ON AIR NOW

LISTEN NOW

Weather

heavy-rain-night
59°
Rain
H 67° L 63°
  • heavy-rain-night
    59°
    Current Conditions
    Rain. H 67° L 63°
  • rain-day
    64°
    Evening
    Rain. H 67° L 63°
  • clear-night
    64°
    Morning
    Mostly Clear. H 79° L 68°
LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

The latest top stories

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

The latest traffic report

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

The latest forecast

00:00 | 00:00

National
Former intelligence chief Clapper denies Trump Tower wiretap
Close

Former intelligence chief Clapper denies Trump Tower wiretap

Trump Accuses Obama Of Wiretapping His Phones

Former intelligence chief Clapper denies Trump Tower wiretap

In an interview Sunday, former Director of National Intelligence James Clapper denied that he directed, or had any knowledge of, any Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA) court-authorized wiretap on President Donald Trump or Trump Tower during his candidacy or once he’d won the election and become president-elect.

Clapper, while qualifying his answer with “obviously, I can’t speak officially anymore,” told NBC's "Meet the Press" that “as part of the national security apparatus I oversaw, there was no such wiretap mounted against the president-elect at the time, or the president as a candidate or against his campaign.”

>> Obama team fires back after Trump's wire tap accusation

He also said he could not speak for the efforts of other entities in the government who were empowered to seek such warrants. But Clapper then said he’d have knowledge of a warrant distributed via a FISA court order and denied that one existed. When host Chuck Todd asked if he could neither confirm nor deny the existence of a FISA court order, Clapper said, “I can deny.”

To Todd’s claims that there was “a lot of smoke” regarding Russian ties, Clapper reminded him that the report released by the Office of the Director of National Intelligence last month found no direct evidence of collusion between Trump or the Trump campaign and Russia. His office’s report did, however, cite significant Russian intervention to “undermine the Democratic process, denigrate Secretary (Hillary) Clinton, and harm her electability and potential presidency” as well as a “clear preference for President-elect Trump.”

>> Trump accuses Obama of tapping phone before election

Clapper believes a transparent, independent investigation is the best way forward for everyone involved, including Trump. He told Todd, "It is in everyone’s interest to get to the bottom of this, it is such a distraction. ... I think it would be very healthy to clear the air on this subject. I think it would be in everyone’s best interest.”

Clapper went on to commend the investigation by the Senate Intelligence Committee, which he lauded as a “truly bipartisan” effort. “At this point,” he said, “I do have confidence” in the investigation mounted by the Senate Intelligence Committee.

>> Read more trending news

Should that change, Clapper said, a special prosecutor should be appointed.

Read More

The Latest News Headlines

  • Two juveniles have been arrested, after the St. Augustine Police Department says they tried to rob another juvenile at gunpoint at a local park. According to the incident report, the juvenile victim told police he was at Project Swing Park at 1 South Castillo Drive this past Sunday night, when he was approached by four individuals. He told police some of these individuals began to dig through his pockets and saying things like 'what you got?' and 'give it up!'.  The victim told police when he refused to give up his belongings, one of his friends attempted to defend him, leading a fight to break out.  During that fight, someone yelled there was a gun and everyone took off running, according to the victim. The report reveals there was at least one witness who spotted one of the individuals pulling a firearm from his waistband and pointing it at someone else.  Police say they caught up to the four individuals in the area of Sevilla Street and Saragossa Street a short time later, where they were taken into custody.  The report reveals that as the investigation continued, two of the four individuals were found to have nothing to do with the robbery that occurred.  However, one of the other individuals was identified as the suspect responsible for digging through the victim's pockets. The report reveals he told police he was ‘just playing.’ As for the other individual, the report says he eventually admitted to police he was armed at that time and helped officers recover the gun. The two juveniles are now charged with attempted robbery with a firearm.  A third juvenile involved in this incident is also expected to face charges, as police say the individual had an open warrant for an unrelated case.
  • Unless there is a major earthquake, you may not pay much attention to the United States Geological Survey. >> Read more trending news  But when the earth shakes, it’s the USGS that provides important initial information on where the damage occurred and how big the quake was.  However, while that is a very important function of the agency, it's only part of the mission of the USGS, or the Survey, as it is commonly called. The agency, a part of the U.S. Department of the Interior, also provides “reliable scientific information to describe and understand the Earth; minimize loss of life and property from natural disasters; manage water, biological, energy, and mineral resources; and enhance and protect our quality of life,” according to the agency’s website. To study and catalog the country’s resources, the USGS employs a broad array of sciences, including biology, geography, geology and hydrology.  Created on March 3, 1879, the USGS’s original mission was 'classification of the public lands, and examination of the geological structure, mineral resources, and products of the national domain.” The Survey was immediately tasked with the exploration and inventory of new lands the U.S. government had acquired through the Louisiana Purchase in 1803 and the Mexican–American War in 1848.  The agency also produces various publications in which its research is reported and runs the United States Geological Survey Library. The USGS employs more than 8,600 people across the United States. Related stories: 15 things you may not know about earthquakes What is the strongest earthquake to hit the US? What should you do if you are caught in an earthquake? What are the 10 deadliest earthquakes in recorded history? How likely will the ‘big one’ occur in our lifetime?  New earthquake simulations show how the 'big one' could shake the Pacific Northwest Building an emergency disaster kit can be easy and cheap, here's how
  • Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg has returned to her bench eight weeks after undergoing lung cancer surgery. >> Read more trending news  NPR reported that the 85-year-old underwent a pulmonary lobectomy Dec. 21 at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York. The surgery removed two malignant growths on her left lung, according to court officials. No further evidence of cancer was found on her lungs. Related: Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg released from hospital after cancer surgery The Associated Press reported Ginsberg returned to the Supreme Court building Friday for the justices’ private conference. She came back to the bench for the first time Tuesday, wearing her black robe and ornamental collar. CNBC reported that Ginsberg participated in the court’s cases while she was away, unprecedented for a justice. NPR reported she was also walking more than a mile a day and working with her trainer twice a week, according to friends.
  • A day after posting a photograph online of a federal judge which included a crosshairs near her head, U.S. District Judge Amy Berman Jackson ordered Roger Stone to appear at a Thursday hearing to explain what he was doing, and whether it should impact restrictions imposed on Stone about charges brought against him in the investigation of Russian interference in the 2016 elections, and any ties to the Trump campaign. In an order issued Tuesday morning, U.S. District Judge Amy Berman Jackson summoned Stone to explain “why the media contact order entered in this case and/or his conditions of release should not be modified or revoked in light of the posts on his Instagram account.” Stone posted the photo on Monday – and stood by it for much of the day – repeating his objections to having his case assigned to Judge Jackson, who is also presiding over a case brought by the Special Counsel’s office against 12 Russian intelligence agents, charged with hacking materials from Democrats during the 2016 campaign. “Any inference that this in someway threatens the judge is false,” Stone wrote on Monday about the photo – which he then pulled down. Roger Stone now directly attacking the federal judge presiding over his case and posting a pic of her head beside crosshairs pic.twitter.com/ze3lnuoSOE — Jon Swaine (@jonswaine) February 18, 2019 Monday night, Stone’s lawyers submitted an official “Notice of Apology” to the judge, trying to head off any sanctions. “Undersigned counsel, with the attached authority of Roger J. Stone, hereby apologizes to the Court for the improper photograph and comment posted on Instragram today. Mr. Stone recognizes the impropriety and had it removed,” his lawyers wrote. But that evidently was not enough for Judge Jackson, whose order raised the question of whether further limits would be placed on Stone, a political operative who worked briefly for the Trump campaign, and has been charged with coordinating actions between the campaign and Wikileaks over emails involving the Hillary Clinton campaign. Stone has charged that the Special Counsel’s office wrongly tipped off CNN to his imminent arrest in late January; last week, the judge ordered the feds to submit information about that matter.
  • A judge in Washington has set a hearing for political consultant Roger Stone to allow him to explain why he shouldn’t have the conditions of his bond modified -- or even revoked -- after he posted a photo on social media that showed the judge next to what appeared to be a rifle’s crosshair. >> Read more trending news In a notice filed Monday in court, Stone apologized to U.S. District Judge Amy Berman Jackson 'for the improper photograph and comment posted on Instagram.' >> Mueller investigation: Judge issues gag order in Roger Stone case He had earlier in the day posted the image to Instagram along with his repeated objections to having his case assigned to Jackson, Vox.com reported. The judge is also tasked with overseeing special counsel Robert Mueller’s case against 12 Russian intelligence agents who have been accused of hacking  the Democrats during the 2016 presidential campaign, according to Cox Media Group’s Jamie Dupree. >> From Cox Media Group's Jamie Dupree: Roger Stone ordered to explain posted photo of federal judge In a court filing Tuesday, Jackson ordered Stone to appear in court at 2:30 p.m. Thursday. Jackson last week put restrictions on prosecutors and on Stone’s attorneys to keep either party from making statements near the courthouse to either members of the media or the public. She also ordered Stone to refrain from making public comments on the case within the vicinity of the courthouse. >> Who is Roger Stone, what links him to Trump? In Jackson’s ruling, Stone was allowed to continue expressing his opinions via social  media, which he is known for, though Jackson reserved the right to adjust the order in the future. Stone, who served as a campaign manager for Trump during his 2016 presidential campaign, faces charges brough by Mueller’s team of obstruction, giving false statements and witness tampering. >> More on Robert Mueller's investigation Since his arrest Jan. 25 at his home in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, Stone has been outspoken in proclaiming his innocence and criticizing Mueller’s team, which he has accused of targeting him because of his politics. Stone is the sixth Trump aide to be charged in connection with Mueller’s investigation into Russian meddling in the 2016 presidential election and its possible ties to Trump campaign officials.

The Latest News Videos