ON AIR NOW

LISTEN NOW

Weather

clear-night
82°
Mostly Sunny
H 94° L 77°
  • clear-night
    82°
    Current Conditions
    Mostly Sunny. H 94° L 77°
  • clear-day
    94°
    Afternoon
    Mostly Sunny. H 94° L 77°
  • cloudy-day
    94°
    Evening
    Partly Cloudy. H 97° L 78°
LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

The latest top stories

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

The latest traffic report

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

The latest forecast

00:00 | 00:00

Stories About The Jacksonville Budget

    Through ShotSpotter, the Real Time Crime Center, the National Integrated Ballistic Information Network, and other tools, there has been an investment in Jacksonville in technology that’s intended to aid the fight against violent crime. Now, the city has launched the Crime Gun Intelligence Center, where all of that information and the human resources that can piece it together will work every day. “It sounds very simple, but that’s a big step, so we can be efficient in how we do this work,” says Jacksonville Sheriff Mike Williams. Housed in the State Attorney’s Office in Downtown and built with one-million dollars from the City, the CGIC serves as the home base for several dozen employees from JSO, the ATF, and the SAO. The space is lined with white boards and filled with cubicles and meeting rooms, including one that prominently displays a “Violent Crime Dashboard”. That dashboard is put together daily by JSO analysts and shows incidents of violent crime, people and addresses connected to that type of activity, and other factors that JSO says they want to have front of mind at all times. This CGIC concept has already rolled out in other jurisdictions around the country, and includes several full-time assigned ATF agents. ATF Acting Deputy Director Regina Lombardo says their focus is two-fold: NIBIN, which process, tracks, and finds connections among ballistic evidence; and tracing capabilities that allow them to go after the traffickers who put guns on the street, and the people who pull the trigger. She says bringing those capabilities to this CGIC will make a big impact. “The shared purpose is to reduce violent crime, the shared purpose is to make the country safe from violent crime, violent gun crime,” Lombardo says. Jacksonville already uses NIBIN, and in fact has two sets of equipment to process that evidence and get timely results. The City has also been increasingly looking at technology to aid in investigations, including ShotSpotter to alert to gunshots, and the new Real Time Crime Center, which brings together different data sources to a uniform system and provides searchable video in conjunction with that information. One of those data feeds- City surveillance- is going through a big revamp in its own right as well. BEHIND THE SCENES: Inside Jacksonville’s Real Time Crime Center Just a few weeks ago, stakeholders credited this technology in leading to the arrest of Jamin Tolliver for three different shootings, including two that were deadly. That case was again highlighted today, and when WOKV asked the impact the Center specifically had, Williams said having that collaborative environment to look at the cases allowed for them to not only find the links, but bring everything to a relatively quick resolution. “This is the repository for all of the intelligence,” says State Attorney Melissa Nelson. “The collaborative approach and just the sharing of intelligence will have a successful result.” From a prosecutor’s standpoint, Nelson says using NIBIN as a lead generator- like in the Tolliver case- means they can not only disrupt violent crime trends, but find links before those trends grow larger. She says having SAO representatives assigned to the CGIC further helps find those links to open and prior cases. It’s that broad perspective that really speaks to the core of this project, according to Williams. “A homicide investigator still has to work his homicide case, a robbery still has to work- he’s working for that victim, to solve that case. These guys [in the CGIC] will take a more overarching approach to those issues,” he says. This ribbon-cutting is something these stakeholders are excited about, but comes at a time that Jacksonville continues to see spikes in violent crime. “The City remains committed to investing in smart ways and wise ways to do everything that we can to make sure that you all have the resources that you need to make the City safe,” Jacksonville Mayor Lenny Curry said to Williams and Nelson. Williams says the Tolliver case shows that these strategies can work, but he knows people can get frustrated that there has not been a large scale drop in violent crime as these resources have come online. “We want it to work on a larger scale and more consistently, so that’s the drive now, is to have more consistent reductions, more consistent impact. We’re always a little bit reactive when it comes to violent crime, so this helps us be a little more proactive, but we still have to continue to monitor that every day. It’s really about having those consistent gains, being consistent not only in the work, but in the progress we’re making,” he says. While there’s no clear time he thinks that can be achieved, he told WOKV he thinks they can close some two dozen cases like the Tolliver one by the end of this year. And from the City government side, Curry says they will continue to look at strategies to prevent young people from ever getting in to crime in the first place, including the pending rollout of the Cure Violence program. The City also funded mini-grants for grassroots organizations trying to stop violence in their communities as part of the last budget, and a special Task Force is weighing different options for improving safety and reducing crime in the city.
  • For the second time, the contractor carrying out the reconstruction of Liberty Street and Coastline Drive on the Northbank of Downtown Jacksonville is getting for more time and money for the project- and a third extension is already in the works as well. In early 2015, a portion of Liberty Street collapsed, leading both roads to close in that immediate area. The City developed a plan to completely demolish those roads and the parking lot they surround- all of which are technically bridge structures, because they’re built on pilings over the St. Johns River- and rebuild Liberty Street and Coastline Drive, but leave the lot space open. Superior Construction Company Southeast LLC was awarded the project in 2016 for $24.7 million. About one year ago, they requested an additional $1,026,221.45, citing several factors like the need to repair the existing bulkhead wall and a decision to replace some benches, light poles, and other features. That addition also pushed the timeline for completion from July 2018 to February 2019, with the contract lasting through March 11, 2019. WOKV has now obtained a second change order, which shows the contractor is getting another $199,551.41, as well as another timeline extension. That brings the total contract award to just over $25.9 million, with project completion estimated in May 20, 2019. The contract itself lasts through mid-June. Public Works documents obtained by WOKV pointed to the likelihood that the City was planning for even more time for the project, and a City Spokesperson now confirms that a third change order has, in fact, been submitted and is currently under review. While the date has not been officially confirmed, the Public Works documents point to January 2020 as a likely new target completion date. GALLERY: Liberty Street collapses This second, approved change order is driven by three factors, according to the documents.  $20,249.49 is for replacing and enhancing the perimeter fence. The change order says the City requested that the contractor enhance the existing 10-foot chain link fence, with the City installing a barrier screen “to harmonize the surrounding areas”. An invoice shows that work includes installing 208 feet of a ten-foot high fence, installing a ten-foot gate, and modifying 180 feet of existing fence. 108 feet of existing six-foot fence is removed, as part of this change. The second and most substantial portion of the cost is $125,623.08 for trailer relocation. Because of the adjacent demolition of the old County Courthouse and implosion of the City Hall Annex, the City asked Superior Construction to move their equipment and materials to a different spot on their work site. Superior Construction says that caused a disruption in managing the existing work and required them to re-task some crews to aid in the relocation. The move not only required heavy equipment rentals, but also reconnecting surveillance, utilities, and related areas, as well as manual labor-hours. The final $53,678.84 of this change order accounts for costs incurred to handle an obstruction that was found below the River floor. Notice from Superior Construction says they found the obstruction when preparing to put down some piles, and it took several days to figure out a work-around. That plan involved using an auger to get through the obstruction, but Superior Construction says the cutter head was damaged in that process, so they had to repair it. The City additionally tells WOKV “very deteriorated existing structure collapses” are to blame for the extension. While the contract award now stands a little over $25.9 million, the City has actually budgeted $31 million for the project. WOKV asked the City for additional comment about their confidence this project will get done in the time and with the funding that’s now set, and we were told they’re not providing any additional comments. We’re working to get more insight on the third change order, which is pending review, including whether there will be any additional funding sought. Stay with WOKV for updates as we confirm more information.
  • The City of Jacksonville may soon start regulating short-term vacation rentals. City Councilman Jim Love has put forward a proposal to create a registration program and establish rules around properties being rented through sites like Airbnb. The City has previously studied the issue, including forming a Special Committee, but that group was terminated by Council President Aaron Bowman in February. Bowman’s memo on the decision says State lawmakers have taken up the issue.  Love chaired that Special Committee, and he tells WOKV that it’s possible the action being considered in Tallahassee doesn’t pass, or passes but could be “detrimental” to Jacksonville citizens, so he decided to act now by putting forward this bill.  “It is important to my constituents to get this bill right. First it must protect the rights of those living in residential neighborhoods without interrupting the enjoyment of their community and to legitimize those who want to provide short term rentals in a responsible and controlled way,” says a statement from Love to WOKV.  The registration program would have someone who wants to list their property as a short-term vacation rental notify the City’s Planning and Development Department. In order to get the registration, the operator would have to give basic information, show proof of insurance, provide evidence of the property passing inspection by the Fire Prevention Division, pay a fee, and- in the case of renewals- submit documentation on the number of rental nights and amount of taxes paid during the prior registration period. The registration would need to be renewed by January 31st of even numbered years, meaning every two years.  Within six months of being registered, the property operator and any Point of Contact they designate to assist with renters would have to go through the City’s Landlord Training program.  Once the registration is obtained, the person involved would then have to get a Certificate of Use for each property they’re operating. Getting that requires submitting a site map of the property that highlights the guest amenities and parking, proof of insurance, Rules of Conduct, and related areas. As defined in this bill, the Rules of Conduct would have to list noise, waste, and other City regulations along with emergency contact numbers. Those would have to be posted in the property at all times.  There are several rules specifically listed in this bill for operation of the property, including that the rentals are not for commercial or social events like weddings. The rental would be capped to two people over 16-years-old per room and three rooms per property. Children are not limited per this ordinance, but overall occupancy would be dictated by fire code. The bill also requires the property have at least one off-street parking spot available per bedroom, and that renters be notified about those limitations. The operator would further not be allowed to rent a space if it is an “accessory structure”, or something that wasn’t built or legally modified to be lived in.  While the bill doesn’t have specific restrictions on what locations the rentals can be in, there are requirements for whether there is on-site property management. If the rental is in a residential zoning district or planned use but mainly residential, the bill would require a property agent live on site through the time of the rental. If the property is in commercial or industrial zoning areas, that requirement does not exist.  Love says there are several goals to the program, like addressing concerns he has heard about noise and the disruption of what he calls the “neighborhood atmosphere”. The bill itself says the rules are designed to “protect the public health, safety and welfare of its citizens and visitors, to prevent unreasonable burdens on services and impacts on residential neighborhoods”, while also ensuring the rentals are compatible with the area.  This would also be a step toward ensuring that Jacksonville is collecting the appropriate taxes on these types of rentals.  Mid-last year, the City Council Auditor’s Office released a report that found Jacksonville was missing out on potentially hundreds of thousands of dollars annually in taxes from people who are required to self-report that they operate a rental like this and remit the appropriate county tax. Airbnb partners with some cities in Florida to directly collect local taxes through their site, which they then remit, but there is no such agreement in place with the City of Jacksonville. That means people who list on their site are responsible for directly reporting themselves to the City, and it can be difficult to ensure that’s taking place.  Love says, even with this registration system in place, it would still largely up to the property operators to self-report, although they would also be able to investigate complaints, as is done now. He says the Tax Collector would be responsible for ensuring the proper taxes are being remitted.  For the City’s share, he says that could mean hundreds of thousands of dollars, which would go toward the Tourist Development Council. A portion of the State tax also stay in Jacksonville.  Airbnb estimates that, in 2018, they collected and remitted $89.5 million in tax revenue to state and local governments in Florida. That figure is nearly double the 2017 collections. Around 40 of Florida’s counties have an agreement letting that company collect local taxes, and Airbnb says that totaled around $27 million in 2018.  The Florida Vacation Rental Management Association says rentals are already licensed and inspected by the State, and should not face any more regulation than long-term rentals. Executive Director Denis Hanks tells WOKV that they previously gave many suggestions to the City, but this doesn’t capture that. “Two bills currently being heard in the state legislative session that we are supporting passage of are HB 987 and SB 824 which seeks to control this type of rampant over reach by a city or county imposing local regulations that strip property rights from law abiding Florida property owners. We support fair regulatory licensing and inspections but we cannot support this local regulatory change,” Hanks says. He further says they believe the local concerns could be addressed through existing local ordinances dealing with noise and trash, as opposed to needing new regulations on one part of the rental market. There are many properties excluded from the registration program established in this bill, including government-owned units, healthcare licensed facilities, units rented or provided for social or healthcare purposes, hotels, motels, and bed and breakfasts.  Love’s proposal is being formally introduced to the City Council on Tuesday, but faces several weeks of vetting before getting a final vote.
  • Protecting against people who intentionally or accidentally drive in to large crowds, Jacksonville’s Emergency Preparedness Division is the first entity in Florida to use anti-vehicle barriers at large events. After launching their first set of the barriers last year, they’re now looking to triple their current capabilities. Emergency Preparedness Division Assistant Chief Todd Smith says they first saw the barriers while at the National Hurricane Conference in New Orleans. They immediately started researching the system and then asked the State for funds. “We recognized that we needed to address a gap, and a gap- for us- is any time there’s not the right equipment or the right training to address the issue. And so the issue here was- whether it was intentional or accidental- impacts to public gatherings from vehicles,” Smith says. The Division got $79,000 in Department of Homeland Security grant funds through the state last year to pilot anti-vehicle barriers, as the first organization in Florida to try them out. Smith says they were deployed about 30 times in the first 100 days alone, and they can cover events like Jags games at TIAA Bank Field, festivals- from Five Points to the Beaches- and the recent NCAA action at the VyStar Veterans Memorial Arena. The Division went back to the State with their early positive results, to ask for more support. Now, $160,000 in grant funding is pending approval by the Jacksonville City Council, which would let the Division triple their existing capabilities. “Ensure that public gatherings are safer,” says Jacksonville Emergency Preparedness Division Director Steven Woodard. Bill documents filed with the Council show the barriers are intended to “address the new and emerging threat posed by terrorists using vehicles to conduct attacks”. Woodard points to cases across the US and in other countries where people have intentionally driven in to large crowds, or even accidentally because of impairment or other factors. These barriers are set up at strategic points around large gatherings, in an effort to prevent that from happening. Smith says this system is relatively new to the US, but has been tested at embassies overseas. The appeal, he says, is that while each barrier weighs around 750 pounds, they can be set up and moved by just one person. They come in a motorized trailer that facilitates loading and unloading, and then a specialized tool helps move the barrier itself. 19 people at the Emergency Preparedness Division have gone through the training needed to safely set up the barriers, meaning they have a lot of flexibility in using the system. “Can be placed in advance, but is rapidly deployable and easily movable, so it doesn’t impeded emergency traffic,” Smith says. The barriers are designed to be non-lethal- if a vehicle makes impact, one side of the barrier digs in and the other lifts up, essentially raising the front of the car and stopping it. The barrier is intended to work on any terrain, and Smith says it is durable enough to immediately be put back in to use, even if it is hit by a vehicle. While they’re intended for use at pre-planned events, Smith says the flexibility of the system allows them to quickly deploy if they believe an incident has surfaced where the barriers would be useful, or move the barriers if the size, scale, and location of an event changes. The grant funding entirely covers the cost of the barriers and trailers with no City funding match, and the barriers themselves have a lifetime guarantee. The City will have to cover the cost of any future maintenance needs of the trailer. While the Division was the first in Florida to use these, Smith says many other entities- from the Port of Tampa to Disney- are now exploring them. And Jacksonville could look to further expand as well, as the community grows. “Certainly, to protect large areas, you would need more of these. We’re really focusing on places where crowds are concentrated, and making sure the public is safe,” Woodard says. Woodard says this is just one of many elements they deploy, and they’re constantly working with JSO, JFRD, facility management partners, and others to ensure you’re safe at these big events. He says they have not had any incidents requiring protection from the barriers, but it’s a good tool and service he’s happy they can provide.
  • Ending a lengthy legal dispute and aiming to redevelop one of the most prominent features of Downtown Jacksonville’s Riverfront, the City is officially taking over complete ownership of the Jacksonville Landing. And that means the Landing itself is going to soon come down. “I agree it’s iconic. I was here when it was built, and I miss the kind of vibrancy and excitement that the Landing brought to Jacksonville once upon a time. But, that’s kind of history. That isn’t where we are today, and it’s not going to regain that stature by us wishing that it would. So, it’s time to move on, take the next step, and replace it with Jacksonville’s future, as opposed to kind of wishful thinking about Jacksonville’s past,” says Councilwoman Lori Boyer. In a 15-1 vote, the City Council has approved an overall $18 million package. Councilwoman Anna Lopez Brosche was the sole “no” vote, while Councilmen Garrett Dennis, Matt Schellenberg, and Samuel Newby were not present for the vote. $15 million is a payment to Jacksonville Landing Investments to end the long-term lease they have with the City. The City owns the land, but JLI owns and operates the Landing building, and that arrangement was slated to last through at least 2056. The relationship strained recently, with the Landing claiming the City was not providing the maintenance and security it was required to, and the City contending the Landing was not the first-class facility that had been promised.  The fight led to disputes over rent payments, eviction, and related areas- but that mostly comes to an end with this agreement, which is why there was support on the Council.  “This is about settling litigation that’s been hanging around for more than two years I think, and what it’s going to cost us to get out from under some risk that we have if we continue the litigation. Because the tenant- the plaintiff- has a 37-year remaining term on their lease. So this isn’t about buying a building, this is about getting ourselves out from under a lawsuit and moving forward with Plan B, and Plan B’s gotta be better than Plan A, who’s ribbon was cut in 1987,” says Councilman John Crescimbeni, who characterized the Landing as destined to not succeed. There is one remaining legal matter, dealing with a parking lot on the eastern portion of the parcel. The settlement allows the City to take ownership of the lot, despite the administrative and accounting matters that will still be addressed by a judge.  AUDIO: What you want to see happen with the Jacksonville Landing site The remaining $3 million is split equally between closing out subtenant leases and demolishing the building /restoring the site. Jacksonville Mayor Lenny Curry’s Chief of Staff Brian Hughes, who is also serving as the Interim CEO of the Downtown Investment Authority, says there are fewer than three dozen remaining businesses, and almost all are on month-to-month leases. Of those few that are not, one is in the process of being evicted, two have specific closeout terms in their leases, and one has been having “meaningful conversations” with the City, according to the Administration. The City and DIA intend to work with all of these businesses about possible relocation in other areas of Downtown. “As much as people may have had issues with Mr. Sleiman [of JLI] about one thing or another and his operation of the property, he’s a really good shopping center operator, and he’s got shopping centers all over the city. And if he felt like he couldn’t get first class tenants in this building and keep those spaces full, and we’re only at 50% occupancy, how in the world do you think the City of Jacksonville as a government entity is going to run a shopping center. I mean, that is not our job, it is not our business, and we are certainly not going to go out and find better tenants and keep it more active and safer and more vibrant than it has been right now,” Boyer says. The final share of the bill would be used to demolish the existing building and put grass on the property. Jacksonville Mayor Lenny Curry has previously put forward a plan for the property that involves public green space and two structures for development. There was an attempt by Councilman Danny Becton to put the demolition funding “below the line”, meaning the Council would have to separately approve the demolition in separate action in the future. The intent of that, according to Becton, was to address concerns he has heard about there not yet being a defined plan for what the City will do with the property in the future. He also questioned the removal of what he called an “iconic” venue, which hosts many big events through the year. “In a Downtown that is limited with public space and venues giving visitors and groups of our city somewhere to gather, we are unnecessarily eliminating this facility that is used for events like the Georgia/Florida weekend, the TaxSlayer [Gator] Bowl weekend, Christmas festivities, and many other things, to name a few. We are eliminating the only iconic venue of our city for a grassy knoll,” he says. The Administration says there is no final vision for the future of the property yet, as they intend to seek community input, but they don’t feel that any option would involve using the existing building. Council President took it further to say keeping the building would be a “maintenance nightmare” that would require constant security and surveillance. “Every working day for the last eight years, I’ve gone to work across from the Landing. I will not go there. I go there occasionally, I go there about every six months, just to see really how bad it is- how many tenants have left, what tenants are still there, what is not working. The bathrooms are horrendous, I won’t even use them. The upstairs dining area is now closed,” he says, adding that he also actively tells other people not to go. Councilman Bill Gulliford says the City likely would have given incentives to tear the building down to any future developer, so this just expedites the timeline. He further says no prior redevelopment plans have involved preserving the facility. “I’m just tickled to death to see there’s movement on the Landing. We all know that it’s been in decline for the last however many years. I don’t have any heartburn about demolishing the structure, frankly. I think any suggestion as to space not being available for events will only will only be a short term or short period before you would come up with another solution,” he says. $3.5 million of the $18 million tab is cash-on-hand, and the rest is coming through borrowed funds. The City says they will formally close the deal on the lease termination within the next 45 days. Hughes expects closing out the subtenant leases to take up to four months beyond that, and demolition could happen within six months. Beyond that, the Council has high hopes. “Let’s move forward. Let’s move Jacksonville forward, let’s move our Downtown forward. Yeah, we’ve got the City Hall [Annex] demolished, we’ve got the old Courthouse demolished, we’ll have sooner than later the Jacksonville Landing demolished, and you’re going to see a beautiful new Riverfront, with lots of activities, and not have the building that we see today,” says Councilman Tommy Hazouri. The outgoing management of the Landing is looking forward as well, announcing a “Last Bash” just hours after the Council vote. Let us know if you support the changes by weighing in on Facebook:
  • The choices on the ballot will be sparse when Duval County voters go back to the polls on May 14th, but that doesn't mean the election comes with a smaller price tag. There are five spots still undecided on the City Council and because two of them are in at-large groups, it means all 199 precincts have to open with the same level of staffing as any other election, says Mike Hogan, the supervisor of elections in Duval.  'Just about every election is going to cost between $1.2 and $1.4 million dollars, and that's excluding the occasional recount,' Hogan says. 'Recounts will cost a little more money.'  In At-Large Group 3, incumbent Democrat Tommy Hazouri and Republican Greg Rachal will be the choices. Democrat Lisa King will face Republican Terrance Freeman in At-Large Group 1.  Those are the only choices you'll see on the ballot if you live in one of the precincts without a district runoff.  In District 8, Democrat Ju’Coby Pittman and Democrat Tameka Gaines Holly are the top two contenders. In District 10, the two choices are Democrat Brenda A. Priestly Jackson and Democrat Celestine Mills. District 14 is where Republican Randy DeFoor and Democrat Sunny Gettinger will be on the ballot.  'We're still looking at the numbers, but it could be as low as 10 percent,' Hogan says of the overall turnout in the county. 'That's not good, but we have to do everything that we did in the first election.'  He says that means between 1,400 and 1,500 poll workers and beefing up his staff with extra part-time employees.  Hogan says he is considering some ideas to save money, but he's not ready to commit to any of them yet. Those cost-saving measures include limiting the number of early voting sites that are open and reducing the number of days they are. But if he decides against that, the election could cost tax payers just as much as any other time the polls are open.
  • As JEA considers several different designs and locations for a new Downtown headquarters, WOKV has learned they’re trying to build the facility without changing your rates. To do that, they may take on some big real estate sales. JEA has put together a “Real Estate Optimization Initiative”, where they have identified parcels for which they have no current or anticipated future use. According to documents from a planned presentation to the Board of Directors, four properties have already been identified and are either being appraised or have an appraisal planned. The list includes sites on Atlantic, Normandy, Talleyrand, and the existing HQ.  Those initial four are valued around $32.5 million, but JEA projects they could sell for as much as $65 million. Several other sites could follow, with a value of more than $100 million. Senior leadership envisions using that revenue to offset the cost of a new Downtown headquarters, and the documents project that would mean not having to look at customer rates to fund the facility. Off Southside and Atlantic sits the former Coggin Automotive dealership site. JEA acquired that property in 2011 to aid construction under the Total Water Management Plan, which involved a water transmission pipeline. Because that project has now been completed, JEA says they have no use for the roughly five acre property, although they would retain an easement for the underground utilities that were installed. A second site is 250 acres in the Cecil Commerce Center off Normandy Boulevard. JEA’s overall claim right now is 305 acres, but that involves an electric substation, water treatment plant, and other improvements and restrictions. JEA’s analysis has determined they can reduce their acreage, and would then be in a good position to sell a “prime commercial/industrial parcel”, according to the Board packet. In the Talleyrand area is the third property, of which JEA is considering selling 30-36 of its 48 acres. This faces up to the St. Johns River, and could therefore be attractive for industrial maritime development, according to JEA. They would retain the land that has improvements on the site- including two combustion turbine generators- and sell the rest, under the initiative. Finally, JEA has identified their current Downtown headquarters as a property to potentially sell. The Board documents note that JEA could sell and then lease the property back, until they’re prepared to move in to the new HQ. It’s expected to take more than two years to get the new building up and JEA moved in. This campus is actually three separate lots, which includes parking. The current HQ needs substantial repair, and is too large for JEA’s current needs. A September 2016 assessment- which WOKV was told is the most recent comprehensive assessment of the Tower- showed renovating the structure as it stands was at that time expected to cost between $65.3 million and $78.2 million. Problems identified with the Tower include everything from efficiencies, like the poor floor plan, to systems problems, like plumbing, electrical, and security. Just last month, parts of nine floors in the 19-story Tower experienced flooding because of several different building issues. The cost of the repairs and cleanup in that case was around $60,000. JEA’s Board of Directors has been weighing three proposals for a new Downtown HQ, and they’re expected to vote next month on which plan to move forward with. The cost of each of the proposals has not been made public, nor is it clear at this time how much of that bill the real estate sales could cover. GALLERY: JEA HQ proposal at Lot J by TIAA Bank Field GALLERY: JEA HQ proposal at Kings Avenue Station on the Southbank GALLERY: JEA HQ proposal on West Adams Street by the County Courthouse JEA says an appraisal is underway at the Atlantic site, and the other three properties have appraisals pending. While these four properties have been identified at this point, JEA says they could pursue others, including two thousand acres at the former St. Johns River Power Park, around two dozen small surplus properties, and surplus areas on existing tracts. JEA further projects they would incur operations and maintenance savings by not having to do landscaping, security, and related areas at the properties they sell. For just the four parcels identified so far, that savings is estimated around $1 million annually. The process involves first appraising the properties, and then offering them to other government agencies at appraised value, according to JEA. If there is interest, that’s where the sale would be, but if not, there would be a public bid process and formal award. There is no timeline for how long that process could take, but the Board would have to approve any sale over $500,000, and the Board and City Council would have to approve any sale under assessed value. The Board will be presented this initiative for discussion Tuesday, although they will not have to take any action at this point. Leasing or partnering in development on properties could also be considered, although the Board packet shows JEA’s leadership studied that and determined selling the sites would be the best move economically.
  • All of Jacksonville’s public libraries are now open at least six days a week, as a financial boost in the City budget takes hold. WOKV reported last year that Jacksonville Public Library received funding to expand hours at nine branch locations. That funding came through clearance to hire 13 new staff members to support the expansion.IN DEPTH: Jacksonville’s $1.2 billion budget In reviewing their schedules, peak usage times, and related areas, JPL says they were able to find efficiencies, like reducing staff overlap. Through those efficiencies, they realized they could not only add days for nine branch locations- as initially planned- but also boost hours for the four regional libraries. That expansion formally went in to effect over the weekend, meaning this is the first Monday that the Argyle, Beaches, Murray Hill, San Marco, South Mandarin, West, and Willowbranch branches are open. The Mandarin and Maxville branches added Fridays to their schedule. This means all 16 branch libraries are now open Monday and Tuesday from noon through 8PM, and Wednesday through Saturday from 10AM to 6PM. They are closed on Sundays. The four regional libraries- Highlands, Pablo Creek, Southeast, and Charles Webb Wesconnett- were already open seven days a week, but now have expanded hours. They are now open Monday through Thursday from 10AM through 9PM, Friday and Saturday from 10AM through 6PM, and Sunday from 1PM through 5PM. In addition to the expanded hours, JPL has also streamlined the hours that the facilities are open, in an attempt to make access easier for you. JPL says they have hired or are in the process of hiring most of the 13 positions they were allocated.
  • As Jacksonville continues to explore how to fight back against violent crime, WOKV is getting a closer look at one of the newest systems police believe will help not only their immediate response, but their investigation that follows. IN DEPTH: Jacksonville’s Real-Time Crime Center WOKV was the first station to take you in depth on the RTCC proposal several months ago, outlining a pilot process, which the Jacksonville Sheriff’s Office was already planning to move beyond. Sheriff Mike Williams says they have 20 cameras deployed right now and are planning for 80 more before the year is up. This year’s budget allows for four hires dedicated to the RTCC, and two of those are currently on board. “It’s more about us measuring our approach to this, taking our time, make sure we’re doing it right. We don’t want to put too much in too fast, and then have to pull back. So we’re taking our time in that,” Williams says. JSO walked WOKV and our partner Action News Jax through the system, which centers on a software called CommandCentral Aware, that serves to streamline various data streams for quick and easy use by an analyst. The analyst hears dispatch audio and can see the notes from the dispatcher. The system can be set up to flag certain types of incidents, and automatically detects other useful resources- like ShotSpotter- that may be in the area. If there are cameras in that radius, they are triggered by the system, meaning it is no longer up to people to monitor potentially hundreds of camera feeds. All of that information can help first responders and the very early investigation, and an analyst can even proactively monitor the video feeds for any suspicious circumstances. But the system is also used in the long-running work. Surveillance footage can be downloaded and put in to another RTCC program which lets the analyst overlay video from different times and search for key features. If they have some suspect attributes to search for, that could mean taking two hours worth of surveillance and processing it in minutes, as opposed to needing officers to review it manually. Williams says information like this has already helped in four or five priority cases, although he declined to say which. He says having the video can be invaluable when there is not a lot of witness testimony or there are conflicting accounts, because where they would previously have to sort through the statements and make judgement calls, they now have easily accessible and searchable video that can help point their investigation in the right direction. “It gives us some very powerful analytical tools to be able to look through video, look for- again- people on bicycles, a white van, whatever it is that we’re looking for, and really shrink that time down that we’re spending on looking at and watching video kind of roll. The system will do that for us. And, again, that puts us quicker to whatever logical conclusion we’re looking for- are we catching a bad guy quicker, are we recovering a child quicker. All those things that you can imagine, you get out of something like this,” Williams says. Analysts are also able to search historically, meaning they can go back and see surveillance from an overnight incident, when the station was unmanned. Currently, the RTCC does not operate 24-hours because of the limited staffing, but Williams says they hope to be in that posture some time next year. That also means increasing from the one current work station to four overall- one more would join the station that’s already set up at the North Florida Transportation Planning Organization, and two would be at the Police Memorial Building, which is JSO’s headquarters Downtown. As they build up those hours, they’re also looking at continuing to build out the capabilities. The plan and budget is 100 cameras this year, with the early focus being pairing cameras with ShotSpotter locations, City parks, and Downtown. Williams says they could look to add even more cameras in the future, and while data would drive the decision on where those are placed, he believes areas like the 103rd Street corridor would be on the list. Once they’re more established, Williams says they will also look at adding cameras feeds that don’t belong to JSO. Internet-based cameras have the ability to feed in to the RTCC, so Williams says they’ve already been in talks with businesses about gaining access to their surveillance feeds to use if there are incidents in that area. He says they could seek the same types of arrangements with home surveillance and City cameras as well. The City is in the process of upgrading hundreds of surveillance cameras, and the proposal that’s been put forward would ensure the new cameras can network as JSO would need. The growth within JSO’s own system requires additional funding. About $3 million has been put in to this project so far according to Jacksonville Mayor Lenny Curry, and he says he’s willing to back investing in more, if it’s shown that that’s what’s needed. He says he and Williams have not yet talked about what the budget request for the next fiscal year will be, but prevention, intervention, and enforcement are all important elements that need investment in order to better public safety. IN DEPTH: Jacksonville’s $1.2 billion budget “This is another tool that’s gunna set the foundation not only for today, success today- the Sheriff talked about some of the success today- but even bigger success in the future, as we build this out. ShotSpotter, NIBIN, the way all this integrates, this is all a collective effort to have another tool to solve the problem,” he says. And while the City is using tools like this and exploring non-policing measures like Cure Violence as well, Curry says it’s important to keep traditional means strong. “We can make these investments in manpower and technology and people and after school programs and summer programs, but individual people are still making bad decisions. And so, we can’t force them to make good decisions. All we can do is invest in the enforcement to get them off the street, and then invest in the young people to make sure they make good decisions,” Curry says. The RTCC also monitors the demands on JSO overall, through mapping of calls by incident type, tracking overall call volume, and more. Curry says he knows it can be frustrating to see violence continue in the community while everything comes together, especially spikes like last weekend, when four people were killed and five others hurt in seven separate shooting incidents. “Over the long term, you’re gunna get the results that you want. You can’t throw stuff against the wall and change a strategy and your way forward every time there’s a terrible tragic event,” he says. Williams believes that within a year and a half, they will have the camera coverage and systems in place to truly maximize on the potential of the RTCC. 
  • With the aim of streamlining the overall system and aiding investigations by the Jacksonville Sheriff’s Office, the City Council is now considering a plan to spend close to $3.5 million upgrading and replacing security cameras and related systems at City buildings. WOKV previously reported that $3 million was set aside for this as part of the annual budget process. Several departments had sought upgraded equipment, and the Administration decided to form a working group to look at the need from a more broad perspective, rather than continuing to have each department handle their own procurement. Details obtained by WOKV now show that working group has recommended 1,666 new cameras from three main vendors- Lenel, Geutebruck, and Optiview. That includes new cameras mainly at public libraries, the County Courthouse, and Tax Collector branches, as well as a few other locations and some recording and storage upgrades. The overall ask totals $3,456,857, though. The $456,857 that’s over the $3 million already set aside will come from Public Parking’s budget and will focus specifically on new cameras for the Ed Ball garage and Water Street garage, as well as a new video recording server for all Public Parking locations. IN DEPTH: Jacksonville’s $1.2 billion budget Jacksonville Mayor Lenny Curry’s Chief of Staff Brian Hughes, who led up the working group on this matter, says this recommendation reduces the number of vendors being used and involves vendors that IT employees are already familiar with. He says looking at this from a more broad perspective also let them realize some cost savings, as part of negotiating a larger deal. But the biggest impact in these upgrades could instead be on the benefit it may provide to JSO. “Making sure that, if we make these investments in technology for video surveillance, that they were systems that would integrate with JSO’s programming,” Hughes says. Currently, if JSO sees City surveillance cameras that may have captured something important to an investigation, they have to work through a process of requesting that footage and then physically obtaining it, according to Hughes. He says that’s because the current camera system uses recording and storage devices that are not network- or cloud-based. In recent months, the Jacksonville Sheriff’s Office has been setting up a “Real-Time Crime Center”, which is built around software called CommandCentral Aware, which grabs many different information feeds and streamlines them to then relay to first responders and investigators. By replacing the current cameras and recording systems with ones that are compatible with wireless networking, the new infrastructure can feed in to the CommandCentral Aware system directly, meaning video that used to take hours or more to obtain can now be accessed very quickly. IN DEPTH: What is a “Real Time Crime Center” “If, let’s say, something happened on a street, any street. If they [JSO] know a government building is there and it’s a cloud-based system that they’ve logged in to their capabilities, they can- in a much faster time- access the feed and say ‘Oh, that camera faces out on to the street that we want to see if a car drove by’, or see who was walking on the street, or driving by at the moment when an incident happened,” Hughes says. The RTCC system is able to search those video feeds and synch up various streams, in an effort to create a comprehensive look at a scene and find potential evidence and leads.  These camera replacements represent the needs that were expressed to the Administration in the lead up to the last budget cycle, but not all of the cameras and infrastructure in the City. WOKV asked if the Administration’s intent is to continue replacing this tech at their end of life, or if they will look at proactively upgrading existing tech in order to further support the RTCC. “Those decisions are obviously budget impact decisions, and we try to weigh all the priorities that are coming forth in the budget process, as we prepare for Council’s consideration. But, obviously, public safety is a number one priority for the Mayor, so wherever we can find the possibility of contributing to public safety, we will. But we have to balance that, as always, with all of the other budget priorities,” Hughes says. He says this process will help guide them in the event other City departments request security camera and system upgrades in the next budget. They are looking at several different vendors because Hughes says there are unique needs that each one can address in various departments, but the core focus is that all of the upgrades will be capable of wireless- and cloud based-networking. City Council must still approve this plan in the coming weeks, although the money that’s being used has already been earmarked for these purposes. If approved, Hughes says there will be some steps that take place in procurement, but they will look to deploy the new cameras and systems as soon as possible. The RTCC is also fed by programs like ShotSpotter, which detects the sound of gunshots and alerts police, even if there is no 911 cal that’s placed. It further integrates the National Integrated Ballistic Information Network, which compares ballistic evidence against other cases. JSO recently doubled the equipment they have to process evidence through NIBIN. While the intelligence-based technology and systems continue to expand in Jacksonville, City leaders have also tried other measures to reach in to neighborhoods to address violence, through a program awarding grants to small community organizations. JSO has also been rolling out hundreds of body cameras. Despite that, we saw a spike of violence in Jacksonville this past weekend, with at least seven shootings leaving four people dead and five others hurt. WOKV will continue to press City leadership for insight on what kind of returns these investments are getting.

The Latest News Headlines

  • It's underway all summer. The Blue Star Museums 2019 program has kicked off, allowing the nation's active-duty military personnel and their families, including National Guard and Reserve, to visit participating museums free of charge.  The 2019 program officially started on Saturday, May 18th, which is Armed Forces Day, and will run through Labor Day on Monday, September, 2nd.  Locally, military families will be able to visit the following museums free of charge:  Jacksonville  -Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens  -Mandarin Museum & Historical Society  -MOCA Jacksonville  -Ritz Theatre & LaVilla Museum  Jacksonville Beach  -Beaches Museum  St. Augustine  -Lightner Museum  -St. Augustine Lighthouse & Maritime Museum  To find museums outside of Northeast Florida, click HERE. The Blue Star Museums program is a collaboration among the National Endowment for Arts, Blue Star Families, the Department of Defense, and participating museums.
  • A judge sentenced the man who admitted to killing a Wisconsin couple last year before holding their 13-year-old daughter captive for three months to life in prison without the possibility of supervised release. >> Read more trending news Jake Thomas Patterson, 21, appeared before a Barron County judge for sentencing in the killing of James and Denise Closs and the kidnapping of their daughter, Jayme, according to the Duluth News Tribune. He pleaded guilty in March to two counts of intentional homicide for gunning down James Closs, 56, and Denise Closs, 46, in the early morning hours of Oct. 15. He also pleaded guilty to one count of kidnapping for abducting Jayme. >> Man pleads guilty to kidnapping Wisconsin teen Jayme Closs, killing her parents Update 4:30 p.m. EDT May 24: A judge sentenced Patterson to life in prison without the possibility of parole for each of the intentional homicide charges to which Patterson pleaded guilty. The judge also gave Patterson the maximum sentence -- 40 years -- for kidnapping Jayme. Update 4:20 p.m. EDT May 24: In a brief, tearful statement in court, Patterson said he “would do like, absolutely anything to take back what I did.” “I would die,” he said. “I would.” Patterson’s attorneys asked a judge to sentence him to life in prison without the possibility of parole until 2072 for the killings of James and Denise Closs. The sentencing hearing is ongoing. Update 3:30 p.m. EDT May 24: In a statement read by an attorney Friday in court, Jayme said Patterson took many things from her but that, “He can never take my spirit away.” “He thought he could make me like him, but he was wrong,” she said. “He can’t stop me from being happy and moving forward with my life. I will go on to do great things in my life, and he will not. Jake Patterson will never have any power over me.” Chris Gramstrup, an attorney representing Jayme, read the victim impact statement in court. “He stole my parents from me,” Jayme said in the statement. “He stole almost everything I loved from me. For 88 days, he tried to steal me, and he didn’t care who he hurt or who he killed to do that. He should stay locked up forever.” Prosecutors said Jayme and her mother heard Patterson shoot and kill James Closs as they huddled together in a bathtub. Denise Closs called 911 as Patterson tried to batter down the bathroom door. Once he broke down the door, he wrestled the phone from Denise Closs and ordered her to tape Jayme’s mouth, hands and feet, prosecutors said. He told authorities that he thought she was doing a bad job, so he put down his shotgun to do it himself. Once Jayme was restrained, authorities said he picked up his shotgun again and, with Jayme feet from her mother, shot Denise Closs in the head. He then dragged Jayme to his car, threw her in the trunk and drove her to his home, where she was held captive for 88 days. Through Gramstrup, Jayme said her parents “did all they could to make me happy and protect me.” “He took them away from me forever,” Jayme said. “I felt safe in my home and I love my room and all of my belongings. He took all of that too. I don’t want to even see my home or my stuff because of the memory of that night. My parents and my home were the most important things in my life.” She said that since her escape in January, “It’s too hard for me to go out in public.” “I get scared and I get anxious,” she said. Prosecutors said Jayme escaped from Patterson’s home Jan. 10 after he left her alone. Original report: Barron County Sheriff Chris Fitzgerald said members of Jayme’s family are expected to give statements at Friday’s hearing, MPR News reported. The court proceeding is expected to last several hours, according to CNN. Under Wisconsin law, Patterson will face a mandatory life sentence for each of the homicide convictions, the Duluth News Tribune reported. The main question for Friday will be whether Patterson will eventually be eligible for parole, according to the newspaper. >> Who is Jake Thomas Patterson? Suspect in Jayme Closs kidnapping identified Authorities said Patterson admitted to targeting Jayme after seeing her get on a school bus while he was driving home from work one day. He told investigators he did not know the Closses before the attack. Jayme told authorities she woke early on the morning of Oct. 15 when the family dog started barking. She woke her parents and then hid with her mother in a bathroom. Investigators said Patterson shot and killed James Closs before he found Jayme and Denise Closs in the bathroom. >> Jayme Closs kidnapping: Suspect charged in Closs murders, bail set at $5 million Jayme said Patterson killed her mother before dragging her to his car and driving her to what would turn out to be his home in Douglas County. He was arrested after Jayme escaped Jan. 10 from his home and flagged down a woman walking her dog. >> Jayme Closs to be given $25K reward after she saved herself from accused kidnapper Jayme told investigators Patterson made her hide under the bed in his bedroom for as many as 12 hours at a time without food, water or bathroom breaks. She escaped after Patterson left her alone in the home 88 days after he first abducted her. Jayme is living with her aunt and uncle, the Stevens Point Journal reported.
  • The Jacksonville Sheriff's Office is actively investigating on the Westside, after a man called 911, claiming he had just shot someone attempting to break into his home. Police say this happened on North Dover Cliff Drive in the Pilgrims Trace neighborhood.  When officers arrived, they say they found a man dead in a nearby roadway. He has not yet been identified, but he's described by JSO as a black male between 30 and 40-years-old.  The investigation is still in its early states, but JSO says it does not appear that the two knew each other. We're told the homeowner is being cooperative with investigation.  Police are asking anyone with information on what happened to come forward.
  • House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerry Nadler said he was OK on Friday after he appeared to nearly faint during a news conference in New York City. >> Read more trending news Nadler, D-N.Y., was appearing Friday at a news conference about plans to expand the city’s use of speed cameras in school zones when New York Mayor Bill de Blasio appeared to notice he looked pale, WABC-TV reported. Video from the news conference showed Nadler looking ill and weak as the mayor asked him if he wanted some water.  The New York Daily News reported that paramedics called a code blue emergency after Nadler appeared to suffer from a brief dizzy spell. He was given water and an orange and later taken by ambulance to Lenox Hill Hospital, according to the Daily News. “Appreciate everyone’s concern,” Nadler said in a statement posted later Friday on Twitter. “Was very warm in the room this morning, was obviously dehydrated and felt a bit ill. Glad to receive fluids and am feeling much better. Thank you for your thoughts.”
  • A Colorado man arrested in Utah earlier this year for threatening to “kill as many girls as (he saw)” has been sentenced to serve up to five years in prison, despite prosecutors’ recommendation that he serve probation.  Christopher Wayne Cleary, 27, of Denver, pleaded guilty to a charge of attempt to make a terroristic threat as part of a plea deal with Utah County prosecutors, according to The Deseret News. Cleary, who was arrested in Provo in January, was already on probation in Colorado on two previous convictions of stalking women, the newspaper reported.  Cleary expressed remorse over his words. “I’m just sorry for what happened,” Cleary told the court, according to the News.  Prosecutors in Utah negotiated a plea deal with Cleary for a third-degree felony charge instead of the second-degree felony with which he was initially charged, the News reported. In exchange for his plea -- which would let them secure a felony conviction -- they agreed to recommend no jail time. The plea bargain was aimed at helping Colorado authorities send Cleary to prison for violating his probation in the stalking cases, the News reported.  >> Related story: Man upset over not having girlfriend accused of mass shooting threat to girls Fourth District Judge Christine Johnson on Thursday declined to take the state up on its recommendation, citing her uncertainty of whether Cleary would serve any jail time for probation violation in Colorado, the newspaper said. “I don’t want to be in the position of guessing what Colorado is going to do,” Johnson said during Cleary’s sentencing hearing.  Cleary was arrested Jan. 19, the same day multiple women’s marches were being held in Utah and throughout the country, based on an alarming Facebook post he wrote the night before, the News said. In the post, he bemoaned his lack of romantic prospects and, like several mass shooters who have targeted women, blamed the opposite sex for his plight. “All I wanted was a girlfriend,” Cleary wrote, according to a police affidavit obtained by The Denver Post. “All I wanted was to be loved, yet no one cares about me. I’m 27 years old and I’ve never had a girlfriend before, and I’m still a virgin. This is why I’m planning on shooting up a public place soon and being the next mass shooter ‘cause I’m ready to die and all the girls the turned me down is going to make it right by killing as many girls as I see.” Another post stated, “There’s nothing more dangerous than (a) man ready to die,” the Post reported.  Cleary’s threats alarmed state and federal authorities in Colorado and neighboring Utah, where they traced his cellphone the following day. He was arrested at a McDonald’s in Provo and charged with making a terroristic threat.  Following his arrest, Cleary told investigators he was “upset and not thinking clearly” when he wrote the Facebook posts. According to the Post, he deleted the threats after other people called him and threatened him. Court records obtained by multiple newspapers paint a disturbing portrait of Cleary, who was accused of stalking and harassment by at least eight women and girls dating back at least seven years. The News reported that Cleary was also accused of threatening to bomb a grocery store in 2013 and threatened to commit a mass shooting at a mental health facility in 2016.  >> Read more trending news An 18-year-old Arvada woman called police on New Year’s Eve 2015 and reported that Cleary, with whom she’d been chatting on Facebook, began harassing her online and over the phone after she declined to go on a date with him. According to the Post, the woman told detectives he would use aliases, including one alias on Facebook named John Coleman. “I’ve been watching you,” the person claiming to be Coleman wrote to her on Facebook. “Soon here, you’ll be lying in your deathbed.” During that investigation, Arvada detectives found details of a previous criminal investigation in which Cleary told another woman who spurned his advances she should kill herself, the Post reported. He also posted her name and phone number in an online sex ad, offering her services for $20, court records show. In a prior misdemeanor harassment case from earlier in 2015, Cleary was convicted after talking a woman into posing naked for him and then posting the picture to a fake Facebook page in her name, the newspaper reported.  A harassment case from Denver found Cleary accused of writing threatening messages to a 17-year-old girl, including a message that said, “I own multipul (sic) guns. I can have u dead in a second. One day I’ma snap and kill everyone,” according to court documents. A second Denver case involved a 19-year-old woman who said she lived with Cleary in a hotel room for two weeks, during which time he choked her and urinated on her, the court documents said.  Cleary was convicted in October 2016 on two counts of stalking and harassment involving two of the three alleged victims in Arvada, the Post said. He was sentenced to two years of probation.  Cleary was arrested in yet another stalking case less than a year later. A 43-year-old Lakewood woman who had dated him called 911 Aug. 5, 2017, to report Cleary was stalking her. He was arrested outside the woman’s house. According to the Post, Cleary told investigators the woman was the only person who loved him and he was lonely without her. The woman told police she and Cleary had a sexual relationship -- contradicting Cleary’s claim earlier this year that he was a virgin. The victim told police Cleary, who began stalking her when she broke off the relationship, had called her 45 times that day, threatening her and telling her he hoped she would die.  “I am going to burn your house down,” Cleary told her, according to court records. “I am going to send people to your house to kill you.” Cleary also posted her phone number and address on Craigslist “soliciting sexual acts and rape,” according to a probable cause statement in the case. The woman said she’d received multiple phone calls from strangers due to the ad. The woman told police she lost 20 pounds and began having nightmares and anxiety attacks because of the stalking, the Post reported.  Cleary pleaded guilty to charges of felony stalking and making threats, the newspaper said. A judge in Jefferson County sentenced him last May to three years of probation.  Despite having violated his probation on the Arvada cases, he was not jailed following his guilty plea in the case involving the Lakewood woman, the Post reported. Pam Russell, a spokeswoman for the Jefferson County District Attorney’s Office, said Cleary’s mental health played a part in his sentencing in that case, as well as in his 2016 stalking conviction, which was handled in Adult Mental Health Court.  “The courts decided to let his mental health issues be a big component of his treatment,” Russell told the Post.  Cleary’s defense attorney in the most recent case, Dustin Parmley, said this week that his client’s violent words are related to his mental illness, which he was reportedly diagnosed with at age 10. Cleary told investigators he takes medication for an impulse control disorder.  Parmley said Cleary’s words have never turned to action. Investigators found no evidence that Cleary had weapons or attempted to obtain any, the Post said.  The newspaper reported that four of the criminal investigations into Cleary ended without charges filed against him.  Cleary will serve his time in Utah before being transferred to Colorado to face probation violation charges there, the News reported. An official with the Utah Board of Pardons and Parole told the paper his earliest hearing could take place as soon as September. The News said the board could potentially set a release date at that time, or members could decide to keep him in prison. Cleary could serve the entire five years of his sentence before being returned to Colorado. 

The Latest News Videos