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    Porn actress Stormy Daniels was scheduled to meet with federal prosecutors in New York on Monday as part of their investigation into President Donald Trump's longtime personal attorney, but the meeting was abruptly cancelled late Sunday after it was reported by news organizations, her attorney said. Daniels, whose real name is Stephanie Clifford, was supposed to meet with prosecutors from the U.S. attorney's office in Manhattan in preparation for a possible grand jury appearance as they work to assemble a case against Trump's longtime personal lawyer, Michael Cohen. But after several news organizations, including The Associated Press, reported on the meeting, two prosecutors called Daniels' lawyer, Michael Avenatti, and told him that they were concerned about media attention in the case, he said. 'I was shocked at that response,' Avenatti said. Avenatti offered to move the meeting to another location and reiterated that Daniels — who he says has been cooperating with prosecutors for months — was ready to go forward with the meeting, but they called back to cancel it, he said. The meeting has not been rescheduled and prosecutors offered no other explanation for the cancellation, he said. Daniels has said she had sex with Trump in 2006 when he was married, which Trump has denied. As part of their investigation into Cohen, prosecutors have been examining the $130,000 payment that was made to Daniels as part of a confidentiality agreement days before the 2016 presidential election. 'We believe canceling the meeting because the press has now caught wind of it is ridiculous,' Avenatti wrote in an email to Assistant U.S. Attorney Nicolas Roos. 'We do not think it was any secret that at some point you were going to meet with my client.' A spokesman for the U.S. attorney's office in Manhattan had declined to comment on the meeting earlier Sunday night and did not immediately respond to messages seeking comment on the cancellation. Daniels is suing to invalidate the confidentiality agreement that prevents her from discussing the alleged relationship with Trump. She argues the nondisclosure agreement should be invalidated because Cohen, signed it, but the president did not. Daniels and Avenatti have also turned over documents in response to a subpoena from federal prosecutors about the $130,000 that Daniels was paid, a person familiar with the matter said. They weren't authorized to discuss the matter publicly and spoke to The Associated Press on condition of anonymity. Daniels' interview had been in preparation for a possible grand jury appearance in the federal investigation into Cohen's business dealings, the person familiar with the matter said. If prosecutors bring a case to a grand jury, they could call witnesses to testify under oath and the grand jury would decide whether to bring criminal charges with a written indictment. In April, FBI agents raided Cohen's home, office and hotel room as part of a probe into his business dealings and investigators were seeking records about the nondisclosure agreement that Daniels had signed, among other things. Cohen had said he paid Daniels himself, through a limited liability company known as Essential Consultants, LLC, and that 'neither the Trump Organization nor the Trump campaign was a party to the transaction with Ms. Clifford, and neither reimbursed me for the payment, either directly or indirectly.' In May, Rudy Giuliani, one of Trump's attorneys, said the president had repaid Cohen for the $130,000 payment to Daniels, contradicting Trump's prior claims that he didn't know the source of the money. Earlier this month, Trump said he hadn't spoken with Cohen — his longtime fixer and a key power player in the Trump Organization — in 'a long time' and that Cohen is 'not my lawyer anymore.' __ Lucey reported from Washington.
  • President Donald Trump is telling 'Tonight Show' host Jimmy Fallon to 'be a man' and stop 'whimpering' about the personal anguish he felt over the backlash he received after messing up Trump's hair during a 2016 campaign appearance on Fallon's late-night talk show. Fallon recently told The Hollywood Reporter that he 'made a mistake' on the Sept. 15, 2016, episode and would do it differently. The comments didn't appear to sit well with Trump. The president tweeted Sunday: '.@jimmyfallon is now whimpering to all that he did the famous 'hair show' with me (where he seriously messed up my hair), & that he would have now done it differently because it is said to have 'humanized' me-he is taking heat. He called & said 'monster ratings.' Be a man Jimmy!' Fallon responded on Twitter with a nod to the plight of young immigrants caught up in administration policies. 'In honor of the President's tweet I'll be making a donation to RAICES in his name,' Fallon said, referring to a nonprofit organization that provides free and low-cost legal services to immigrant children, families and refugees in Texas.
  • At San Francisco's Tawla restaurant, Muna Anaee powdered her hands with flour and gently broke off a piece of golden dough to prepare bread eaten in Iraq, the country she fled with her family. Anaee was preparing more than 100 loaves for diners Wednesday night as part of a program that lets refugees aspiring to be chefs work in professional kitchens. The Refugee Food Festival — a joint initiative of the United Nations Refugee Agency and a French nonprofit, Food Sweet Food — started in Paris in 2016 and came to the U.S. for the first time this year, with restaurants in New York participating as well. The establishments' owners turn over their kitchens to refugee chefs for an evening, allowing them to prepare sampling platters of their country's cuisine and share a taste of their home. Restaurants in 12 cities outside the U.S. are taking part in the program this month. 'It's been a big dream to open a restaurant,' said Anaee, 45, who now has a green card. Anaee was among five refugees chosen to showcase their food in San Francisco — each at a different restaurant and on a different night, from Tuesday through Saturday. Organizers say the goal is to help the refugees succeed as chefs and raise awareness about the plight of refugees worldwide. It's important to 'really get to know these refugees and their personal stories,' said Sara Shah, who brought the event to California after seeing it in Belgium. Anaee and her husband and two children left Baghdad in 2013 over concerns about terrorism and violence. She worked as a kindergarten teacher in Iraq, not a chef, but was urged to pursue cooking as a career by peers in an English class she took in California after they tasted some of her food. Azhar Hashem, Tawla's owner, said hosting Anaee was part of the restaurant's mission to broaden diners' understanding of the Middle East — a region that inspires some of its dishes. 'Food is the best — and most humanizing — catalyst for having harder conservations,' she said. The four other aspiring chefs serving food in San Francisco are from Myanmar, Bhutan, Syria and Senegal. Karen Ferguson, executive director of the Northern California offices of the International Rescue Committee, said San Francisco was a good city for the food festival. 'We have so much diversity, and we see the evidence of that in the culinary expertise in the area,' she said. The Bay Area has a high concentration of refugees from Afghanistan, Honduras, Guatemala, El Salvador, Eritrea and Burma, though exact numbers are unclear, according to the rescue committee. Its Oakland office settled more than 400 refugees in the Bay Area last year, but the number of refugees settling in the region has fallen dramatically since the Trump administration this year placed a cap on arrivals, Ferguson said. Pa Wah, a 41-year-old refugee from Myanmar, presented dishes at San Francisco's Hog Island Oyster Co. on Tuesday. She said she didn't consider a career in cooking until she moved to California in 2011 and got her green card. Cooking was a means of survival at the Thailand refugee camp where she lived after escaping civil conflict in Myanmar as a child. Participating in the food festival showed her the challenges of running a restaurant, but also helped her realize she was capable of opening her own, she said.
  • Kris Kobach's top Republican rivals are trying to sound the right notes on illegal immigration to appeal to business and agriculture leaders without conceding too many conservative votes to a hardliner who's made tougher state policies a key theme in an increasingly contentious race. Kobach, the Kansas secretary of state, is trying to unseat Gov. Jeff Colyer in the state's Aug. 7 primary. He argued during a debate Saturday that Kansas is too lax in dealing with people living in the U.S. illegally, pushing initiatives such as requiring state contractors to verify the status of their workers. The contest is being fought largely on the political right, and Colyer spent much of the debate attempting to undercut Kobach's conservative credentials, including his opposition to abortion . Colyer and the third major candidate participating in the debate, Insurance Commissioner Ken Selzer, decried illegal immigration and expressed support for President Donald Trump. But Kobach could do them one better, noting that he has been advising Trump since the 2016 campaign. Even before that, he had a national reputation for helping to draft tough immigration policies in other states. 'I'm the only person here who's actually done something in his career about illegal immigration. I've been fighting it,' Kobach told the crowd of about 300 people. 'And, yeah, I have a relationship with president. I spoke with him just last week on the phone.' Illegal immigration surged as a political issue again amid the backlash against Trump's 'zero tolerance' policy for illegal crossings of the U.S.-Mexico border and the forced separation of immigrant children from their parents. Trump on Wednesday issued an executive order to end family separations, but many Republican voters in Kansas remain behind his efforts to crack down. The issue splits GOP legislators when they consider some of the issues Kobach has raised repeatedly, including repealing a 2004 state law that helps young immigrants in Kansas brought to the U.S. illegally by their parents to attend college by charging them the same, lower tuition rates as legal Kansas residents. Business and agriculture groups worry about cutting off a flow of workers, particularly in southwest Kansas. Philip Hinman, a 28-year-old high school history teacher from McPherson, is a registered Republican who's undecided about the governor's race. He acknowledged feeling conflicted, balancing with his Christian faith, 'just in terms of loving our neighbors and serving them when they're in need' with a respect for the law. 'Does that change our responsibilities as Christians to serve others?' he said. 'It's something I still wrestle with.' Colyer said he'd sign a bill to repeal the tuition law and would send Kansas National Guard soldiers to the border if Trump asked. But he also told reporters after the debate: 'Washington, D.C., needs to get its act together and clean up the job.' Selzer said that the supply of labor is a key issue with immigration, and he supports efforts to allow legal — and, he emphasized, 'fully screened' — workers stay in the U.S. longer for agricultural work. But he also said ahead of the debate: 'Voters want a secured border. That's the No. 1 priority.' Kobach has a solid base among conservatives and left the Salina debate for a fundraiser in the Kansas City-area with 'Catch Scratch Fever' rocker and gun-rights provocateur Ted Nugent. But part of Kobach's appeal for right-leaning voters is his visibility on immigration issues. Beverly Caley, a 68-year-old retired teacher from the small town of Green, attributed the recent uproar over immigration to 'just the hatred for Donald Trump.' 'You can't tell people who are enforcing the laws, 'Don't enforce them,'' she said. Meanwhile, Kobach defended his seeking a pardon for a corporate campaign donor's vice president that Colyer recently denied because the police said the crime involved threatening a cab driver with a gun to the head. Colyer asked whether Kobach would pardon Ryan Bader, who pleaded guilty to attempted robbery stemming from a 2009 cab ride after a round of drinking. Kobach, who was Bader's attorney for the pardon, accused Colyer of lying about the incident, saying a judge found a gun wasn't involved. The judge who sentenced Bader checked a box on a sentencing form saying a deadly weapon wasn't involved. But a police affidavit said the cab driver reported the threat and a gun was found in Bader's home. His record was expunged in 2014. ___ Follow John Hanna on Twitter: https://twitter.com/apjdhanna .
  • President Donald Trump's former longtime personal attorney Michael Cohen retweeted a photo of himself with comedian Tom Arnold, who is working on a TV show to hunt down recordings of the president, fueling speculation Friday that Cohen has secret tapes of Trump and is willing to share them. Last month, Vice Media announced that Arnold would be featured in a new show called 'The Hunt for the Trump Tapes' and would investigate rumored recordings of the president. Arnold told NBC News on Friday that he met with Cohen at the Lowes Regency Hotel in Manhattan and they discussed the new show. 'We've been on the other side of the table and now we're on the same side,' Arnold told NBC. 'It's on! I hope he (Trump) sees the picture of me and Michael Cohen and it haunts his dreams.' Arnold tweeted the photo with Cohen and the caption 'I love New York' on Thursday night and Cohen retweeted it without comment. Later Friday, Cohen tweeted that he had a 'chance, public encounter' in the hotel's lobby and that Arnold asked to take a selfie. 'Not spending the weekend together, did not discuss being on his show nor did we discuss @POTUS. #done #ridiculous,' Cohen tweeted. The idea for the show, which is set to air on Viceland later this year, came about after the release of the 'Access Hollywood' tape during the 2016 presidential election, which captured Trump bragging about grabbing women's genitals. In announcing the show last month, Vice said Arnold would 'draw on his high-profile network of celebrity friends, entertainment executives, and crew members he's met over more than 35 years in showbiz to dig for evidence on Trump's most incriminating moments.' 'I say to Michael: 'Guess what? We're taking Trump down together,' and he's so tired he's like, 'OK,' and his wife is like, 'OK, (expletive) Trump,'' Arnold told NBC. Arnold tweeted Friday to clarify that it was him who said he was teaming with Cohen to 'take down' Trump and that Cohen was not being paid by Vice. Cohen replied, 'Thank you Tom for correcting the record.' For more than a decade, Cohen was Trump's personal lawyer and fixer, and he has long been a key power player in the Trump Organization and a fixture in Trump's political life. He regularly threatened lawsuits against those who could pose a challenge to Trump, and a day before the FBI raided his office and hotel room, he tweeted, 'I will always protect my POTUS.' Last week, Trump said he hadn't spoken with Cohen 'in a long time' and said, 'He's not my lawyer anymore, but I always liked Michael.' Cohen is under investigation by federal officials in New York. His home, office and hotel room were raided by the FBI in April as part of a probe into his business dealings. Investigators are also looking into a $130,000 payment made as part of a confidentiality agreement with porn actress Stormy Daniels, who alleges she had an affair with Trump in 2006, which Trump denies. She is suing both Cohen and Trump in an attempt to invalidate the nondisclosure agreement. Daniels' former attorney, Keith Davidson, has sued Cohen and alleges he illegally recorded their telephone calls when Davidson represented Daniels. The lawsuit, filed earlier this month in Los Angeles, provided no proof to substantiate the claims and no details on exactly when the calls were recorded. ___ Submit a confidential tip to The Associated Press at www.ap.org/tips .
  • Charles Krauthammer, the Pulitzer Prize-winning columnist and pundit who helped shape and occasionally dissented from the conservative movement as he evolved from 'Great Society' Democrat to Iraq War cheerleader to denouncer of Donald Trump, has died at age 68. His death was announced Thursday by two longtime employers, Fox News Channel and The Washington Post. Krauthammer had said publicly a year ago he was being treated for a cancerous tumor in his abdomen and earlier this month revealed that he likely had just weeks to live. 'I leave this life with no regrets,' Krauthammer wrote in The Washington Post, where his column had run since 1984. 'It was a wonderful life — full and complete with the great loves and great endeavors that make it worth living. I am sad to leave, but I leave with the knowledge that I lived the life that I intended.' Sometimes scornful, sometimes reflective, he was awarded a Pulitzer in 1987 for 'his witty and insightful' commentary and was an influential voice among Republicans, whether through his syndicated column or his appearances on Fox News Channel. He was most associated with Brit Hume's nightly newscast and stayed with it when Bret Baier took over in 2009. Krauthammer is credited with coining the term 'The Reagan Doctrine' for President Reagan's policy of aiding anti-Communist movements worldwide. He was a leading advocate for the Iraq War and a prominent critic of President Barack Obama, whom he praised for his 'first-class intellect and first-class temperament' and denounced for having a 'highly suspect' character. Krauthammer was a former Harvard medical student who graduated even after he was paralyzed from the neck down because of a diving board accident, continuing his studies from his hospital bed. He was a Democrat in his youth and his political engagement dated back to 1976, when he handed out leaflets for Henry Jackson's unsuccessful presidential campaign. But through the 1980s and beyond, Krauthammer followed a journey akin to such neo-conservative predecessors as Irving Kristol and Norman Podhoretz, turning against his old party on foreign and domestic issues. He aligned with Republicans on everything from confrontation with the Soviet Union to rejection of the 'Great Society' programs enacted during the 1960s. 'As I became convinced of the practical and theoretical defects of the social-democratic tendencies of my youth, it was but a short distance to a philosophy of restrained, free-market governance that gave more space and place to the individual and to the civil society that stands between citizen and state,' he wrote in the introduction to 'Things That Matter,' a million-selling compilation of his writings published in 2013. As of midday Friday, the hardcover edition of 'Things That Matter' Was No. 1 on Amazon.com. The paperback was No. 2. For the Post, Time magazine, The New Republic and other publications, Krauthammer wrote on a wide range of subjects, and in 'Things That Matter' listed chess, baseball, 'the innocence of dogs' and 'the cunning of cats' among his passions. As a psychiatrist in the 1970s, he did groundbreaking research on bipolar disorder. He was attacked for his politics, and for his predictions. He was so confident of quick success in Iraq he initially labeled the 2003 invasion 'The Three Week War' and defended the conflict for years. He also backed the George W. Bush administration's use of torture as an 'uncontrolled experiment' carried out 'sometimes clumsily, sometimes cruelly, indeed, sometimes wrongly. But successfully. It kept us safe.' And the former president praised Krauthammer after hearing of his death. 'For decades, Charles' words have strengthened our democracy,' George W. Bush said in a statement. 'His work was far-reaching and influential — and while his voice will be deeply missed, his ideas and values will always be a part of our country.' Krauthammer was sure that Obama would lose in 2008 because of lingering fears from the Sept. 11, 2001 attacks, and foresaw Mitt Romney defeating him in 2012. But he prided himself on his rejection of orthodoxy and took on Republicans, too, observing during a Fox special in 2013 that 'If you're going to leave the medical profession because you think you have something to say, you betray your whole life if you don't say what you think and if you don't say it honestly and bluntly.' He criticized the death penalty and rejected intelligent design as 'today's tarted-up version of creationism.' In 2005, he was widely cited as a key factor in convincing Bush to rescind the Supreme Court nomination of the president's friend and legal adviser Harriet Miers, whom Krauthammer and others said lacked the necessary credentials. And he differed with such Fox commentators as Bill O'Reilly and Laura Ingraham as he found himself among the increasingly isolated 'Never Trumpers,' Republicans regarding the real estate baron and former 'Apprentice' star as a vulgarian unfit for the presidency. 'I used to think Trump was an 11-year-old, an undeveloped schoolyard bully,' he wrote in August 2016, around the time Trump officially became the Republican nominee. 'I was off by about 10 years. His needs are more primitive, an infantile hunger for approval and praise, a craving that can never be satisfied. He lives in a cocoon of solipsism where the world outside himself has value — indeed exists — only insofar as it sustains and inflates him.' Trump, of course, tweeted about Krauthammer, who 'pretends to be a smart guy, but if you look at his record, he isn't. A dummy who is on too many Fox shows. An overrated clown!' Krauthammer married Robyn Trethewey, an artist and former attorney, in 1974. They had a son, Daniel, who also became a columnist and commentator. The son of Jewish immigrants from Europe, Krauthammer was born in New York City and moved with his family to Montreal when he was 5, growing up in a French speaking home. His path to political writing was unexpected. First, at McGill University, he became editor in chief of the student newspaper after his predecessor was ousted over what Krauthammer called his 'mindless, humorless Maoism.' After Krauthammer announced that he was dying of cancer, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu wrote him a letter, telling him that he had gleaned wisdom from his insights. 'You never bored. You were never mundane,' Netanyahu wrote in his June 10 letter. 'More than anything else, you have lived a life of purpose. As a proud American and a proud son of the Jewish people, you harnessed your formidable intellect to defend liberty and the Jewish state.' In the late 1970s, while a psychiatric resident at Massachusetts General Hospital, a professor with whom he had researched manic depression was appointed to a mental health agency created by President Jimmy Carter. Krauthammer went, too, began writing for The New Republic and was soon recruited to write speeches for Carter's vice president and 1980 running mate, Walter Mondale. Carter was defeated by Reagan and on Jan. 20, 1981, Reagan's inauguration day, Krauthammer formally joined The New Republic as a writer and editor. 'These quite fantastic twists and turns have given me a profound respect for serendipity,' he wrote in 2013. 'A long forgotten, utterly trivial student council fight brought me to journalism. A moment of adolescent anger led me to the impulsive decision to quit political studies and enroll in medical school. A decade later, a random presidential appointment having nothing to do with me brought me to a place where my writing and public career could begin. 'When a young journalist asks me today, 'How do I get to a nationally syndicated columnist?' I have my answer: 'First, go to medical school.'' ____ AP Television Writer David Bauder contributed to this report.
  • The young immigrants held in prison-like conditions at a juvenile detention center in the mountains of Virginia express despair. Some cling to pleasant memories from home. For a select few, there is hope. For a handful of immigrants who came to the U.S. from Central America — many as unaccompanied minors — poetry has given them a chance to tell the world both about their journeys north — and through the byzantine immigration system. 'A lot happens in life, most of it sad, an occasional happiness, and sometimes you have no choice but to play the clown and laugh on the outside, even though inside we feel less than failures,' wrote one of them in a poem titled 'The Future.' The collection of poems in 'Dreaming America,' published last year, was assembled by a Washington and Lee University professor and students who visited the Shenandoah Valley Juvenile Center in Staunton, Virginia, lockup and helped the young immigrants put pencil to paper, giving voice to a largely unheard population at the center of an increasingly heated U.S. policy debate. The Associated Press reported Thursday that immigrants as young as 14 at the center said they were beaten, locked away in solitary confinement for long periods of time and left alone naked in cold cells. Their claims were included in a federal civil rights lawsuit filed in October. The AP's reporting also cited an adult who saw bruises and broken bones the children said were caused by guards. In court filings, officials at the detention facility denied all the allegations of physical abuse, which the lawsuit asserts happened between 2015 to 2018, during both the Obama and Trump administrations. Republicans and Democrats in Washington said the allegations described by the AP were alarming, and Virginia's governor on Thursday ordered state officials to investigate the abuse claims. The writings in 'Dreaming America' offer another kind of sworn testimony than what is detailed in the court files, said poet Jimmy Santiago Baca, who visited the center last year and worked with the immigrants on their poems. 'Every single kid in there acknowledged it was despair without an outlet, it was a dark tomorrow without a voice,' he said. In a poem titled 'Hi, Love,' one of the immigrants wrote: 'Bitterness, thank you for feeding me and giving me life. Without you I don't know what I'd be, I'd be someone without emotions, without reason to exist or reason to live.' In an untitled poem, another child wrote about trying to end his life six times. 'I don't know what will happen with my life,' wrote yet another teen, in a poem called 'I have a dream...' ''But I don't worry about that. My life has been a disaster and I don't think that will change.' None of the poems' authors is identified and the facility in Virginia was not identified in the book. Cristina Casado, who manages the Office of Refugee Resettlement program at the Shenandoah Valley Juvenile Center, wrote in a postscript of the 111-page book that the children had behavioral or criminal histories and experienced trauma in their home countries. She said, 'working with these children in a secure environment is a difficult but extremely rewarding experience.' The book's publisher, Larry Moffi, said that so far 'Dreaming America' sold about 1,500 copies, and all proceeds from the $16 sales were donated to a Washington legal clinic representing the immigrants in their deportation proceedings. 'They were so excited to have this book,' Moffi said. The immigrants were given copies of 'Dreaming America' after it was published last fall. 'It's the first book they'd ever had and they're in it.' Not all the poems dwell on the bleakness of their journeys north and confinement since. In 'My Dog Spay,' one immigrant wrote about the joy of his long-lost pet. 'Being without him now makes me feel like I have nothing in my life,' he wrote. 'And when we see each other he's going to be so happy he'll start jumping like crazy.' Another immigrant directly addresses President Donald Trump. 'You don't know what you're doing/ It's your fault we're being booted/ It's our jobs we're losing/ Damn fool, why you hassling us,' he wrote. ___ This story has been corrected to show the title of the book is 'Dreaming America,' not 'American Dream.
  • Reactions to the death of conservative writer and pundit Charles Krauthammer. ___ 'Laura and I are deeply saddened by the loss of an intellectual giant and dear friend, Charles Krauthammer. For decades, Charles' words have strengthened our democracy. His work was far-reaching and influential — and while his voice will be deeply missed, his ideas and values will always be a part of our country.' — President George W. Bush, in a written statement. ___ 'Charles Krauthammer was one of the great thinkers of our time. A giant in his intellect and his character. A good and gracious man. And a dear friend. This is such a loss.' — Speaker of the House Paul Ryan on Twitter. ___ 'I was deeply saddened to learn of the passing of my friend Charles Krauthammer this afternoon.' — Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell on Twitter. ___ 'He was such a decent man. His commentary was principled and piercing. What a loss.' — David Gregory, CNN political analyst, on Twitter. ___ 'We've lost a national treasure.' — Megyn Kelly, NBC news anchor, on Twitter. ___ 'No greater master of the form.' — New York Times columnist Ross Douthat, on Twitter. ___ 'A loss of wisdom and talent.' — Nikki Haley, U.S. ambassador to the United Nations, on Twitter. ___ 'One of baseball's greatest fans — Charles Krauthammer — passed away today ... He was loved and admired by many and will be truly missed here at Nationals Park.' — Official Twitter account of the Washington Nationals Major League Baseball team, on Twitter. ___ 'Charles Krauthammer was a man of extraordinary intellect. Truly one of a kind. The conservative movement & the nation will miss his incredible insight, especially in times such as these.' — Sen. Marco Rubio of Florida, on Twitter. ___ 'Very sad to report the death of Charles Krauthammer — award winning journalist and a courageous, caring man,' — Judy Woodruff, anchor of PBS Newshour, on Twitter. ___ 'Terribly sad news. The great Charles Krauthammer has died.' — Brit Hume, political analyst for Fox News, on Twitter. ___ 'We have lost a great mind, a great conservative and a great American. I, like millions of Americans, will miss the wit and wisdom of Charles Krauthammer.' — Sen. Pat Toomey of Pennsylvania, on Twitter. ___ 'Charles Krauthammer's columns and commentary shaped American politics for generations.' — CNN media analyst Brian Stelter, on Twitter. ___ 'A remarkable man, whom we all shall miss.' — Actor James Woods, on Twitter. ___ 'Everyone at Fox News is saddened to report that our dear friend — a giant of our industry — Charles Krauthammer has passed away.' Fox News chief White House correspondent John Roberts, on Twitter. ___ 'RIP good friend. I am sure you will be owning the panel discussion in heaven as well. And we'll make sure your wise words and thoughts — your legacy — will live on here.' — Bret Baier, chief political anchor, Fox News, on Twitter.
  • Charles Krauthammer, the Pulitzer Prize-winning columnist and pundit who helped shape and occasionally dissented from the conservative movement as he evolved from 'Great Society' Democrat to Iraq War cheerleader to denouncer of Donald Trump, died Thursday. He was 68. His death was announced by two organizations that were longtime employers, Fox News Channel and The Washington Post. Krauthammer had said publicly a year ago he was being treated for a cancerous tumor in his abdomen and earlier this month revealed that he likely had just weeks to live. 'I leave this life with no regrets,' Krauthammer wrote in The Washington Post, where his column had run since 1984. 'It was a wonderful life — full and complete with the great loves and great endeavors that make it worth living. I am sad to leave, but I leave with the knowledge that I lived the life that I intended.' Sometimes scornful, sometimes reflective, he was awarded a Pulitzer in 1987 for 'his witty and insightful' commentary and was an influential voice among Republicans, whether through his syndicated column or his appearances on Fox News Channel. He was most associated with Brit Hume's nightly newscast and stayed with it when Bret Baier took over in 2009. Krauthammer is credited with coining the term 'The Reagan Doctrine' for President Reagan's policy of aiding anti-Communist movements worldwide. He was a leading advocate for the Iraq War and a prominent critic of President Barack Obama, whom he praised for his 'first-class intellect and first-class temperament' and denounced for having a 'highly suspect' character. Krauthammer was a former Harvard medical student who graduated even after he was paralyzed from the neck down because of a diving board accident, continuing his studies from his hospital bed. He was a Democrat in his youth and his political engagement dated back to 1976, when he handed out leaflets for Henry Jackson's unsuccessful presidential campaign. But through the 1980s and beyond, Krauthammer followed a journey akin to such neo-conservative predecessors as Irving Kristol and Norman Podhoretz, turning against his old party on foreign and domestic issues. He aligned with Republicans on everything from confrontation with the Soviet Union to rejection of the 'Great Society' programs enacted during the 1960s. 'As I became convinced of the practical and theoretical defects of the social-democratic tendencies of my youth, it was but a short distance to a philosophy of restrained, free-market governance that gave more space and place to the individual and to the civil society that stands between citizen and state,' he wrote in the introduction to 'Things That Matter,' a million-selling compilation of his writings published in 2013. For the Post, Time magazine, The New Republic and other publications, Krauthammer wrote on a wide range of subjects, and in 'Things That Matter' listed chess, baseball, 'the innocence of dogs' and 'the cunning of cats' among his passions. As a psychiatrist in the 1970s, he did groundbreaking research on bipolar disorder. But he found nothing could live apart from government and the civic realm. 'Science, medicine, art, poetry, architecture' and other fields were 'fundamentally subordinate. In the end, they must bow to the sovereignty of politics.' Ever blunt in his criticisms, Krauthammer was an 'intense disliker' the liberal columnist E.J. Dionne told Politico in 2009. And opponents had words for him. Christopher Hitchens once called him the 'newest of the neocon mini-windbags,' with the 'arduous job, in an arduous time, of being an unpredictable conformist.' He was attacked for his politics, and for his predictions. He was so confident of quick success in Iraq he initially labeled the 2003 invasion 'The Three Week War' and defended the conflict for years. He also backed the George W. Bush administration's use of torture as an 'uncontrolled experiment' carried out 'sometimes clumsily, sometimes cruelly, indeed, sometimes wrongly. But successfully. It kept us safe.' And the former president praised Krauthammer after hearing of his death. 'For decades, Charles' words have strengthened our democracy,' George W. Bush said in a statement. 'His work was far-reaching and influential — and while his voice will be deeply missed, his ideas and values will always be a part of our country.' Krauthammer was sure that Obama would lose in 2008 because of lingering fears from the Sept. 11, 2001 attacks, and foresaw Mitt Romney defeating him in 2012. But he prided himself on his rejection of orthodoxy and took on Republicans, too, observing during a Fox special in 2013 that 'If you're going to leave the medical profession because you think you have something to say, you betray your whole life if you don't say what you think and if you don't say it honestly and bluntly.' He criticized the death penalty and rejected intelligent design as 'today's tarted-up version of creationism.' In 2005, he was widely cited as a key factor in convincing Bush to rescind the Supreme Court nomination of the president's friend and legal adviser Harriet Miers, whom Krauthammer and others said lacked the necessary credentials. And he differed with such Fox commentators as Bill O'Reilly and Laura Ingraham as he found himself among the increasingly isolated 'Never Trumpers,' Republicans regarding the real estate baron and former 'Apprentice' star as a vulgarian unfit for the presidency. 'I used to think Trump was an 11-year-old, an undeveloped schoolyard bully,' he wrote in August 2016, around the time Trump officially became the Republican nominee. 'I was off by about 10 years. His needs are more primitive, an infantile hunger for approval and praise, a craving that can never be satisfied. He lives in a cocoon of solipsism where the world outside himself has value — indeed exists — only insofar as it sustains and inflates him.' Trump, of course, tweeted about Krauthammer, who 'pretends to be a smart guy, but if you look at his record, he isn't. A dummy who is on too many Fox shows. An overrated clown!' Krauthammer married Robyn Trethewey, an artist and former attorney, in 1974. They had a son, Daniel, who also became a columnist and commentator. The son of Jewish immigrants from Europe, Krauthammer was born in New York City and moved with his family to Montreal when he was 5, growing up in a French speaking home. His path to political writing was unexpected. First, at McGill University, he became editor in chief of the student newspaper after his predecessor was ousted over what Krauthammer called his 'mindless, humorless Maoism.' In the late 1970s, while a psychiatric resident at Massachusetts General Hospital, a professor with whom he had researched manic depression was appointed to a mental health agency created by President Jimmy Carter. Krauthammer went, too, began writing for The New Republic and was soon recruited to write speeches for Carter's vice president and 1980 running mate, Walter Mondale. Carter was defeated by Reagan and on Jan. 20, 1981, Reagan's inauguration day, Krauthammer formally joined The New Republic as a writer and editor. 'These quite fantastic twists and turns have given me a profound respect for serendipity,' he wrote in 2013. 'A long forgotten, utterly trivial student council fight brought me to journalism. A moment of adolescent anger led me to the impulsive decision to quit political studies and enroll in medical school. A decade later, a random presidential appointment having nothing to do with me brought me to a place where my writing and public career could begin. 'When a young journalist asks me today, 'How do I get to a nationally syndicated columnist?' I have my answer: 'First, go to medical school.'' ____ AP Television Writer David Bauder contributed to this report.
  • The Latest on Melania Trump's visit to a Texas facility housing migrant children (all times local): 9:20 p.m. Melania Trump says her visit with migrant children has 'impacted me greatly.' The first lady commented in a written statement Thursday after she returned from touring the Upbring New Hope Children's Center in McAllen, Texas. The facility is home to about 55 migrant teenagers. A fraction of them were separated from their parents under the Trump administration's crackdown on illegal immigration into the U.S. from Mexico. Mrs. Trump says time spent with the children reinforces the fact that they're in the situation 'as a direct result of adult actions.' She is calling on Congress to pass immigration legislation that secures the borders and keeps families together. The House on Thursday defeated a conservative immigration measure and delayed until next week a final vote on a compromise immigration bill. __ 6 p.m. President Donald Trump says his wife, Melania, was taking a dig at the news media Thursday when she wore a jacket that read, 'I really don't care, do u?' as she traveled to and from a facility housing migrant children separated from their parents. The jacked caused a commotion on social media, which Trump responded to by tweet. He says the slogan 'written on the back of Melania's jacket, refers to the Fake News Media,' adding, 'Melania has learned how dishonest they are, and she truly no longer cares!' Asked earlier what message the first lady was trying to send, Mrs. Trump's spokeswoman Stephanie Grisham said: 'It's a jacket. There was no hidden message.' Grisham underscored that message in a tweet with the hashtags #SheCares and #ItsJustAJacket. __ 3:05 p.m. First lady Melania Trump boarded a flight to a facility housing migrant children separated from their parents wearing a jacket that read 'I really don't care, do u?' The green hooded spring military jacket has the words written graffiti-style on the back. When asked what message the first lady's jacket intended to send, spokeswoman Stephanie Grisham said: 'It's a jacket. There was no hidden message.' Mrs. Trump wore a different pale yellow jacket when the plane landed in McAllen, Texas, for a visit to the Upbring New Hope Children's Center, which houses 55 migrant children. The youthful jacket sharply contrasts with the first lady's typically bold, foreign-flavored wardrobe. In public appearances, the first lady has worn designs by Dolce & Gabbana, Del Pozo, Christian Dior, Emilio Pucci, Givenchy and Valentino, often with daringly high Christian Louboutin heels. ___ 12:45 p.m. Third-graders at a facility housing migrant children separated from their parents welcomed first lady Melania Trump with a large paper American flag they'd signed. The students are among 58 at the Upbring New Hope Children's Center, where Mrs. Trump made a surprise visit Thursday. The first lady's visit came the morning after President Donald Trump signed an executive order halting the practice of separating families that entered the U.S. illegally. Visiting another classroom, Mrs. Trump asked children where they were from and how long they'd been at the center where staff said children typically spend between 42 and 45 days. She told children to 'be kind and nice to each other' as she left another classroom. The first lady said she wanted to lend her support to the children, and asked staff to reunite them with their families as quickly as possible. ___ 12:05 p.m. Melania Trump was welcomed by staff at the Upbring New Hope Children's Center as she made an unannounced visit Thursday to the facility that houses 58 unaccompanied migrant children. The first lady met with the facility's executive director, a case manager, a medical care coordinator and others as she began a tour of the facility. She was told the children there, most of whom are between the ages of 12 and 17, are usually 'distraught' when they first enter. Their physical and mental states are immediately assessed, and they are given orientation. Program Director Roy De La Cerda told the first lady that the mostly Guatemalan children typically stay at the center for an average of 42 to 45 days. He says staff have 'a tremendous passion for working with these children' and the center is 'their home.' ___ 11:24 a.m. Melania Trump is visiting two Texas facilities housing some of the more than 2,300 migrant children sent by the U.S. government after their families entered the country illegally. The first lady's visit to Upbring New Hope Children's Center on Thursday comes after President Donald Trump signed an executive order halting the practice of separating families. However, his policy of criminally prosecuting illegal border-crossers remains. Mrs. Trump, whose focus is on children, may have helped encourage her husband to act. The first lady said earlier through her spokeswoman that she 'hates' to see families separated at the border. A White House official followed up Wednesday, saying Mrs. Trump had been making her opinion known to the president that he needed to act to keep migrant families together.

The Latest News Headlines

  • A 5-year-old girl is dead after police say a pickup truck struck her in the SeaWorld San Antonio parking lot. >> Read more trending news  According to the San Antonio Express-News, the vehicle hit the child Sunday night as she and her parents were getting ready to leave the tourist attraction. Police said she 'got away from' her parents in the parking lot and 'darted between two vehicles' before she was struck and killed, the newspaper reported. WOAI's David Caltabiano tweeted that no charges have been filed against the truck's driver, who stopped to help after hitting the girl.  Read more here or here.
  • The Jacksonville Sheriff’s Office is asking for the community’s help as they try to find 74-year-old Charles Sapp.  Sapp lives on the Westside and was last seen on June 17th, when he told someone he was going for a drive.  The 74-year-old has several medical conditions including possible short-term memory loss. According to JSO, Sapp should be driving a 2003 Hyundai XG350 with Florida tag “ACFT42.” Police say Sapp’s car has a different color paint on the hood and the driver side rear bumper is peeling.   If you have any information, you are asked to call the Jacksonville Sheriff’s Office at 904.630.0500.
  • It was another violent weekend in Jacksonville, with more than half a dozen shootings reported in just two days. There is no indication any of these incidents are related, and in some of the investigations the suspects are known and speaking with police or in custody. WOKV will be gathering more information about these incidents through Monday.  The violence started in the very early hours of Saturday. Just after midnight, officers responded to a person shot in a home on Glenn Mottin Way in Mandarin. An adult man was taken to the hospital with life-threatening injuries, and the person responsible for the shooting has spoken with police, according to JSO. We’re working to learn more about the circumstances of the shooting, and whether there will be any arrests.  Just before 6AM, officers responded to a person shot in the Amtrak parking lot on Clifford Lane in Northwest Jacksonville. The victim in this case suffered non-life-threatening injuries and the suspect is in custody. JSO says this incident had nothing to do with Amtrak, despite its location. We’ll update you as we learn more about the suspect and motive.  Saturday night, just after 9PM, JSO responded to a shooting on Barnhill Road. A Hispanic man told investigators he had been shot during a robbery attempt. Robbery detectives are leading this investigation, with no suspect information available at this time. We’re told this victim’s injuries are not life threatening.  Around the same time, police responded to reports of a person shot on Noah Road on the Northside. Two people in a home were involved in a dispute, during which one person was shot, according to JSO. We’re told both people were injured and taken to the hospital, but the person who was shot is in stable condition. No word yet on any arrests, but we will update you as more information is available.  JSO was dispatched to a shooting on Atlantic Blvd around 10PM. Officers found a black male victim, who had been shot multiple times- although the shooting apparently happened several blocks away, and the victim walked to where he was found in order to get help. The victim’s injuries are life-threatening.  Early Sunday, JSO responded to a person shot on Jefferson Street. The female victim was taken to the hospital, but died as a result of her injuries. JSO says the victim was shot on the basketball court at the Julius Guinyard Park. There is no suspect information at this point.  Around 1PM, police were called to the Quality Inn at Dix Ellis Trail on the Southside. A black male in his 20s was found dead, but police say the victim identified as a woman. Our partner Action News Jax reports the victim was transgender, which marks three transgender individuals killed in Jacksonville in recent months. JSO says the suspect is a black man who appears to have fled the scene in a beige colored vehicle. Police aren’t giving many other details at this time, but we’re told there were witnesses.  Around 7PM Sunday, a JSO officer on patrol found a man lying dead on the ground on University Blvd Ct, which is off University and Philips. Homicide detectives are investigating, but there is no information right now about what the victim’s cause of death was or his identity. At this point, this death is classified as “undetermined”.  If you have any information about any of these investigations, you can contact JSO at 904-630-0500 or JSOCrimeTips@jaxsheriff.org. You can also submit an anonymous tip by calling Crime Stoppers at 1-866-845-TIPS.  A fatal shooting is also being investigated by Jacksonville Beach Police. 23-year-old Leon Bennett was killed following a fight outside of The Pier Restaurant. JBPD has released several videos they hope will help lead to the one or more suspects responsible, and if you have any information on that incident, you can call 904-270-1661.
  • A young man is dead, after a fight in Jacksonville Beach leads to a shooting. Jacksonville Beach Police say there was first a fight on the sidewalk in front of The Pier Restaurant on 1st Street North early Sunday morning. The victim then walked north along 1st Street, until several black male subjects drove up in a white four-door sedan-style vehicle. One of the suspects in that car shot the suspect, and the vehicle then fled west on 7th Avenue North.  The victim was taken to the hospital, but later died. He has been identified as 23-year-old Leon Bennett.  Police released a video that was posted on Instagram, which they say shows an “involved party” in their investigation of this shooting. They’re asking for your help identifying the man in the middle of the street, who a woman is on top of in this video. Police say he appears to have light skin and to be bald, and is seen here wearing all black with white-soled shoes.  JBPD is also asking for the public’s help identifying any person seen in another video, which was posted on YouTube. This video is believed to show the fight that happened moments before this shooting.  If you have any information about the identity of the people in these videos, you’re asked to contact JBPD Detective Kulcsar at 904-270-1661.
  • As Republicans struggled again to gather a majority in the House this week for an immigration reform bill, President Donald Trump on Sunday seemed to hint that the effort might be a waste of time, blaming Democrats for their opposition to GOP plans, and demanding major changes in how the U.S. legal system deals with those illegally entering the United States. “When somebody comes in, we must immediately, with no Judges or Court Cases, bring them back from where they came,” the President tweeted on Sunday, making the argument that illegal immigrants deserve no legal standing in court, no due process after being detained. But the U.S. Supreme Court has held the opposite, ruling in a 1982 case that “illegal aliens…may claim the benefit of the Equal Protection Clause, which provides that no State shall ‘deny to any person within its jurisdiction the equal protection of the laws.'” “Summarily removing individuals with no opportunity for a hearing, even if they might have viable legal objections to their removal, would likely violate due process,” said Steve Vladeck, a professor at the University of Texas Law School. That idea was one of a number of tweets this weekend on immigration from the President: We cannot allow all of these people to invade our Country. When somebody comes in, we must immediately, with no Judges or Court Cases, bring them back from where they came. Our system is a mockery to good immigration policy and Law and Order. Most children come without parents… — Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) June 24, 2018 It’s very sad that Nancy Pelosi and her sidekick, Cryin’ Chuck Schumer, want to protect illegal immigrants far more than the citizens of our country. The United States cannot stand for this. We wants safety and security at our borders! — Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) June 23, 2018 House Republicans could easily pass a Bill on Strong Border Security but remember, it still has to pass in the Senate, and for that we need 10 Democrat votes, and all they do is RESIST. They want Open Borders and don’t care about Crime! Need more Republicans to WIN in November! — Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) June 25, 2018 Mr. Trump’s comments came as House Republicans were still preparing a vote this week on a backup immigration reform bill – but no date for the vote had been set, as GOP leaders have struggled to corral a majority on the issue. In Congress, Mr. Trump’s idea to deny due process rights to illegal aliens landed with a big thud in both parties. “Removing due process from immigration cases is yet another example of Trump’s extreme immigration policy and disregard for the rule of law,” said Rep. Frank Pallone (D-NJ). “No person shall be…deprived of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law,” tweeted Rep. Justin Amash (R-MI), quoting the text of the Fifth Amendment to the Constitution. “Due process is a bedrock American legal principle,” said Rep. Jerry Nadler (D-NY). Democrats spent much of the weekend trying to focus more attention on the effort to reunite children of illegal immigrant families, who were separated from their parents under a Trump Administration effort to deter illegal immigrants from trying to cross the U.S. southern border. 'Enough is enough.' We must continue to protest, to speak out, and keep working until all families are reunited who have been torn apart by Trump's heartless immigration policies. pic.twitter.com/J3qlrVveHA — Mike Capuano (@mikecapuano) June 24, 2018 @RepTedDeutch speaking against Trump Administration immigration family separation policy. @CBSMiami pic.twitter.com/VSpodc1f9W — Carey (@ccoddcbs4news) June 24, 2018 But others on Capitol Hill saw the current immigration debate in much a different light. “America is heading in the direction of another Harpers Ferry,” said Rep. Steve King (R-IA), a strong backer of the President’s calls for tough action on illegal immigration, referring to John Brown’s raid in 1859, in a bid to start a slave revolt. “After that comes Ft. Sumter,” King said in a tweet, referring to the first shots of the Civil War.  

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