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  • Two Atlanta police officers have been fired for using a stun gun on two college students during this weekend’s protests in Atlanta. A video of officers Mark Gardner and Ivory Streeter using the stun gun on the students as they sat in a vehicle led to action by Atlanta’s mayor and police chief. The Fulton County District Attorney Paul Howard said he’s investigating and looking at criminal charges against the officers. Still shaken, the Morehouse and Spelman students spoke for the first time Monday about what happened Saturday night. “We felt like we were going to die in that car,” said Taniyah Pilgrim, a student at Spelman College. The Atlanta Police Department provided WSB-TV with body camera video from seven different officers showing Messiah Young, a senior from Morehouse College, and Pilgrim, his girlfriend, tased and dragged from their car. “I’m sorry you guys had to even see something like that occur. It’s disgusting,” Pilgrim said Monday. Moments before they were tased, the video shows Young taking a video of the police and protesters from his car. The couple said they were not part of the protests, but were going out to eat and got stuck in the traffic. “At the end of the day, it’s a blessing that I’m alive and here to talk with you,” Young said. Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms and police Chief Ericka Shields said the videos left them no choice but to terminate officers Streeter and Gardner. “I knew that I had only one option, and that was to terminate the employees,” Shields said. WSB-TV dug into the history of the two men. Both were longtime veterans of the force and investigators in APD’s fugitive unit. Both men, according to state peace officer records, had just gone through use-of-force and de-escalation training in the last two months. Streeter completed his de-escalation training just last week. Vince Champion, Southeast regional director for the International Brotherhood of Police Officers, told WSB-TV that he thinks the officers should have been placed on leave while they were investigated. “We just don’t know the facts. Making an arrest on video as a police officer, almost all of them are going to be ugly,” Champion said. Young has a fractured arm and 20 stitches from the incident. He also spent the night in jail. The couple and their attorneys want more disciplinary action taken against the officers involved. “This is a long, long fight. This isn’t just about me. This is an entire generation that has to deal with brutality and injustice and wrongdoing for nothing because of the color of their skin,” Young said. WSB-TV remained in contact with Howard’s office throughout Monday. Howard was said to be speaking with the families, the police chief, and then will make a determination on any possible criminal charges against the officers.
  • More than 6.2 million people worldwide -- including more than 1.8 million in the United States – have been infected with the new coronavirus, and the number of deaths from the outbreak continues to rise. While efforts to contain the COVID-19 outbreak continue, states have begun to shift their focus toward reopening their economies. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is tracking cases in the U.S. here. Live updates for Tuesday, June 2, continue below: US coronavirus cases eclipse 1.8M, deaths top 105K Published 12:41 a.m. EDT June 2: The number of novel coronavirus cases in the United States climbed past 1.8 million early Tuesday across all 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, Guam and the U.S. Virgin Islands. According to a Johns Hopkins University tally, there are at least 1,811,357 confirmed U.S. cases of the virus, which have resulted in at least 105,160 deaths.  The hardest-hit states remain New York with 371,711 cases and 29,917 deaths and New Jersey with 160,918 cases and 11,723 deaths. Massachusetts, with 100,805 cases, has the third-highest number of deaths with 7,035, while Illinois has the third-highest number of cases with 121,234. Only 15 states and territories have confirmed fewer than 5,000 cases each. Six other states have now confirmed at least 53,000 novel coronavirus cases each, including: · California: 114,733 cases, resulting in 4,217 deaths · Pennsylvania: 76,646 cases, resulting in 5,567 deaths · Texas: 65,593 cases, resulting in 1,683 deaths · Michigan: 57,532 cases, resulting in 5,516 deaths · Florida: 56,830 cases, resulting in 2,460 deaths · Maryland: 53,327 cases, resulting in 2,552 deaths Meanwhile, Georgia, Virginia, Connecticut and Louisiana each has confirmed at least 40,000 cases; Ohio and Indiana each has confirmed at least 34,000 cases; North Carolina, Colorado, Minnesota, Tennessee, Washington and Arizona each has confirmed at least 20,000 cases, followed by Iowa with 19,699; Alabama and Wisconsin each has confirmed at least 18,000 cases, followed by Mississippi with 15,752; Rhode Island and Nebraska each has confirmed at least 14,000 cases, followed by Missouri with 13,724, South Carolina with 12,148 and Kentucky with 10,046; Utah, Kansas and Delaware each has confirmed at least 9,000 cases; the District of Columbia and Nevada each has confirmed at least 8,000 cases; New Mexico and Arkansas each has confirmed at least 7,000 cases, followed by Oklahoma with 6,913 and South Dakota with 5,034.. Click here to see CNN’s state-by-state breakdown.
  • Florida Governor Ron DeSantis is detailing the state's response amid protests and violent demonstrations following the death of George Floyd in Minnesota. “Florida has zero tolerance for violence, rioting and looting. George Floyd’s murder was appalling, and the Minnesota perpetrators need to be brought to justice, but this cannot be used as a pretext for violence in our Florida communities,' says DeSantis in a statement.  DeSantis says he has mobilized 700 Florida National Guard soldiers and has coordinated more than 1,300 sworn Florida Highway Patrol troopers to support local law enforcement efforts.  He says he will continue to do everything necessary to keep residents safe and has been in talks with President Trump, Vice President Mike Pence, and many others to help with the response.
  • There will be no curfew in place for Jacksonville heading into Monday night. Jacksonville Mayor Lenny Curry making the announcement on Twitter, saying it is thanks to the help of law-abiding citizens and the hard work of law enforcement.   However, he says should the need arise, the city does have the capacity to respond to any violent protests. Mayor Curry previously issued a curfew for Sunday night, amid violent protests in Jacksonville. One officer with the Jacksonville Sheriff’s Office was either stabbed or slashed in the neck, but JSO said Monday this individual has already been treated and released from the hospital.
  • Protests and demonstrations have led to violence in at least 30 cities across the United States in the aftermath of the death of George Floyd, an unarmed black man who died while in police custody in Minneapolis, Minnesota.  Floyd, 46, died after he was detained for questioning regarding a possible forgery in progress. Video of his death caught by bystanders showed a Minneapolis police officer, identified as Derek Chauvin, holding his knee to Floyd’s neck for more than five minutes as Floyd pleaded for air, sparking outrage.  As of Monday, at least 40 cities across 16 states have imposed curfews.  Live updates for Monday, June 1 continue below:  SUV hits 2 officers at Floyd protest in Buffalo, speeds off Update 11:40 p.m. EDT June 1: A vehicle plowed through a group of law enforcement officers at a George Floyd demonstration Monday night in Buffalo, injuring at least two. Video posted by a bystander shows a line of police officers, backed up by an armored personnel carrier, rushing and tackling a man who was being interviewed by a man with a TV camera about 9:30 p.m. Other officers used batons to whack at protesters, who scattered. Moments later, there was the sound of firearms discharging off camera, then officers ran as an SUV barreled through a cluster of officers, who ran. At least one appeared to go under the vehicle’s wheels. The SUV drove around an armored vehicle and sped off as more gunfire sounded. The officers were taken to Erie County Medical Center. Authorities said their condition was stable. Erie County Executive Mark Poloncarz tweeted shortly before 11 p.m. that the driver and passengers of the vehicle were believed to be in custody. Buffalo Police spokesman Michael DeGeorge said two people were struck by gunfire during Monday’s protest. It was not immediately known whether the shots came from police or others, he said. They were being treated at the same hospital. As a police helicopter flew overhead, officers in armored vehicles later fired tear gas to disperse the crowd within a few blocks of where the police were struck. Several stores in the area were broken into, and people were seen entering and leaving with goods. One woman on her front stoop said, “I’m scared,” to a person over phone. On the spot where George Floyd died, his brother urges calm Update 9:55 p.m. EDT June 1: George Floyd’s brother pleaded for peace in the streets Monday, saying destruction is “not going to bring my brother back at all.” Terrence Floyd’s emotional plea came as the United States braced for a third straight night of violence in response to Floyd’s killing a week ago. Chants of “What’s his name? George Floyd!” filled the air as a large crowd gathered at the spot where the black man who became the latest symbol of racial injustice in America lay dying as a white police officer pressed his knee into his neck. Wearing a face mask with Floyd’s image on it, his brother dropped to his knees at the storefront that has been turned into a memorial covered with flowers and signs. As he kneeled silently, many who were around him joined him on the ground. The memorial site was a space of calm compared to the devastation left in the wake of fires and violence that paralyzed the city for days last week before it spread nationwide. “I understand y’all are upset. I doubt y’all are half as upset as I am,” said Terrence Floyd, who lives in New York. “So if I’m not over here blowing up stuff, if I’m not over here messing up my community, then what are y’all doing? What are y’all doing? Y’all doing nothing. Because that’s not going to bring my brother back at all.” New York City imposes 11 p.m. curfew amid Floyd protests Update 8:45 p.m. EDT June 1: New York City imposed an 11 p.m. curfew Monday as the nation’s biggest city tried to prevent another night of destruction amid protests over George Floyd’s death. With an 11 p.m. to 5 a.m. curfew, New York is joining other cities around the country in imposing such measures after days of unrest. The limit on a city of more than 8 million people comes after months of restrictions already imposed because of the coronavirus pandemic. Mayor Bill de Blasio and Gov. Andrew Cuomo said the outbreaks of violence — which left stores ransacked, police vehicles burned — gave them no choice, even as they insisted they stood with the throngs of peaceful demonstrators who have spoken out for several days against police brutality and racial injustice. “We can’t let violence undermine the message of this moment,” de Blasio said in a statement. Cuomo blamed “people who are looking to distract and discredit” the protests and said they couldn’t be allowed to undermine public safety. The two leaders, both Democrats, also said many more police officers would be deployed Monday night. Trump threatens military force to stop violent protests Update 6:50 p.m. EDT June 1: President Donald Trump threatened to deploy United States military unless states halt violent protests. Trump said he was recommending that governors deploy the National Guard in sufficient numbers to “dominate the streets. If governors fail to take action, Trump said he will deploy the United States military and “quickly solve the problem for them.” Trump in his Rose Garden remarks said he would mobilize the U.S. military to end “lawlessness” as police fired tear gas at hundreds of protesters gathered outside the White House. Trump blamed anarchists and Antifa for fomenting unrest. Medical examiner lists Floyd’s death a homicide Update 5:45 p.m. EDT June 1: The Hennepin County Medical Examiner classified George Floyd’s death as a homicide, saying his heart stopped as police restrained him and suppressed his neck, in a widely seen video that has sparked protests across the nation. “Decedent experienced a cardiopulmonary arrest while being restrained by law enforcement officer(s),” the report read. Under “other significant conditions” it said Floyd suffered from heart disease and hypertension, and listed fentanyl intoxication and recent methamphetamine use. A Minneapolis police officer has been charged with third-degree murder in Floyd’s death, and three other officers were fired. Bystander video showed the officer, Derek Chauvin, holding his knee on Floyd’s neck despite the man’s cries that he can’t breathe until he eventually stopped moving. An autopsy commissioned for Floyd’s family found that he died of asphyxiation due to neck and back compression, the family’s attorneys said Monday. The autopsy by a doctor who also examined Eric Garner’s body found the compression cut off blood to Floyd’s brain, and that the pressure of other officers’ knees on his back made it impossible for him to breathe, attorney Ben Crump said. He called for the third-degree murder charge against Officer Derek Chauvin to be upgraded to first-degree murder and for three other officers to be charged. The family’s autopsy differs from the official autopsy as described in a criminal complaint against the officer. That autopsy included the effects of being restrained, along with underlying health issues and potential intoxicants in Floyd’s system, but also said it found nothing “to support a diagnosis of traumatic asphyxia or strangulation.” The family’s autopsy found no evidence of heart disease and concluded he had been healthy. Louisville police chief fired Update 4:50 p.m. EDT June 1: Louisville Metro Police Chief Steve Conrad has been fired according to Louisville Mayor Greg Fisher. Fischer said Monday afternoon that police officers involved with the deadly shooting early Monday morning had not turned on their body cameras. Earlier, Kentucky’s governor had called for the release of police video from the shooting that took place while police officers and National Guard soldiers were enforcing a curfew. Killed in the gunfire was barbecue operator David McAtee, whose business is next to the parking lot where the shooting occurred early Monday. Conrad said McAtee was killed while police officers and National Guard soldiers returned fire after someone in a large group fired at them first. A witness said the group had nothing to do with the protests, and was shocked to see soldiers disrupt their gathering. “Never thought I would experience that here in America,” Kris Smith said. Floyd family attorney announces planned memorial services Update 4 p.m. EDT June 1: Memorial services are planned in Minneapolis, North Carolina and Houston to remember George Floyd, the 46-year-old who died last week after video showed a Minneapolis police officer with his knee pressed to Floyd’s neck for nearly nine minutes. Attorney Ben Crump, who is representing Floyd’s family, said a memorial will be held Thursday from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. in Minneapolis. Another memorial will be held Saturday from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. in North Carolina, where Floyd was born. On Monday, June 8, a viewing will be held in Houston with Floyd’s funeral scheduled to begin in the city at 11 a.m. No underlying medical conditions contributed to Floyd’s death, doctor says Update 3:50 p.m. EDT June 1: In contradiction to preliminary autopsy results shared by authorities in charging documents filed against former Minneapolis police Officer Derek Chauvin, a doctor said Monday that results from an independent autopsy show George Floyd had no underlying medical problems that caused or contributed to his death. Dr. Michael Baden said at a news conference that the determination was made on information from Floyd’s family, who said he was in good health. “The compressive pressure of the neck and back are not seen at autopsy because the pressure has been released by the time the body comes to the medical examiner’s office,” Baden said. 'It can only be seen ... while the pressure is being applied or when, as in this instance, it is captured on video. In this instance we can see after a little bit less than four minutes that Mr. Floyd is motionless, lifeless.' Prosecutors said that body camera footage showed Floyd appeared to stop moving three minutes before Chauvin took his knee off Floyd’s neck. In video footage captured by passersby, Floyd can be heard pleading for air before going silent as onlookers demanded Chauvin get off the 46-year-old. Prosecutors said Floyd appeared to stop moving around 8:24 p.m. A minute later, officials said he appeared to stop breathing. “When he said ‘I can’t breathe,’ unfortunately many police are under the impression that if you talk, that means your breathing,” Baden said.' That is not true. I am talking and talking and talking and not breathing in front of you.' In all, prosecutors said Chauvin kept his knee on Floyd’s neck for nearly nine minutes. Doctor says evidence shows Floyd died of ‘mechanical asphyxia’ Update 3:30 p.m. EDT June 1: Dr. Allecia Wilson, director of autopsy and forensic sciences at the university of Michigan, said Monday that evidence shows that George Floyd died of mechanical asphyxia. “We acknowledge that additional medical information including toxicology and further investigation are necessary for a final report, however, the evidence is consistent with mechanical asphyxia as the cause of death and homicide as the manner of death,” she said. A preliminary autopsy mentioned by authorities in charging documents filed against former Minneapolis police Officer Derek Chauvin found “no physical findings that support a diagnosis of traumatic asphyxia or strangulation.” Authorities said Floyd had likely died from a combination of being restrained by police, underlying health conditions and 'any potential intoxicants in his system.” Independent autopsy shows George Floyd died of asphyxia from sustained forceful pressure, family attorney says Update 3:25 p.m. EDT June 1: An independent autopsy has found that George Floyd died last week of asphyxia from sustained forceful pressure, Ben Crump, the attorney representing George Floyd’s family, said Monday in a news release obtained by PBS. “Despite how painful these autopsy findings are, especially for George Floyd’s family, we think it is essential that the truth comes out about the manner and the exact manner and science as to how George Floyd was killed,” Crump said Monday at a news conference. Crump and medical professionals held a news conference Monday to discuss the autopsy results. “What you’re going to hear from these renowned pathologists is essentially: George died because he needed a breath,' Crump said. “He needed a breath of air.” George Floyd’s family to announce results of independent autopsy Update 3:05 p.m. EDT June 1: The family of George Floyd and their attorney, Ben Crump, are holding a news conference Monday to announce the results of an independent autopsy performed on the 46-year-old. Atlanta’s curfew extended for another night Update 2:30 p.m. EDT June 1: Officials in Atlanta announced Monday that a curfew enacted amid protests over the death of George Floyd will continue for another night, WSB-TV reported. Tens of thousands of people nationwide have taken to city streets to protest Floyd’s death, which happened last week after a Minneapolis police officer pinned Floyd’s neck under his knee for nearly nine minutes. Most demonstrations have been peaceful, but some have been marred by skirmishes between police and demonstrators, WSB-TV reported. Monday’s curfew will begin Monday at 9 p.m. and last until sunrise, according to WSB-TV. Florida governor activates National Guard Update 2:20 p.m. EDT June 1: Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis has activated the Florida National Guard after some protests over the death of George Floyd turned violent over the weekend, WFTV reported. The governor’s office said the specially trained units were put on standby Saturday, according to WFTV. More protests against police brutality are expected in Florida and nationwide in the wake of Floyd’s death last week. >> Read more on WFTV.com George Floyd’s brother urges people to vote during peaceful protest in Minneapolis Update 2:05 p.m. EDT June 1: One of George Floyd’s brothers, Terrence Floyd, urged protesters to remain peaceful Monday and told people that the best thing they can do to make change is to vote “not just in the presidential elections.” “If i’m not over here wilding out. If i’m not over here blowing stuff up. If I’m not here messing up my community, what are you all doing?” he asked as the crowd cheered him on. “You’re doing nothing. Because that’s not going to bring my brother back at all.” He compared the recent nights of looting and rioting to drinking. “It might feel good for a moment, like when you drink but ... you’re going to wonder what you did,” he said. More than 400 arrested in Santa Monica, California protest; most from out of town, police say Update 1:30 p.m. EDT June 1: Police in Santa Monica, California, said authorities arrested more than 400 people in citywide protests overnight in the wake of George Floyd’s death. Police Chief Cynthia Renaud said 95% of those arrested “reside outside the city.' 30 arrested during protests in Orlando, Florida Update 1:15 p.m. EDT June 1: Orlando Mayor Buddy Dyer said up to 30 people were arrested amid overnight protests in the city, according to WFTV. Police Chief Orlando Rolon said some of the arrests were connected to eight businesses that people attempted to break into or vandalize in the city, WFTV reported. Rolon said some demonstrators got onto Interstate 4 on Sunday and threw rocks and other objects at police officers, who responded by deploying tear gas. Dyer said he’s ordered the release of body camera footage from the situation in order to be fully transparent. >> Read more on WFTV.com Memorial for George Floyd scheduled for Thursday Update 1:05 p.m. EDT June 1: A funeral memorial will be held Thursday for George Floyd, Minnesota Gov. Tim Walz said Monday, according to CNN. “It will be an important event both for the city of Minneapolis and Minnesota and for the nation to watch that process of celebrating a life that was taken in front of us,” he said, according to the news network. Floyd died May 25 after then-Minneapolis police Officer Derek Chauvin pinned his neck under his knee for nearly nine minutes. Video of Floyd begging for air as he lay face-down on the ground surfaced after the situation, prompting widespread protests nationwide and calls for police reform. State of emergency declared in Birmingham, Alabama due to civil unrest Update 12:40 p.m. EDT June 1: Mayor Randall Woodfin of Birmingham, Alabama, declared a state of emergency for the city Monday due to civil unrest after protests over the weekend left behind widespread property damage. At a news conference Monday morning, Woodfin said that he “100 percent (supports) civil disobedience but that is very different from civil unrest.” “I support activism and your right to peacefully assemble, but I don’t support mobs and people destroying things just because,” he said. “And so, moving forward, the City of Birmingham as of today (is) declaring a state of emergency due to civil unrest and will be implementing a citywide curfew starting today at 7 p.m. to 6 a.m. everyday going forward.” On Sunday, demonstrators tried to tear down a Confederate monument in Linn Park and several members of the media were attacked, according to AL.com. Windows were smashed at several businesses, the news site reported. Trump to governors: ‘Most of you are weak’ Update 12:10 p.m. EDT June 1: President Donald Trump is telling the nation’s governors that most of them are “weak” and calling for tougher crackdowns on violence as protests rage across the nation. Trump is speaking to governors on a video teleconference with law enforcement and national security officials. He’s telling them they “have to get much tougher” amid nationwide protests and criticizing their responses, saying: “Most of you are weak.” And he’s chastising them for failing to use the National Guard more aggressively, saying they’re making themselves “look like fools.” Attorney General Bill Barr is also on the call and telling governors they have to “dominate” the streets and control, not react to crowds. He’s calling on them to “go after troublemaker” and use “adequate force.” Curfew will be in effect for next two nights in Washington DC Update 12:05 p.m. EDT June 1: Washington D.C. Mayor Muriel Bowser on Monday announced that the city will enforce a 7 p.m. curfew for the next two nights amid protests following the death last week of George Floyd. Bowser has enacted a curfew Sunday that didn’t go into effect until 11 p.m. The decision Sunday sparked criticism from White House Press Secretary Kayleigh MeEnany. “I think when you look at some of the befuddling actions, like right here in D.C., the mayor of D.C. didn’t issue a curfew until 11 p.m.,” McEnany said during an appearance on Fox News’ “Fox and Friends,” according to The Hill. “Well, guess what? At 10 p.m. you had St. John’s Church burning. Several other cities had curfews at 4 p.m., at 5 p.m., at 6 p.m.” Florida police officer suspended after video showed him pushing kneeling protester Update 11:50 a.m. EDT June 1: Interim Fort Lauderdale police Chief Rick Maglione said an officer who appeared to shove a protester without provocation Sunday as she was kneeling near him has been suspended from duty as authorities investigate the situation. Maglione said the situation began when an officer asked for help after she became surrounded by protesters. A short while later, some protesters began to attack a police car, smashing windows and jumping on the vehicle as a police officer sat inside. “In the middle of that event ... our officer, as he passed a female that was on the ground already, appears to shove her as he goes by her,” Maglione said. “That officer has been removed from any contact with the public. He is relieved from duty, basically, while this matter is investigated.” Maglione said officials with the Florida Department of Law Enforcement have opened a criminal investigation into the situation. Mayor Dean Trantalis said he thought the situation was “offensive” and “should never have happened.” “I appreciate the fact that the department has relieved him of duty while this investigation happens,” he said at a news conference Monday. “I understand the state attorney has opened a file, an investigation to make sure that we get to the bottom of this and If it’s determined by those agencies that something wrong was done we will follow with swift disciplinary action.” New York City mayor: Police cars driving into crowd of protesters Saturday ‘unacceptable’ Update 11:20 a.m. EDT June 1: New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio said Monday that two police cars caught on video driving into a crowd during a protest Saturday of police brutality was “dangerous” and “unacceptable,' according to The Guardian. “There is no situation where a police vehicle should drive into a crowd of protesters or New Yorkers of any kind,” the mayor said, according to the newspaper. In a video that went viral Saturday, protesters could be seen carrying a yellow metal barricade to block a police SUV in Brooklyn, The New York Times reported. While some demonstrators began to throw things at the vehicles, both of them sped up into the crowd, according to the Times. The newspaper reported it was not clear whether anyone was injured in the incident. De Blasio said he had directed city officials to investigate the situation, the Times reported. Obama: Protests and political action necessary ‘if we want to bring about real change’ Update 11:10 a.m. EDT June 1: Former President Barack Obama said people need to be active in both protests and the political process if they want to bring about real, lasting change as protests erupted nationwide due to the death last week of George Floyd. “If we want to bring about real change, then the choice isn’t between protest and politics,” Obama said in a post published Friday on Medium. “We have to do both. We have to mobilize to raise awareness, and we have to organize and cast our ballots to make sure that we elect candidates who will act on reform.” Obama noted that while the focus is often on the federal government’s response to events like Floyd’s death, “the elected officials who matter most in reforming police departments and the criminal justice system work at the state and local levels.” “The more specific we can make demands for criminal justice and police reform, the harder it will be for elected officials to just offer lip service to the cause and then fall back into business as usual once protests have gone away,” Obama said. “I recognize that these past few months have been hard and dispiriting — that the fear, sorrow, uncertainty, and hardship of a pandemic have been compounded by tragic reminders that prejudice and inequality still shape so much of American life. But watching the heightened activism of young people in recent weeks, of every race and every station, makes me hopeful. If, going forward, we can channel our justifiable anger into peaceful, sustained, and effective action, then this moment can be a real turning point in our nation’s long journey to live up to our highest ideals.” At least 12 arrested during demonstrations in Portland, Oregon Update 10:20 a.m. EDT June 1: Police in Portland, Oregon, said they arrested at least a dozen people after peaceful protests in the city spurred by the death of George Floyd turned violent. Authorities said they also detained two juveniles during Sunday night’s protests. Police said thousands of demonstrators marched Sunday to the city’s Justice Center. The gathering remained peaceful until around 11:30 p.m., when authorities said some demonstrators began to throw things at officers. When the crowd refused to disperse, police said they deployed “Riot Control Agents to disperse the crowd.” In response, some demonstrators threw what police described as fireworks at officers before the crowd broke into smaller groups, some of which set fires, smashed storefront windows and vandalized buildings and parked vehicles, authorities said. Police Chief Jami Resch said she met Sunday with demonstration leaders. “We agreed that the majority of demonstrators AND the police want a peaceful protest and are frustrated by those who are engaging in violence and destruction because it is not helpful for change efforts,” she said in a statement. “Unfortunately, while we were meeting, some individuals started to engage in violent acts toward Officers, which continued despite warnings to disperse. Officers deployed riot control agents to disperse the crowd for the safety of all.' NBA coaches: ‘We cannot treat this as an isolated incident of outrage’ Update 9:40 a.m. EDT June 1: The National Basketball Coaches Association released a statement Monday sharing condolences and prayers for the family of George Floyd and condemning his death. “The events of the past few weeks -- police brutality, racial profiling and the weaponization of racism are shameful, inhumane and intolerable,” the group said. “Witnessing the murder of George Floyd in cold blood and in broad daylight has traumatized our nation, but the reality is that African Americans are targeted and victimized on a daily basis. As NBA coaches, we cannot treat this as an isolated incident of outrage.” Coaches said in the statement that they will work with local leaders, officials and law enforcement agencies in the cities where they are based “to create positive change in our communities.” “We have the power and platform to affect change, and we will use it,” the statement said. 1 dead after authorities, protesters exchange fire in Kentucky; police investigating Update 9:20 a.m. EDT June 1: Kentucky Gov. Andy Beshear said Monday that he’s authorized an investigation into a police-involved shooting that left one person dead during protests over the death of George Floyd. Beshear said the Louisville Metro Police Department and the Kentucky National Guard were dispatched around midnight to 26th Street and Broadway. “While working to disperse a crowd, LMPD and the Kentucky National Guard were fired upon,” the governor said. “LMPD and the Kentucky National Guard returned fire resulting in a death. Given the seriousness of the situation, I have authorized the Kentucky State Police to independently investigate the event.” DC mayor: Some protesters brought tools, supplies with them Update 9 a.m. EDT June 1: Mayor Muriel Bowser of Washington D.C. said Friday that some protesters brought “tools and supplies” with them to demonstrations Sunday over the death of George Floyd. “We know that we have people that came here with tools and supplies and they re-upped their supplies,' Bowser said during an interview Monday with NBC’s “Today” show. 'They went to different parts of the city. So, we think there was a mix of people here but certainly people here who do this type of protest and demonstration.” Ask if the demonstrators were believed to have been “professional protesters,” Bowser told the “Today” show, “We’ve seen some of these tactics before so we know that they were among the groups here.” She described the tactics used as “the types of tools they use, restocking, setting fires here and there to try to draw in the police to various locations.” 2 killed, police officer injured during protests in Iowa Update 8:35 a.m. EDT June 1: Two people died and a police officer is injured Monday following a series of shootings reported during protests overnight in Davenport, Iowa, police said. One person died in a shooting reported at the Walmart on West Kimberly Road and one person died in a separate shooting in the 1100 block of West 15th Street, according to police. Officials said rioters ambushed police officers in a vehicle around 3 a.m., firing several shots, some of which hit a police car while officers were inside. Police Chief Paul Sirkorski said one officer was injured. Police were later able to find the vehicle and arrested several people after it crashed during a pursuit. Sirkorski said the officer was “doing okay” Monday morning. “What we experienced tonight, last night was completely unacceptable and it does not honor the memory of Mr. Floyd,” Sirkorski said at a news conference Monday. Mayor Mike Matson said that in light of the overnight violence, a curfew will be enacted for all of Scott County on Monday. He said he has also requested the help of the Iowa National Guard. Facebook pledges $10 million toward ‘efforts committed to ending racial injustice’  Update 7:51 a.m. EDT June 1: Facebook will donate $10 million to “efforts committed to ending racial injustice,” the social media juggernaut announced early Monday. Several Boston police officers injured, more than 3 dozen protesters arrested Sunday night Update 5:37 a.m. EDT June 1: The Boston Police Department has confirmed multiple officers were injured during Sunday night’s protests, and 40 demonstrators were arrested. According to the department, at least seven officers were transported to local hospitals for treatment of injuries, numerous others were treated at the scene of the violent clashes and at least 21 police cruisers were damaged during the protest.  Citing ‘violence and thefts,’ Washington county declares state of emergency Update 5:14 a.m. EDT June 1: Washington’s King County, which includes the city of Seattle, declared a state of emergency early Monday due to “violence and thefts associated with some of the local protests.” “King County values and respects the peaceful expression of political views, and supports all people in exercising their First Amendment rights,” the county government said in a news release. Derek Chauvin’s 1st court appearance postponed 1 week Update 4:55 a.m. EDT June 1: The first court appearance for the former Minnesota officer charged with third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter in the death of George Floyd has been postponed until June 8. Chauvin, the officer seen in a video kneeling on Floyd’s neck, originally had a hearing set for 1 p.m. Monday. Court records cite no specific reason for the delay. Chauvin was moved to the Hennepin County Jail from the Ramsey County Jail Sunday. Birmingham protesters tear down Confederate monument, set fire to Thomas Jefferson statue Update 4:32 a.m. EDT June 1: Protesters in Birmingham, Alabama, were captured on video Sunday night looping a rope around the neck of a monument to a Confederate naval captain before dragging it to the ground. The statue, depicting Charles Linn, could be seen in the aftermath lying face down with “BLM” painted in large red letters along the back of his leg, The Washington Post reported. In addition to smashing the namesake of Birmingham’s Linn Park, protesters also set a statue of Thomas Jefferson ablaze. Police fatally shoot man at Louisville protest they say opened fire first Update 4:12 a.m. EDT June 1: A man has been shot and killed during protests in Louisville, Kentucky. According to the Louisville Metro Police Department, shots were fired at them first. The shooting occurred around 12:15 a.m., and the victim has not been identified. Washington activates statewide National Guard Update 3:38 a.m. EDT June 1: Washington Gov. Jay Inslee has called up the National Guard for statewide deployment. “We must not let these illegal and dangerous actions detract from the anger so many feel at the deep injustice laid so ugly and bare by the death of George Floyd,” Inslee said in a statement. He also noted that members of the Guard engaged in crowd control must remain unarmed to ensure public safety. “But we also will not turn away from our responsibility to protect the residents of our state,” Inslee said in the statement. Florida police officer suspended after shoving kneeling protester Update 3:14 a.m. EDT June 1: A police officer has been suspended after video showed him shoving a kneeling woman during a Sunday afternoon protest in Fort Lauderdale, Florida. According to The Washington Post, the video shows police walking through throngs of protesters as several people dropped to their knees and held their hands overhead. As one officer passed a black woman kneeling at his feet, he reached down and shoved the back of her head, sending her falling forward into the pavement. Nearby protesters erupted in shouts and several people threw water bottles at the police. The officer retreated, followed by other officers who appeared to be yelling at him over his actions, the Post reported. George Floyd's son says heart ‘really touched’ by mass protests Update 2:59 a.m. EDT June 1: Quincy Mason Floyd had not seen his father, George, since he was a young child. On Sunday night, the younger Floyd attended a Bryan, Texas, protest and spoke with CNN affiliate KBTX. 'Everyone is coming out and showing him love. My heart is really touched by all this,” Quincy Mason Floyd told the local station. DC’s historic St. John’s church set ablaze during Sunday protests Update 2:51 a.m. EDT June 1: A fire was set in the basement of historic St. John’s Episcopal Church, across Lafayette Square from the White House, during Sunday night demonstrations calling for justice in the death of George Floyd. Tanker truck driver who plowed into crowd of Minnesota protesters charged with assault Update 2:32 a.m. EDT June 1: Bogdan Vechirko, the man who drove a tanker truck into a crowd of protesters on a Minnesota interstate Sunday, has been charged with assault, according to Hennepin County Jail records. The Minnesota Department of Public Safety described Vechirko’s actions as “inciting a crowd of peaceful demonstrators.”  He is being held without bail. The Massachusetts National Guard arrives in Boston Update 2:02 a.m. EDT June 1: The Massachusetts National Guard has arrived in Boston to disperse the remaining protesters, Massachusetts State Police spokesman David Procopio told CNN. Police have already made two arrests after two protesters jumped a fence and tried to get onto State House property, the network reported. Austin police fire on protesters after a day of peaceful demonstrations Update 1:42 a.m. EDT June 1: Police in Austin, Texas, opened fire on protesters early Sunday with what demonstrators described as rubber bullets, The Washington Post reported. The clash followed a day of peaceful protests in the Texas capital with witnesses stating the shots were fired by a group of officers on a nearby overpass at protesters who had been descending on police headquarters. .At least three people were struck by the projectiles, including a young woman who was hit in the back of the head, the Post reported. The Associated Press contributed to this report.

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