said he was OK on Friday after he appeared to nearly faint during a news conference in New York City. >> Read more trending news Nadler, D-N.Y., was appearing Friday at a news conference about plans to expand the city’s use of speed cameras in school zones when New York Mayor Bill de Blasio appeared to notice he looked pale, WABC-TV reported. Video from the news conference showed Nadler looking ill and weak as the mayor asked him if he wanted some water.  The New York Daily News reported that paramedics called a code blue emergency after Nadler appeared to suffer from a brief dizzy spell. He was given water and an orange and later taken by ambulance to Lenox Hill Hospital, according to the Daily News. “Appreciate everyone’s concern,” Nadler said in a statement posted later Friday on Twitter. “Was very warm in the room this morning, was obviously dehydrated and felt a bit ill. Glad to receive fluids and am feeling much better. Thank you for your thoughts.”
  • A Colorado man arrested in Utah earlier this year for threatening to “kill as many girls as (he saw)” has been sentenced to serve up to five years in prison, despite prosecutors’ recommendation that he serve probation.  Christopher Wayne Cleary, 27, of Denver, pleaded guilty to a charge of attempt to make a terroristic threat as part of a plea deal with Utah County prosecutors, according to The Deseret News. Cleary, who was arrested in Provo in January, was already on probation in Colorado on two previous convictions of stalking women, the newspaper reported.  Cleary expressed remorse over his words. “I’m just sorry for what happened,” Cleary told the court, according to the News.  Prosecutors in Utah negotiated a plea deal with Cleary for a third-degree felony charge instead of the second-degree felony with which he was initially charged, the News reported. In exchange for his plea -- which would let them secure a felony conviction -- they agreed to recommend no jail time. The plea bargain was aimed at helping Colorado authorities send Cleary to prison for violating his probation in the stalking cases, the News reported.  >> Related story: Man upset over not having girlfriend accused of mass shooting threat to girls Fourth District Judge Christine Johnson on Thursday declined to take the state up on its recommendation, citing her uncertainty of whether Cleary would serve any jail time for probation violation in Colorado, the newspaper said. “I don’t want to be in the position of guessing what Colorado is going to do,” Johnson said during Cleary’s sentencing hearing.  Cleary was arrested Jan. 19, the same day multiple women’s marches were being held in Utah and throughout the country, based on an alarming Facebook post he wrote the night before, the News said. In the post, he bemoaned his lack of romantic prospects and, like several mass shooters who have targeted women, blamed the opposite sex for his plight. “All I wanted was a girlfriend,” Cleary wrote, according to a police affidavit obtained by The Denver Post. “All I wanted was to be loved, yet no one cares about me. I’m 27 years old and I’ve never had a girlfriend before, and I’m still a virgin. This is why I’m planning on shooting up a public place soon and being the next mass shooter ‘cause I’m ready to die and all the girls the turned me down is going to make it right by killing as many girls as I see.” Another post stated, “There’s nothing more dangerous than (a) man ready to die,” the Post reported.  Cleary’s threats alarmed state and federal authorities in Colorado and neighboring Utah, where they traced his cellphone the following day. He was arrested at a McDonald’s in Provo and charged with making a terroristic threat.  Following his arrest, Cleary told investigators he was “upset and not thinking clearly” when he wrote the Facebook posts. According to the Post, he deleted the threats after other people called him and threatened him. Court records obtained by multiple newspapers paint a disturbing portrait of Cleary, who was accused of stalking and harassment by at least eight women and girls dating back at least seven years. The News reported that Cleary was also accused of threatening to bomb a grocery store in 2013 and threatened to commit a mass shooting at a mental health facility in 2016.  >> Read more trending news An 18-year-old Arvada woman called police on New Year’s Eve 2015 and reported that Cleary, with whom she’d been chatting on Facebook, began harassing her online and over the phone after she declined to go on a date with him. According to the Post, the woman told detectives he would use aliases, including one alias on Facebook named John Coleman. “I’ve been watching you,” the person claiming to be Coleman wrote to her on Facebook. “Soon here, you’ll be lying in your deathbed.” During that investigation, Arvada detectives found details of a previous criminal investigation in which Cleary told another woman who spurned his advances she should kill herself, the Post reported. He also posted her name and phone number in an online sex ad, offering her services for $20, court records show. In a prior misdemeanor harassment case from earlier in 2015, Cleary was convicted after talking a woman into posing naked for him and then posting the picture to a fake Facebook page in her name, the newspaper reported.  A harassment case from Denver found Cleary accused of writing threatening messages to a 17-year-old girl, including a message that said, “I own multipul (sic) guns. I can have u dead in a second. One day I’ma snap and kill everyone,” according to court documents. A second Denver case involved a 19-year-old woman who said she lived with Cleary in a hotel room for two weeks, during which time he choked her and urinated on her, the court documents said.  Cleary was convicted in October 2016 on two counts of stalking and harassment involving two of the three alleged victims in Arvada, the Post said. He was sentenced to two years of probation.  Cleary was arrested in yet another stalking case less than a year later. A 43-year-old Lakewood woman who had dated him called 911 Aug. 5, 2017, to report Cleary was stalking her. He was arrested outside the woman’s house. According to the Post, Cleary told investigators the woman was the only person who loved him and he was lonely without her. The woman told police she and Cleary had a sexual relationship -- contradicting Cleary’s claim earlier this year that he was a virgin. The victim told police Cleary, who began stalking her when she broke off the relationship, had called her 45 times that day, threatening her and telling her he hoped she would die.  “I am going to burn your house down,” Cleary told her, according to court records. “I am going to send people to your house to kill you.” Cleary also posted her phone number and address on Craigslist “soliciting sexual acts and rape,” according to a probable cause statement in the case. The woman said she’d received multiple phone calls from strangers due to the ad. The woman told police she lost 20 pounds and began having nightmares and anxiety attacks because of the stalking, the Post reported.  Cleary pleaded guilty to charges of felony stalking and making threats, the newspaper said. A judge in Jefferson County sentenced him last May to three years of probation.  Despite having violated his probation on the Arvada cases, he was not jailed following his guilty plea in the case involving the Lakewood woman, the Post reported. Pam Russell, a spokeswoman for the Jefferson County District Attorney’s Office, said Cleary’s mental health played a part in his sentencing in that case, as well as in his 2016 stalking conviction, which was handled in Adult Mental Health Court.  “The courts decided to let his mental health issues be a big component of his treatment,” Russell told the Post.  Cleary’s defense attorney in the most recent case, Dustin Parmley, said this week that his client’s violent words are related to his mental illness, which he was reportedly diagnosed with at age 10. Cleary told investigators he takes medication for an impulse control disorder.  Parmley said Cleary’s words have never turned to action. Investigators found no evidence that Cleary had weapons or attempted to obtain any, the Post said.  The newspaper reported that four of the criminal investigations into Cleary ended without charges filed against him.  Cleary will serve his time in Utah before being transferred to Colorado to face probation violation charges there, the News reported. An official with the Utah Board of Pardons and Parole told the paper his earliest hearing could take place as soon as September. The News said the board could potentially set a release date at that time, or members could decide to keep him in prison. Cleary could serve the entire five years of his sentence before being returned to Colorado. 

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