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Charity
2019 Careathon marks 25 years of helping local childhood cancer families 
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2019 Careathon marks 25 years of helping local childhood cancer families 

2019 Careathon marks 25 years of helping local childhood cancer families 

2019 Careathon marks 25 years of helping local childhood cancer families 

25 years ago, two mothers who were passing acquaintances joined forces when they were informed about a critical need. The Child Life Specialist in Oncology at Nemours Children’s Specialty Care, Joli Craver, was told her position was being eliminated due to budget cuts. 

For Jan Saltmarsh and Laura Ferrante, that was unacceptable.  Miss Joli, as their children called her, was a critical ally in their fight.  Both Jan and Laura’s daughters were in cancer treatment. And both girls actually looked forward to going to clinic because Miss Joli made it fun.  

Jan and Laura set out on a mission to find donors who would be willing to support the Child Life Specialist. And with that, the Child Cancer Fund was born.  25 years later, Miss Joli is still entertaining kids who are in various stages of cancer treatment, and her position will forever be in place at Nemours through a restricted fund. 

INDEPTH:  Stories, photos, videos from Careathon

In 2015, News 104.5 WOKV partnered with the Child Cancer Fund to launch the WOKV Careathon, a day-long broadcast featuring stories from local childhood cancer survivors and their families.  Every dollar raised through Careathon goes directly to local families through multiple programs offered by the Child Cancer Fund. 

BID NOW:  Careathon auction

In four short years, Careathon has raised nearly $720,000. Proceeds from Careathon have helped complete the Child Life Specialist restricted fund and have paid for financial assistance and support services offered by the Child Cancer Fund. 

Here is what a donation to the Child Cancer Fund can accomplish:
$1,000 pays for Mom or Dad’s support group for an entire year (meals, meeting space, etc.)
$750 pays for a family weekend at Camp Boggy Creek in Central Florida
$500 covers the cost of a private tutor so child don’t fall behind in school
$100 covers the cost of a gift card for groceries for a family battling pediatric cancer
$50 pays for gas to get to and from treatment, in some cases daily
$25 pays for books with information for newly diagnosed families
$10 covers snacks, toys, and diversionary supplies for the Child Life Specialist to use with a child

Volunteers from the Child Cancer Fund and Cox Media Group Jacksonville will be taking donations by phone from 5am - 6pm on Friday at 855-636-6877.  Secure donations can be made online directly to the Child Cancer Fund.  And donations can be made through the 2019 Careathon Auction, which is open until Monday, July 15th at 12pm.  

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The Latest News Headlines

  • Police in Fayetteville, North Carolina, said a man broke into a home and forced a woman and a 1-month-old boy into a car at gunpoint, according to WTVD. The home invasion and kidnapping happened Monday at 1:12 a.m. Wani Thomas broke into a home on Tangerine Drive and forced Jasmine Livermore and the baby boy, Nathaniel Thomas, into a vehicle, police said. Authorities are currently searching for all three. Thomas is considered armed and dangerous and last seen wearing a brown jacket with blue jeans. Livermore, 20, was last seen wearing gray pants, a brown shirt and a camouflage jacket. Anyone with information should call Fayetteville police at (910) 676-2597 or Cumberland County Crimestoppers at (910) 483-8477.
  • The Jacksonville Fire and Rescue Department rescued a man that was stuck in a tree in Atlantic Beach Sunday afternoon.  Video taken from the scene shows a ladder truck ascending into a large oak tree.   JFRD tweeted that the man was rescued from the tree safely and was taken to the hospital with non life-threatening injuries.
  • As many as six people were shot in a violent weekend across Jacksonville. And the common thing in all these cases, no arrests. Two of the shootings happened within a block of each other on Justina Road in Arlington.  A man was sitting at a bus stop by when he was shot by someone in a red SUV on Saturday afternoon.  Hours later a person was shot nearby and hospitalized with injuries.  Late Sunday night a man was shot in the leg on Old Kings near Edgewood. The man was taken to a local hospital with non-life-threatening injuries.  On Friday night two men in their 20's were injured in a shooting off Kings Road on the northwest side.  One man was hit in the lower leg and the other was struck in the upper torso. Both were taken to a local hospital for treatment.  JSO says the shooting happened in a Shot Spotter area, and the technology system captured three gunshots.  On Friday around 8pm, a man in his 30’s was shot and killed on Brooklyn Road in the Moncrief area. JSO detectives were trying to locate any witnesses or video surveillance. 
  • Coming off a weekend in the 70's, a strong cold front brought drenching rain on Sunday afternoon, followed by a chill. Action News Jax Meteorologist Corey Simma is tracking temps well below average.  “Mostly sunny and cold with temperatures in the 50’s all day. And then clear and cold Monday night and Tuesday morning with some patchy inland frost”, said Simma.   Tuesday looks to be the coldest day this week, as we’ll struggle to reach 50 degrees. A breeze will keep it feeling even colder. We stay below average on Wednesday, with temperatures only in the 50’s.  The mid-60’s return on Thursday, and on Friday we’ll be near 70 but with scattered showers. 
  • The Jacksonville Humane Society and Animal Care and Protective Services announced the city of Jacksonville, once again, earned the no-kill designation for the year of 2019. According to Best Friends Animal Society, “A no-kill community is a city or town in which every brick-and-mortar shelter serving and/or located within that community has reached a 90% save rate or higher and adheres to the no-kill philosophy, saving every animal who can be saved.'  According to a release put out by the JHS, the save rate for APCS was 90 percent and for JHS it was 95 percent, making a citywide save rate of 93 percent.  In total, 16,874 animals entered the JHS shelters in 2019, which is a significant decrease from 19,366 animals in 2018, according to the JHS.  According to JHS, Jacksonville earned the distinction of being the largest city in the United States to earn a no-kill status. The city has maintained that status until last year when ACPS save rate fell to 86 percent.  “Examining the data and trends in 2017 and 2018 resulted in our renewed focus on cats and kittens in 2019,” said Deisler. “As a community, we had to take a look at ourselves ask – what can we do to save those lives? We knew that with the help of our community, a return to no-kill was possible. We are excited about the results from 2019 and even more excited for 2020. Thank you, Jacksonville!”

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