ON AIR NOW

LISTEN NOW

Weather

cloudy-day
86°
Mostly Cloudy
H 92° L 76°
  • cloudy-day
    86°
    Current Conditions
    Mostly Cloudy. H 92° L 76°
  • cloudy-day
    83°
    Evening
    Mostly Cloudy. H 92° L 76°
  • cloudy-day
    77°
    Morning
    Partly Cloudy. H 92° L 76°
LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

The latest top stories

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

The latest traffic report

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

The latest forecast

00:00 | 00:00

    Newspapers from Maine to Hawaii pushed back against President Donald Trump's attacks on 'fake news' Thursday with a coordinated series of editorials speaking up for a free and vigorous press. The Boston Globe, which set the campaign in motion by urging the unified voice, had estimated that some 350 newspapers would participate. They did across the breadth of the country. The Portland (Maine) Press-Herald said a free and independent press is the best defense against tyranny, while the Honolulu Star-Advertiser emphasized democracy's need for a free press. 'The true enemies of the people — and democracy — are those who try to suffocate truth by vilifying and demonizing the messenger,' wrote the Des Moines Register in Iowa. In St. Louis, the Post-Dispatch called journalists 'the truest of patriots.' The Chicago Sun-Times said it believed most Americans know that Trump is talking nonsense. The Fayetteville Observer said it hoped Trump would stop, 'but we're not holding our breath.' 'Rather, we hope all the president's supporters will recognize what he's doing — manipulating reality to get what he wants,' the North Carolina newspaper said. On Thursday morning, Trump again took to Twitter to denounce 'fake news.' He wrote: 'The Boston Globe, which was sold to the the Failing New York Times for 1.3 BILLION DOLLARS (plus 800 million dollars in losses & investment), or 2.1 BILLION DOLLARS, was then sold by the Times for 1 DOLLAR. Now the Globe is in COLLUSION with other papers on free press. PROVE IT!' That followed this tweet from the president: 'THE FAKE NEWS MEDIA IS THE OPPOSITION PARTY. It is very bad for our Great Country....BUT WE ARE WINNING!' The Morning News of Savannah, Georgia, said that it was a confidant, not an enemy, to the people. 'Like any true friend, we don't always tell you want you want to hear,' the Morning News said. 'Our news team presents the happenings and issues in this community through the lens of objectivity. And like any true friend, we refuse to mislead you. Our reporters and editors strive for fairness.' Some newspapers used history lessons to state their case. The Elizabethtown Advocate in Pennsylvania, for instance, compared free press in the United States to such rights promised but not delivered in the former Soviet Union. The New York Times added a pitch. 'If you haven't already, please subscribe to your local papers,' said the Times, whose opinion section also summarized other editorials across the country. 'Praise them when you think they've done a good job and criticize them when you think they could do better. We're all in this together.' That last sentiment made some journalists skittish. Some newspapers, including the Wall Street Journal and the San Francisco Chronicle, wrote editorials explaining why they weren't joining the Globe's effort. The Chronicle wrote that one of its most important values is independence, and going along with the crowd went against that. Both the Chronicle and Baltimore Sun said that it plays into the hands of Trump and his supporters who think the media is out to get him. Nolan Finley, columnist and editorial page editor of The Detroit News, spoke up for the press but added a scolding. He said too many journalists are slipping opinion into their news reports, adding commentary and calling it context. 'Donald Trump is not responsible for the eroding trust in the media,' Finley wrote. 'He lacks the credibility to pull that off. The damage to our standing is self-inflicted.' The Radio Television Digital News Association, which represents more than 1,200 broadcasters and web sites, is also asking its members to point out that journalists are friends and neighbors doing important work holding government accountable. 'I want to make sure that it is positive,' said Dan Shelley, the group's executive director. 'We're shooting ourselves in the foot if we make this about attacking the president or attacking his supporters.' It remains unclear how much sway the effort will have. Newspaper editorial boards overwhelmingly opposed Trump's election in 2016. Polls show Republicans have grown more negative toward the news media in recent years: Pew Research Center said 85 percent of Republicans and Republican-leaning independents said in June 2017 that the news media has a negative effect on the country, up from 68 percent in 2010. ___ Associated Press correspondents Hannah Fingerhut, Skip Foreman, Amanda Kell, Jack Jones, Herb McCann, David Runk and Juliet Williams contributed to this report.
  • Republicans on Wednesday condemned a poster by Pearl Jam that shows the White House in flames and a bald eagle pecking at a skeleton they say is meant to depict President Donald Trump. The National Republican Senate Committee compared it to the now-infamous photo of comedian Kathy Griffin holding a fake decapitated Trump head. The rock group's Twitter account says the official poster from Monday's concert in Missoula, Montana, is a collaboration between bassist Jeff Ament and Bobby Brown, an artist also known as Bobby Draws Skulls. The 'Rock2Vote' concert aimed to encourage young people to vote in the November midterm elections and support Democratic U.S. Sen. Jon Tester of Montana, who is from Ament's hometown of Big Sandy. Ament was unapologetic in an emailed statement Wednesday. 'The role of the artist is to make people think and feel, and the current administration has us thinking and feeling,' Ament said in the statement. 'I was the sole conceptualist of this poster, and I welcome all interpretations and discourse.' He ended the statement, 'Love, from the First Amendment, Jeff Ament.' The poster shows Tester in a tractor flying over a burning Washington, D.C., framed by the letters 'P'' and 'J,' with smoke forming the word 'Vote' in the background. Several objects and people are in the foreground, including a skeleton with a full head of hair lying face down, an eagle pecking at the bones of its foot. Tester's Republican opponent, Montana State Auditor Matt Rosendale, also is depicted with a crab claw for a hand and carrying a 'Maryland' flag, a reference to Rosendale's native state. The message from Ament accompanying the poster included the description: 'D.C. burning. Tester Evel Knievel on tractor ... over the cesspool below. Russian money, golf courses, hookers? Maryland Matt. Stars and Stripes as flames.' Rosendale called the poster 'disgusting and reprehensible' and called on Tester to 'denounce this act of violence and blatant display of extremism.' The National Republican Senate Committee, which is supporting Rosendale's campaign, also blamed Tester for not speaking out against the poster it called 'gory.' The committee compared it to other examples of public figures 'encouraging violence' against Trump, like Griffin's photo. Tester officials said the campaign had nothing to do with the poster. 'We never saw the poster before the show and we don't like it,' Tester spokesman Chris Meagher said. 'And we don't condone violence of any kind.' Ament told The Associated Press in April that the band wanted to use the Montana concert to support local advocacy groups, encourage voter participation and boost Tester's campaign. He said he believed that the political climate had become too divisive. 'Probably more than ever it's important to have a congressman that can sort of make people think less emotionally about some of these things,' he said.
  • For years, Omarosa Manigault Newman stood at Donald Trump's side, making her deeply unpopular with African-Americans who see her as a sellout for aligning herself with a president who has hurled one insult after another at black people. Her falling out with Trump and her decision to call him a racist as she sells her new book — and in turn, his calling her a 'dog' — have not been enough for many African-Americans to invite her back to the family picnic. Too little, too late, many said. 'Her tell-all mea culpa won't win her any brownie points with most blacks,' said Earl Ofari Hutchinson, author of the book 'Why Black Lives Do Matter.' ''Their loathing of Omarosa is virtually frozen in stone. She's still roundly lambasted as a two-bit opportunist, a racial sellout and an ego driven hustler.' Few in the black community immediately rushed to defend Manigault Newman after she wrote a book titled 'Unhinged' about her time in the White House. It paints a damning picture of Trump, claiming without evidence that tapes exist of him using the N-word as he filmed 'The Apprentice' reality series, on which she co-starred. She has since stepped up her attacks on Trump as she promotes her book, telling The Associated Press on Tuesday that the president is 'a racist, a misogynist, a bigot.' 'I want to see this nation united as opposed to divided,' she said. 'I don't want to see a race war, as Donald Trump does.' The deep hostility that African-Americans harbor for Manigault Newman stems largely from her defense of the president or her public silence as he repeatedly attacked the American citizenship of former President Barack Obama; insulted various minority groups and described some African nations as 'shithole' countries. He has also insulted prominent blacks like U.S. Rep. Maxine Waters and NBA superstar LeBron James, said that 'many sides' are to blame for the violence at last year's white nationalist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, and ripped African-American athletes for protesting racial injustice. As the highest-profile African-American on the White House staff, she pushed back on accusations that Trump was racist. She once told PBS' 'Frontline,' ''Every critic, every detractor will have to bow down under President Trump.' In the book, Manigault Newman suggests she joined Trump's campaign — despite the misgivings she said she had about her longtime friend and mentor — after an arrangement to join Democrat Hillary Clinton's campaign fell through and left her feeling spurned. She writes that Trump and his campaign were 'eager for my help' and she wanted to experience working on a campaign at a 'high level.' And, 'since Trump had little chance of winning, it would be 'no harm, no foul' for me to have worked with the campaign for however long it lasted,' she wrote. She now says he 'used' her, calling him a 'con' who 'has been masquerading as someone who is actually open to engaging with diverse communities' but is 'truly a racist.' Trump ratcheted up his rhetoric against Manigault Newman on Tuesday. 'When you give a crazed, crying lowlife a break, and give her a job at the White House, I guess it just didn't work out,' Trump said. 'Good work by General Kelly for quickly firing that dog!' John Kelly is the White House chief of staff. Many condemned the president and his repeated attempts to compare minorities with animals, but there was little defense of Manigault Newman — unlike when Trump attacked NBA superstar LeBron James in recent weeks. 'We should not mistake anything that has happened here as to be Omarosa in any way purporting be a benefit to the African-American community,' said Aisha Moodie-Mills, a Democratic strategist. More than 8 in 10 blacks said they thought Trump was racist in a February poll by The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research. More than 9 in 10 of African-Americans disapproved of how Trump is handling his job as president. Manigault Newman has been associated with Trump for more than a decade. Minimal association with Trump, like taking a photograph with the president in the Oval Office, was enough for protesters to decry Historically Black Colleges and University presidents on their own campuses last year. Black ministers who met with Trump are being criticized by their colleagues and some by their congregations. Among the criticized is Darrell Scott, an African-American pastor from Ohio who declared 'This is probably going be ... the most pro-black president that we've had in our lifetime.' Raynard Jackson, a black Republican who has worked on GOP presidential, gubernatorial and local campaigns, said Manigault Newman secretly recording Trump and other White House officials will make her a pariah in conservative circles as well. 'There is absolutely no way she can redeem herself. Who is going to trust her ever again?' Jackson said. 'Recording someone under these circumstances is the political equivalent of spitting on a man.' Conservative commentator Armstrong Williams said he's known Manigault Newman since she was 19 and will always consider her a friend. But 'Omarosa can't be trusted,' he said. 'There's an issue when you can't be trusted and can't be loyal.' As her feud with Trump intensified, Manigault Newman's relationship with the black community became the topic of many conversations among African-Americans, especially on social media. Some offered hope for Manigault Newman, however conditional. If Omarosa 'is the one to get some traction on people seeing how truly raggedy this administration is enough to take action... we should reconsider letting her get a to-go plate from the cookout. Someone can take it to her,' tweeted Bari A. Williams, an Oakland lawyer and business operations executive. ___ Associated Press writer Darlene Superville contributed to this report. ___ Jesse J. Holland covers race and ethnicity for The Associated Press. Contact him at jholland@ap.org, on Twitter at http://www.twitter.com/jessejholland.
  • In a night of firsts, Democrats in Vermont's primary chose the nation's first transgender gubernatorial nominee. In Minnesota, they picked a woman who would be the first Somali-American member of Congress. Connecticut Democrats nominated a candidate who could become the first black woman from the state to serve in Congress. Democrats embraced diversity in Tuesday primaries, while Republicans in Minnesota rejected a familiar face of the GOP old guard in favor of a rising newcomer aligned with President Donald Trump. But Minnesota Democrats also backed a national party leader who is facing accusations of domestic violence. He has denied the allegations, yet they threaten to undercut enthusiasm in his state and beyond. On the other side, Trump tightened his grip on the modern-day Republican Party as the turbulent 2018 primary season lurched toward its finale. A one-time Trump critic, former two-term Minnesota Gov. Tim Pawlenty lost a comeback attempt he was expected to win. Trump fired off a celebratory tweet Wednesday, hailing 'Great Republican election results' and adding 'Red Wave!' He also endorsed a series of candidates in Wisconsin, including Bryan Steil who won the GOP primary for the House seat held by Speaker Paul Ryan and Leah Vukmir, who will face Democratic Sen. Tammy Baldwin in November. All but 10 states picked their candidates for November's general election by the time the day's final votes were counted. While the full political battlefield isn't quite set, the stakes are clear: Democrats are working to topple Republican control of Congress and governors' offices across the nation. Four states held primaries Tuesday: Vermont, Connecticut, Minnesota and Wisconsin. Kansas' gubernatorial primary, which was held last week, was finalized when Republican Gov. Jeff Colyer conceded defeat. In Minnesota, Republican County Commissioner Jeff Johnson defeated Pawlenty, who once called Trump 'unhinged and unfit' and was hoping to regain his old post. In Wisconsin, Gov. Scott Walker, endorsed just this week by Trump, won the right to seek a third term. The president's pick for Kansas governor, Secretary of State Kris Kobach, scored a delayed victory against Colyer, who became the first incumbent governor to fall this season. In Vermont, Democrat Christine Hallquist won the Democratic nomination in her quest to become the nation's first transgender governor. The former chief executive of Vermont Electric Cooperative bested a field of four Democrats that included a 14-year-old. While she made history on Tuesday, Hallquist faces a difficult path to winning the governor's race. Republican incumbent Phil Scott remains more popular with Democrats than members of his own party in the solidly liberal state. Vermont Democrats also nominated Sen. Bernie Sanders, who hasn't ruled out a second presidential run in 2020, for a third term in the Senate. The 76-year-old democratic socialist won the Democratic nomination, but he is expected to turn it down and run as an independent. Democrats appeared particularly motivated in Wisconsin, where eight candidates lined up for the chance to take on Walker. Walker's strong anti-union policies made him a villain to Democrats long before Trump's rise. State schools chief Tony Evers, who has clashed with Walker at times, won the Democratic nomination and will take on Walker this fall. Once a target of Trump criticism, Walker gained the president's endorsement in a tweet Monday night calling him 'a tremendous Governor who has done incredible things for that Great State.' Trump also starred, informally at least, in Wisconsin's Senate primaries as Republicans try to deny Democratic Sen. Tammy Baldwin a second term. Longtime state lawmaker Leah Vukmir, who was backed by House Speaker Paul Ryan, won the Republican primary, even after struggling to explain footage recently unearthed from 2016 in which she called Trump 'offensive to everyone.' Tuesday's primaries served as a test of Democratic enthusiasm in the upper Midwest, a region that has long been associated with liberal politics but has been trending red. Trump won Wisconsin by less than 1 percentage point in 2016, becoming the first Republican presidential candidate to carry the state since 1984. It was much the same in Minnesota, where Trump lost by less than 3 percentage points in a state that hasn't backed a Republican presidential contender since 1972. Nearly twice as many Minnesota Democrats as Republicans cast ballots in their parties' respective gubernatorial primaries. Pawlenty had been considered the heavy favorite in a two-person Republican contest for his old job. But he struggled to adapt to a GOP that had changed drastically since he left office in 2011 and flamed out early in a 2012 presidential bid. The former two-term governor strained to live down his October 2016 comment that Trump was 'unhinged and unfit for the presidency,' remarks that incensed many Republican voters in Minnesota and beyond. Johnson, his underfunded opponent, circulated Pawlenty's critique far and wide, telling voters that he was a steadfast supporter of the president. Johnson will face Democratic Rep. Tim Walz, who won a three-way race for his party's nomination. Three Minnesota women won Senate nominations, including incumbent Democrats Amy Klobuchar and Tina Smith. Smith, who had been appointed to replace Democrat Al Franken, will face Republican state Sen. Karin Housley, ensuring a woman will hold the seat once held by Franken, who left Congress amid allegations of sexual misconduct toward women. Nationwide, a record number of women are running this year for governor and Congress. Meanwhile, a new scandal threatened to dampen Democratic enthusiasm. Rep. Keith Ellison, the Democratic National Committee's deputy chairman, captured his party's nomination in the race to become the state's attorney general. That's after Ellison's candidacy was rocked by allegations over the weekend of domestic violence amid a broader national outcry against sexual misconduct by powerful men in business, entertainment and politics. Ellison has denied a former girlfriend's allegations that he dragged her off a bed while screaming obscenities during a 2016 relationship she said was plagued by 'narcissistic abuse.' Also in Minnesota, Democrat Ilhan Omar, the nation's first Somali-American legislator, won her party's congressional primary in the race to replace Ellison. In Connecticut, Republican businessman Bob Stefanowski emerged from a field of five Republicans seeking to replace the unpopular outgoing governor, Democrat Dan Malloy. Former gubernatorial candidate Ned Lamont won the Democratic nomination. Connecticut Democrats picked former teacher of the year, Jahana Hayes, to run for the seat being vacated by Rep. Elizabeth Etsy, who is leaving Congress after bungling sexual abuse claims levied against a former staffer. Hayes could become the first black woman from the state to serve in Congress. ___ Peoples reported from Washington. Associated Press writer Scott Bauer in Madison, Wisconsin, contributed to this report.
  • Democrats embraced diversity Tuesday in a primary night of firsts, while Republicans in Minnesota rejected a familiar face of the GOP old guard in favor of a rising newcomer aligned with President Donald Trump. In Vermont, Democrats rallied behind the nation's first transgender nominee for governor. Minnesota Democrats backed a woman who would be the first Somali-American member of Congress. And in Connecticut, the party nominated a candidate who could become the first black woman from the state to serve in Congress. Still, Democrats in Minnesota also backed a national party leader who is facing accusations of domestic violence. He has denied the allegations, yet they threaten to undercut enthusiasm in his state and beyond. On the other side, Trump tightened his grip on the modern-day Republican Party as the turbulent 2018 primary season lurched toward its finale. A one-time Trump critic, former two-term Minnesota Gov. Tim Pawlenty, lost a comeback attempt he was expected to win. All but 10 states picked their candidates for November's general election by the time the day's final votes were counted. While the full political battlefield isn't quite set, the stakes are clear: Democrats are working to topple Republican control of Congress and governors' offices across the nation. Four states held primaries Tuesday: Vermont, Connecticut, Minnesota and Wisconsin. Kansas' gubernatorial primary, which was held last week, was finalized when Republican Gov. Jeff Colyer conceded defeat. In Minnesota, Republican County Commissioner Jeff Johnson defeated Pawlenty, who once called Trump 'unhinged and unfit' and was hoping to regain his old post. In Wisconsin, Gov. Scott Walker, endorsed just this week by Trump, won the right to seek a third term. The president's pick for Kansas governor, Secretary of State Kris Kobach, scored a delayed victory against Colyer, who became the first incumbent governor to fall this season. In Vermont, Democrat Christine Hallquist won the Democratic nomination in her quest to become the nation's first transgender governor. The former chief executive of Vermont Electric Cooperative bested a field of four Democrats that included a 14-year-old. While she made history on Tuesday, Hallquist faces a difficult path to the governor's mansion. Republican incumbent Phil Scott remains more popular with Democrats than members of his own party in the solidly liberal state. Vermont Democrats also nominated Sen. Bernie Sanders, who hasn't ruled out a second presidential run in 2020, for a third term in the Senate. The 76-year-old democratic socialist won the Democratic nomination, but he is expected to turn it down and run as an independent. Democrats appeared particularly motivated in Wisconsin, where eight candidates lined up for the chance to take on Walker. Walker's strong anti-union policies made him a villain to Democrats long before Trump's rise. State schools chief Tony Evers, who has clashed with Walker at times, won the Democratic nomination and will take on Walker this fall. Once a target of Trump criticism, Walker gained the president's endorsement in a tweet Monday night calling him 'a tremendous Governor who has done incredible things for that Great State.' Trump also starred, informally at least, in Wisconsin's Senate primaries as Republicans try to deny Democratic Sen. Tammy Baldwin a second term. Longtime state lawmaker Leah Vukmir, who was backed by House Speaker Paul Ryan, won the Republican primary, even after struggling to explain footage recently unearthed from 2016 in which she called Trump 'offensive to everyone.' Tuesday's primaries served as a test of Democratic enthusiasm in the upper Midwest, a region that has long been associated with liberal politics but has been trending red. Trump won Wisconsin by less than 1 percentage point in 2016, becoming the first Republican presidential candidate to carry the state since 1984. It was much the same in Minnesota, where Trump lost by less than 3 percentage points in a state that hasn't backed a Republican presidential contender since 1972. Nearly twice as many Minnesota Democrats as Republicans cast ballots in their parties' respective gubernatorial primaries. Pawlenty had been considered the heavy favorite in a two-person Republican contest for his old job. But he struggled to adapt to a GOP that had changed drastically since he left office in 2011 and flamed out early in a 2012 presidential bid. The former two-term governor strained to live down his October 2016 comment that Trump was 'unhinged and unfit for the presidency,' remarks that incensed many Republican voters in Minnesota and beyond. Johnson, his underfunded opponent, circulated Pawlenty's critique far and wide, telling voters that he was a steadfast supporter of the president. Johnson will face Democratic Rep. Tim Walz, who won a three-way race for his party's nomination. Three Minnesota women won Senate nominations, including incumbent Democrats Amy Klobuchar and Tina Smith. Smith, who had been appointed to replace disgraced Democrat Al Franken, will face Republican state Sen. Karin Housley, ensuring a woman will hold the seat once held by Franken, who left Congress amid allegations of sexual misconduct toward women. Nationwide, a record number of women are running this year for governor and Congress. Meanwhile, a new scandal threatened to dampen Democratic enthusiasm. Rep. Keith Ellison, the Democratic National Committee's deputy chairman, captured his party's nomination in the race to become the state's attorney general. That's after Ellison's candidacy was rocked by allegations over the weekend of domestic violence amid a broader national outcry against sexual misconduct by powerful men in business, entertainment and politics. Ellison has denied a former girlfriend's allegations that he dragged her off a bed while screaming obscenities during a 2016 relationship she said was plagued by 'narcissistic abuse.' Also in Minnesota, Democrat Ilhan Omar, the nation's first Somali-American legislator, won her party's congressional primary in the race to replace Ellison. In Connecticut, Republican businessman Bob Stefanowski emerged from a field of five Republicans seeking to replace the unpopular outgoing governor, Democrat Dan Malloy. Former gubernatorial candidate Ned Lamont won the Democratic nomination. Connecticut Democrats picked former teacher of the year, Jahana Hayes, to run for the seat vacated by Rep. Elizabeth Etsy, who is leaving Congress after bungling sexual abuse claims levied against a former staffer. Hayes could become the first black woman from the state to serve in Congress. ___ Peoples reported from Washington. Associated Press writer Scott Bauer in Madison, Wisconsin, contributed to this report.
  • Former White House aide Omarosa Manigault Newman declared that she 'will not be silenced' by President Donald Trump, remaining defiant as her public feud with her former boss appeared to shift to a possible legal battle. In an interview Tuesday with The Associated Press, Manigault Newman, who is promoting her new book about her time in Trump's orbit, said she believes the president's campaign is trying to keep her from telling her story. She commented just hours after Trump's campaign announced it was filing an arbitration action against her, alleging violations of a secrecy agreement she signed. 'I will not be intimidated,' she told the AP. 'I'm not going to be bullied by Donald Trump.' Still, the former reality TV star-turned-political aide declined to answer several questions about her experiences during her year as the highest-ranking African-American aide in Trump's White House, citing the arbitration action. She said she'd been interviewed by special counsel Robert Mueller's office, but would not discuss details. But Manigault Newman insisted she pushed for diversity at the White House, which currently has no African-American in a senior role following her departure. Manigault Newman continued to unleash scathing criticism of the 72-year-old Trump, saying he's in mental decline and unfit to be president, and is intentionally sowing racial division. She accused him of using his rowdy political rallies to divide, even suggesting Trump is promoting violence. Discussing the differences between their views, she said: 'One, I want to see this nation united as opposed to divided. I don't want to see a race war as Donald Trump does.' The White House counters that Manigault Newman is a disgruntled former staffer with credibility and character issues who is now trying to profit through false attacks against someone she has worked with and supported for more than a decade, including his presidential campaign. 'She worked here for a year and didn't have any of these things to say,' White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders told reporters in Washington. 'In fact, everything she said was quite the opposite. And not just the year that she worked here, but the time that she spent on the campaign trail and I think it's really sad what she's doing at this point.' Manigault Newman, who has known Trump since she was a contestant in 2003 on his reality TV show, 'The Apprentice,' said his proclivity for racial division is evident 'when you see at every single opportunity he insults African-Americans.' She noted, as examples, Trump's recent criticism of NBA player LeBron James and California Democratic Rep. Maxine Waters. Trump recently tweeted that it took the 'dumbest man on television' — also an African-American — to make James 'look smart,' and he regularly refers to Waters as 'low I.Q.' 'He wants to divide this nation,' said Manigault Newman, who spoke to the AP during the publicity tour for her book, 'Unhinged,' in which she portrays Trump as racist and misogynistic. 'He wants to pit his base against successful African-Americans,' she said. 'He uses his rallies to really encourage people to bring down African-Americans. That is truly evidence that this man is not trying to unite us. But he is specifically trying to divide us.' In addition to speaking publicly about her experiences in Trump's White House, Manigault Newman has been releasing audio recordings of conversations and meetings held in the building, including a snippet of one she says is of her telephone conversation with Trump the day after she was fired in December by White House chief of staff John Kelly. She declined Tuesday to answer questions about her recordings, which she has described as a 'treasure trove,' and the extent to which colleagues are secretly recording each other at the White House, again citing the arbitration action. But she defended herself against criticism that she didn't do enough to help African-Americans. She noted that hiring and personnel were the responsibility of others in the White House, but said she has 'tons and tons of emails' in which she pushed job candidates for consideration. 'And it just didn't seem good enough for this White House,' Manigault Newman said, suggesting the president is uninterested having a diverse staff. 'There is no excuse that there's not another African-American assistant to the president. No excuse whatsoever.' She talked about helping secure funding for the nation's historically black colleges and universities, of which she is a graduate. __ Associated Press writer Laurie Kellman in Washington contributed to this report. ___ Follow Darlene Superville on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/dsupervilleap
  • President Donald Trump unloaded on former aide Omarosa Manigault Newman, calling her a 'crazed, crying lowlife' and 'that dog,' as a clash rooted in the reality star's accusations of racism focused new attention on his frequent disparagement of prominent African-Americans. The public conflict showed no signs of slowing, as Manigault Newman did another round of interviews to promote her tell-all book and Trump's presidential campaign filed arbitration action against her alleging she breached a confidentiality agreement. Manigault Newman, who has painted a damning picture of Trump and alleged there is a videotape of him using a racial slur, told The Associated Press she is not going away. 'I will not be silenced. I will not be intimidated. And I'm not going to be bullied by Donald Trump,' she said. Trump, who has denied the existence of any such tape, assailed Manigault Newman in language that stood out even by his trash-talking standards, praising his chief of staff, John Kelly, 'for quickly firing that dog!' That slam follows a pattern of inflammatory language about women and minorities. In 2015, shortly before he launched his campaign, Trump described Huffington Post founder Arianna Huffington as 'a dog.' He has recently targeted California Rep. Maxine Waters, basketball star LeBron James and TV journalist Don Lemon, all African-Americans, and has repeatedly attacked black football players for kneeling during the national anthem in social protest. Manigault Newman told the AP that 'at every single opportunity he insults African-Americans,' and she accused him of trying to start a 'race war.' During the campaign and her White House tenure, Manigault Newman, who was the highest-ranking black official in the West Wing, stood by Trump even at moments of racial strife, including the clashes between white supremacists and counterprotesters in Charlottesville, Virginia, and Trump's targeting of NFL players kneeling during the national anthem in social protest. Fired by Kelly in December, Manigault Newman now says many of Trump's actions gave her pause but she was sympathetic to him as a longtime friend and mentor. In her book, she casts herself as a strong black woman who overcame humble beginnings and has often navigated hostile work environments with aplomb. Now she is aligning herself with Trump's victims, said Leah Wright Rigueur, a historian at Harvard's Kennedy School of Government. 'She's drawing a direct line of comparison between herself and other black women Trump has attacked,' Rigueur said. 'She's suggesting that the president is racist and sexist and using herself as evidence.' White House spokeswoman Sarah Huckabee Sanders insisted Tuesday that the president's insults were not racially motivated, saying: 'This has absolutely nothing to do with race and everything to do with the president calling out someone's integrity.' A contestant on the first season of Trump's TV show 'The Apprentice' and a veteran of reality television, Manigault Newman has managed her explosive book tour for maximum effect, conducting back-to-back interviews and teasing out new bits of information in each one, successfully baiting the television-watching president. Central to her argument that Trump is racist is her claim that she had heard an audiotape of him using the N-word. Trump has pushed back hard, tweeting that he had received a call from the producer of 'The Apprentice' assuring him 'there are NO TAPES of the Apprentice where I used such a terrible and disgusting word as attributed by Wacky and Deranged Omarosa.' White House spokeswoman Sarah Sanders said she could not guarantee Trump had never used a racial slur. Asked if she could say with certainty that Trump had never used the N-word, she said, 'I haven't been in every single room,' though she stressed that the president has addressed the question and denied ever using such language. Manigault Newman continued to stir the pot Tuesday, providing CBS another audio recording that she said showed campaign workers discussing the alleged recording. Her allegations put Trump allies on their heels and clearly got under the president's skin. Trump insisted, 'I don't have that word in my vocabulary, and never have.' He said Manigault Newman had called him 'a true champion of civil rights' until she was fired. Manigault Newman writes in her book that she'd heard such tapes of Trump language existed. She said Sunday that she had listened to one after the book closed. Asked if the book can be backed up by email or recordings, Manigault Newman said on CBS that every quote in the book 'can be verified, corroborated and it's well documented,' suggesting she may have more information to release. She told MSNBC that she's been interviewed by special counsel Robert Mueller's team investigating Russian election interference, though she did not provide any details to the network or the AP. A person familiar with the White House response to the investigation said that at no time prior to her departure did the Mueller team request documents related to her or seek an interview with her. The person insisted on anonymity to discuss the investigation. Manigault Newman also asserted on MSNBC that Trump knew in advance about the release of Hillary Clinton's emails by WikiLeaks, but did not provide any evidence. In her interviews, Manigault Newman has also revealed two audio recordings from her time at the White House, including her firing by Kelly, which she says occurred in the high-security Situation Room, and a phone call with Trump after she was fired. She also alleges that Trump allies tried to buy her silence after she left the White House, offering her $15,000 a month to accept a 'senior position' on his 2020 re-election campaign along with a stringent nondisclosure agreement. ___ Whack reported from Philadelphia. Associated Press writer Darlene Superville in New York contributed to this report.
  • Former White House aide Omarosa Manigault Newman declared Tuesday that she 'will not be silenced' by President Donald Trump, remaining defiant as her public feud with her former boss appeared to shift to a possible legal battle. In an interview with The Associated Press, Manigault Newman, who is promoting her new book about her time in Trump's orbit, said she believes the president's campaign organization is trying to keep her from telling her story. She commented just hours after Trump's campaign announced it was filing an arbitration action against her, alleging violations of a secrecy agreement she signed. 'I will not be intimidated,' she told the AP. 'I'm not going to be bullied by Donald Trump.' Still, the former reality TV star-turned-political aide declined to answer several questions about her experiences during her year as the highest-ranking African-American aide in Trump's White House, citing the arbitration action. She said she'd been interviewed by special counsel Robert Mueller's office, but would not discuss details. She did defend herself against criticism that she didn't do enough to help African-Americans at the White House, which currently has no African-American in a senior role following her departure. Manigault Newman continued to unleash scathing criticism of the 72-year-old Trump, saying he's in mental decline and unfit to be president, and is intentionally sowing racial division. She accused him of using his rowdy political rallies to divide, even suggesting Trump is promoting violence. Discussing the differences between their views, she said: 'One, I want to see this nation united as opposed to divided. I don't want to see a race war as Donald Trump does.' The White House counters that Manigault Newman is a disgruntled former staffer with credibility and character issues who is now trying to profit through false attacks against someone she has worked with and supported for more than a decade, including his presidential campaign. 'She worked here for a year and didn't have any of these things to say,' White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders told reporters in Washington. 'In fact, everything she said was quite the opposite. And not just the year that she worked here, but the time that she spent on the campaign trail and I think it's really sad what she's doing at this point.' Manigault Newman, who has known Trump since she was a contestant in 2003 on his reality TV show, 'The Apprentice,' said his proclivity for racial division is evident 'when you see at every single opportunity he insults African-Americans.' She noted, as examples, Trump's recent criticism of NBA player LeBron James and California Democratic Rep. Maxine Waters. Trump recently tweeted that it took the 'dumbest man on television' — also an African-American — to make James 'look smart,' and he regularly refers to Waters as 'low I.Q.' 'He wants to divide this nation,' said Manigault Newman, who spoke to the AP during the publicity tour for her book, 'Unhinged,' in which she portrays Trump as racist and misogynistic. 'He wants to pit his base against successful African-Americans,' she said. 'He uses his rallies to really encourage people to bring down African-Americans. That is truly evidence that this man is not trying to unite us. But he is specifically trying to divide us.' In addition to speaking publicly about her experiences in Trump's White House, Manigault Newman has been releasing audio recordings of conversations and meetings held in the building, including a snippet of one she says is of her telephone conversation with Trump the day after she was fired in December by White House chief of staff John Kelly. She declined Tuesday to answer questions about her recordings, which she has described as a 'treasure trove,' and the extent to which colleagues are secretly recording each other at the White House, again citing the arbitration action. But she insisted she pushed for diversity in the White House. She noted that hiring and personnel were the responsibility of others, but said she has 'tons and tons of emails' in which she pushed job candidates for consideration. 'And it just didn't seem good enough for this White House,' Manigault Newman said, suggesting the president is uninterested having a diverse staff. 'There is no excuse that there's not another African-American assistant to the president. No excuse whatsoever.' She talked about helping secure funding for the nation's historically black colleges and universities, of which she is a graduate. __ Associated Press writer Laurie Kellman in Washington contributed to this report. ___ Follow Darlene Superville on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/dsupervilleap
  • Keep your friends close and your enemies closer. And, perhaps, your potential leakers closer yet. President Donald Trump's political operation has made a regular practice of providing soft landing-pads for discarded staffers, offering nebulous jobs at big salaries to aides who have been pushed out of his West Wing. The revelation this week that former White House assistant Omarosa Manigault Newman was offered a high-paying job on Trump's re-election campaign in return for signing a non-disclosure agreement was the clearest demonstration yet of how a slot in the Trump orbit is being used to take care of loyalists — and protect against potential liabilities. Manigault Newman, who contends in her new book that she was offered a hush-money contract with the Trump campaign paying $15,000 a month, is hardly the first erstwhile staffer to find a lucrative off-ramp in the expanse of pro-Trump political organizations. The former staff members have found a wide range of rehabilitation within Trump's orbit: his re-election campaign, the Republican National Committee, and outside groups that support both him and Vice President Mike Pence. Keith Schiller, the president's former bodyguard who served for eight months as director of Oval Office operations, has been paid the same $15,000 a month by the Republican National Committee as a security consultant for its national convention — in 2020 in Charlotte. John McEntee, Trump's former personal aide, is paid $14,000 a month by the Trump re-election campaign. One-time Trump campaign manager Corey Lewandowski joined Pence's Great America PAC in May, and former press secretary Sean Spicer was announced in June to replace him as the 'senior advisor and spokesman' for pro-Trump super PAC America First Action. Manigault Newman told MSNBC's 'Hardball' on Monday: 'They told me I could work from home, I didn't have to come in if I didn't want to. ... I could choose between the RNC, America First or the Trump campaign.' She says she said no. Now she has released a book filled with unsavory White House inside stories — Trump says the ones about him are false — and has been playing recordings of the president and others on TV. That's exactly what he wanted to avoid, and his presidential campaign filed an arbitration action against her Tuesday, alleging she had breached a confidentiality agreement she had signed. The outside groups have also become magnets for Trump backers who were not brought into the administration, like Katrina Pierson and Trump daughter-in-law Lara Trump. The all-in the-family approach to taking care of stalwarts is nothing new. But the systematic approach with which Trump White House veterans have been offered plush gigs is. According to aides, it reflects a reality that for some the lucrative private sector jobs that are typically available to exiting White House officials never materialized, while for others, it serves as a way keep them nearby and quiet. Some current and former staffers have struggled to find post-White House jobs — given the conflicted feelings on the Trump administration in Washington — making the campaign or a super PAC an attractive paycheck. And Trump, despite his reality-television catch-phrase, is loath to fire anyone from his inner circle, preferring to keep receiving their public and private adoration. 'When Gen. Kelly came on board he told me she was a loser & nothing but problems,' Trump tweeted about Manigault Newman on Monday. 'I told him to try working it out, if possible, because she only said GREAT things about me - until she got fired!' But the president's venom has grown as she releases recordings she had surreptitiously made of staff and him, undermining West Wing morale and infuriating Trump, who used incendiary language on Twitter Tuesday, writing 'When you give a crazed, crying lowlife a break, and give her a job at the White House, I guess it just didn't work out. Good work by General Kelly for quickly firing that dog' The vitriol Trump unleashed, even exceeding his scorn after it was revealed that adviser Steve Bannon was the source of unflattering comments about the president's family in a book earlier this year, stands in stark contrast to the president's promise that he'd 'surround myself only with the best and most serious people.' Instead, he hired a staff beset by infighting, a Cabinet besieged by ethical questions and a team of aides working under the shadow of the special counsel's Trump-Russia probe. No administration has experienced such a high rate of senior-staff exits, and for the Trump White House it follows the struggles it had filling the building more 18 months ago. Trump himself fostered a culture in which internal squabbles took priority over the shared agenda — in large part, aides say, because he enjoyed the ensuing drama. Now he's trying to keep some of it under wraps. The payments to former officials and aides, though likely legal according to experts, raise questions about the blurring lines inside Trump's world and reflect a fondness for secrecy under the threat of his litigation that was part of his profile as both real estate developer and reality TV star. Trump's 2016 campaign and his re-election operation have both made a practice of requiring staffers to sign expansive non-disclosure agreements that include non-disparagement clauses protecting the president, his family and his businesses. That's the agreement his campaign said Tuesday, in its filing with the American Arbitration Association, that she violated. Frustrated by leaks, Trump was insistent that White House aides also be bound by a similar arrangement. White House Counsel Don McGahn ultimately drafted a short agreement to be signed by senior administration officials to mollify Trump, but it was not universally mandated, and aides were told it was likely unenforceable for government employees. Seven current and former White House aides offered differing stories about the White House agreement, indicative of the inconsistent standard with which it was applied. 'We have confidentiality agreements in the West Wing, absolutely we do,' Trump counsellor Kellyanne Conway told ABC's 'This Week' Sunday. 'And — and why wouldn't we?' ___ Lemire reported from New York. AP writers Catherine Lucey and Jill Colvin contributed.
  • Michael Avenatti, the attorney taking on President Donald Trump on behalf of adult film star Stormy Daniels, offered some details on his policy views Tuesday as he weighs an outsider Democratic bid for the White House. Fresh off a visit to early-voting Iowa, Avenatti said he would release more information over time, but said 'people want to know how I stand on the issues at 20,000 feet.' In a new policy document, Avenatti said he supports a 'basic Medicare plan for all Americans,' with an option to purchase additional coverage, and backed a path to citizenship for the young immigrants known as 'Dreamers.' He also wants to see a national paid family leave program. Marijuana should be decriminalized at the federal level, so-called assault weapons should be banned and the United States should re-join the Paris climate accord, according to Avenatti. Those positions generally align Avenatti with the left flank of potential 2020 Democratic presidential prospects, but he is more moderate on some of the issues. On the federal government's chief immigration enforcement agency, Avenatti said: 'We should not eliminate ICE but we must change the way ICE carries out enforcement.' Some Democrats have gone further. Sen. Kristen Gillibrand told CNN recently that 'You should get rid of it, start over, reimagine it and build something that actually works.' And Sen. Kamala Harris of California has said the government 'maybe' or 'probably' should 'start from scratch' on an immigration enforcement agency. Avenatti is a self-styled provocateur who has gained national attention for representing Daniels in her lawsuit against Trump following an alleged 2006 affair, which the president denies. For months, he's been a fixture on cable news shows, taunting Trump in interviews and baiting him and his lawyers in tweets. Avenatti also has a blistering Twitter feed and a knack for a catchy slogan. He pledged that should he run, he will not take corporate PAC money — putting him in line with a number of potential 2020 prospects. Avenatti is more general on some issues in the brief outline, saying he wants an economic plan that 'delivers good quality jobs' and that college must be 'more affordable for all Americans.' He promised a detailed infrastructure plan called the 'Real Deal.' On trade, he said America must 'be aggressive in dealing with countries that have gamed the system - but smart about how we fight back to avoid inflicting unnecessary harm on American workers and farmers.' And on international relations, he said the United States must 'negotiate denuclearization agreements with North Korea and Iran.' Avenatti said he is studying the issues, consulting experts and will be releasing more information, including a 'detailed economic infrastructure plan in the coming weeks.' The document also serves as a statement of principle for the attorney who has never run for office. It stresses his support for all Americans 'regardless of race, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation or identity.' He fully backs unions and said teachers need more financial support, according to the document.

The Latest News Headlines

  • Musicians, fans and friends of Aretha Franklin, the “Queen of Soul,” are honoring her legacy after news of her death Thursday. Franklin’s publicist said she died at her home in Detroit, according to The Associated Press. She was 76. >> Read more trending news  Fans are remembering Franklin’s singular presence, stage command and legendary performances. >>Related: Aretha Franklin dies at 76 Franklin’s family issued an official statement to The Hollywood Reporter: “In one of the darkest moments of our lives, we are not able to find the appropriate words to express the pain in our heart. We have lost the matriarch and rock of our family. The love she had for her children, grandchildren, nieces, nephews and cousins knew no bounds.  “We have been deeply touched by the incredible outpouring of love and support we have received from close friends, supporters and fans all around the world. Thank you for your compassion and prayers. We have felt your love for Aretha and it brings us comfort to know that her legacy will live on. As we grieve, we ask that you respect our privacy during this difficult time.” Family members confirmed Monday to WDIV-TV that Franklin, 76, was “gravely ill,” after a report from entertainment site Showbiz411 claimed she was being surrounded by friends and family in Detroit. >>Photos: Aretha Franklin through the years Franklin canceled several concerts this year due to health issues, Fox13Memphis reported. According to The Associated Press, “she was ordered by her doctor to stay off the road and rest up.” She performed in her hometown of Detroit in June 2017, the Detroit Free Press reported. She ended the concert with an appeal for those in the crown to, “Please keep me in your prayers,” according to the newspaper. She last performed in November at Elton John’s AIDS Foundation gala in New York City, the News reported. >>Related: The best Aretha Franklin songs: A timeline Franklin was born March 25, 1942, in Memphis, Tennessee. Her family moved to Detroit when she was young, according to Fox13Memphis. Franklin started singing when she was young, with encouragement from her mother, Barbara, and her father, the Rev. C.L. Franklin. She started out singing gospel but launched a career in secular music after she turned 18. She rose to fame after signing in 1967 with Atlantic Records. Franklin’s career, spanning six decades, has spawned hits including “Respect,” “(You Make Me Feel Like) A Natural Woman” and “Chain of Fools.” She’s considered one of the best-selling artists of all time, selling more than 75 million albums worldwide. Franklin was inducted in 1987 to the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame. She’s earned 18 Grammy Awards and a Presidential Medal of Freedom for her work. In 2005, then-President George W. Bush described Franklin as “a woman of achievement, deep character and a loving heart.”
  • One of the development groups behind a plan to build a Convention Center at the Jacksonville Shipyards site, is now putting forward a proposal for “Riverwalk Place”, less than a mile down the street. GALLERY: “Riverwalk Place” in Downtown Jacksonville Jacksonville’s Downtown Investment Authority solicited bids to build a Convention Center, hotel, and parking garage at the site of the old Courthouse and City Hall Annex. Three proposals were returned, including one from Rimrock Devlin DeBartolo Jacksonville, LLC. That group is, in turn, a partnership between Rimrock Devlin Development and DeBartolo Development, LLC.  Despite offering that plan, RDD then partnered with Iguana Investments Florida- which is a development group backed by Jacksonville Jaguars owner Shad Khan- to propose a Convention Center and hotel for the Shipyards site instead. The DIA previously selected Iguana as the master developer for that site, and Iguana is pitching this Convention Center project as the first phase of the overall redevelopment.  GALLERY: Convention Center proposed for Jacksonville Shipyards “We believe the Shipyards is the optimal location for the Convention Center and hotel because of its riverfront location, ability to expand if needed, and synergies gained from its proximity to the existing sports venues and other development activities planned in the immediate aftermath, says DeBartolo Development President and Chief Operating Officer Edward Kobel.  Now, RDD is offering alternate plans for the old Courthouse/Annex site, where the DIA initially imagined the Convention Center potentially being constructed.  “Our alternative development proposal for the Old Courthouse property will serve as a perfect complement and will provide downtown with much needed uses and facilities that will help strengthen the connectivity between the downtown core and sports complex area,” Kobel says.  “Riverwalk Place” is a “mixed-use 24 x 7 lifestyle community”, according to RDD. It includes a 10,000 square foot multi-restaurant venue along the St. Johns River. Along Bay Street, there would be a five-story, 347-unit luxury multi-family apartment complex; nine-story, 150-room limited service hotel; and six-and-a-half story, 468-space parking garage.  “We believe our interwoven plans for the Old Courthouse and Shipyards will help accomplish this goal and we are thrilled to take this next step in pursuing this vision,” says Rimrock Devlin Development’s Wallace Devlin.  RDD believes these proposals together will be an impetus for riverfront development in Downtown, and could also serve to transform the Downtown core overall.  RDD delivered this proposal to the DIA today. It’s not yet clear how the DIA will receive this proposal, as it still has active bids for a Convention Center and hotel at the old Courthouse/Annex site.  These project proposals come as several projects are underway to try to revitalize the area. GALLERY: Shad Khan’s plan for the Jacksonville Shipyards WOKV has brought you an in-depth look at the City’s proposal to take down the Hart Bridge ramps, to further accommodate riverfront development. Khan’s group continues to negotiate the Shipyards redevelopment, and has a greater $2.5 billion redevelopment vision for the Shipyards and Sports Complex combined. The Laura Street Trio is also undergoing redevelopment, Berkman Plaza II was recently sold, and The District is underway on the Southbank.
  • Drain your property of standing water.  The Nassau County Health Department is seeing an increase in West Nile Virus activity in chickens that are used to test for mosquito-borne illness.   There's also been an outbreak of Eastern Equine Encephalitis reported in emus.  According to the Health Department, human infections with EEEV and WNV are asymptomatic or may result in a nonspecific flu-like syndrome with fever and headache.   So far in 2018, there have been four cases of Eastern Equine Encephalitis infection in horses in Nassau, and one outbreak of EEEV reported in emus. Ten sentinel chickens have tested positive for EEEV, and 17 have tested positive for WNV.  Nassau County health officials urge you to avoid being bitten by mosquitoes and to take precautions to help limit your exposure:  -Drain water from garbage cans, house gutters, buckets, pool covers, coolers, toys, flower pots or any other containers where sprinkler or rain water has collected. -Discard old tires, drums, bottles, cans, pots and pans, broken appliances and other items that aren't being used. -Empty and clean birdbaths and pet's water bowls at least once or twice a week. -Protect boats and vehicles from rain with tarps that don’t accumulate water. -Maintain swimming pools in good condition and appropriately chlorinated. Empty plastic swimming pools when not in use.  You are also encouraged to cover your skin with repellent and/or clothing.  Repellents with DEET, picaridin, oil of lemon eucalyptus, para-menthane-diol, and IR3535 are effective.
  • Aretha Franklin is the Queen of Soul, and while her rendition of the national anthem was soulful before Thursday’s NFL game between Detroit and Minnesota, some critics believed the song was too long. Those naysayers were drowned out by Franklin's fans, who said they needed to show a little R-E-S-P-E-C-T. >> Read more trending stories Franklin wore her trademark fur coat and a Detroit beanie to signify her hometown. She sat down at a piano and belted out a 4-minute, 35-second version of “The Star-Spangled Banner.” Her version brought the house down at Detroit's Ford Field, and her performance quickly went viral. For reference, the average length of the last ten Super Bowl national anthems has been just under two minutes. Twitter had a field day with the song’s length, and so did the game’s broadcaster, CBS. The network put up a graphic that showed not only the time of possession by the Lions and Vikings, but also by Franklin. But Franklin’s legion of fans responded in kind, defending the song’s length. “That was a gospel version of the #NationalAnthem,” tweeted John Miller (@jfreemon63) “It's called seasoning folks. Prep takes longer ... but it tastes better.”
  • Former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee was among the passengers on board an American Airlines plane that was quarantined in Nashville early Thursday. That plane has since “been cleared” and the passengers allowed to leave, according to WZTV. Here are the latest updates: Update 9:10 a.m. EDT Aug. 16: Huckabee thanked American Airlines employees for their professionalism  in a tweet Thursday morning. “Kudos to @AmericanAir pilot and crew -- handled medical issue on red eye from LAX to Nashville very professionally,” Huckabee wrote. “We were held for a while as medical personnel made sure the person wasn’t Gwyneth Paltrow from Contagion. Seriously, hope the lady is okay -- taken on gurney.” Airport officials said in a statement released to The Tennessean Thursday morning that American Airlines Flight 1289 was quarantined as a precaution because of fears that a passenger’s recent illness might still be contagious. The plane has since been cleared and all passengers released, according to multiple reports. Officials did not identify the illness. Update 8:40 a.m. EDT Aug. 16: Nashville International Airport spokesperson Shannon Sumrall said in a statement released to The Tennessean that passengers were held Thursday morning on American Airlines Flight 1289 as a precaution because of a passenger’s recent illness. Sumrall told the newspaper that a physician “medically cleared” the passenger ahead of the flight, but that the passenger did not have paperwork to confirm his or her health. “(The passenger) was talking bout the recent illness and other passengers on board became worried of exposure,” Sumrall told The Tennessean. “For safety, passengers were held by BNA (Nashville International Airport) Police until contact was made with the physician to confirm clearance, which it was.” Officials did not identify the illness. Update 7:52 a.m. EDT Aug. 16: The American Airlines passenger who appeared to be ill “has been cleared,” WZTV reports. The passengers are now off the plane, the station said. Original report: Former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee is on board an American Airlines plane that has been quarantined in Nashville, WZTV reports. Flight 1289, which traveled from Los Angeles to Nashville overnight, was detained at Nashville International Airport after a passenger appeared to be sick, an American Airlines spokeswoman told the news station. >> Read more trending news  Huckabee tweeted about the incident early Thursday. “5 hr red eye flight on @AmericanAir Nashville from LA. On ground for 40 min and now told someone on board is sick & we are being towed to other gate and quarantined until all checked out. Can’t get up to go to bathroom or get off plane. It’s the Russians! I just know it!” he wrote just after 6:30 a.m. EDT Thursday. “1 hr after landing got to far away gate where @AmericanAir will hopefully get us off this plane! Medical [personnel] at gate. Hope it’s not because I got that straw in CA,” he added. According to WZTV, “the plane was taken to a remote portion of the airport where emergency personnel were waiting for the plane.” Those on board were instructed to stay put as a Vanderbilt Hospital doctor examined the patient. Read more here.

The Latest News Videos