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Woman who kidnapped Jacksonville newborn: “My mindset at the time wasn’t logical”
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Woman who kidnapped Jacksonville newborn: “My mindset at the time wasn’t logical”

Woman who kidnapped Jacksonville newborn: “My mindset at the time wasn’t logical”

Woman who kidnapped Jacksonville newborn: “My mindset at the time wasn’t logical”

Twenty years after she took a newborn from a Jacksonville hospital and brought the baby to South Carolina to raise as her own daughter, Gloria Williams is telling the court why.

Williams says she was in an abusive relationship with a man, Charles Manigo.

“He took me to a place that was dark. My soul, my spirit was broke, my heart was broke,” she says.

She says Manigo wanted her to have a baby, and she thought that would help bring peace to their home, so she ultimately got pregnant. Williams says she miscarried as a result of the stress of the abuse, but she didn’t initially know it, because her body continued to change. She prepared her home for a baby and even had a baby shower, before realizing what happened- but even after she got it medically confirmed, she didn’t tell anyone.

In July 1998, Williams says she was leaving work, when she essentially went in to autopilot, and instead of stopping at her home, she kept driving. She says she doesn’t know why she drove down I-95 from her home in South Carolina, or what she was  thinking when she ultimately got off the highway in Jacksonville.

“It was definitely not to take a baby, that’s for sure,” she says.


That blank slate continued as she walked in to the hospital.

“I really just cannot tell you what was on my mind. My head back then, I was a different person. My head was in a different place, I was just broken. I had a broken heart, I had a broken spirit, I didn’t feel good about myself, I didn’t feel good about anything,” she says.

Williams says she went and looked at the other babies and thought about the one she had lost, and then walked in to Shanara Mobley’s room, again telling the defense she wasn’t sure why.

Williams says she spent a lot of time talking with Mobley and helping her out. She was still wearing scrubs from her job, and while she told the prosecutor that she didn’t claim to be a nurse at the hospital, she admitted that she knew that’s what Mobley thought. Then the newborn, Kamiyah Mobley, was brought in to the room.

“I was thinking about, you know, maybe this baby could help Charles, that’s what I was thinking. It was like, she [Shanara] was so young, and she just wasn’t real sure about what she was gunna do, and just my mindset at that time wasn’t logical, it definitely wasn’t logical. But for what I was thinking at that time, it seemed right, it seemed right,” Williams says.

Williams would ultimately take the baby back to her home in South Carolina, renaming her Alexis Manigo, and telling Charles Manigo it was his baby. She says the baby did not bring peace to their home after all, though, and when she ultimately had a custody agreement with her two sons from a prior marriage changed because of the abuse, she decided to leave with Kamiyah as well.

“I just thought to myself, I can’t have him around her. I can’t do it, and she deserves better,” Williams says.

The defense walked Williams through a series of photos showing awards, celebrations and gatherings featuring Kamiyah while she was growing up. Williams further said Kamiyah was always cared for and provided for.


Things changed, when Kamiyah decided she wanted to start working. Williams says Kamiyah asked for her birth certificate and social security card, so she could finish all the paperwork on a job she had already lined up.

“I said, ‘you’re not my daughter’. I said, ‘I took you a long time ago’,” Williams says she told Kamiyah at that time.

Williams says she offered to turn herself in at that time, but Kamiyah told her not to. They went on another year and a half or so before the Jacksonville Sheriff’s Office ultimately learned about Kamiyah and reached out.

“She wanted me to run. I told her I couldn’t do that, I couldn’t leave her, I just couldn’t do it. I couldn’t have a life like that. I was already in this for too long, and the truth was going to come out,” Williams says.

Williams says she had thought often about bringing Kamiyah back, but couldn’t do it.

“I think fear, I think just crippling fear. And then I fell in love with her,” Williams says.

The prosecutor questioned Williams to show she made choices and decisions along the way, to lead to where we are now. Williams agreed that how this went is the “worst” possible outcome for Kamiyah, and that she could have even left her anonymously at a hospital at any point when the child was young. Upon questioning from the prosecution, Williams said her motivation for taking the baby was not out of concern for how Mobley would raise her, but for selfish reasons.



Despite that, she is asking for forgiveness from all parties involved, including from Kamiyah.

"I never meant to hurt you, I never meant to hurt you. I just love that child so and I never meant to hurt you, I never meant to cause you any harm, any pain, any of that. And I’m sorry, and I hope that you can find it in your heart to forgive me. I tried to love you the best way I could, the only way I could. I tried to nurture you, but nothing can take away what I took from you. Nothing can replace that. I will always love you, always. And the joy that you brought me, I thank God the world can’t take it away from me. But you're not mine. Your mother and father are sitting right here,” Williams says.


And to Kamiyah’s biological parents- Shanara Mobley and Craig Aiken- she apologized as well.

“I pray every day, every day for the good Lord to renew your hearts, renew your minds, and to heal your hearts, and to give you the peace and joy that comes from knowing His word. I can’t explain where I was back then 20 years ago, I know I wronged you, and I’m so sorry and so many days, so many days, so many days, so many days I just wanted to pick that child up and say, ‘C’mon, let’s get in this car and go’, I just couldn't. I couldn’t. When I left Jacksonville, I didn't look back, I didn't know what you went through,” she says.


Williams is facing up to 22 years in prison, after pleading guilty earlier this year to kidnapping and custody interference of the child. She says, if she’s allowed to return to society, she wants to help young girls who are in abusive relationships. She intends to return to South Carolina to live with her husband, who supports her.

The prosecutor asked Williams what penalty she thinks she deserves for what she did. She said she knows she needs to be punished for her crimes, but isn’t able to say what that should look like. Instead, she says she will abide by whatever the judge decides.

The judge is taking everything under consideration, and will impose a sentence for Williams on June 8th.


Gloria Williams delivers emotional apologies, while telling the court she wasn’t thinking logically when she abducted...

Posted by Stephanie Brown, News 104.5 WOKV on Friday, May 4, 2018

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On June 19, 2017, the President met one-on-one in the Oval Office with his former campaign manager Corey Lewandowski, a trusted advisor outside the government, and dictated a message for Lewandowski to deliver to Sessions. The message said that Sessions should publicly announce that, notwithstanding his recusal from the Russia investigation, the investigation was 'very unfair ' to the President, the President had done nothing wrong, and Sessions planned to meet with the Special Counsel and 'let [him] move forward with investigating election meddling for future elections.' Lewandowski said he understood what the President wanted Sessions to do. One month later, in another private meeting with Lewandowski on July 19, 2017, the President asked about the status of his message for Sessions to limit the Special Counsel investigation to future election interference. Lewandowski told the President that the message would be delivered soon. 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In October 2017, the President met privately with Sessions in the Oval Office and asked him to 'take [a] look' at investigating Clinton. In December 2017, shortly after Flynn pleaded guilty pursuant to an operation agreement, the President met with Sessions in the Oval Office and suggested, according to notes taken by a senior advisor, that if Sessions unrecused and took back supervision of the Russia investigation, he would be a 'hero.' The President told Sessions, 'I'm not going to do anything or direct you to do anything. I just want to be treated fairly.' In response, Sessions volunteered that he had never seen anything 'improper ' on the campaign and told the President there was a 'whole new leadership team' in place. He did not unrecuse. 8. Efforts to have McGahn deny that the President had ordered him to have the Special Counsel removed.  In early 2018, the press reported that the President had directed McGahn to have the Special Counsel removed in June 2017 and that McGahn had threatened to resign rather than carry out the order. The President reacted to the news stories by directing White House officials to tell McGahn to dispute the story and create a record stating he had not been ordered to have the Special Counsel removed. McGahn told those officials that the media reports were accurate in stating that the President had directed McGahn to have the Special Counsel removed. The President then met with McGahn in the Oval Office and again pressured him to deny the reports. In the same meeting, the President also asked McGahn why he had told the Special Counsel about the President’s effort to remove the Special Counsel and why McGahn took notes of his conversations with the President. McGahn refused to back away from what he remembered happening and perceived the President to be testing his mettle. 9. Conduct towards Flynn, Manafort, (redacted name) After Flynn withdrew from a joint defense agreement with the President and began cooperating with the government, the President’s personal counsel left a message for Flynn’s attorneys reminding them of the President's warm feelings towards Flynn, which he said 'still remains,' and asking for a 'heads up' if Flynn knew 'information that implicates the resident.' When Flynn’s counsel reiterated that Flynn could no longer share information pursuant to a joint defense agreement, the President's personal counsel said he would make sure that the President knew that Flynn 's actions reflected 'hostility' towards the President. During Manafort’s prosecution and when the jury in his criminal trial was deliberating, the President praised Manafort in public, said that Manafort was being treated unfairly, and declined to rule out a pardon. After Manafort was convicted, the President called Manafort 'a brave man' for refusing to 'break' and said that 'flipping' 'almost ought to be outlawed.” (redacted material) 10. Conduct involving Michael Cohen The President’s conduct towards Michael Cohen, a former Trump Organization executive, changed from praise for Cohen when he falsely minimized the President's involvement in the Trump Tower Moscow project, to castigation of Cohen when he became a cooperating witness. From September 2015 to June 2016, Cohen had pursued the Trump Tower Moscow project on behalf of the Trump Organization and had briefed candidate Trump on the project numerous times, including discussing whether Trump should travel to Russia to advance the deal. In 2017, Cohen provided false testimony to Congress about the project, including stating that he had only briefed Trump on the project three times and never discussed travel to Russia with him, in an effort to adhere to a 'party line' that Cohen said was developed to minimize the President's connections to Russia. While preparing for his congressional testimony, Cohen had extensive discussions with the President's personal counsel, who, according to Cohen, said that Cohen should 'stay on message' and not contradict the President. After the FBI searched Cohen's home and office in April 2018, the President publicly asserted that Cohen would not 'flip,' contacted him directly to tell him to 'stay strong,' and privately passed messages of support to him. Cohen also discussed pardons with the President's personal counsel and believed that if he stayed on message he would be taken care of. But after Cohen began cooperating with the government in the summer of 2018, the President publicly criticized him, called him a 'rat,' and suggested that his family members had committed crimes. 
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  • House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerrold Nadler, D-N.Y., on Friday subpoenaed the Justice Department for the full, unredacted report compiled by special counsel Robert Mueller as part of his probe of Russian election meddling. >> Read more trending news Nadler said authorities would have until May 1 to comply with the subpoena. It came one day after U.S. Attorney General William Barr released a redacted version of the 448-page report to Congress and the public. >> Mueller report: Key findings from the investigation “My committee needs and is entitled to the full version of the report and the underlying evidence consistent with past practice,” Nadler said Friday in a statement. “I am open to working with the department to reach a reasonable accommodation for access to these materials, however I cannot accept any proposal which leaves most of Congress in the dark.”  Earlier Friday, Nadler said on “Good Morning America” that the subpoena would be forthcoming. “We need the entire report – unredacted – and the underlying documents in order to make informed decisions,” he said. “We will subpoena that entire report today …. Including the grand jury evidence.” The House Judiciary Committee voted along party lines earlier this month to authorize a subpoena for the full, unredacted Mueller report. Democrats have criticized Barr for not immediately releasing the report to Congress after the special counsel submitted it late last month, saying Barr’s decision fell far short of the typical disclosure given to lawmakers after special counsel investigations. >> Mueller investigation: Read the report Barr said Thursday that he plans to provide a less redacted version of Mueller’s report to some congressional leaders in the coming weeks in an effort to address congressional requests for more transparency. Mueller completed his investigation late last month, 22 months after he launched his probe at the direction of the Justice Department. The investigation was frequently lambasted by President Donald Trump as a “witch hunt” aimed at undermining his presidency.

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