ON AIR NOW

LISTEN NOW

Weather

cloudy-day
75°
Mostly Cloudy
H 92° L 76°
  • cloudy-day
    75°
    Current Conditions
    Mostly Cloudy. H 92° L 76°
  • cloudy-day
    89°
    Afternoon
    Mostly Cloudy. H 92° L 76°
  • partly-cloudy-tstorms-day
    83°
    Evening
    Sct Thunderstorms. H 92° L 76°
LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

The latest top stories

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

The latest traffic report

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

The latest forecast

00:00 | 00:00

Int'l Women's Day: Protests, a strike, a Russian's apology

A 24-hour strike by millions of Spanish women. A crackdown in France on companies violating gender-equal pay policies. In Russia, a candid apology from a powerful legislator to women he sexually harassed.

Many of the International Women's Day events on Thursday powerfully echoed the #MeToo movement that has mobilized women against sexual violence and workplace harassment.

Demonstrators filled the streets in several Asian cities, including Manila, Seoul and New Delhi. Clad in pink and purple shirts, the activists in Manila lambasted Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte, calling him among the worst violators of women's rights in Asia. Human rights groups have condemned Duterte's sexist remarks, including a suggestion that troops shoot female communist rebels in the genitals.

In Pakistan's largest city, Karachi, a throng of activists was joined by a victim of one of the acid attacks frequently perpetrated in the country by embittered men. Black glasses covered part of her badly burned face.

Hundreds of women gathered in Afghanistan's capital, Kabul, to commemorate the occasion and urge more progress on women's political rights, education and safety. During Taliban rule, many women would have been afraid to leave their homes.

In Spain, major unions estimated that 5.3 million people joined the strike, which targeted gender violence and unequal pay. The day culminated with street protests in scores of cities. The theme was "If we stop, the world stops."

Social services worker Teresa Sonsur, protesting in Madrid, said she wanted to end workplace discrimination at her agency.

"The women are doing all the hard work, dealing with the customers, but in the positions of management it is always men," the 38-year-old woman said.

French companies that treat women unequally may soon face new pressure and penalties. President Emmanuel Macron says his government is going to name and shame such companies. He predicted positive changes "because no one wants to be the worst student in the class."

Another government initiative would fine companies with more than 50 employees if there is an "unjustified" gender wage gap.

The left-leaning French daily Liberation said that for one day only, men would have to pay 50 cents more than women for the newspaper, a reminder that women in France, on average, are paid 25 percent less than men.

In a striking development in Russia, the head of Parliament's foreign affairs committee apologized after being accused of sexual harassment by several female journalists. Noting it was International Women's Day, Leonid Slutsky said on Facebook, "I am using the occasion to ask forgiveness from those of you whom I freely or involuntarily caused suffering."

The apology came after demonstrators, including opposition presidential candidate Ksenia Sobchak, picketed outside Parliament, demanding Slutsky's resignation.

In Italy, actress Asia Argento, who helped sparked the #MeToo campaign last year, said she is launching a new movement, #WeToo, to unite women against a power imbalance favoring men.

Argento told Radio 24 that her aim is "to finally change the patriarchal system so rooted in our culture, not just in Italy."

Argento helped embolden other women to report sexual assault and harassment when she accused Hollywood mogul Harvey Weinstein of rape in an expose by The New Yorker. She faced a backlash in Italy, with critics questioning why she waited 20 years to come forward.

German Chancellor Angela Merkel, one of the world's most powerful women, said in a video message that the quest for greater gender equality in Germany and worldwide must continue.

"Many women before us have made sacrifices and fought persistently so that women would have more rights," she said. "But there's still a lot to do."

In Rome, Catholic women challenged Pope Francis to give women a greater voice in church affairs. Former Irish President Mary McAleese, an advocate for women's ordination and gay rights, accused the church's all-male leadership of refusing to change women's second-class status.

"The Catholic Church has long since been a primary global carrier of the toxic virus of misogyny," McAleese said.

In Uganda, where domestic violence is common and often goes unreported, Ugandan President Yoweri Museveni urged men to stop abusing their wives.

"If you want to fight, why don't you look for a fellow man and fight?" said Museveni, calling domestic abusers cowards.

At a star-studded event at the United Nations, U.N. Secretary-General Antonio Guterres called on men to join in making gender equality "a reality for all."

"This is what women and girls want. And that is what I want," he said. "It is what every sensible man and boy should want."

International Women's Day, created over a century ago by the socialist and labor movements, traditionally has been a higher-profile occasion abroad than in the United States, where women's rights activists have been energized over the past 14 months by huge protest marches and the emergence of the #MeToo movement.

Nonetheless, several U.S. companies, including McDonald's, Kroger and Old Navy, made gestures in recognition of the day, and the White House announced that first lady Melania Trump would present State Department courage awards to women from around the world at a March 21 ceremony.

___

Associated Press reporters around the world contributed to this report.

Read More
VIEW COMMENTS

There are no comments yet. Be the first to post your thoughts. or Register.

The Latest News Headlines

  • Former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee was among the passengers on board an American Airlines plane that was quarantined in Nashville early Thursday. That plane has since “been cleared” and the passengers allowed to leave, according to WZTV. Here are the latest updates: Update 8:40 a.m. EDT Aug. 16: Nashville International Airport spokesperson Shannon Sumrall said in a statement released to The Tennessean that passengers were held Thursday morning on American Airlines Flight 1289 as a precaution because of a passenger’s recent illness. Sumrall told the newspaper that a physician “medically cleared” the passenger ahead of the flight, but that the passenger did not have paperwork to confirm his or her health. “(The passenger) was talking bout the recent illness and other passengers on board became worried of exposure,” Sumrall told The Tennessean. “For safety, passengers were held by BNA (Nashville International Airport) Police until contact was made with the physician to confirm clearance, which it was.” Officials did not identify the illness. Update 7:52 a.m. EDT Aug. 16: The American Airlines passenger who appeared to be ill “has been cleared,” WZTV reports. The passengers are now off the plane, the station said. Original report: Former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee is on board an American Airlines plane that has been quarantined in Nashville, WZTV reports. Flight 1289, which traveled from Los Angeles to Nashville overnight, was detained at Nashville International Airport after a passenger appeared to be sick, an American Airlines spokeswoman told the news station. >> Read more trending news  Huckabee tweeted about the incident early Thursday. “5 hr red eye flight on @AmericanAir Nashville from LA. On ground for 40 min and now told someone on board is sick & we are being towed to other gate and quarantined until all checked out. Can’t get up to go to bathroom or get off plane. It’s the Russians! I just know it!” he wrote just after 6:30 a.m. EDT Thursday. “1 hr after landing got to far away gate where @AmericanAir will hopefully get us off this plane! Medical [personnel] at gate. Hope it’s not because I got that straw in CA,” he added. According to WZTV, “the plane was taken to a remote portion of the airport where emergency personnel were waiting for the plane.” Those on board were instructed to stay put as a Vanderbilt Hospital doctor examined the patient. Read more here.
  • A judge sentenced a Georgia man to 15 years in prison for shooting an off-duty police officer, but the man served barely one year in prison before he was released – by mistake. >> Watch the news report here A representative of the DeKalb County District Attorney’s Office told WSB-TV investigative reporter Mark Winne that last week, the state Department of Community Supervision notified the office that Jermarcus Jordan was not in prison, where he was supposed to be. This week, the DeKalb County Sheriff's Office arrested Jordan on new charges of aggravated assault and cruelty to children after he had been out of prison for two years. Chris Smith is the officer who was shot by Jordan. He told Winne that he's no longer a police officer and there are too many holes in the system of which he was once a part. “It shows that there are a lot of loopholes and different things that really just need to be fixed,” Smith said. Smith said he was an Atlanta police officer working an extra job in uniform at an apartment complex when a gunman cut loose in 2013 with a shotgun as Smith sat in his pickup truck. >> Baby found dead in car after man flees traffic stop, police say “I was shot in the head, a birdshot, and I was shot in my right calf with buckshot. Had it been reversed, I would have been dead on the scene,” Smith told Winne. “I still have six pellets in my head, anywhere from my hairline back.” Documents and other information suggest the following timeline: On Jan. 14, 2015, a judge sentenced Jordan to 25 years in prison, with 15 years to serve. That same day, a probation revocation order was filed against Jordan, involving an old robbery case against him. The sentence for that case expired on May 13, 2016. A judge this week said it appeared to him that Jordan was released by the Department of Corrections in error on May 13, 2016 -- long before he had served 15 years for the attack on Smith. “I wish I had an answer for how that happened,” Smith said. Joan Heath, with the Georgia Department of Corrections, said the department did not release Jordan in error and that there was a problem with the documentation the department received from the DeKalb County Clerk of Superior Court’s Office regarding the sentence for the attack on Smith. >> Read more trending news  The documentation was returned, but the Department of Corrections said it never received the corrected paperwork needed to legally hold Jordan past May 2016. DeKalb County Superior Court Clerk Debra DeBerry told Winne that her office sent everything it was supposed to send. Heath said that, because of other, similar paperwork issues with clerk's offices, last year the department initiated new follow-up procedures as an additional safeguard. DeBerry said that a 2015 document Winne found in the records indicates a probation worker told the Department of Corrections she would take care of the problem. A representative for the Department of Community Supervision said probation is under that department now, but wasn’t in 2015, so the department can’t comment on this case.
  • Troopers with the Florida Highway Patrol are investigating a hit and run that happened Wednesday evening on I-295 at Roosevelt Boulevard.  According to the crash report, the driver of a white SUV was in the right lane when it hit a woman who was driving a BMW as she was slowing down behind a Toyota Highlander who had come to a complete stop due to traffic. After being rear-ended, the BMW then hit the back of the Highlander.  The driver of the SUV took off before first responders were able to get to the crash. Troopers were unable to provide a complete description of the SUV. FHP is not sure which state the SUV’s tag is from, but they do know the first two letters are “PG.”  Two people were injured in the crash, the driver of the BMW and the driver of the Toyota Highlander.  The Toyota also had to small children inside, but they were not hurt. 
  • A fight that broke out following an early morning crash on a California interstate ended with both drivers dead, according to state troopers.  California Highway Patrol officials told the Sacramento Bee that a call came in shortly before 4 a.m. reporting a crash on Interstate 5 in the Natomas community, just north of Sacramento. The drivers, both men, stopped their vehicles in the area of Del Paso Road, got out and began to fight.  One driver struck the other with a blunt force object, killing him, the Bee reported.  “It escalated from a traffic collision to a fight to a homicide,” Mike Zerfas, spokesman for the Highway Patrol, told the Bee.  The still-living driver began walking north on the freeway -- at which point he was struck and killed by a passing motorist, Zerfas said. Both men were pronounced dead at the scene. The freeway was closed for more than eight hours as detectives investigated the crime scene.  >> Read more trending news A witness told CBS Sacramento that the blunt object used in the homicide appeared to be a baseball bat. The woman, who asked to remain anonymous, said she was driving to work Sunday morning when she came upon the scene.  “I look over to my right and there’s a body in the middle lane,” the woman told the television station. “At that point, I panicked and was trying to protect the body with my car so the other vehicles wouldn’t run him over.” The woman said the man with the bat was hitting windows on passing vehicles as the other man lay on the roadway. Afraid, she drove off, she said.  Zerfas told KXTL-TV in Sacramento that fights between angry motorists are a common occurrence, but not in the way Sunday’s fight went down.  “Fights on the freeway between angry motorists, whether it’s the result of a traffic collision or some sort of road rage-type incident, occur quite often,” Zerfas said. “Usually not in the middle of the lanes like it happened here.” A death in such a situation is rare, much less two deaths.  The motorist who hit the homicide suspect remained at the scene and cooperated with investigators, the news station reported. It was not yet known if any charges would be filed against that driver. 
  • Political consultant Paul Manafort led a professional life that put him in rich and powerful circles. He worked for four of the last five Republican presidents and made his money by making connections.  But as Manafort’s fortunes grew, so did federal prosecutors’ curiosity about his work with politicians at home and abroad. Now Manafort, 69, is facing the possibility that he will live out his life behind prison bars.  In October 2017, Manafort surrendered at the FBI field office in Washington, D.C. after being indicted on 12 counts by a grand jury in special counsel Robert Mueller’s probe of Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election. Manafort went on trial in August 2018 on charges of tax and bank fraud and tax evasion, and faces a second trial in the fall on charges of money laundering and failing to register as a foreign agent while he lobbied for the government of Ukraine. While the indictment came out of the special counsel’s investigation, none of the charges against Manafort directly involve President Trump. Manafort served as Trump’s campaign chairman for a short time during the summer of 2016. Here is what we know about Paul Manafort: Manafort was born in 1949. He grew up in Connecticut. He earned a law degree from Georgetown University. Manafort worked for former Presidents Ronald Reagan and George H. W. Bush. He was the chairman of Donald Trump’s campaign but resigned in August 2016 after revelations surfaced about his work on behalf of former Ukrainian President Viktor Yanukovych. Yanukovych was a supporter of Russian President Vladimir Putin.  According to The Associated Press, Manafort “helped a pro-Russian governing party in Ukraine secretly route at least $2.2 million in payments to two prominent Washington lobbying firms in 2012, and did so in a way that effectively obscured the foreign political party's efforts to influence U.S. policy.” All U.S. lobbyists must declare publicly if they represent any foreign leaders or political parties.  The New York Times reported that Manafort spoke to Russian intelligence officials last year via telephone calls that were monitored by U.S. intelligence agencies. Manafort has denied that he spoke with the Russians.  Manafort has also been linked to handwritten ledgers that list cash payments of $12.7 million in Manafort’s name.  According to Politico, legal complaints filed by representatives of Russian billionaire Oleg Deripaska in the Cayman Islands in 2014 claimed Deripaska gave Manafort $19 million to invest in a Ukrainian TV company. After the venture failed, Manafort took the money, the complaint claims, and did not pay Deripaska back.  Trump hired Manafort's lobbying firm to help the Trump Organization.  CNN reported that federal investigators wiretapped Manafort both before and after the 2016 election. Federal investigators executed a “no-knock warrant” at Manafort's home in northern Virginia on July 26, 2017. Manafort had met with the Senate intelligence committee the day before. 

The Latest News Videos