ON AIR NOW

LISTEN NOW

Weather

clear-day
40°
Sunny
H 70° L 59°
  • clear-day
    40°
    Current Conditions
    Sunny. H 70° L 59°
  • clear-day
    66°
    Afternoon
    Sunny. H 70° L 59°
  • clear-night
    63°
    Evening
    Mostly Clear. H 70° L 59°
LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

The latest top stories

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

The latest traffic report

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

The latest forecast

00:00 | 00:00

    The Chinese-language version of the Oscars is being held Saturday night in Taiwan's capital, Taipei, with veteran director Zhang Yimou's monochrome historical epic 'Shadow' a leading contender for best picture. The Golden Horse Awards honor films from Taiwan, Hong Kong, mainland China and other parts of the Chinese-speaking world, transcending political, cultural and geographic borders. This year's judging committee is led by Gong Li, the leading actress in many of Zhang's earlier films, who was invited by Ang Lee, director of Hollywood features such as 'Brokeback Mountain' and 'Hulk.' 'Shadow,' which delves into the rich vein of Chinese martial arts and palace intrigue, leads with 12 nominations. Other films in contention include 'Dear Ex,' which explores the relationship between a homosexual's family and his gay lover after his death.
  • Standing amid the charred foundations and burned-out movie sets of Paramount Ranch, officials from the National Park Service said Friday that they plan to rebuild and reopen the site that holds decades of movie history and still hosts a steady stream of Hollywood productions within the next two years. Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area Superintendent David Szymanski announced the plan Friday as he guided reporters through the twisted metal and ashes that once made up the ranch's 'Western Town,' most of which burned shortly after a huge wildfire broke out Nov. 8 and swept through the surrounding mountains and community, destroying more than 700 homes and other buildings. 'The site is almost a total loss,' Szymanski said. 'It's easy to be somber. But there's some things that I'm hoping will allow us to be a little bit less somber. We'd like to get Paramount Ranch rebuilt in the next 24 months.' A church built for HBO's 'Westworld' and a train depot constructed for the 1990s CBS series 'Dr. Quinn, Medicine Woman,' the two productions most associated with the site, are all that remain of the structures, backed by the blackened hills of a wildfire that many feared for years. 'We've all dreaded it, we've tried to prepare, but sometimes the wind just takes over,' said Rory Skei, the chief deputy executive officer of the Santa Monica Mountains Conservancy. 'We do what we can do.' Elsewhere on the fire, more residents were allowed Friday to return to homes they fled from days earlier. Authorities reopened more areas in Los Angeles and Ventura counties. But they kept some locations within the Woolsey Fire zone off-limits because of hazards ranging from burned power poles to compromised gas lines and destroyed roadways. Utility crews worked to remove damaged equipment and bring in replacements, including numerous power poles. Although walls of flame and towering columns of smoke were gone, firefighters continue to expand containment lines around the scorched area. Fire commanders said the 153-square-mile (396-square-kilometer) burn area was 78 percent surrounded. The count of destroyed structures reached 713. Another 201 structures were damaged. Los Angeles County sheriff's detectives were investigating three deaths. Two adults were found in a gutted car last week, and the remains of a person were found Wednesday in the rubble of a home that had burned to the ground. At the Paramount Ranch, structures that served as barns, hotels, saloons and barbershops for decades of movies and TV shows are gone. Workers will salvage what they can and then work to rebuild. The site began as a set for Paramount Pictures in the 1920s and was taken over by the National Park Service in 1980. It got a major restoration in 1985, with the park service trying to maintain as much as it could from the original buildings. Corrugated tin roofs on many of them still dated to the 1920s. Now those roofs lie burned and twisted on the ground like pieces of a crashed plane. Western Town specifically was built for TV productions in the 1950s and was used for such westerns as 'The Cisco Kid' and 'Dick Powell's Zane Grey Theatre.' But the site lent itself to productions of all kinds. 'American Sniper,' the 2014 film starring Bradley Cooper, was also partly filmed there, as was 2006's 'The Lake House,' starring Sandra Bullock and Keanu Reeves. 'It could be adapted for anything,' Szymanski said. It remained to be seen how much the ranch being out of commission would affect Hollywood productions. HBO did not immediately answer questions about whether the fire would affect the upcoming season 3 of 'Westworld,' or whether production was planned for the ranch at all. The network previously expressed concern for 'all those affected by these horrible fires.' As the ranch's manmade structures are rebuilt, the stark surrounding hills will most likely take care of themselves. 'All this natural vegetation will regenerate itself,' said Sara Horner, board president of the Santa Monica Mountains Fund. 'A year from now, it will be green, from after the rains, and then in a few years, it'll look pretty much as it did. Nature is amazingly powerful in her ability to heal.
  • Justin Bieber has agreed to settle a long-running lawsuit filed by a former neighbor whose house the pop singer egged. A document filed Friday shows the case has been resolved in its entirety. No details were given about the terms. Jeffrey and Suzanne Schwartz filed a lawsuit in early 2015 that alleged they suffered emotional harm because of the egging and other actions by Bieber when he lived next door. The 24-year-old pop singer has already served probation in a criminal plea deal after the 2013 incident, and paid $80,000 in restitution for the damage he caused. The lawsuit alleged Bieber spit in Jeffrey Schwartz's face and terrorized the family with loud parties, drug use and aggressive driving while living in a gated community in the celebrity enclave of Calabasas. It sought more than $25,000 in damages for assault and battery, trespassing and infliction of emotional distress claims. Bieber's attorneys argued that the restitution he already paid and the punishment he was given were sufficient, and that he did not rightly owe more for emotional damages. Messages left for attorneys from both sides were not immediately returned. During an August hearing, Judge Elaine W. Mandel, who had taken over the case after three years, expressed skepticism at the plaintiffs' claims. She grilled the Schwartz's attorney Brian J. Kim to explain what damages Bieber caused the plaintiffs, calling them 'minimal.' She also did not appear inclined to admit much of the evidence the plaintiffs want to introduce at trial, including dozens of media stories about Bieber's misbehavior.
  • ABC Entertainment President Channing Dungey, who created a deep bench of ethnic diversity in the network's shows and fired Roseanne Barr for a racist tweet, will be stepping down. Her decision announced Friday comes amid ABC corporate parent Walt Disney Co.'s pending acquisition of 21st Century Fox and the planned reorganization of Disney's television units. Dungey, who became the first African-American programming chief for a major broadcast network when she was named to the job in February 2016, will be replaced by Karey Burke, head of programming development at ABC sibling cable channel Freeform since 2014, the network said. Dungey will remain during a transition period as Burke takes over. Burke's resume includes overseeing production of NBC prime-time series including 'ER' and 'The West Wing' from 1999 to 2003, during which time she developed 'Scrubs,' ''Freaks & Geeks' and other shows. In a statement, Dungey said she could have called ABC home for many more years but wants to tackle new, unspecified challenges. Under Dungey, both as president and in her previous job as head of ABC's drama development, the network became the home of 'Scandal,' ''How to Get Away With Murder' and other multiethnic shows from powerhouse African-American producer Shonda Rhimes. But Rhimes, whose shows own ABC's Thursday prime-time schedule, and another prominent producer, Kenya Barris of the network's sitcom 'black-ish,' have both jumped ship for lucrative streaming deals. More recently, Dungey made news for her quick action in canning Barr from her revived namesake show 'Roseanne' after the actress-comedian posted an insulting tweet about former Obama adviser Valerie Jarrett, who is African-American. Barr apologized, but the show, which had been an immediate success for ABC, was revamped without her and debuted this fall as 'The Conners.' In October, Disney said it was bringing in Fox executive Dana Walden as chairman of Disney Television Studios and ABC Entertainment. Burke will report to Walden after the Fox acquisition is completed, with Burke's replacement at Freeform to be announced, ABC said. In a statement, Disney CEO Bob Iger lauded Dungey for her 'curiosity, passion and creativity' and predicted she will be successful at whatever she chooses to pursue. Burke, a graduate of the University of California, Los Angeles, said she was honored to continue Dungey's legacy of 'excellent storytelling that touches so many people's hearts.' ___ Lynn Elber can be reached at lelber@ap.org and on Twitter at http://twitter.com/lynnelber .
  • A small, private funeral has been held to mourn Marvel Comics mogul Stan Lee, and his company is making more plans to memorialize him. 'Stan was always adamant that he did not want a large public funeral, and as such his family has conducted a private closed ceremony in accordance with his final wishes,' Lee's company POW! Entertainment said in a statement to The Associated Press on Friday. POW! Entertainment has set up a memorial wall on Lee's website where friends, colleagues and fans can share thoughts, prayers and tributes to Lee, and messages from fellow creators and artists will be posted on Lee's social media pages in the coming days. The company says further memorial plans are in the works, and hopes to share more details soon. 'The grandeur of Stan makes this a monumental task,' the statement said. The 95-year-old was declared dead after being rushed to a Los Angeles hospital on Monday. No cause of death has been given. He co-created the Incredible Hulk, Spider-Man, The Fantastic Four, and many of the other heroes in the Marvel comic and cinematic universes. He was a hero himself to fans who frenzied for his movie cameos and public appearances as he remained an ambassador for Marvel until the end of his life.   
  • The 34th Film Independent Spirit Awards showered nominations on Bo Burnham's coming-of-age tale 'Eighth Grade,' Lynne Ramsay's existentialist thriller 'You Were Never Really Here' and Paul Schrader's religious drama 'First Reformed' in nominees announced Friday . Each scored four nods including best picture. Also nominated for best picture: Barry Jenkins' James Baldwin adaptation 'If Beale Street Could Talk' and Debra Granik's father-daughter tale 'Leave No Trace.' With many of this year's major Oscar contenders being bigger-budget studio releases like 'A Star Is Born' and 'Black Panther,' the Spirits threw their support behind a more idiosyncratic array of independent films from both veteran and first-time filmmakers. The leading nominee was a directorial debut that has collected all of $66,000 at the box office: Jeremiah Zagar's 'We the Animals.' The film, a lushly poetic story of three biracial brothers, received a leading five nominations including best first feature and the 'someone to watch' award. Doled out the day before the Academy Awards, the Spirits honor independent film, selecting from nominees with budgets under $20 million. Two other Academy Awards favorites — Alfonso Cuaron's 'Roma' and Yorgos Lanthimos' 'The Favourite' — weren't eligible for the Spirits' main categories, but were nominated for best international feature. That left plenty of room for films like Tamara Jenkins' 'Private Life' (three nods, including best director and best screenplay for Jenkins), Paul Dano's directorial debut 'Wildlife' (three nods, including best actress for Carey Mulligan) and Jennifer Fox's childhood sexual abuse chronicle 'The Tale' (three nods, including best first feature) to find attention. Selection committees went especially for 'Eighth Grade,' including a best actress nomination for its 15-year-old star, Elsie Fisher, and a supporting actor nom for her fictional father, Josh Hamilton. Joaquin Phoenix, the unhinged hit-man of 'You Were Never Really Here,' was nominated for best actor, along with John Chu ('Searching'), Daveed Diggs ('Blindspotting'), Christian Malheiros ('Socrates') and Ethan Hawke of 'First Reformed.' Alongside Mulligan and Fisher, the nominees for best actress were: Glenn Close ('The Wife'), Toni Collette ('Hereditary'), Regina Hall ('Support the Girls') and Helena Howard ('Madeline's Madeline'). The Spirits' Robert Altman Award, an ensemble prize given to a film's director, cast and casting director, will go to Luca Guadagnino's horror remake 'Suspiria.' The Spirits will also, for a second time, give the Bonnie Award (and a $50,000 grant) to a mid-career female director. This year's nominees are Granik, Jenkins and Karyn Kusama ('Destroyer'). Gemma Chan and Molly Shannon announced the nominations, which were streamed online, in a press conference from the W Hotel in Hollywood on Friday. After four straight years of matching best picture winners with the Oscars ('Moonlight,' ''Spotlight,' ''Birdman,' ''12 Years a Slave'), the Spirit Awards last year deviated by choosing Jordan Peele's 'Get Out' for its top award. The Spirits, presented by the non-profit arts organization Film Independent, will be broadcast live on IFC on February 23. ___ Follow AP Film Writer Jake Coyle on Twitter at: http://twitter.com/jakecoyleAP
  • First day sales for Michelle Obama's 'Becoming' topped 725,000 copies, making it one of the year's biggest debuts. Crown Publishing told The Associated Press on Friday that the figures include sales and pre-orders for the former first lady's memoir include hardcover, audio and e-books editions for the United States and Canada. 'Becoming' was released on Tuesday, the same day Mrs. Obama launched a national book tour . Crown also announced that it had raised the book's print run from 1.8 million copies to 2.6 million. Reviews of the book, which traces Obama's journey from Chicago's South Side to the White House, have been positive, with The Washington Post praising its 'impressive balance in telling the truth of her challenges while repeatedly acknowledging her lucky life.' 'Becoming' had the biggest opening of any books in 2018 by Crown's parent company, Penguin Random House. But at least one other book this year, from Simon & Schuster, did start higher: Bob Woodward's 'Fear: Trump in the White House' sold around 900,000 copies after one day. 'Becoming' is well exceeding the pace of previous memoirs by first ladies. In 2003, Hillary Clinton's 'Living History' had first week sales of around 600,000 copies, at a time when audio sales were tiny and e-book sales nonexistent.
  • William Goldman, the Oscar-winning screenwriter and Hollywood wise man who won Academy Awards for 'Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid' and 'All the President's Men' and summed up the mystery of making a box office hit by declaring 'Nobody knows anything,' has died. He was 87. Goldman's daughter Jenny said her father died early Friday in New York due to complications from colon cancer and pneumonia. 'So much of what's he's written can express who he was and what he was about,' she said, adding that the last few weeks, while Goldman was ailing, revealed just how many people considered him family. Goldman, who also converted his novels 'Marathon Man,' ''Magic,' ''The Princess Bride' and 'Heat' into screenplays, clearly knew more than most about what the audience wanted. He was not only a successful film writer but a top script doctor, the industry title for an uncredited writer brought in to improve or 'punch up' weak screenplays. Goldman also made political history by coining the phrase 'follow the money' in his script for 'All the President's Men,' adapted from the book by Washington Post reporters Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein on the Watergate political scandal. The film starred Robert Redford as Woodward and Dustin Hoffman as Bernstein. Standing in the shadows, Hal Holbrook was the mystery man code-named Deep Throat who helped the reporters pursue the evidence. His advice, 'Follow the money,' became so widely quoted that few people realized it was never said during the actual scandal. A confirmed New Yorker, Goldman declined to work in Hollywood. Instead, he would fly to Los Angeles for two-day conferences with directors and producers, then return home to fashion a script, which he did with amazing speed. In his 1985 book, 'Adventures in the Screen Trade,' he expressed disdain for an industry that elaborately produced and tested a movie, only to see it dismissed by the public during its first weekend in theaters. 'Nobody knows anything,' he remarked. Screenwriter and filmmaker Aaron Sorkin called Goldman a mentor. 'He was the dean of American screenwriters and generations of filmmakers will continue to walk in the footprints he laid,' Sorkin said in a statement. 'He wrote so many unforgettable movies, so many thunderous novels and works of non-fiction, and while I'll always wish he'd written one more, I'll always be grateful for what he's left us.' Goldman launched his writing career after receiving a master's degree in English from Columbia University in 1956. Weary of academia, he declined the chance to earn a Ph.D., choosing instead to write the novel 'The Temple of Gold' in 10 days. Knopf agreed to publish it. 'If the book had not been taken,' he told an interviewer, 'I would have gone into advertising ... or something.' Instead, he wrote other novels, including 'Soldier in the Rain,' which became a movie starring Steve McQueen. Goldman also co-authored a play and a musical with his older brother, James, but both failed on Broadway. James Goldman would later write the historical play 'The Lion in Winter,' which he converted to film, winning the 1968 Oscar for best adapted screenplay. William Goldman had come to screenwriting by accident after actor Cliff Robertson read one of his books, 'No Way to Treat a Lady,' and thought it was a film treatment. After he hired the young writer to fashion a script from a short story, Goldman rushed out to buy a book on screen writing. Robertson rejected the script but found Goldman a job working on a screenplay for a British thriller. After that he adapted his novel 'Harper' for a 1966 film starring Paul Newman as a private eye. He broke through in 1969 with the blockbuster 'Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid,' starring Newman and Redford. Based on the exploits of the real-life 'Hole in the Wall' gang of bank robbers, the movie began a long association with Redford, who also appeared in 'The Hot Rock,' ''The Great Waldo Pepper' and 'Indecent Proposal.' Other notable Goldman films included 'The Stepford Wives,' ''A Bridge Too Far' and 'Misery.' The latter, adapted from a Stephen King suspense novel, won the 1990 Oscar for Kathy Bates as lead actress. In 1961 Goldman married Ilene Jones, a photographer, and they had two daughters, Jenny and Susanna. The couple divorced in 1991. Born in Chicago on Aug. 12, 1931, Goldman grew up in the suburb of Highland Park. He graduated from Oberlin College in 1952 and served two years in the Army. Despite all his success as a screenwriter, Goldman always considered himself a novelist and didn't rate his scripts as great artistic achievements. 'A screenplay is a piece of carpentry,' he once said. 'And except in the case of Ingmar Bergman, it's not an art, it's a craft.' ___ The late AP Entertainment Writer Bob Thomas contributed to this report.
  • A federal judge ordered the Trump administration on Friday to immediately return the White House press credentials of CNN reporter Jim Acosta, though a lawsuit over the credentials' revocation is continuing. U.S. District Court Judge Timothy Kelly, an appointee of President Donald Trump, announced his decision at a hearing Friday morning. The judge said Acosta's credentials must be reactivated to allow him access to the White House complex for press briefings and other events. Acosta, CNN's chief White House correspondent, was back in the afternoon. The White House said it would be developing new rules for orderly press conferences. The White House revoked Acosta's credentials last week after he and Trump tangled verbally during a press conference following the midterm elections. CNN sued and asked the judge to issue a temporary restraining order forcing the White House to give back Acosta's credentials. The judge agreed. CNN alleged that Acosta's First and Fifth Amendment rights were violated when the White House revoked his 'hard pass.' While the judge didn't rule on the underlying case, he ordered Acosta's pass returned for now in part because he said CNN was likely to prevail on its Fifth Amendment claim — that Acosta hadn't received sufficient notice or explanation before his credentials were revoked or been given sufficient opportunity to respond before they were. The judge said the government could not say who initially decided to revoke Acosta's hard pass and how that decision was reached. 'In response to the court, we will temporarily reinstate the reporter's hard pass,' White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders said in a statement. 'We will also further develop rules and processes to ensure fair and orderly press conferences in the future.' Speaking to reporters after the decision, Trump said, 'If they don't listen to the rules and regulations, we will end up back in court and we will win.' He later added: 'We want total freedom of the press. It's very important to me, more important to me than anybody would believe. But you have to act with respect when you're in the White House, and when I see the way some of my people get treated at press conferences, it's terrible. So we're setting up a certain standard, which is what the court is requesting.' The White House had spelled out its reasons for revoking Acosta's credentials in a tweet from Sanders and in a statement after CNN filed its lawsuit. But the judge said those 'belated efforts were hardly sufficient to satisfy due process.' But the judge also emphasized the 'very limited nature' of his ruling Friday. He noted he had not determined that the First Amendment was violated. The judge told attorneys to file additional court papers in the case by Monday. On Friday afternoon, more than 50 members of the White House press corps greeted Acosta as he strode through the northwest gate of the presidential compound. He said he was grateful for the judge's ruling, that it was a test and the media passed the test. 'This is just any other day at the White House for me and I would like to get back to work,' he said. Trump has made his dislike of CNN clear since before he took office and continuing into his presidency. He has described the network as 'fake news' both on Twitter and in public comments. At last week's press conference, Trump was taking questions from reporters and called on Acosta, who asked about Trump's statements about a caravan of migrants making its way to the U.S.-Mexico border. After a terse exchange, Trump told Acosta, 'That's enough,' several times while calling on another reporter. Acosta attempted to ask another question about special counsel Robert Mueller's Russia investigation and initially declined to give up a handheld microphone to a White House intern. Trump responded to Acosta by saying he wasn't concerned about the investigation, calling it a 'hoax,' and then criticized Acosta, calling him a 'rude, terrible person.' Hours later, the White House pulled Acosta's credentials. The White House's explanations for why it seized Acosta's credentials have shifted over the past week. Sanders initially explained the decision by accusing Acosta of making improper physical contact with the intern seeking to grab the microphone. But that rationale disappeared after witnesses backed Acosta's account that he was just trying to keep the microphone and Sanders distributed a doctored video that made it appear Acosta was more aggressive than he actually was. On Tuesday, Sanders accused Acosta in a written statement of being unprofessional by trying to dominate the questioning at the news conference.
  • The Latest on the legal challenge to the White House's decision to strip CNN reporter Jim Acosta of his White House press credentials (all times local): 6:55 p.m. CNN's Jim Acosta is back at the White House after a federal judge ordered the Trump administration to immediately return his press credentials, though a lawsuit over the revocation is continuing. The White House revoked Acosta's credentials last week after he and President Donald Trump tangled verbally during a press conference. CNN sued and asked the judge to issue a temporary restraining order. U.S. District Court Judge Timothy Kelly, an appointee of President Donald Trump, said Friday that Acosta's credentials must be reactivated to allow him access to the White House complex for press briefings and other events. Trump says the White House is 'writing up rules and regulations' for reporters. __ 1:20 p.m. President Donald Trump says the White House is 'writing up rules and regulations' for reporters after a judge ordered the administration to restore credentials for CNN reporter Jim Acosta. Trump told reporters Friday that 'people have to behave.' He added that if journalists 'don't listen to the rules and regulations, we will end up back in court and we will win.' Asked what he meant by rules and regulations, Trump said: 'Decorum. You can't take three questions and four questions. And just stand up and not sit down.' Trump said he wants 'total freedom of the press,' but added 'you have to act with respect.' The White House said Friday that it would 'temporarily reinstate' the credentials that were revoked after Acosta and Trump tangled during a press conference last week. __ 12:40 p.m. CNN White House correspondent Jim Acosta says all he wants to do is go back to work covering 'the guy in there,' referring to President Donald Trump. More than 50 members of the White House press corps greeted Acosta as he strode through the northwest gate of the presidential compound. A federal judge on Friday ordered the administration to restore the credentials that were revoked after Acosta and Trump tangled during a press conference last week. Acosta says journalists need to know that in the United States their First Amendment rights and freedom of the press 'are sacred' and protected by the Constitution. He says he's grateful for the judge's ruling, that it was a test and he thinks the media passed the test. Acosta says: 'This is just any other day at the White House for me and I would like to get back to work.' ___ 11:55 a.m. The White House says it will 'temporarily reinstate' the White House press credentials of CNN reporter Jim Acosta in response to a judge's order. A federal judge on Friday ordered the administration to return the credentials that were revoked after Acosta and Trump tangled during a press conference last week. White House spokeswoman Sarah Huckabee Sanders also called for 'decorum' at the White House and said they would be developing 'rules and processes to ensure fair and orderly press conferences in the future.' The judge granted CNN's request for a temporary restraining order. A lawsuit that CNN brought against the Trump administration over the issue is continuing. __ 10:47 a.m. CNN's Jim Acosta has thanked the judge who ordered the Trump administration to immediately return his White House press credentials. Acosta said Friday that he wanted to thank fellow reporters who supported him and the judge for the 'decision he made today.' U.S. District Court Judge Timothy Kelly ordered the White House to immediately return Acosta's credentials while CNN's lawsuit continues. He found that Acosta was 'irreparably harmed' and dismissed the government's argument that CNN could send another reporter in Acosta's place to cover the White House. In brief remarks after the ruling, Acosta said, 'Let's go back to work!' __ 10:30 a.m. A federal judge in Washington is ordering the Trump administration to immediately return the White House press credentials of CNN reporter Jim Acosta. U.S. District Court Judge Timothy Kelly announced his decision Friday morning. CNN had asked that Acosta's credentials be returned while a lawsuit over their revocation goes forward. The network's chief White House correspondent has clashed repeatedly with Trump and press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders in briefings over the last two years. But the White House pulled his credentials last week following a combative press conference in which he clashed with Trump. The judge is a Trump appointee. __ 12:50 a.m. It's a waiting game in the legal case about whether a federal judge will order the Trump administration to return the White House press credentials of CNN reporter Jim Acosta. CNN has asked U.S. District Judge Timothy Kelly, who was appointed to the bench by President Donald Trump, for an order that would force the White House to immediately hand back credentials that give reporters access to the White House complex. CNN wants Acosta's credentials returned while a lawsuit over their revocation goes forward. Acosta has clashed repeatedly with Trump and press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders in briefings over the past two years. The White House pulled his credential last week following a combative press conference. Trump has made his dislike of CNN clear since before he took office and continuing into his presidency. He's described the network as 'fake news' both on Twitter and in public comments.

The Latest News Headlines

  • Over a week after being publicly ridiculed for losing her seat in Congress by President Donald Trump, Rep. Mia Love (R-UT) on Friday night was on the verge of pulling off a stunning comeback in her re-election bid, as the continued counting of ballots in her Utah district finally pushed her into the lead by a slender 419 votes. “Hard to see how she relinquishes that now,” said Dave Wasserman, an elections expert who has been forecasting a possible comeback by Love for several days. Still being tabulated are thousands of provisional ballots in Utah and Salt Lake counties, which take time to verify, as Utah and a number of other states slowly push their way through the votes of the November mid-term elections. The jump into first place for Love came as a judge tossed out a lawsuit that she filed – which oddly would have stopped vote counting in Salt Lake County – a move that her opponent said ‘smacks of desperation.’ “Utah voters deserve better than this,” said Democrat Ben McAdams. With the Utah County numbers posting, Rep. Mia Love has taken a 419-vote lead over Ben McAdams. #utpol — #VoteGehrke (@RobertGehrke) November 16, 2018 But the McAdams lead over Love has slowly withered away in recent days, leaving Love favored by many to win re-election. A comeback victory would be filled with irony, especially after the mocking ridicule heaped upon Love and a number of other House Republicans by President Donald Trump, who said the day after the elections that Love and others were defeated because they refused to embrace him. “Mia Love gave me no love and she lost,” the President said, almost seeming to enjoy the outcome. “Too bad. Sorry about that Mia.” President Trump lists Republicans who didn't embrace him and lost. 'They did very poorly. I'm not sure that I should be happy or sad, but I feel just fine about it.' 'Mia Love gave me no love and she lost. Too bad. Sorry about that Mia.' pic.twitter.com/ZV7EKcWjLX — CSPAN (@cspan) November 7, 2018 Two weekends after the elections, a small number of races remained undecided – with some that could stretch until after Thanksgiving: FLORIDA SENATE – With a manual recount finishing up, and Florida’s 67 counties waiting through Saturday to deal with any other stray ballots, Gov. Rick Scott (R-FL) seems headed for victory over Sen. Bill Nelson (D-FL). This will give the GOP a big victory, and a 2 seat margin in the U.S. Senate. From a statistical/electoral/historical perspective, Scott's defeat of Nelson is pretty much unmatched in recent political history. Beating a swing state opposition party senator without a hint of scandal in a midterm… It's quite impressive. — (((Harry Enten))) (@ForecasterEnten) November 17, 2018 CALIFORNIA 39 – This is the first of six (or maybe seven) undecided House races. After holding the lead for days, Republican Young Kim has now been swamped by late votes coming from both Orange and Los Angeles counties, and now trails Democrat Gil Cisneros by over 3,000 votes. This should complete what is a total GOP wipeout in Orange County, as Democrats would gain six GOP seats in the Golden State. Congressional districts in Orange County, Calif. in 2016 and in 2018 pic.twitter.com/TWRQ1pPzS4 — Morning Joe (@Morning_Joe) November 16, 2018 CALIFORNIA 21 – This seat has already been called by the AP and other news organizations for the Republicans, but as the votes keep coming in, Rep. David Valadao’s lead keeps shrinking, and some wonder if he can hold on. This might be a long shot, but it bears watching. It’s hard to fathom that Democrats could gain a seventh seat in California. We've been watching CA-21 like a hawk for more than a week now, and the chance for Democrat T J Cox to catch up to Valadao has gone from remote but intriguingly possibile to plausible. We're moving this one to our uncalled races tab. https://t.co/FeGWU7SsoE — Daniel Donner (@donnermaps) November 17, 2018 UTAH 4 – As mentioned above, Rep. Mia Love (R-UT) now has the lead. This would be a big save for Republicans, who have had very little to cheer about in the past 10 days since the elections. In fact, there has been an almost daily drumbeat of Democratic victories each night since then, as they edge closer to a possible pickup of almost 40 House seats, their largest gains since 1974 after Watergate. BREAKING: As expected, #UT04 GOP Rep. Mia Love (R) has pulled into the lead over Ben McAdams (D) by 419 votes. Hard to see how she relinquishes it now. https://t.co/nfsptUdHiN — Dave Wasserman (@Redistrict) November 16, 2018 NEW YORK 22 – This seat can probably be called for the Democrats by the AP and other organizations, as absentee ballot counts on Friday went clearly for Democrat Anthony Brindisi, leaving Rep. Claudia Tenney (R-NY) behind by over 3,000 votes in this northern New York district. This is not a spot where the GOP should have lost. @Redistrict Brindisi lead in NY22 has surged to more 3000 votes! I see no path to victory for Tenney. She's falling further behind as more ballots are counted, that's a losing combination, a larger deficit, and fewer votes left to count. https://t.co/ae1Ny8Osws — Kevin O'Connell (@Kevtoco) November 17, 2018 NEW YORK 27 – Indicted Rep. Chris Collins (R-NY) still leads by over 1,000 votes in this western New York district, with one big cache of absentee ballots and provisionals to count next Tuesday around Buffalo. Democrat Nate McMurray has been winning a majority of absentee ballots in recent days in counties where he lost the Election Day vote, making some wonder if he has a chance to win this race at the last minute next week. This is the equivalent of betting a horse that’s maybe 9-1. It might win. Nate McMurray continues to gain ground in counties that he lost to Rep. Chris Collins in. Biggest test will be Tuesday when the Erie County absentee and affidavit votes will be counted. https://t.co/f5nincKkZx — WGRZ (@WGRZ) November 16, 2018 GEORGIA 7 – While the race for Governor is over, Rep. Rob Woodall (R-GA) has a 419 vote edge in this suburban Atlanta district, with all of the votes counted. Democratic challenger Carolyn Bourdeaux announced on Friday afternoon that she would ask for a recount. While a recount doesn’t usually switch the outcome, we have certainly seen in Florida and other states in recent days where there are tabulation errors uncovered – so you can’t say this is in the bag for the GOP – but they are favored. News: We will file for a recount of the 7th district race. With a margin of only 419 votes (0.14%), we want to make sure every vote was counted correctly & fairly. It is crucial that every eligible vote is counted & every voice is heard. #GA07 #GAPol — Carolyn Bourdeaux (@Carolyn4GA7) November 16, 2018 TEXAS 23 – Even though she’s behind by just under 1,000 votes, Cindy Ortiz Jones spent the week in Washington going through freshman orientation, but that may not work out for the Texas Democrat, as Rep. Will Hurd (R-TX) seems like he’s in good position in this race, leading by 0.5 percent. Hurd’s people on Friday were declaring victory, but it wasn’t clear if Jones would press for any kind of vote review. Republicans are favored to hold on to this border district, but it was much closer than anyone had predicted. Bexar County has finished counting, leaving only six votes left to count (Kinney & Upton). @WillHurd has won by 928 votes, this race is over #TX23 — Connor Pfeiffer (@ConnorPfeiffer) November 16, 2018 Democrats right now have a net gain of 36 seats – they should win at least two of the undecided races left, and have an outside chance at others. Right now, the new Congress stands at 231 Democrats to 198 Republicans, with six seats undecided. One final note – this extended time of vote counting is totally normal. Reporters follow it every two years, but many partisans think there is something amiss.
  • The Jacksonville Sheriff's Office says an active investigation is underway after their officers were involved in a shooting in the Paxon area on the Westside.  The Director of Investigations and Homeland Security with JSO, Ron Lendvay, says the shooting stemmed from a traffic violation at around 4:00 PM Friday.  'A field training officer and his recruit were working in the area of St. Clair and Detroit Street, when they observed a traffic violator. The violator was observed running a stop sign and increasing his speed. The officers activated their overhead emergency lights and noted that the passenger side kept opening and closing as the vehicle continued on,' explains Lendvay.  At some point, the officers say the vehicle stopped to let someone out of the passenger side on Melson Avenue. JSO says that person was seen by the officers with a pistol in his hand.  Officers stopped to chase that man and the field training officer was able to catch up to him. At some point during their interaction, police say the officer fired several shots at him.  The suspect was hit by the gunfire, taken into custody, and then to the hospital, where police say he underwent surgery. He's now described as being in critical condition, but currently stable at the hospital.  As this chase and shooting was occurring, Lendvay says the original driver abandoned the vehicle nearby and fled on foot as did another passenger. At this time, neither of those individuals have been found.  Lendvay says several officers involved in different portions of this incident were wearing body cameras. That video is still in the process of being collected and will be reviewed.  At this time, police say it's not clear if the suspect fired any shots or what exactly occurred during the interaction with the officer.  The sheriff's office plans to release further information on this shooting on Saturday. WATCH FULL BRIEFING FROM JACKSONVILLE SHERIFF’S OFFICE:
  • Gas prices are down across the country right now, which is good news if you plan on driving to visit friends or family for Thanksgiving. Depending on which way you are going, you might want to fill up before you leave, says Patrick DeHaan, Head of Gas and Petroleum Analysis at Gas Buddy.  'Generally, if you are heading out of the state, wait until you cross out of Florida to fill up,' he says.  But if you are heading south to places like Miami or the Florida Keys, you'll want to get your gas before you get too far south, because that's where the prices are the highest.  Although prices are down right now across Florida, states like Georgia, South Carolina and Alabama are generally going to be cheaper to top off your tank, DeHaan says.  GasBuddy.com is a website with a free app that directs you to the most affordable gas stations in your area. But DeHaan says as a general rule in the Southeast, the farther south you go the higher the gas prices get.  DeHaan says in Georgia into the Carolinas it can be anywhere from 10 to 15 cents cheaper per gallon than Florida. Gas Buddy can help you find the cheapest prices no matter where you go.
  • A Middleburg man has been found guilty of aggravated battery with a deadly weapon and leaving the scene of a crash involving injury, after an incident involving his ex-girlfriend. The State Attorney's Office says Larry Jamison now faces a maximum of 15 years in Florida State Prison, after they say surveillance video showed the entire incident.  According to investigators, Jamison drove his car into his ex-girlfriend as she was walking to church back in February. Investigators say just after hitting her, he got out of his car and yelled at her, and then drove off.  He was then later found by police in the church and acting as if the incident hadn't happened.   Jamison's sentencing hearing has been set for the week of December 3rd.
  • A former Alabama nurse accused of poisoning her private investigator husband had a preliminary hearing Thursday, at which time the shocking details of the crime were revealed for the first time. Marjorie Nicole “Nikki” Cappello, 32, of Huntsville, is charged with murder in the September death of her husband, New York native Jim Cappello Jr. AL.com reported that Jim Cappello, who was reported missing by his wife, was found dead at the couple’s south Huntsville home Sept. 22.  The registered nurse surrendered her license six days later, Alabama Board of Nursing records show.  Nikki Cappello, who jail records show is out on $100,000 bond, waived her right to appear at the preliminary hearing, but members of Jim Cappello’s family were in the courtroom as prosecutors and investigators laid out their case.  >> Read more trending news “Honestly, the family gets a lot of respect from me,” Assistant Madison County District Attorney Tim Douthit told WAFF 48 News. “I don't know if I would be able to sit there and listen to all of that and keep a straight face the way that they did. The evidence that came out today was pretty clear and horrendous.” Lead investigator Mike DeNoon testified Thursday that the investigation showed Jim Cappello, 37, had become suspicious that his wife was abusing narcotics. According to WAFF, he had begun gathering evidence against her, so he could file for divorce and obtain custody of their 4-year-old daughter, Ryleigh. According to his LinkedIn profile, Jim Cappello worked for Posey Investigations for several years before opening his own business, Cappello Investigative Agency, in 2012. DeNoon testified that Nikki Cappello reported her husband missing Sept. 21. The detective said that Jim Cappello’s co-workers had become concerned because he had not shown up for work. When they went to the couple’s home, however, Nikki Cappello would not let them inside, DeNoon said. Jim Cappello’s car was parked outside the house. According to WAFF, DeNoon testified that Nikki Cappello called a friend, Crystal Anderson, the following day and admitted she had killed her husband with insulin. Anderson told investigators that her friend asked her to come and help her get rid of the body. DeNoon said that Nikki Cappello put Anderson on hold for a few moments before returning to the line and telling her not to worry, that another friend was on the way to help her.  A concerned Anderson called police, WAFF reported. Police officials are trying to determine who the other friend was, the news station said.   A foul odor and a freshly dug grave Patrol officers were dispatched to the Cappello home, where one officer went to the front door and a second went around back, WAFF said. DeNoon testified that the officer at the front door smelled the odor of a dead body when Nikki Cappello answered the door. The officer around back found what appeared to be a freshly dug grave, DeNoon testified. The officers detained Nikki Cappello on the front porch and called detectives in.  WAFF reported that DeNoon, who was one of the investigators called to the scene, testified he also smelled the odor of human decomposition when he arrived. He said he asked a visibly nervous Nikki Cappello for permission to search her home. She gave permission for the investigators to search everywhere but the garage, the news station reported. DeNoon said Nikki Cappello was taken to the police station for questioning and he obtained a search warrant for the entire property. Jim Cappello’s body was found sprawled on a tarp on the garage floor, his feet on the floorboard of a car as though someone had tried to move him into the vehicle.  DeNoon told the court that the defendant acted as though nothing was wrong when she was told about the discovery, according to WAFF.  “You know I went inside. You know I found him, right?” DeNoon testified that he asked her.  “Yes, I knew he was there,” Nikki Cappello allegedly responded.  Though Jim Cappello’s final autopsy report is pending, the medical examiner told DeNoon the private detective was poisoned using insulin, WAFF reported.  DeNoon told the court that investigators went to the hospital where Nikki Cappello was a charge nurse and spoke to her co-workers, who said she often talked about her problems with her husband and said she would only be rid of him if he were dead, the news station said.  Hospital workers who looked through their medication supply found that some insulin was missing, WAFF reported. DeNoon said Nikki Cappello told him she’d accidentally brought a bottle of the diabetes drug home with her.  Jim Cappello apparently found the bottle and took a photo of it before texting the photo to a friend, WAFF said. At the time, he appeared not to know what the drug was.  Madison County District Judge Claude Hundley III ordered that the murder case go before a grand jury.  ‘Please make today like your last’ Jim Cappello’s obituary described him as an asset in multiple facets of his life, especially to the legal community. “He was an avid car enthusiast, passionate about helping people and providing for his family (was a) priority,” the obituary read. “Jim was a well-known proud father who cherished every smile and laugh from his baby girl.” Jim Cappello’s father and sister sat through Thursday’s testimony. Afterward, they told WAFF they felt it was important to be there, even though they had to come from out of state.  “It was pretty intense but I'm glad it’s going to move on,” Jim Cappello Sr. told the news station. 'We want to be part of the whole thing. He didn’t deserve this, but he deserves justice. He’s my son and I miss him.” The younger Jim Cappello’s sister, Jamie Weast, said she’s hopeful the family can get some closure through the legal process.  “He’s shining down on us right now. He’s with us every step of the way,” she said. “We’re doing everything that we're capable of every day to remember and honor him.” The family started a Facebook page, Legacy of James Cappello, for relatives and friends to share memories of him so Ryleigh, who is being cared for by the Cappello family, will remember her doting father. Many friends shared memories addressed directly to the little girl. “Your dad worked at McDonald’s during high school,” one man wrote. “Happy Meals included a Beany (sic) Baby doll. He used to complain about being surrounded by these furry toys. “Yet he fell in love with them when you came along. You were his hero. With or without fries.” Weast posted a text message her brother sent her on Mother’s Day, in which he said a friend’s mother had died and he was helping the friend out. He told her he was thinking of the people in his life and things happening to them. “So please make today like your last,” he wrote, according to Weast. “We don’t know. Enjoy it. And have everyone around you enjoy it. Love you so much. Can’t handle the thought of you not there.”  

The Latest News Videos