ON AIR NOW

LISTEN NOW

Weather

cloudy-day
58°
Clear
H 62° L 42°
  • cloudy-day
    58°
    Current Conditions
    Clear. H 62° L 42°
  • clear-night
    54°
    Evening
    Clear. H 62° L 42°
  • clear-night
    43°
    Morning
    Clear. H 67° L 48°
LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

The latest top stories

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

The latest traffic report

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

The latest forecast

00:00 | 00:00

Entertainment
To ovations, Hamilton's star reprises role in Puerto Rico
Close

To ovations, Hamilton's star reprises role in Puerto Rico

To ovations, Hamilton's star reprises role in Puerto Rico
Photo Credit: AP Photo/Carlos Giusti
Lin-Manuel Miranda, composer and creator of the award-winning Broadway musical, Hamilton, receives a standing ovation with tears at the ending of the play's premiere held at the Santurce Fine Arts Center, in San Juan, Puerto Rico, Friday, Jan. 11, 2019. The musical is set to run for two weeks and will raise money for local arts programs. (AP Photo/Carlos Giusti)

To ovations, Hamilton's star reprises role in Puerto Rico

Lin-Manuel Miranda reprised his lead role in the hit musical "Hamilton" to start a two-week run in Puerto Rico expected to raise millions of dollars for artists and cultural groups struggling in the wake of Hurricane Maria.

The audience giggled, hooted, clapped and tapped their feet throughout Friday's night's performance as Miranda took the stage for the first time since his last appearance in the Broadway version in July 2016, when he played the role of U.S. founding father Alexander Hamilton.

"I have never felt anything like that," he said of the crowd's energy, adding that singing the song "Hurricane" was a challenge. "It was very hard to sing that here in Puerto Rico because you know better than I what it is to survive a hurricane. I feel like I'm going back to Maria a little bit every time I sing it."

After the two-hour show, Miranda spoke with reporters, who peppered him with questions including how the White House was exploring diverting money for border wall construction from a range of accounts, including using some of the $13.9 billion allocated to the Army Corps of Engineers after last year's deadly hurricanes and floods.

"I think that's absolutely monstrous," Miranda said as he apologized that he didn't have further comment. "It's the first time I'm hearing that. I've been a little busy."

It's the first time in nine years that Miranda has performed in Puerto Rico. Opening night drew more than 1,000 people who bought tickets ranging from $10 to $5,000.

Among the attendees was Ron Chernow, the Pulitzer Prize winner whose biography of Alexander Hamilton inspired the musical.

He told The Associated Press that it was the most extraordinary Miranda performance he has seen.

"There was an extra passion and pain and sadness and beauty that he brought to his character," Chernow said. "This was no ordinary performance tonight."

The crowd gave Miranda a standing ovation before the show even started, and during the curtain call he wiped away tears and wrapped himself in a large Puerto Rican flag as he briefly addressed the crowd in Spanish and English.

During the show's intermission, accountant Zoraida Alvira sat absorbed as she read the three-page synopsis since she struggles a bit with English. It was the first time she had seen a musical and was transfixed.

"Here in Puerto Rico we are not too exposed to theater, let alone musicals," she said as she praised the performance. "I didn't move, and I'm a fidgety person."

Alvira, like several other Puerto Ricans who attended opening night, snapped up her ticket thanks to a lottery launched by "Hamilton" organizers who are selling 275 tickets for every performance at $10 each. Others in the audience on Friday included musician Questlove and TV producer Shonda Rhimes.

Among those expected to attend the show in upcoming days are several federal lawmakers visiting the U.S. territory for the weekend to learn more about reconstruction efforts following Hurricane Maria, which caused more than $100 billion in damage when it hit on Sept. 20, 2017.

Even people who didn't have tickets showed up at the venue.

"This is a very important moment for Puerto Rico right now," said Vivian Rodriguez, a student who lives in Puerto Rico but is from New York. She noted that Friday is Hamilton's birthday, and she said Puerto Rico has suffered from what she described as its "colonial" status.

"Hamilton" was initially going to be staged at the University of Puerto Rico from Jan. 8 to 27, but producers announced in December that it was moving to the Centro de Bellas Artes Luis A. Ferre following the threat of protests by university employees upset over enrollment changes at the island's largest public university.

The change forced some people on the U.S. mainland to forego their Hamilton tickets because they were unable or could not afford to change their airline tickets to accommodate the show's new dates. Others were upset when they did not hear back from the agency responsible for reassigning new dates for previously purchased tickets.

"It has been such a nightmare for me," said Myla Ruiz, who lives in the northern coastal town of Toa Baja and had gotten tickets for the original opening night.

Her husband is now unable to go because he will be on a work trip, and then she struggled to get a response from the agency selling the tickets. She is now reluctantly attending the show's last night.

"I'm originally from New York, so I'm a huge fan of Broadway," she said. "This to me is huge. There's nothing like Broadway here. When they said this was coming, it's all I've been talking about."

The show also drew the attention of Jimmy Fallon, whose "Tonight Show" will air its Jan. 15 episode from Puerto Rico with Miranda and the new touring cast.

Miranda, composer and creator of "Hamilton," won a Tony Award and Pulitzer Prize for the musical.

___

Danica Coto on Twitter: https://twitter.com/danicacoto

Read More

The Latest News Headlines

  • Three people are dead in Washington state in what investigators are calling a murder-suicide. >> Read more news stories Update 1:30 p.m. EST Jan. 16: The bodies of a couple and their adult son were found Tuesday during a welfare check at the couple’s home in Sammamish. Police said the deaths were the result of a murder-suicide, but they stopped short of saying who was responsible. >> See the latest on KIRO7.com Authorities said the victims died of gunshot wounds and that a weapon was recovered inside the house. Neighbors told KIRO-TV that the couple’s adult son lived in the home with them and that he worked at Microsfot. Friends and neighbors identified the female victim as Lorraine Ficken, 68. She was a realtor for Coldwell Banker Bain who was well-liked by n “She was the sweetest woman in the world. Just so sweet,” neighbor Jennifer Eiken said. “She would do anything for you. Anytime I would go outside we would have a conversation, you know, for a long time. Just a really nice, nice person.” Lorraine Ficken’s husband, 72-year-old Robert E. Ficken, was the acclaimed author of several books on the history of Washington State. Their son, 34-year-old Matt Ficken, was a longtime software engineer. “(He) was very kind of reclusive,” Eiken said. “I knew he had a great job working for Microsoft. He worked from home.” Relatives in Oregon called Sammamish police after the family's phones went unanswered for several days. The King County Sheriff’s Office said there were no recent calls to police from the home before Tuesday. “We checked the records,” Sgt. Ryan Abbott said. “(Deputies) haven’t been here any time, at least recently, that we found, and aid hadn’t been here, either.” Original report: According to Seattle's KIRO-TV, two men and a woman were found dead from gunshot wounds in a Sammamish home during a welfare check Tuesday. The King County Sheriff's Office described the woman and one of the men as 'elderly,' while the other man appeared to be in his 30s. Authorities do not believe there are any suspects outstanding.  The house is located in the 23900 block of SE 42nd Place. The Cox Media Group National Content Desk contributed to this report.
  • Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand announced Tuesday that she plans to run for president in the 2020 race for the White House. >> Read more trending news The New York Democrat said in an appearance Tuesday on “The Late Show with Stephen Colbert” that she was filing the paperwork necessary to launch an exploratory committee, which would enable her to raise money for a White House run. “I'm going to run as president of the United States because, as a young mom, I'm going to fight for other people's kids as hard as I would fight for my own,” she said Tuesday. Here are some things to know about Gillibrand: Gillibrand was born Dec. 9, 1966, in Albany, New York. She attended the Academy of Holy Names, an all-girls Catholic school in Albany, before graduating in 1984 from the Emma Willard School in Troy, New York. She graduated from Dartmouth College magna cum laude in 1988 and earned her law degree from the UCLA School of Law in 1991. She worked as an attorney for more than a decade before being elected to represented New York in the U.S. House of Representatives. She represented the state's 20th congressional district in the House until 2009. After President Barack Obama was elected to office in 2008, he chose former first lady Hillary Clinton, who at the time represent New York in the U.S. Senate, to serve as his secretary of state. Gillibrand was chosen to replace Clinton, The New York Times reported. She went on to win the seat when voters went to the polls in 2010. Gillibrand has butted heads with President Donald Trump before over allegations of sexual assault, which Trump has denied. In December 2017, Trump took to social media to call Gillibrand 'a total flunky' who 'would do anything' for campaign contributions. Gillibrand criticized the president's response, calling it 'a sexist smear.' Gillibrand lives in Brunswick, New York, with her husband of 18 years, Jonathan Gillibrand, and their sons, Theodore, 15 and Henry, 10.
  • The Jacksonville Sheriff’s Office is welcoming back K9 Officer Jeremy Mason, nearly 18 months after he was shot in the face while chasing a robbery and carjacking suspect. The shooting happened in July 2017, when police were called to 103rd Street and Old Middleburg Road, after community tips led them to believe a bank robbery suspect was in that area. Police say that suspect- since identified as 28-year-old Michael Harris- carjacked and kidnapped a woman there by getting in her car and forcing her to drive off. JSO says Mason was shot in the ensuing chase, but continued to pursue the suspect. The suspect vehicle got in a crash with a civilian car, and Mason and a detective ultimately fatally shot Harris when he refused to disarm, according to police. Mason has undergone 12 surgeries through his recovery, according to JSO. Today marks the first day back on the job for Mason and K9 Echo.
  • With a partial government shutdown showing no signs of being resolved, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi on Wednesday basically ‘disinvited’ President Donald Trump from a scheduled January 29 State of the Union Address, saying that the Secret Service and Homeland Security Department should not be tasked with such a major event while they are in a shutdown status. “Sadly, given the security concerns and unless government re-opens this week, I suggest that we work together to determine another suitable date after government has re-opened,” Pelosi wrote in a letter sent to the President on Wednesday morning. There was no immediate reaction from the White House or the President. The President gives the State of the Union at the invitation of the Congress, as the House and Senate must agree to use the House chamber for such an event. The reaction in Congress split down party lines. “It is very ironic that Democrats reference security concerns in their latest grandstanding tactic, delaying the State of the Union, but will not address the security concerns that are creating a humanitarian crisis at the border,” said Rep. Chuck Fleischmann (R-TN). “We know the state of our union,” said Rep. Jim McGovern (D-MA), as Democrats said there should be no speech from the President while the partial shutdown continues. In an interview with NBC News, House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer said the President had been “disinvited” by Pelosi.
  • Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi asked President Donald Trump on Wednesday to postpone his State of the Union address as the partial government shutdown that started Dec. 22 continues. >> Read more trending news Earlier this month, Pelosi invited Trump to deliver the annual State of the Union address on Jan. 29. However, the California Democrat said Wednesday that the Department of Homeland Security and the U.S. Secret Service -- the agency tasked with coordinating and implementing security for certain special events, including the State of the Union address -- have not been paid for 26 days. >> State of the Union 2019: What day, what time, who will be there? “Given the security concerns and unless government re-opens this week, I suggest that we work together to determine another suitable date after government has re-opened for this address or for you to consider delivering your State of the Union address in writing to the Congress on January 29th,” Pelosi said. Pelosi noted that State of the Union addresses were routinely brought to Congress in writing up until the presidency of Woodrow Wilson in 1913. >> Who is Nancy Pelosi? California Democrat elected as House speaker 'Since the start of modern budgeting in Fiscal Year 1977, a State of the Union address has never been delivered during a government shutdown,' Pelosi said. Several federal agencies have been closed and thousands of government employees have been compelled to wok without pay since last month, when lawmakers failed to approve of a budget to keep the federal government running. >> From Cox Media Group’s Jamie Dupree: Coast Guard misses paychecks as partial shutdown reaches Day 25 At issue is funding for a proposed wall along the U.S.-Mexico border that Democrats have opposed. Trump has signaled that he’ll refuse to sign any budget passed by lawmakers that fails to include $5.7 billion to build the wall.

The Latest News Videos