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    The Latest on special counsel Robert Mueller's report and President Donald Trump (all times local): 3 p.m. The White House says President Donald Trump played golf Friday with conservative commentator Rush Limbaugh and a couple of unidentified friends. Trump is spending the Easter weekend at his private Mar-a-Lago club along with the first lady. The foursome played at Trump International Golf Club in West Palm Beach, Florida. The trip comes one day after a redacted special counsel report found no Trump campaign collusion with Russia around the 2016 election, but issued no clear verdict on obstruction, while detailing several instances of Trump seeking to squash the investigation. Prior to golfing, Trump lashed out through tweets at people who cooperated with Robert Mueller's team. He said statements in the report made by some were 'fabricated & totally untrue.' Trump struck a much harsher tone than the day before when he marked the report's release by tweeting 'game over.' ___ 9:25 a.m. President Donald Trump says some statements made in special counsel Robert Mueller's Russia report are 'fabricated & totally untrue.' Tweeting Friday from his Mar-a-Lago club in Palm Beach, Florida, Trump dubbed the more than 400-page document the 'Crazy Mueller Report.' He's alleging that 'notes' some people said they took after meetings with him didn't exist until they were created for the Mueller investigation. Trump says he never agreed to testify because he didn't need to respond to what he says were 'total bullshit' statements made about him in the report to make someone look good or make him look bad. __ 9:10 a.m. The chairman of the House Judiciary Committee has issued a subpoena for special counsel Robert Mueller's report and the underlying materials. Democratic Rep. Jerry Nadler of New York is asking for the information by May 1. That's also the day when Attorney General William Barr is scheduled to testify before a Senate committee and one day before Barr is set to appear before Nadler's committee. The subpoena is the opening shot in what could be a lengthy legal battle. If the Justice Department doesn't respond, Democrats could hold officials in contempt of Congress or eventually fight the battle in court. The Judiciary Committee voted 24-17 earlier this month to give Nadler permission to issue subpoenas for the final report, its exhibits and any underlying evidence or materials prepared for Mueller's investigation. ___ 8 a.m. President Donald Trump's spokeswoman Sarah Sanders is pushing back on allegations that special counsel Robert Mueller's Russia report exposed a culture of lying at the White House. Sanders also disputed allegations that she misled the media when she said that 'countless' members of the FBI had lost confidence in FBI Director James Comey, which led to his firing. Sanders had told reporters after Comey's 2017 dismissal that she had heard from 'countless' members of the FBI who welcomed the president's decision. She told ABC's 'Good Morning America' on Friday that her word 'countless' was a 'slip of the tongue' made in the 'heat of the moment.' Democratic House Judiciary Chairman Jerrold Nadler, also speaking on ABC, said the Mueller report clearly outlines 'a culture of lying' inside the White House. __ 7:40 a.m. House Judiciary Chairman Jerrold Nadler says he expects to issue a subpoena within a few hours for special counsel Robert Mueller's report on Russian election meddling and President Donald Trump. The New York Democrat told ABC's 'Good Morning America' Friday that he is preparing a subpoena not only for Mueller's complete report, but also for the underlying documents, including grand jury evidence. He said, 'We need the entire report, unredacted, and the underlying documents in order to make informed decisions.' Attorney General William Barr sent the Mueller report to Congress, with some material redacted, including grand jury information. Grand jury evidence, including witness interviews, is normally off limits but can be obtained in court. __ 12:12 a.m. President Donald Trump sought the removal of special counsel Robert Mueller, discouraged witnesses from cooperating with prosecutors and prodded aides to mislead the public on his behalf. That's according to a hugely anticipated report from Mueller that details multiple efforts the president made to curtail a Russia probe he feared would cripple his administration. Mueller writes that Trump's attempts to seize control of the investigation, and directions to others on how to influence it, 'were mostly unsuccessful, but that is largely because the persons who surrounded the President declined to carry out orders or accede to his requests.' Mueller's two-volume, 448-page redacted report was released Thursday.
  • The chairman of the House Judiciary Committee, Rep. Jerrold Nadler, has issued a subpoena for special counsel Robert Mueller's full report as Democrats intensified their investigation of President Donald Trump, but leaders stopped short of liberal demands for impeachment proceedings. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi has insisted on a methodical, step-by-step approach to the House's oversight of the Trump administration, and she refuses to consider impeachment without public support, including from Republicans, which seems unlikely. But in light of Mueller's findings , Democratic leaders are under mounting pressure from the party's rising stars, deep-pocketed donors and even a presidential contender to seize the moment as a jumping-off point for trying to remove Trump from office. Speaking Friday in Belfast as Pelosi wrapped up a congressional visit to Ireland, she declined to signal action beyond Congress' role as a check and balance for the White House. 'Let me assure you that whatever the issue and challenge we face, the Congress of the United States will honor its oath of office to protect and defend the Constitution of the United States to protect our democracy,' she told reporters. 'We believe that the first article — Article 1, the legislative branch — has the responsibility of oversight of our democracy, and we will exercise that.' That approach isn't enough for some liberals who see in Trump's actions not just a president unfit for office but evidence of obstruction serious enough that Mueller said he could not declare Trump exonerated. Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y., is now signed on to an impeachment resolution from fellow Democratic Rep. Rashida Tlaib of Michigan, bringing new energy to the effort. Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., a presidential candidate, said Friday the House 'should initiate impeachment proceedings against the president.' And billionaire Tom Steyer, a leading advocate of impeachment, has grown impatient with the House's pace of investigations and wants televised hearings to focus Americans' attention on Trump. 'Let's get the show on the road,' Steyer said in an interview Friday. 'The Mueller report very clearly outlined obstruction by the president and basically said, I can't do anything about it, it's up to Congress to hold the president accountable.' Democrats, though, may see greater power in pursuing an investigative effort, leaving impeachment on the shelf as a break-glass option. The Judiciary chairman, Nadler, D-N.Y., says he expects the Justice Department to comply with the committee's subpoena for the full report by May 1. That's the same day Attorney General William Barr is to testify before a Senate committee and one day before Barr is to appear before Nadler's panel. Nadler also has summoned Mueller to testify by May 23. 'It now falls to Congress to determine the full scope of that alleged misconduct and to decide what steps we must take going forward,' Nadler said. A Justice Department spokeswoman, Kerri Kupac, called Nadler's move 'premature and unnecessary.' Barr sent Congress a redacted version of the Mueller report, blacking out several types of material, including classified information, material pertaining to ongoing investigations and grand jury evidence. Nadler said he was open to working with the department on accommodations, but he also said the committee 'needs and is entitled to the full version of the report and the underlying evidence consistent with past practice.' But the committee's top Republican, Rep. Doug Collins of Georgia, said the subpoena was 'wildly overbroad' and that Trump already had declined to assert executive privilege over the Mueller report in a move of 'unprecedented openness.' 'This is politically convenient,' Collins said, allowing the chairman 'to grandstand and rail against the attorney general for not cooperating on an impossible timeline.' Mueller's report provides fresh evidence of Trump's interference in the Russia investigation and challenges lawmakers to respond. For Congress, though, organizing an immediate response been complicated by the spring recess that left leadership in both parties away from Washington and rank-and-file lawmakers. GOP Leader Kevin McCarthy has been on a delegation trip to South America, and GOP Sen. Lindsey Graham, the top Republican on the Senate Judiciary Committee, has been in Africa. One Republican, Sen. Mitt Romney of Utah was one of the few who spoke out Friday, saying he was 'sickened' by the report's findings of dishonesty at the highest levels of the administration, 'including the president,' and appalled that some Americans were working with Russians during the 2016 election. Pelosi will convene House Democrats for a conference call Monday, after the holiday weekend when many lawmakers are celebrating Easter and Passover. With Barr, Democrats expect a long battle ahead. The attorney general has come under intense scrutiny over his handling of the Mueller report and subsequent comments that have left him exposed to criticism he is acting in Trump's interest. Late Friday Democrats rejected an offer from Barr for a limited number of congressional leaders to view some of the redacted materials in a confidential setting. They said it was inadequate. It's unlikely that the full Mueller report or the special counsel's public testimony will untangle the dilemma that Democrats face. Mueller laid out multiple episodes in which Trump directed others to influence or curtail the Russia investigation after the special counsel's appointment in May 2017, and Trump made clear that he viewed the probe as a potential mortal blow — 'the end of my presidency.' Democratic leaders are walking a delicate line on what to do with Mueller's findings. The No. 2 Democrat, Rep. Steny Hoyer of Maryland, drew criticism for refusing to consider impeachment, and quickly revised his comments to say 'all options ought to remain on the table.' And Pelosi, in an interview last week, before the report's release, reiterated her 'high bar' for impeachment. But she also didn't close the door on the option. 'The fact is the president has engaged in activities that are unethical, un-American. ... In every way he is unfit to be president of the United States. Does that make it — is that an impeachable offense? Well it depends on what we see in the report.' ___ Associated Press reporters Mary Clare Jalonick and Padmananda Rama in Washington, Jennifer Peltz in New York and Dylan Lovan in LaGrange, Kentucky, contributed to this report. ___ For complete coverage of the Mueller report, go to https://www.apnews.com/TrumpInvestigations
  • With the Mueller Report finally out Thursday, at least in redacted form, publishers are hurrying to release book editions. Two Mueller Report books are in the top 15 on Amazon.com even though free pdfs are available online. The special prosecutor's findings, which run more than 400 pages, concluded that he could not find criminal evidence of conspiracy between the Donald Trump 2016 presidential campaign and Russia's government but could not rule out the possibility that Trump may have obstructed justice after he won the 2016 election. Scribner, Melville House and Skyhorse Publishing are among those planning to have paperbacks out before the end of the month, with prices ranging from $15 for the Scribner book to $9.99 for the Melville House one, and e-books out by the end of the week. Barnes & Noble expects to have a free download for its Nook e-reader on Thursday. The Amazon-owned Audible Inc. plans a free audiobook. By Thursday night, the Skyhorse version was No. 9 and Scribner No. 14 on Amazon's bestseller list. Melville House had climbed from No. 324 earlier in the day to 74. Government reports have been a highly specialized niche in the book world for decades. They are public documents, often available for free and open for anyone to publish. But some releases are so intensely anticipated, among them the Warren Commission study of former President John F. Kennedy's assassination and the 9-11 Commission Report, they become best sellers. The 9-11 report was even nominated for a National Book Award. The Mueller report will likely have a substantial paying audience because of enormous public interest and because nonfiction works tend to sell predominantly in paper form. Scribner and Skyhorse also hope to attract readers with additional material, some of which they are hurrying to complete over the next couple of days. Skyhorse editorial director Mark Gompertz said that Alan Dershowitz, the attorney and frequent Trump defender, was 'the fastest reader and writer we have ever worked with' and was expected to finish an introduction for the Mueller book by Thursday night. The Scribner book, expected to exceed 700 pages, is being prepared in conjunction with The Washington Post. Some material, including a timeline of the investigation, has already been prepared. The Post is working on an introduction that will provide analysis of the report, and a combination of Post reporters and professional narrators will work on an audio edition. 'We're going as fast as we can,' says Colin Harrison, Scribner's editor-in-chief. The industry suffered from printing shortages last fall and winter, with such works as David W. Blight's Pulitzer Prize-winning biography unavailable for weeks. But Harrison says that Scribner can easily meet its announced first printing of 350,000. 'The planning for this has been in the works for a long time,' he says. 'We're even prepared to go back to press, expeditiously, for more books. We have the paper. We're ready.
  • For nearly two years, President Donald Trump and his allies sought to undermine special counsel Robert Mueller's Russia probe, attacking investigators' credibility and playing down their findings. As a redacted version of Mueller's report was finally released Thursday, Trump resorted to bluster, broadsides and falsehoods to try, once more, to frame the moment as a political victory. It began even before the public glimpsed the two volumes covering 448 pages . The report included an account of how the president attempted to seize control of the investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 U.S. election and force out Mueller from leading the inquiry. But that didn't stop Trump from taking a public victory lap, declaring at a White House event that he was having 'a good day.' Twelve times Trump took to Twitter in the hours before Attorney General William Barr outlined the findings of the report. The president proclaimed his innocence and insisted that the investigation was politically motivated. As soon as Barr concluded his remarks, and more than an hour before Mueller's report was released, Trump tweeted a taunt over an image inspired by the HBO show 'Game of Thrones.' 'No Collusion. No Obstruction,' it said. 'For the haters and the radical left Democrats — Game Over.' But the report does recount how Trump repeatedly sought to intervene in a probe that has hovered over the first two years of his presidency. And it says Trump had been agitated by the investigation from the start, reporting that Trump reacted to Mueller's appointment by saying it was the 'end of his presidency.' At Justice Department headquarters, reporters buzzed around as they awaited Barr and then the Mueller report. A few blocks away, there was calm on one of the defining days of Trump's presidency. The news media were led into the White House East Room, just before the report came out, for Trump's appearance with wounded warriors. While newsrooms across the country digested the report, the White House guests, already seated while waiting for the president to arrive, were entertained by the U.S. Marine Band. Among the selections played: 'Somewhere Over the Rainbow.' 'Knockout,' read a text message from Rudy Giuliani, one of the president's attorneys, to reporters after Barr finished speaking. A further statement from Giuliani and Trump's lawyers said 'the report itself is nothing more than an attempt to rehash old allegations' and insisted that 'the results of the investigation are a total victory for the president.' Current and former White House officials eagerly rushed through the report. They scanned for their names to see what Mueller had said about them and how he had characterized their testimony, and wondered how those depictions might sit with a mercurial president. Staffers had been told by the White House to cooperate fully with Mueller's team and answer their questions truthfully. But many were nervous about how Trump would react to their testimony and whether it would damage their relationships with him. Talking points went out to Trump allies while his supporters' phones buzzed with text messages from the campaign looking to raise money off Thursday's developments. 'Now the tables have turned, and it's time to investigate the liars who instigated this sham investigation into President Trump, motivated by political retribution and based on no evidence whatsoever,' said Trump's re-election campaign manager, Brad Parscale. Donald Trump Jr, the president's eldest son, was featured prominently in the report for meeting with a Kremlin-connected lawyer at Trump Tower in June 2016. Though the report said 'the campaign anticipated receiving derogatory documents and information' from Russians that 'could assist Trump's electoral prospects,' it said 'the government would unlikely be able to prove beyond a reasonable doubt' that the participants at that meeting 'had general knowledge that their conduct was unlawful.' Though a seemingly backhanded exoneration, the younger Trump tweeted a series of attacks on Democrats. 'Better luck next hoax!' he said. Senior White House adviser Kellyanne Conway said that because the White House didn't interfere with Mueller's work, that 'should make people feel good about democracy.' 'We're accepting apologies today, too,' Conway told reporters, adding that Trump watched Barr, talked to his lawyers and was in 'a great mood.' The president, who normally talks to reporters on his way out of the White House, declined to speak as he left to spend the Easter weekend in Florida. But from Air Force One, he tweeted: 'I had the right to end the whole Witch Hunt if I wanted. I could have fired everyone, including Mueller, if I wanted. I chose not to. I had the RIGHT to use Executive Privilege. I didn't!' Appearing relaxed earlier Friday at a military event, Trump said a statue he'd been presented with as a memento would have a permanent home 'at least for six years, in the Oval Office.' As the audience applauded and laughed, Trump said he was going to joke and say 'at least for 10 or 14 years, but we would cause bedlam if I said that.' ___ Lemire reported from New York. ___ Follow Lemire on Twitter at http://twitter.com/@JonLemire , Colvin at http://twitter.com/@colvinj and Superville at http://twitter.com/@dsupervilleap ___ For complete coverage of the Mueller report, go to: https://www.apnews.com/TrumpInvestigations
  • The Latest on the special counsel's report on Russian election interference and Donald Trump's campaign (all times local): 8:40 p.m. The chairman of the House Judiciary Committee says the attorney general is 'taking unprecedented steps to spin' the special counsel's Russia investigation. Rep. Jerrold Nadler, a New York Democrat, said Wednesday that Attorney General William Barr 'appears to be waging a media campaign' on behalf of President Donald Trump. He says the attorney general's decision to hold a Thursday morning news conference, before releasing a redacted version of Robert Mueller's report to Congress, will 'again result in the report being presented through his own words.' He warns that if the report is heavily redacted, the committee will issue subpoenas 'in short order.' Nadler says he will 'probably find it useful' to call Mueller and members of his team to testify after reading the version of the report Barr releases. __ 8:20 p.m. The Justice Department plans to release a redacted report on the special counsel's Russia investigation one or two hours after a Thursday morning news conference by Attorney General William Barr. That's raising the ire of Democrats. They have said they are concerned that Barr will try to color the findings before the public has a chance to read the report. The chairman of the House Judiciary Committee, New York Democrat Jerrold Nadler, says the timing of Barr's discussion of the redacted report and its release to Congress is 'wrong.' Senate Democratic leader Chuck Schumer says 'the process is poisoned before the report is even released.' House Speaker Nancy Pelosi says Barr has 'thrown out his credibility & the DOJ's independence with his single-minded effort to protect' Trump. ___ 6:45 p.m. The chairman of the House Judiciary Committee says it is 'wrong' that his committee will receive a redacted version of special counsel Robert Mueller's report after Attorney General William Barr gives a news conference on it Thursday. New York Rep. Jerrold Nadler says in a tweet that the Justice Department has informed his panel that it will receive the report around 11 a.m. or noon, hours after Barr's 9:30 a.m. press conference. Democrats have said they are concerned that Barr will try to color Mueller's findings before the public has a chance to read the report. The chairman of the Democratic caucus, New York Rep. Hakeem Jeffries, tweeted in reference to Barr, 'Release the Mueller report tomorrow morning and keep your mouth shut.' __ 5:10 p.m. President Donald Trump says he may hold a press conference after the release of the redacted version of special counsel Robert Mueller's report on Thursday. Trump is expressing confidence about the findings of Mueller's Russia probe in an interview with conservative radio host Larry O'Connor. He says, 'You'll see a lot of very strong things come out tomorrow.' Attorney General William Barr will hold a news conference Thursday morning as the report is set to be released. Trump says, 'Maybe I'll do one after that, we'll see.' ___ 4:30 p.m. The Justice Department says Attorney General William Barr will hold a news conference Thursday morning on special counsel Robert Mueller's Russia investigation. The news conference will be held at 9:30 a.m. at the Justice Department in Washington. Barr will be joined by Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein. The Justice Department has said a redacted version of Mueller's report will be released Thursday. Mueller officially concluded his investigation late last month and submitted a nearly 400-page report to Barr. __ 2:50 p.m. After nearly two years of waiting, America will get some answers straight from Robert Mueller. The Justice Department on Thursday is expected to release a redacted version of the special counsel's report on Russian election interference and Donald Trump's campaign, opening up months, if not years, of fights over what the document means in a deeply divided country. The nearly 400-page report is expected to reveal what Mueller uncovered about ties between the Trump campaign and Russia that fell short of criminal conduct. It will also lay out the special counsel's conclusions about formative episodes in Trump's presidency, including his firing of FBI Director James Comey and his efforts to undermine the Russia investigation publicly and privately.
  • Sen. Amy Klobuchar agreed on Wednesday to become the second Democratic presidential candidate to hold a town hall meeting on Fox News Channel, and others are soon to follow. Sen. Bernie Sanders was the first to venture onto Fox this week. His Monday town hall reached 2.55 million viewers, the biggest audience of any such event in the 2020 campaign cycle, despite not being aired in the prime time hours when most people are available. One of Fox News' most loyal viewers, President Donald Trump, indicated on Twitter that he wasn't happy seeing Sanders on his screen. Fox says it's looking forward to hosting Klobuchar's next town hall. Meanwhile, Pete Buttigieg's campaign confirmed that it is in talks with Fox about a town hall. Jenn Fiore, an aide to Julian Castro, said that campaign is in the process of scheduling one. Sen. Cory Booker also said he's considering one. During an appearance in Fredericksburg, Virginia, on Wednesday, Beto O'Rourke said that while he disagrees with the practices of Fox News, he will appear on the network. He said he wasn't sure whether it would be on a town hall or some other program. 'I don't write anybody off in this country for their choice of cable programming,' O'Rourke said. The Democrats have had to weigh possibly angering a liberal base that holds Fox News in contempt versus reaching a large audience, many of whom wouldn't be likely to see them in action elsewhere. Before the newfound interest, Fox News faced the prospect of watching the Democratic nomination process from the sidelines. The Democratic National Committee announced in February, and reaffirmed this week, that it would not hold any of its upcoming candidate debates on the network. On Twitter, Trump has seemed like a spurned man. He tweeted Tuesday that it seemed 'very strange' to see Sanders on Fox. Trump, who rarely complains about Fox, also said that many of his supporters couldn't get into the Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, event that was 'stuffed' with Sanders fans. Fox has said it reached out to various political and local groups in the Bethlehem area to help fill the audience for the Sanders town hall. Besides the president, Fox News also has to wonder how the large number of his fans in its audience will take to the Democratic visits. The online activists Lynnette Hardaway and Rochelle Richardson, who often appear as commentators on Fox under the name Diamond and Silk, tweeted that it was 'sickening to see Bernie Sanders on a Fox News town hall disparaging our president.' Fox did receive praise for its handling of the Sanders town hall from some unlikely sources, including panelists on MSNBC's 'Morning Joe,' which has been relentless in its criticism of Trump. The Klobuchar town hall will be held May 8 in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. The hour-long event will have a similar blueprint to Sanders' session: Bret Baier and Martha MacCallum will be the anchors, and it will start at 6:30 p.m. Eastern time. ____ Associated Press writers Alexandra Jaffe in Des Moines, Iowa, and Will Weissert in Fredericksburg, Virginia, contributed to this report.
  • Taylor Swift, TV journalist Gayle King and soccer star Mohamed Salah are among the six famous faces featured on the covers of Time's annual '100 Most Influential People in the World' issue. The other cover stars also included House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and actors Sandra Oh and Dwayne Johnson. Fellow Democrat Hillary Clinton wrote Pelosi 'is living proof that when it comes to getting the job done, more often than not, it takes a woman.' Johnson was praised for establishing a positive work environment, while Oh is cited for her creative life. Musician Shawn Mendes wrote Swift 'makes anyone older feel young again.' The issue is comprised of short tributes written by fellow global luminaries throughout all industries. Beyoncé penned an essay on former first lady Michelle Obama. President Donald Trump and Special Counsel Robert Mueller were also on this year's list. ___ This story has been corrected to show the singer's last name is Mendes, not Mendez, and the soccer star's last name is Salah, not Saleh.
  • From Ben Affleck and Susan Sarandon to Anna Wintour and Willie Nelson, celebrities lined up to give money — and a dash of star power — to their favorite Democratic presidential candidates ahead of this week's first quarter fundraising deadline. For months, candidates in the crowded field of more than a dozen contenders have aggressively courted key figures in music, television, publishing and film, who are one of the party's most reliable sources of campaign cash. Although many donors remain on the sidelines, contributing to lackluster fundraising hauls, an early snapshot included in the campaign finance reports submitted to the Federal Election Commission this week offers a glimpse of who is drawing attention from entertainment industry in the early stages of the race. 'When you talk about Hollywood, yes, we are talking about movie stars and writers and directors, but we are also talking about people with decades of experience with presidential campaigns,' said Yusef Robb, a longtime California political strategist. 'Earning support from somebody with a lot of connections in the political world couples with their star power, which people in the chattering classes notice.' California Sen. Kamala Harris has long-standing relationships with major entertainment industry figures in her home state. But former Texas Rep. Beto O'Rourke , Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders and South Bend, Indiana, Mayor Pete Buttigieg are also among the candidates who count celebrities as donors. So far, few donors are bundling large sums of money for candidates by asking their friends, family and colleagues to give, too. But many have given individually, which is limited under campaign finance law to a $2,800 contribution during the primary election, followed by another $2,800 earmarked for the general election campaign. Last month, Harris was feted at the Pacific Palisades home of director J.J. Abrams and his wife, Katie McGrath, in a gathering attended by Hollywood powerbrokers, including TV hitmaker Shonda Rhimes. Harris also has received money from Affleck, who gave $2,800; actress Eva Longoria, who gave $5,400; composer Quincy Jones, who gave $2,800; and former 'Mad Men' star Jon Hamm, who gave $1,000. O'Rourke, a former punk rocker, received $2,800 from a fellow Texan, country music icon Nelson, as well as $1,850 from Grateful Dead bassist Phil Lesh and $2,800 from former Dave Matthews Band violinist Boyd Tinsley. He also took in $5,600 from Vogue editor-in-chief Wintour, $1,500 from comedian and 'Breaking Bad' actor Bob Odenkirk, $2,500 from Texas film director Richard Linklater and $350 from 'Saturday Night Live' star Cecily Strong. Sanders received $2,700 from actor and comedian Danny DeVito, $2,800 from actress Susan Sarandon, $2,500 from piano player Norah Jones and $1,000 from Foo Fighters guitarist Christopher Shiflett. Jonathan Fishman, drummer for the jam band Phish, which was formed in Sanders' home state of Vermont, gave $1,000, while Thomas Middleditch from HBO's 'Silicon Valley' gave $500, records show. Buttigieg, whose campaign raked in $7 million after emerging as an unexpected hit, has also started to draw celebrity attention. 'West Wing' star Bradley Whitford gave $2,000, actor Ryan Reynolds donated $250, NFL network broadcaster Rich Eisen gave $500 and 'Game of Thrones' executive producer Carolyn Strauss chipped in $250. Buttigieg also drew at least one contribution from an unusual source. James Murdoch, the son of conservative media mogul Rupert Murdoch, whose Fox News is closely allied with President Donald Trump, cut Buttigieg a $2,800 donation, records show. ___ This story has been corrected to show that Boyd Tinsley is a former, not current, Dave Matthews Band violinist.
  • Sen. Bernie Sanders took heat from some Democrats for holding a town hall on Fox News Channel but there's one result hard to argue with: it was the most-watched candidate event in the election campaign so far. An estimated 2.55 million people saw Sanders' town hall Monday in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, the Nielsen company said. Not only did that beat the 1.35 million people who saw Sanders on CNN on Feb. 25, the Fox telecast aired before prime time when traditionally the largest audience gathers. Sen. Kamala Harris' CNN town hall in January was seen by 1.95 million viewers, the previous high for a 2020 presidential contender. The Vermont senator also apparently had one prominent viewer in Washington. President Donald Trump tweeted Tuesday that it was 'so weird to watch Crazy Bernie' on Fox News. He said Bret Baier, who co-anchored the event with Martha MacCallum, and the audience was 'so smiley and nice.' Baier later tweeted his thanks to Trump for watching, and said he'd like to have the president on a town hall or for an interview on his nightly news show. 'We cover all sides,' Baier said. While Trump is a frequent interview subject on Fox, he tends to avoid newsier personalities like Baier and Chris Wallace. Later Tuesday, Trump claimed that 'Many Trump Fans & Signs were outside of the @FoxNews Studio' during the Sanders event. 'Big complaints about not being let in-stuffed with Bernie supporters,' the president tweeted. 'What's with @FoxNews?' During the town hall, Sanders noted the blowback he'd gotten from some Democrats for appearing on Fox and took a few shots at the network, at one point drawing a rebuke from Baier. 'We are very grateful that you're here,' Baier said. 'We are giving you an hour of substance and talk on our airwaves so we can get over the Fox thing, if you're alright with that,' he said. Fox says it is in talks with other Democrats to have town halls on the network, but hasn't said who. Democratic National Committee head Tom Perez said earlier Monday that the organization was not reconsidering its decision in February not to hold any of its upcoming debates on the network. He was responding to a question from Fox's Bill Hemmer about upcoming debates, which the DNC has scheduled on NBC News and CNN. Fox chose not to pre-empt its opinionated prime-time lineup of Tucker Carlson, Sean Hannity and Laura Ingraham to show Sanders on Monday. The prime-time hosts spent relatively little time on the Sanders appearance that had preceded their shows. 'You saw crazy Bernie on the air tonight,' Hannity said during his monologue. 'That was hard to watch. ... Let's hear every communist idea we possibly can.
  • Erik Brunetti's four-letter fashion brand starts with an 'F'' and rhymes with 'duct.' The federal government calls it 'scandalous' and 'immoral' and has refused to register the trademark. Brunetti has a different word for his brand and designs: 'thought-provoking.' 'We wanted the viewer to question it: Like, is that pronounced the way I think it's pronounced?' he said of his streetwear brand 'FUCT,' which began selling clothing in 1991. On Monday, the Supreme Court will hear Brunetti's challenge to a part of federal law that says officials should refuse to register trademarks that are 'scandalous' or 'immoral.' Brunetti says it should be struck down as an unconstitutional restriction on speech. The government is defending the century-old provision. The Trump administration says in court papers that the law encourages trademarks that are appropriate for all audiences. It argues it isn't restricting speech but rather declining to promote it. Brunetti and others like him who are denied trademark registration under the 'scandalous' provision can still use the words they wanted to register for their business, nonprofit or brand. They just don't get the benefits that come with registering a trademark. For Brunetti, that would largely mean a better ability to go after counterfeiters who knock off his designs. Brunetti would seem to have a strong argument. Two years ago, the justices unanimously invalidated a related provision of federal law that told officials not to register disparaging trademarks. In that case, an Asian-American rock band sued after the government refused to register its band name, 'The Slants,' because it was seen as offensive to Asians. In court, the justices had no trouble saying the band's name, but Brunetti's brand may be different. His lawyer, John R. Sommer, says he plans to say the individual letters of the name, 'F-U-C-T,' which Brunetti sometimes does too. Another possible workaround: explaining the brand is something of an acronym for 'Friends U Can't Trust.' Part of Sommer's argument is what he sees as the arbitrary nature of the United States Patent and Trademark Office's decisions about what gets tagged as scandalous or immoral. A lawyer working for the office who is from the South might find something 'not nice' that wouldn't faze a lawyer from the Bronx, Sommer said. That means 'you can register profanity if you're lucky' and you get assigned a lawyer who allows it, Sommer said. Two New York University professors gave that argument substantial support in a brief they filed in the case. They showed that the office routinely refuses to register trademarks both by saying something is scandalous and, ironically, too confusingly similar to something that is already registered. For example, the office refused to register 'FUK!T' for being scandalous and immoral but also confusingly similar to the already-registered 'PHUKIT.' ''MIDDLEFINGER' was denied after 'JONNY MIDDLEFINGER' was registered, and 'Ko Kane' was rejected after 'Kokanee' was registered. And those are just some printable examples. Brunetti said the trademark office has registered trademarks 'far more offensive than my mark.' The trademark office declined to comment on the case. If Brunetti wins, the public is unlikely to notice a whole lot of change, his lawyer said. Retailers will decide what products are appropriate for their customers, and Target and Walmart aren't going to carry Brunetti's brand, Sommer said. Brunetti hopes a victory at the high court will help him pursue counterfeiters. In the nearly 30 years since he began his company from his bedroom in Venice, California, he's produced thousands of clothing designs. Some of the best known are parodies involving the Ford logo and 'Planet of the Apes.' These days, he directs a staff of four from a downtown Los Angeles office. They release new clothing on their website about once a month. Some items have sold out in less than a minute, and new collections are always sold out in under three days, Brunetti said. Because of the items' scarcity, some are resold on eBay for a profit, with a T-shirt that cost $40 sometimes fetching more than $100. Brunetti said he's never met anyone truly offended by his brand. 'Most people find it clever,' he said. ___ Follow Jessica Gresko on Twitter at http://twitter.com/jessicagresko

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  • Pope Francis is delivering his annual Easter message Sunday after leading Mass at St. Peter's Square in Vatican City. >> Watch the address here Every year after the Easter Mass, the pope delivers an “Urbi et Orbi” (“to the city and the world”) message, which addresses global issues and conflicts. >> PHOTOS: Pope Francis celebrates Easter Mass at the Vatican This year’s speech comes hours after blasts rocked multiple churches and hotels in Sri Lanka, killing dozens of people and injuring hundreds more. >> Read more trending news  Please return for updates.
  • Explosions hit at least three churches and four hotels in Sri Lanka on Easter Sunday, killing dozens of people and injuring hundreds more, news outlets are reporting. >> PHOTOS: Easter Sunday blasts at Sri Lanka churches, hotels kill dozens Here are the latest updates: Update 5:32 a.m. EDT April 21: Two more blasts have been reported in Sri Lanka. A seventh explosion hit a hotel in Dehiwala, and an eighth blast was reported in the capital, Agence France-Presse is reporting. Update 4:20 a.m. EDT April 21: At least 156 people were killed in blasts at three churches and three hotels in Sri Lanka, Agence France-Presse is reporting. The dead include 35 foreigners, officials said. Update 3:34 a.m. EDT April 21: At least 137 people were killed in blasts at three churches and three hotels in Sri Lanka, Agence France-Presse is reporting. The dead include 45 people in Colombo, 67 in Negombo and 25 in Batticaloa, officials said. At least nine of the people killed were foreigners, the news agency reported. More than 500 people were hurt in the explosions, according to The Associated Press. Original report: Explosions hit three churches and three hotels in Sri Lanka on Easter Sunday, killing dozens of people and injuring nearly 300 more, news outlets are reporting. According to The Associated Press, blasts occurred Sunday morning at St. Anthony’s Shrine in Colombo, St. Sebastian’s Church in Negombo and a church in Batticaloa. Explosions also rocked the Kingsbury, Cinnamon Grand and Shangri La hotels in Colombo, the BBC reported. >> Read more trending news The Agence France-Presse news agency said 52 people died in the blasts. At least 283 people were taken to the hospital, the AP reported. Suicide bombers may have caused at least two of the church blasts, a security official told the AP.  – The Associated Press contributed to this report
  • The Jacksonville Sheriff's Office says a 19-year-old man has been arrested for a deadly double shooting back in February.  JSO asked for your help finding the suspect, Trevon Wiley, just days after the February 16th shooting on Matthew Street; now he's been taken into custody.  According to police, Wiley was sitting in a barber chair next to one of the victims getting their haircut. Police say he then stood up, without saying anything, displayed a gun and then shot the victim multiple times, killing him. Police identified the victim as Ziykye Barnhill. JSO says a second person was shot during this incident, but survived.  Police say multiple witnesses came forward to help with the shooting investigation.  Wiley is charged with murder and attempted murder.
  • The family of a 5-year-old boy thrown from a third-floor balcony at the Mall of America last week says he is making “small steps” as he recovers from his devastating injuries. Landen Hoffman was shopping with his mother and friends around 10:15 a.m. April 12 when Emmanuel Deshawn Aranda, 24, of Minneapolis, is accused of picking the boy up and hurling him over a railing to the first floor nearly 40 feet below. Aranda tried to run, but police, with help from witnesses, found him on a light rail train at the mall and took him into custody.  >> Read more trending news “The family doesn’t know him and are completely clueless as to why this monster would target their family with this heinous act of violence,” a GoFundMe page set up to help with Landen’s medical bills states. As of Friday morning, the page had raised more than $870,000 of its $1 million goal.  Landen, who suffered broken arms and legs and significant head trauma, was initially in critical condition, according to the criminal complaint against Aranda. His condition has since stabilized, but he has a long road to recovery, the GoFundMe page reads.  “(His) condition is again similar to previous days. Another peaceful night of sleep -- small steps towards the healing process. Each new day is a good day,” the page read Thursday.  “Landen's recovery is expected to be ongoing for a long time. While it’s hard to estimate costs, this will change everything for their family and require much of their time and focus.” Aranda is charged with attempted premeditated first-degree murder, according to Hennepin County Attorney Mike Freeman. Aranda is being held in the Hennepin County Jail in lieu of $2 million bond.  >> Related story: Man who threw 5-year-old from third floor of Mall of America intended to kill someone, police say “This crime has shocked the community,” Freeman said in a news release. “That a child, with his mother at a safe public area like a mall, could be violently attacked for no reason is chilling for everyone. Our victim advocates are working with the family during this very difficult time for them. We charged Mr. Aranda with the most severe crime that the evidence allowed.” Bloomington police Chief Jeff Potts said during a news conference Saturday that Aranda was cooperative with detectives. The criminal complaint indicates that Aranda confessed to committing the brazen assault.  Read the criminal complaint against Emmanuel Aranda below. “This is a horrific situation,” Potts said. “The family and this child are in our thoughts and prayers. I know the family appreciates all the thoughts and prayers they can get on this case.” The Hoffman family issued a statement through Freeman’s office showing appreciation for the outpouring of support from the community but requesting privacy as Landen recovers from his life-threatening injuries.  Mall of America officials also praised the outpouring of support. “We are grateful for the efforts of all the first responders involved -- including guests and tenants -- for their immediate actions and the outpouring of concern shown by so many for this young child and his family,” a statement read. “For those who have left gifts, flowers and messages of love at the mall, we thank you. Please know we will keep these items safe and handle them according to the family’s wishes.” The criminal complaint says Aranda told police he had gone to the mall on April 11 intending to kill an adult, but that it did not “work out.” He returned to the mall the next day.  “He said he planned to kill an adult because they usually stand near the balcony, but he chose the victim instead,” the document reads.  Aranda told investigators he chose to kill out of frustration over years of rejection from the opposite sex.  “Defendant indicated he had been coming to the mall for several years and had made efforts to talk to women in the mall, but had been rejected,” the complaint says. “The rejection caused him to lash out and be aggressive.”  Aranda admitted he knew what he did was wrong. “Defendant acknowledged repeatedly in his interview that he had planned and intended to kill someone at the mall that day, and that he was aware that what he was doing was wrong,” the document says.  According to the criminal complaint, surveillance camera footage shows Aranda walking on the third floor of the mall and looking over the balcony several times before approaching Landen and his mother.  Landen’s mother told detectives she saw Aranda approach and stand very close to her and her son, the newspaper reported. She asked him if he needed them to move. “Without warning, defendant picked up the victim and threw him off the third floor balcony in front of (Landen’s mother) and several other witnesses, including children,” the complaint states.  Witnesses told the Minneapolis Star Tribune they heard screaming after the boy went over the railing. “Oh my God! Pray for my son!” Landen’s mother begged, witnesses told the newspaper.  Potts said Saturday that Aranda previously was arrested at the Mall of America. Officers were called there in July 2015 after Aranda was seen throwing an object from the third floor.  “When the officers tried to speak with him, he became … he was not cooperative,” Potts said.  Aranda was charged in that incident with obstruction, disorderly conduct and damage to property, the chief said.  Watch the update from Bloomington police Chief Jeff Potts below.  He was also accused of trespassing at the mall previously after he threw a glass of water in a woman’s face and destroyed property, the criminal complaint says. It was not clear if that was the same incident Potts spoke about during his news conference.  Aranda had been banned from the mall, but apparently ignored the ban.  Aranda next came in contact with Bloomington police officers at a local restaurant, where he refused to pay his bill, Potts said. In a third 2015 incident, Aranda was accused of throwing a glass at a worker at a different restaurant.  He was charged with fifth-degree assault, trespassing, disorderly conduct and obstructing legal process in the third case. That was the last contact Bloomington officers had with Aranda prior to the alleged assault at the mall last week.  The Star Tribune reported that Aranda was also previously arrested for smashing computers at a public library in Minneapolis. At that time, he told arresting officers he has “anger issues,” the newspaper said.  Court records indicate Aranda has a string of arrests and convictions in Minnesota, as well as charges of assault and theft in Illinois, the Star Tribune reported. The criminal complaint indicates he had an outstanding warrant for assault in Illinois.  Judges have repeatedly ordered him to undergo mental health treatment, as well as to abstain from alcohol and drugs, the newspaper reported.  Prosecutors are taking Aranda’s latest Mall of America attack very seriously.  “The state intends to pursue an aggravated sentence based on particular cruelty to the victim, particular vulnerability of the victim and the commission of the act in the presence of other children and the victim’s mother,” the criminal complaint says.  The Mall of America website states that the facility “holds itself to the highest standards” when it comes to its security. It has 175 security officers on the payroll.  “We pride ourselves on our high caliber officers, training and forward-thinking attitude,” the webpage reads. “We take a holistic approach with our industry leading programs and practices which include bike patrol, K-9 units, special operations plain clothes officers, a state-of-the art dispatch center, parental escort policy, crisis planning and lockdown drills. “We are a unique property and we protect it as such.”
  • In a series of interviews Friday, White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders stood by her 2017 comments around the dismissal of FBI director James Comey despite telling special counsel Robert Mueller that her statements were made “’in the heat of the moment’” and “not founded on anything.” >> Read more trending news During a news conference after Comey’s abrupt firing in May 2017, Huckabee Sanders told reporters the White House had “heard from countless members of the FBI” who had lost confidence in Comey. However, Mueller’s team found, “The evidence does not support those claims,” according to the special counsel’s report. >> Mueller report: Key findings from the investigation “Sanders told this Office that her reference to hearing from ‘countless members of the FBI’ was a ‘slip of the tongue,’” investigators said in the Mueller report, which was redacted and released Thursday by U.S. Attorney General William Barr. Huckabee Sanders disputed the special counsel’s interpretation of her comments in an interview Friday with “CBS This Morning,” telling morning show anchors that she only meant to say the word “countless” was a slip of the tongue. >> Mueller investigation: Read the report “The big takeaway here is that the sentiment is 100 percent accurate,” Huckabee Sanders said. “The FBI is a better place without James Comey.” In an interview with “Good Morning America,” Huckabee Sanders insisted “there were a number of FBI, both former (and) current), that agreed with the president’s decision.” >> Mueller investigation: House committee subpoenas full report “I said that the word I used, countless … If you look (at) what’s in quotations from me, it’s that and it was ‘in the heat of the moment,’ meaning that it wasn’t a scripted talking point,” she said. “I’m sorry that I wasn’t a robot like the Democratic Party.” Despite her insistence that her comments about FBI support for Comey’s dismissal were “in the heat of the moment,” Politico noted she told reporters similar things on at least one other occasion, one day after making her initial comment about “countless members of the FBI.” “I can speak to my own personal experience,” she said in 2017, according to Politico. “I’ve heard from countless members of the FBI that are grateful and thankful for the president’s decision.”

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