ON AIR NOW

LISTEN NOW

Weather

cloudy-day
85°
Clear
H 87° L 76°
  • cloudy-day
    85°
    Current Conditions
    Clear. H 87° L 76°
  • clear-night
    77°
    Morning
    Clear. H 87° L 76°
  • cloudy-day
    87°
    Afternoon
    Partly Cloudy. H 89° L 76°
LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

The latest top stories

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

The latest traffic report

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

The latest forecast

00:00 | 00:00

    Actor Danny DeVito has been honored with a lifetime achievement award at Spain's most prestigious film festival in the northern coastal city of San Sebastian. DeVito, 73, received the award from the San Sebastian International Film Festival during Saturday's gala. The American comic film star is promoting the animated children's film 'Smallfoot' at the festival. DeVito won an Emmy and a Golden Globe for his role in the 1970-80's TV sitcom series 'Taxi.' Other career highlights include leading roles in the hit 1980s comedies 'Throw Momma from the Train' and 'Twins' and scores of endearing supporting parts. He also shared an Oscar nomination for best picture as a producer of 'Erin Brockovich' in 2000. He currently stars in the TV series 'It's Always Sunny in Philadelphia.
  • Bill Cosby's sentencing hearing Monday will begin with testimony about his sex offender evaluation and, presumably, a fierce debate over whether the 81-year-old actor should be branded a sexually violent predator. The stakes are high given the lifetime counseling, community alerts and public shaming the designation would trigger. And it could become evidence in the defamation lawsuits filed against Cosby by accusers who say he branded them liars when he denied molesting them. Defense lawyers say the state's latest sex-reporting law, despite several revisions, remains unconstitutional. 'It's the modern-day version of a scarlet letter,' said lawyer Demetra Mehta, a former Philadelphia public defender, 'which I think is sort of an interesting philosophical issue at this time with the #MeToo movement, but also criminal justice reform.' Pennsylvania's sex-offender board has examined Cosby and recommended he be deemed a predator, concluding that he has a mental defect or personality disorder that makes him prone to criminal behavior. Montgomery County Judge Steven T. O'Neill will have the final say Monday. O'Neill has presided over the case for nearly three years, from shortly after Cosby's December 2015 arrest to a 2017 trial that ended in a jury deadlock to the jury finding this past April that Cosby drugged and molested a woman at his suburban Philadelphia estate in 2004. He faces anything from probation to 30 years in prison on the three felony counts of aggravated indecent assault. It's unclear if the judge, in weighing the predator label, will consider the dozens of other Cosby accusers who have gone public or his deposition in the trial victim's 2006 lawsuit, when Cosby acknowledged getting quaaludes to give women before sex; described sex acts as the 'penile entrance' to an 'orifice' and 'digital penetration'; and said he often gave young women alcohol but didn't drink or take drugs himself because he liked to stay in control. Defense lawyers fighting the predator label note that sexual offender registration laws are in flux in Pennsylvania and elsewhere. Numerous courts, including the Pennsylvania Supreme Court, have found the laws so vague as to be unconstitutional. Courts have also debated whether the programs unfairly amount to extra punishment, especially for people convicted of misdemeanors. Cosby has added one of the state's top appellate lawyers, Peter Goldberger, to his defense team. 'This is going to probably be a very important case for sex-offender law when it's up on appeal,' Mehta said. 'It's an area of law that is just sort of unsettled right now. . There's a lot up on appeal, but there's not a lot decided.' Pennsylvania alone now has 2,200 people classified as sexually violent predators, of the more than 20,000 people on its Megan's Law list of sex offenders. The Megan's Law group has their names, pictures and towns listed online, but they're not subject to the same monthly counseling mandates as the 'predator' group, and authorities don't actively warn communities of their nearby presence. The stigma may not be as paralyzing for a man like Cosby — in his 80s, living in a gated house and presumably not looking for work or going to the local gym. However, it's one more stain on his reputation. Defense motions note that the sex offender board's recommendation followed an evaluation by just a single board member, and that the evidence needs only to meet a 'clear and convincing' standard. That violates Cosby's 'right to reputation without confrontation, without trial by jury and without proof beyond a reasonable doubt,' defense lawyer Joseph Green Jr. argued in a July court filing. Legal experts believe a 'predator' classification would be a legal finding that Cosby accusers could use in their defamation suits, including one involving seven women plaintiffs that's pending in Massachusetts. 'That may (also) be about legacy protection, about what the obituary says, what the Wikipedia page says,' said Daniel Filler, dean of Drexel University's Kline College of Law. 'You can bet, especially in crowd-sourced things, everything's going to begin with 'he's a sexually violent predator.' It's like a slogan. He has a tag now.
  • The talk off the Milan runway this season has been a perceived assault on Made-in-Italy's integrity. The Italian Fashion Chamber issued a statement during Milan Fashion Week defending the system following a report by The New York Times on exploited workers in the luxury supply chain in the southern region of Puglia. The chamber said in a statement the report 'embitters and perplexes us for many reasons,' and noted that it has been working to make 'the Italian supply chain resilient, fair and protective on all fronts.' The chamber acknowledged it had been more than 40 years since the last comprehensive study of irregular labor in Italy's fashion sector, but said the most recent estimate put the number at 2,000-4,000 workers in an industry that employs 620,000 people in 67,000 companies. Previews of Made in Italy handiwork for next spring and fall continued for the fourth day Saturday at Milan Fashion Week. Here are some highlights: ____ FERRAGAMO'S TUSCAN COLORS The Salvatore Ferragamo design team of Paul Andrew for womenswear and Guillaume Meilland for menswear worked in perfect symphony for their second combined collection. At Ferragamo, the looks are defined from the shoe up. This season's fantastic sculpted women's heels were inspired by Constantin Brancusi's studied curves and the woven uppers from the Ferragamo archives. 'There are actually all sorts of materials and almost every girl has a different shoe, which I love the idea of doing this season,' Andrew said backstage. 'There's cork heels, stacked leather, wrapped in snakeskin. There are wooden clogs.' A 1940 Ferragamo archive photo of Loretta Young wearing a beveled heel inspired the loose trouser and the palm tree floral print that permeated the collection on handkerchief dresses, suit ensembles and bowling shirts. The color palette was mostly Tuscan-inspired natural hues that were deployed with military precision, with contrasting peacock purple and teals in standout overcoats for him and for her. The brand is looking to target youth while still maintaining its traditional mature customers, sending out experienced models, including 1990s cover-girl Stella Tennant, to underline that point. Tennant opened the show in an olive leather handkerchief skirt, belted with a taupe T-shirt. Woven boots finished the look. Menswear and womenswear echoed each other. Coveralls for men were worn apron down under a suit jacket while a women's tailored jacket was left open in the back for an apron effect, and worn with roomy trousers that blurred into a long skirt. 'I feel until recently Ferragamo was speaking too many different aesthetic languages,' Andrew said. 'You would walk into a store and not really understand what the message was. In working together, we have built this new vocabulary of dressing, in both ready-to-wear and shoes and accessories.' ___ CELEBRITY SPOTTING AT FERRAGAMO American actors Armie Hammer and Julianne Moore took front row seats at Ferragamo. Hammer sat with James Ferragamo, the grandson of founder Salvatore Ferragamo, who oversees accessories at the fashion house. 'I'm a big fan of the (Ferragamo) family, both in person and also their clothes. It is great to come out to a beautiful city like Milan and look at beautiful clothes with beautiful people,' Hammer said, motioning toward Moore. ___ SCERVINO'S GENDER PLAYS Ermanno Scervino knows when to be light and when the occasion calls for something more substantial. A white frothy organza skirt was worn with a prim, fitted white jacket, which segued into a pantsuit featuring a tailored white jacket worn shirtless for the bold, with an angular modesty panel for a bit of daring. Seen together, the pieces would fit a hers-and-hers wedding. Crochet and ruffle details accented the collection's lighter moments without becoming the main feature. To balance a series of light-as-air lace dresses, Scervino also offered black leather ensembles with thigh-high boots for a rocker ethos. Womenswear took some cues from men's dressing: tuxedo details on jackets and trousers, men's shirts combined with ultra-feminine skirts. And Scervino sent men down the runway to illustrate the symmetries. The most striking were shimmery golden jacquard suits, hers with a plunging V neckline, his with a straight white T-shirt. Knitwear, including tennis sweaters, had an edgy golden finish for a wet effect. ____ CAVALLI CELEBRATES PHYSICALITY The men's shirt is getting a workover at Roberto Cavalli, cropped and wrapped around the bodice and worn with plunging front mini-dresses encrusted in beads. The collection by Paul Surridge tapped some of the Cavalli codes while trying to retrace them for a younger generation. For this season, Surridge put the focus on legs, the torso and the plunging neckline, 'celebrating the physicality of the body.' Gigi Hadid opened the show with a muted animal print on a tailored jacket with Bermuda shorts, and took another turn later in glimmering, silver sequined jacket over short shorts. Wrap dresses bared torsos and legs. For a sportier look, biker shorts were worn with long see-through tailored shirts or cropped jackets. Sensual touches included plunging V-necks on a beaded dress and a Cavalli signature diaphanous number with lace detailing. French actor Vincent Cassel watched from the front row with his wife, model Tina Kunakey. ____ PHILIPP PLEIN EMBRACES MILAN Philipp Plein returned to show his womenswear collection in Milan after a several-season New York hiatus, bringing with him a super-star cast including Chris Brown, Ayo & Teo, American rapper 6ix9ine and a bevy of Cirque de Soleil acrobats. The collection was a tribute to Michael Jackson, with a clear military inspiration. It liberally used beads, sequins, fringe, crystals and studs on worn leather, denim, latex or python to create motorcycle jackets, evening gowns and corset dresses.
  • While Halloween is a time for many to wear irreverent costumes based on the year's biggest trends, one company is apologizing after releasing a costume that many found to be offensive. >> Read more trending news  Online clothing retailer Yandy recently unveiled a 'Brave Red Maiden Costume' that featured a red mini dress which showed lots of leg, along with a red cloak and white headdress. The costume, inspired by the classic Margaret Atwood novel and now hit TV show, 'The Handmaid's Tale,' cost $64.95. The backlash was swift, with many commenting on how the costume is at direct odds with the themes of misogyny and patriarchy explored in the fictional dystopian world of 'The Handmaid's Tale.' Yandy released a statement Friday, saying that while it stands by its message of 'Own Your Sexy,' the company was removing the costume from its site after receiving 'sincere, heartfelt response' from customers.
  • Blue Boy' is getting a long-awaited makeover, and the public can watch as one of the world's most recognizable paintings gets a little nip here, a nice tuck there and some splashes of fresh paint (blue presumably) just in time for the eternally youthful adolescent to mark his 250th birthday. Thomas Gainsborough's stunning oil on canvas featuring a British youth dressed nearly all in blue has been one of the most sought-out attractions at Southern California's Huntington Library, Art Collections and Botanical Gardens since its arrival in 1921. But it hasn't had a substantial restoration in at least 97 years, and over time it's become a bit torn and tattered, some of its colors have faded and, worse still, some of its paint is beginning to flake. All that begins to stop Saturday when The Huntington's senior paintings conservator, Christina O'Connell, goes to work armed with an array of 21st century tools to restore an 18th century masterpiece. She'll have a microscope that, at 6 feet (1.8 meters), is taller than she is and can zoom in on the painting's smallest details and magnify them 25 times. She'll have numerous digital X-radiography and infrared reflectography images of the work that she's been compiling and studying over the past year. And, of course, there will be paint created to match what Gainsborough was using circa 1770. With all that at her disposal she expects to have 'Project Blue Boy' completed about this time next year and the kid back on The Huntington's Thornton Gallery wall, alongside other stunning portraits from the era, sometime in early 2020. As O'Connell toils in the same area where 'Blue Boy' has hung for nearly a century, visitors will be able to walk up and watch what she's doing. And, during occasional breaks, she'll stop to explain it to them. 'One of the reasons why the painting hasn't undergone such an extensive conservation treatment before was because people always wanted to keep it on view. So this is a way to address the conservation needs of the painting while keeping it on view — so the visitors won't miss him,' she said with a smile as she took a break from her work in the gallery earlier this week. Indeed, 'Blue Boy' — whoever he was — has become a worldwide icon since Gainsborough put him on display to acclaim at Britain's Royal Academy exhibition of 1770. The artist titled the work, 'A Portrait of a Young Gentleman,' but when stunned viewers saw the full-length portrait of an adolescent dressed all in bright blue silk, from his tunic to the breeches extending just below his knees, they quickly gave him a nickname. Although Gainsborough, one of the greatest British painters of the 18th century, is renowned as a master of the brush, O'Connell says she won't be nervous while a crowd watches her every move when she takes up her own brush to add touches — inpainting, it's called — to replace what the painting has lost to the ravages of time. 'We're dealing with a lot of the usual suspects when it comes to a painting this age as far as condition issues are concerned,' she said, adding she's repaired much worse, including a painting that was once handed to her in pieces. Still, this is 'Blue Boy' so she'll take her time. When The Huntington's founder, railroad tycoon Henry Huntington, bought it in 1921, he paid a then-record sum of $728,000. Some Britons were reported to have cried when they learned their boy was leaving his native country. Art historians have never figured out exactly who 'Blue Boy' was, although they have a pretty good suspect, said Melinda McCurdy, The Huntington's associate curator for British art and O'Connell's partner in the restoration project. 'It could be an image of Gainsborough Dupont, who was the artist's nephew,' McCurdy said. 'He lived with the family so he would have been a readily available model. And we know that the blue suit was a studio prop that the artist owned.' Dupont, looking a few years older than 'Blue Boy,' but not that much different, appears in the same suit in other Gainsborough paintings. 'Blue Boy,' it turns out, also had a dog until Gainsborough painted it out of the picture. The kid's furry friend was discovered in a 1994 X-ray that also is on display at O'Connell's work station, along with X-rays that reveal nearly a foot-long tear in the canvas that was repaired so well it can't be seen with the naked eye. What can be seen was when the tear was fixed, it was painted over with a color that didn't quite match the original. O'Connell plans to fix that. She'll leave out the dog, however. You can still see its front paws, which Gainsborough cleverly turned into rocks when he blended the rest of the canine into the landscape. 'Composition choice, really,' McCurdy speculates on the artist's reasons for sacking the pooch. 'If the white fluffy dog was there in the painting you'd spend a lot of attention on it rather than looking at the figure of the boy.' The boy is indeed what many who visit The Huntington's picturesque grounds come to see, along with the institution's gardens filled with 15,000 varieties of plants, its library containing nearly a half-million rare books and its hundreds of other priceless paintings and sculptures. Which is why, says McCurdy, it's important that people see the care, which isn't cheap or easy, that must be taken to maintain such objects. 'We're not just a building with pretty things on the wall,' she says. 'We take care of them. We preserve them for the future.
  • Paul Simon wraps up his farewell concert tour Saturday night at a park in Queens, a bicycle ride across the borough from where he grew up. The 76-year-old singer picked Flushing Meadows Corona Park to say goodbye, an outdoor show on the first night of autumn. The setlist at recent stops has ranged from his first 1960s hit with ex-partner Art Garfunkel, 'The Sound of Silence,' to selections from a disc released weeks ago. Simon isn't retiring, and hasn't ruled out occasional future performances. But he's said this is his last time out on the road, and he isn't alone among his peers; Elton John and Kiss are also doing goodbye swings. A staple of the folk-rock scene with Garfunkel, Simon explored music from around the world as a solo artist, most notably 'Graceland' and its African influences. His recent work has been his most musically challenging, and in his new disc he revisits overlooked songs from the past four decades. He's a Rock and Roll Hall of Fame member for both stages of his career. The return to New York raised memories of Simon's two iconic shows in Manhattan's Central Park, in 1981 with Garfunkel and in 1991 on his own. He played two nights in Madison Square Garden earlier this week. An often dour performer, Simon has been animated and talkative during the final shows. He seems eager for the freedom that awaits him, said Robert Hilburn, who wrote the biography 'Paul Simon: A Life' that was released this spring. 'The thing that strikes me is that he's been happy, relieved,' Hilburn said. 'There's a burden off of him.' During an earlier show in Portland, Oregon, Simon playfully 'penalized' himself for flubbing the lyrics to one song by singing an old Simon & Garfunkel hit he confessed to hating: 'The 59th Street Bridge Song (Feelin' Groovy).
  • John Bullock, the father of actress Sandra Bullock, died Tuesday, Us Magazine reported. He was 93. >> Read more trending news  John Bullock was preceded in death by his wife and Sandra Bullock’s mother, opera singer Helga Meyer, who died in 2000, the magazine reported. Sandra Bullock’s younger sister, Gesine Bullock-Prado, confirmed her father’s death on Wednesday and wrote about his military career, ETOnline reported. 'John Wilson Bullock February 11, 1925 - September 18, 2018,' she wrote. 'Beloved baby brother, American #WWII #bronzestar #veteran, husband, father of 4 strong women, #grandpa, adorable scamp, handsome devil, and trickster to the end.' Sandra Bullock has not commented yet about her father's death, ETOnline reported.
  • Allman Brothers Band founding member Dickey Betts has had successful surgery after slipping and hitting his head while playing with his dog in Florida. The Dickey Betts website says the 'Ramblin' Man' and 'Blue Sky' singer-songwriter and guitarist underwent surgery Friday to relieve swelling on his brain. A statement posted Saturday on the website says Betts and his family said the 'outpouring of support from all over the world has been overwhelming and amazing. We are so appreciative.' Last month Betts suffered a mild stroke and had to cancel upcoming tour dates with his Dickey Betts Band, which includes his son, Duane Betts. A few weeks ago longtime friend David Spero posted that Betts was responding well to treatment for the stroke and was 'raring to go.
  • The first keg has been tapped and the beer is flowing as the 185th Oktoberfest gets underway in Munich. Mayor Dieter Reiter inserted the tap in the first keg on Saturday with two blows of a hammer and the cry of 'O'zapft is' — 'it's tapped.' As tradition demands, he handed the first mug to Bavarian governor Markus Soeder, who declared that 'the Oktoberfest is perhaps Bavaria's biggest and best calling card in the world.' Around 6 million visitors are expected at the festival grounds in Munich before the Oktoberfest ends on Oct. 7. As in previous years, backpacks and large bags are banned for security reasons. Beer prices are up again, with a liter (2-pint) mug costing up to 11.50 euros ($13.50) — a 55-cent increase over last year. Hundreds of visitors, most of them wearing traditional lederhosen or dirndls, waited to be let in the festival grounds early Saturday morning ahead of the official keg-tapping at noon. Some 600 police officers and hundreds of stewards will keep order at the fenced-off grounds over the 16 days of the event.
  • The newest deputy in a Texas county has a reputation for being mean and green. And the Travis County Sheriff’s Office is more than happy to have actor Lou Ferrigno on its staff. >> Read more trending news  Ferrigno, who starred in “The Incredible Hulk” television series from 1978 to 1982, stopped by the Sheriff’s Office on Thursday on his way to Wizard World Comic Con, which began Friday in Austin and runs through Sunday, KXAN reported.  Ferrigno is a reserve deputy in Los Angeles County, the television station reported. The former bodybuilder said he stopped by the Travis County Sheriff’s Office to offer “encouragement and thanks,” while mugging for photographs with deputies. Sheriff Sally Hernandez swore Ferrigno in as an honorary deputy, KXAN reported.

The Latest News Headlines

  • A Florida Uber driver allegedly refused to let her fare out of the car Wednesday, forcing the female passenger to jump from the window of the moving vehicle, police said.  Destiny Racquel Green, 30, is charged with kidnapping to commit or facilitate a felony and false imprisonment. Leon County Jail records showed Green remained in jail Friday afternoon.  Tallahassee police officers were called early Wednesday morning to a Walgreens parking lot following a 911 call in which the victim -- who identified herself on social media as Brooke Adkins, 19, a college student from St. Petersburg -- could be heard screaming for help in the background, according to WTXL in Midway. When the officers arrived, they found Adkins with torn jeans, soaked through with blood, and scrapes on her hands.  Adkins told officers she had been hanging out with friends at a Tallahassee club when she called for an Uber to take her home, the news station reported. She showed officers the app on her cellphone, which showed Green as the driver assigned to her.  Police officials said that, on the way to Adkins’ home, Adkins asked Green to instead drop her off at The Edge, an apartment complex near Florida State University. Things started getting weird at that point, Adkins said in Twitter posts.  “I was already at my destination and she asked me if I could ride around more with her,” Adkins wrote. “I told her she could take me around the block but to keep the meter on (just in case), and after that she would not let me get out of the car.” Adkins, who was seated in the back seat of the vehicle, wrote that the child lock was on the doors of Green’s car.  As the two women drove around, Green was pulled over near Florida State University by a state trooper. WTXL reported that, during the stop, Green asked Adkins to put her hands on the center console and hold it down.  Adkins found the request odd, but did as Green asked.  >> Read more trending news The Tampa Bay Times reported that Green told her passenger she was taking her to the hospital. Adkins told her she did not need to go to a hospital, but Green refused to stop. “Adkins said she asked Green to let her out of the vehicle at almost every stoplight, and Green continuously said ‘no’ and nothing else,” police officials said, according to the Times.  Adkins called 911. About 25 minutes after Green passed Adkins’ drop-off spot, Adkins made her move. She rolled down the window, holding the button down so Green couldn’t roll it back up, and jumped, police said.  Investigators caught up with Green at her home later that day, WTXL reported. Before they could say anything, Green told them she’d quit working for Uber because of “the girl” to whom she had given a ride, the news station said.  Green said Adkins had wanted to go to the hospital, but did not say why, police said. She told them Adkins jumped from the car on the way to Capital Regional Medical Center, WTXL reported. Investigators wrote in police reports that Green made several comments that were non sequiturs and seemed paranoid during questioning, the news station said.  An Uber spokesperson told BuzzFeed News that what Adkins reported to police is “troubling.” “We have removed the driver from the app and stand ready to support the police investigation,” the spokesperson said.  Adkins took to social media Wednesday to warn other young women of the dangers surrounding them. The initial tweet, which included photos of her torn jeans and battered legs, has since been retweeted more than 91,000 times.  “Tonight, I realized that being kidnapped from an Uber driver is 100 (percent) real,” Adkins wrote. “I’m so thankful that I got out OK, but jumping out a moving car window and running for help has to be the scariest thing I’ve ever gone thru (sic).” She wrote that she wanted girls to be aware and to always remain safe.  “Kidnapping has been happening more recently than ever and I want to raise awareness that everyone just needs to be safe and aware of your surroundings, and also who you are with,” Adkins wrote. 
  • After posting a schedule for a Monday morning vote on the nomination of Judge Brett Kavanaugh for the U.S. Supreme Court, unable to work out an agreement for testimony from a woman who accused the judge of sexual misconduct back when they were teenagers, Republicans gave extra time to Dr. Christine Blasey Ford to consider testimony before the Senate Judiciary Committee. “It’s not my normal approach to b indecisive,” Sen. Charles Grassley (R-IA) tweeted late Friday night from his home state of Iowa, as he tried to both press ahead with a vote on President Donald Trump’s nominee for the U.S. Supreme Court, and hold open the possibility of testimony from Ford. The late night change of heart created an odd mixture of reaction, as even after Grassley said he was giving more time to Ford’s legal team, Democrats were still churning out news releases after midnight criticizing Republicans for their treatment of the allegations against Kavanaugh. “By blocking both an FBI investigation and a hearing where all three witnesses present during the assault could answer questions under oath, the Senate will fail in its duty to the American people,” said Sen. Patrick Leahy (D-VT). Judge Kavanaugh I just granted another extension to Dr Ford to decide if she wants to proceed w the statement she made last week to testify to the senate She shld decide so we can move on I want to hear her. I hope u understand. It’s not my normal approach to b indecisive — ChuckGrassley (@ChuckGrassley) September 22, 2018 With all the extensions we give Dr Ford to decide if she still wants to testify to the Senate I feel like I’m playing 2nd trombone in the judiciary orchestra and Schumer is the conductor — ChuckGrassley (@ChuckGrassley) September 22, 2018 As the sun rose on Saturday morning, it still wasn’t clear whether Ford would testify. “Dr. Blasey Ford has been clear in her desire to testify following an independent, thorough investigation by the FBI,” said Sen. Dick Durbin (D-IL). But Republicans were still suspicious of the allegations brought by Ford, who says she was sexually attacked by Kavanaugh at a high school party in the 1980’s. “Their decision to reveal this allegation at the most politically damaging moment reeks of opportunism,” said Sen. Orrin Hatch (R-UT). Under the timeline originally unveiled by the Judiciary Committee on Friday night, Republicans scheduled a vote for Monday morning on a list of judges, with one prominent name at the top of the list: “Brett M. Kavanaugh, to be an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States,” it read. The recalcitrance, stubbornness and lack of cooperation we’ve seen from Republicans is unprecedented. And candidly, the dismissive treatment of Dr. Ford is insulting to all sexual assault survivors. — Sen Dianne Feinstein (@SenFeinstein) September 22, 2018 Ford’s lawyers wanted her to testify next Thursday – Grassley and Republicans were offering Wednesday. There was also talk of Ford talking directly to investigators in California, instead of traveling to Washington, D.C.
  • The East Coast is no stranger to hurricanes and the destruction that follows. The Saffir-Simpson scale was developed to help determine damage and flooding before it strikes.   What is a hurricane?  A hurricane is a rotating low-pressure weather system that converts the energy of warm air into winds and waves. Hurricanes have “warm core” centers, meaning the center of the storm is warmer than the surrounding air. Warm ocean temperatures and wind patterns that spiral air inward are necessary for a hurricane to form.>>How to use the internet during the storm when your internet is down The “eye” of the storm is produced as the warm air rises in the storm’s center and a center of low pressure is created. When the pressure in that area drops, more air is pulled in, creating a sort of heat-pump effect that causes the storm to repeat the process and grow in intensity. The storm will continue to do so until it’s supply of warm water is interrupted. Thunderstorms spiral out from the eye and the water is pushed ahead of the storm, building what is called a 'storm surge.' The storm surge forms to the east of the eye. >>What is a storm surge and why is it dangerous? When a system has sustained winds of 39 mph, it is classified as a tropical depression. When the winds reach 39 mph or higher, the depression becomes a tropical storm and is given a name.  At 74 mph, the system is a hurricane.  What is the Saffir-Simpson scale and what does it have to do with hurricanes?  The tropical system is assigned a category depending on its wind speed. Here are the categories, the wind speeds and what those winds will likely do once the system makes landfall: >>What is the Saffir-Simpson scale; how does it work; is there a Category 6?  Category 1 -- 74 to 95 mph: Very dangerous winds will produce some damage. Well-constructed frame homes could have damage to the roof, shingles, vinyl siding and gutters. Large branches of trees will snap and shallowly rooted trees may be toppled. Extensive damage to power lines and poles likely will result in power outages that could last a few to several days.  Category 2 -- 96 to 110 mph: Extremely dangerous winds will cause extensive damage: Well-constructed frame homes could sustain major roof and siding damage. Many shallowly-rooted trees will be snapped or uprooted and block numerous roads. Near-total power loss is expected with outages that could last from several days to weeks.  Category 3 -- 111-129 mph: Devastating damage will occur: Well-built framed homes may incur major damage or removal of roof decking and gable ends. Many trees will be snapped or uprooted, blocking numerous roads. Electricity and water will be unavailable for several days to weeks after the storm passes. Category 3 storms and above are considered major hurricanes.  Category 4 -- 130-156 mph: Catastrophic damage will occur. Well-built framed homes can sustain severe damage with loss of most of the roof structure and/or some exterior walls. Most trees will be snapped or uprooted and power poles downed. Fallen trees and power poles will isolate residential areas. Power outages will last weeks to possibly months. Most of the area will be uninhabitable for weeks or months.  Category 5 -- 157 mph or higher: Catastrophic damage will occur. A high percentage of framed homes will be destroyed, with total roof failure and walls collapsing. Fallen trees and power poles will isolate residential areas. Power outages will last for weeks to possibly months. Most of the area will be uninhabitable for weeks or months.   Here is a video that shows the increasing level of damage in each category.  
  • Hurricanes can leave behind tons of damage, including flooding. But did you know that treading through the wrong kind of water can cause illnesses or even death? Floodwaters and standing water are often contaminated, posing several risks, such as infectious diseases, chemical hazards and injuries. Here are six sicknesses you should beware of in the aftermath: Diarrheal diseases Drinking or eating anything that has come in contact with floodwaters can lead to cryptosporidiosis, E. coli or giardiasis. While cryptosporidiosis and giardiasis are brought on by parasites, E. coli is caused by bacteria. Symptoms from each include diarrhea, gas, nausea and vomiting. Cryptosporidiosis, however, can even be fatal for those with weakened immune systems, such as AIDS or cancer.  Wound infections Open wounds and rashes that are exposed to floodwater can cause tetanus or Vibrio vulnificus. Tetanus is a bacterial infection, and it can enter the body through breaks in the skin like a cut. >> 10 tips to stay safe when returning home after a natural disaster Vibrio vulnificus, another bacteria, can be contracted the same way. Many people become infected by consuming undercooked shellfish or exposing an injury to brackish or salt water. Other illnesses  People affected by flooded areas can also get trench foot. It occurs when your feet are wet for long periods of time. It can cause pain, swelling and numbness. >> Read more trending news  You should also be aware of chemical hazards from materials that may have spilled into the water. And be cautious of electrical hazards, since there are puddles that may be electrified due to fallen power lines. Curious about other diseases you can catch? Take a look at the full list at CDC’s official website. 
  • A hurricane leaves a path of destruction and many are left trying to figure out how to begin the chore of cleaning up and repairing their property.  >> Read more trending news  Insurance companies will send claims teams to the affected areas after the event so that customers can get the process of filing a claim started and get the money to repair their property in a timely manner.  Here is a step-by-step guide on how to file an insurance claim following a hurricane or flood:  1. It is important to file the claim with your insurer as soon as possible. Thousands of people will be filing claims, and you want to get yours as high as you can on the list.  2. The Insurance Information Institute, an organization that provides information on insurance issues, suggests you make temporary repairs to your home if they are needed to protect it from further damage. Save the receipts for supplies so you can turn them in for reimbursement.  3. Once you are able to speak to an insurer, you will need to ask these questions: Is the damage you described covered under the terms of your policy? How long do you have to file a claim? How long will it take to process the claim? Do you need estimates for repairs? 4. This step is very important: Once you make the claim, be sure to write down the claim number. Again, insurers will be dealing with thousands of people -- make it easy for them to communicate with you about your claim by having the claim number written down where you can find it. 5. When you speak to your insurer, record the day and time of the conversation and with whom you spoke. Take notes about what is said and if any monetary amounts are mentioned. 6. You need to be ready to provide an accurate description of damages to your insurer. If you can safely do it, walk around your home and make notes on what was damaged.  7. After you contact them, your insurance company with send you a “proof of loss” form to complete or will send an adjuster – a person trained to assess the damage to property – to your home to get the information on your losses. To speed this process along, start gathering information about your property and the items that were lost or destroyed. A proof of loss form will ask you to describe the items damaged or destroyed, provide the approximate date of purchase and estimate the cost to repair it or replace it. If you happen to be able to produce receipts for items, that would be a help as well. 8. Another step you can take to document what was damaged is to photograph or videotape the damage. Be sure to point out structural damage in the photos or video. 9. Do not throw out damaged items. You want an adjuster to see them first. 10. If you are unable to live in your home and must stay elsewhere, keep all receipts for any living expenses – hotel rooms, food, and other costs of evacuation. Most homeowner policies that cover windstorm damage will cover those costs. 11. Be wary of anyone who comes to your door offering to do repairs or claiming to be insurance adjusters.  12. If you have no insurance, you can register for federal disaster relief at DisasterAssistance.gov. You do that by downloading the FEMA mobile app or by calling 1-800-621-3362.  Disaster assistance can help with temporary housing, home repairs and other disaster-related expenses, including crisis counseling and legal assistance. Click here for more information on FEMA aid. Water vs. wind: What is covered? Hurricanes cause wind and water damage. Homeowners insurance covers these hazards in a different way.  >>Does insurance cover hail damage to your car, house? Homeowners insurance does not cover flood damage – including flooding that is caused by storm surge. You would have needed to have flood insurance to pay for damages caused by water beforehand. Structures or belongings that were damaged by flooding are covered only by flood insurance. Wind damage is not covered in some coastal states. You would have had to purchase a separate windstorm policy in advance, which is a common thing in those coastal states. Both North Carolina and South Carolina are states where insurance companies can charge special deductibles for wind damage. Damage to your car is generally covered by your automobile insurance. Finally, be patient. It may take a while for someone to get to you and assess your damages.    

The Latest News Videos