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Thousand Oaks shooting: 12 killed, including deputy, at California bar; suspect also dead
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Thousand Oaks shooting: 12 killed, including deputy, at California bar; suspect also dead

VIDEO: Mass Shooting at California Bar

Thousand Oaks shooting: 12 killed, including deputy, at California bar; suspect also dead

Twelve people, including a sheriff’s deputy, were killed after a gunman opened fire at a bar in Thousand Oaks, California, late Wednesday, authorities confirmed early Thursday. The shooter is also dead.

>> PHOTOS: 12 killed in Thousand Oaks, California, bar shooting

   

>> Thousand Oaks mass shooting: What we know about the suspect

Here are the latest updates:

Update 2:03 a.m. PST Nov. 9: The family of Marky Meza Jr. confirmed that the 20-year-old busboy and food runner at the Borderline Bar & Grill, as the 12th victim, KEYT reported. He was raised in Santa Barbara and Carpinteria and worked at the restaurant as a busboy and food runner, the station said. 

According to a statement released by the family, Meza would have turned 21 on Nov. 19.
“Marky was a loving and wonderful young man who was full of life and ambition,” the statement said. “His family is devastated by his loss. … His family asks for peace and respect at this time to allow them to grieve privately.”

Update 8 p.m. PST Nov. 8Julie Hanson, who lives with her husband next door to the home of shooter Ian Long shared with his mother, says she always found Long odd and disrespectful. 

She says he was strange even before entering the military. 

Tom Hanson called the police on Ian Long in April when he heard loud noises and shouting. Julie Hanson says her husband and a neighbor were worried that he was going to injure himself or his mother. 

She says Ian Long was unfriendly and never made eye contact. She could often hear him yelling and cursing.

Update 5:30 p.m. PST Nov. 8: Officials say five off-duty officers were inside Borderline Bar and Grill in the city of Thousand Oaks when gunfire erupted, and they helped get people to safety. 

Ventura County Sheriff’s Office Capt. Garo Kuredjian said that the two officers from the city of Oxnard and three from Los Angeles “assisted in evacuating those that were injured” and helped prevent others from being hurt.

Update 2:20 p.m. PST Nov. 8: An FBI official said in a press briefing that  investigators seeking the motive for the mass shooting and hope evidence will allow them to paint a picture of the gunman’s frame of mind. 

Paul Delacourt, assistant director of the Los Angeles field office, said the crime scene, the gunman’s home and car are being processed for evidence and interviews are being conducted. 

He also said that it is premature to speculate on the motivation.

Update 11:50 a.m. PST Nov. 8: Officials with California Lutheran University confirmed Thursday that one of the college's recent graduates was among the 12 people killed when a gunman opened fire Wednesday night at Borderline Bar & Grill. 

"Sadly, we have learned from the family that a recent graduate, Justin Meek, 23, is one of the precious lives cut short in this tragedy,” officials said on the university’s website. “Meek heroically saved lives in the incident.”

Update 11:45 a.m. PST Nov. 8: In a statement released to BuzzFeed News, actress Tamara Mowry-Housley and her husband, Adam Housley, confirmed that their niece, Alaina, was among the 12 people killed in Wednesday's shooting at Borderline Bar & Grill.

"Alaina was an incredible young woman with so much life ahead of her and we are devastated that her life was cut short in this manner," the couple said in a statement. "we thank everyone for your prayers and ask for privacy at this time."

 

Update 11:10 a.m. PST Nov. 8: Jason Coffman told reporters on Thursday that deputies confirmed his son, Cody Coffman, was among the 12 people killed in Wednesday night’s shooting at Borderline Bar & Grill.

>> Thousand Oaks shooting: What we know about the victims

Jason Coffman said his son had recently moved in with him and his wife.

“I talked to him last night before he headed out the door,” he said. “First thing I said was, ‘Please, don’t drink and drive.’ Last thing I said was, ‘Son, I love you.’”

Jason Coffman said deputies told him that his son was found dead at the scene of Wednesday’s mass shooting.

Eleven other people, including Ventura County sheriff’s Sgt. Ron Helus, died in Wednesday’s shooting.

Update 9:45 a.m. PST Nov. 8: A neighbor who said he knew the gunman who killed 12 people Wednesday night in a shooting at Borderline Bar & Grill told KABC-TV that the suspect lived with his mother and that she was worried about him.

“He wouldn’t get help,” Richard Berge told the news station.

 

Deputies identified the gunman as Ian David Long, a 28-year-old former U.S. Marine.

Tom Hanson, who lives next door to Long’s mother, told The Associated Press that he called police six months ago when he heard banging and shouting coming from his neighbor’s home.

Ventura County Sheriff Geoff Dean said authorities had made contact with Long before Wednesday’s shooting, including responding to a call to his home in April. Deputies said they found him acting irate and irrationally.

>> Thousand Oaks shooting: Tamera Mowry-Housley, Adam Housley searching for missing niece

The sheriff said a mental health crisis team was called at that time and concluded that Long did not need to be taken into custody.

Long served in the Marines from August 2008 until March 2013 as a machine gunner. He earned the rank of corporal in August 2011. He also earned several awards during his time in the Corps, including a Combat Action Ribbon and a Marine Corps Good Conduct Medal.

Officials with the Marine Corps said Long was deployed to Afghanistan for seven months, from Nov. 16, 2010, to June 14, 2011. He was assigned to the 2nd Battalion, 3rd Marine Regiment, Third Marine Division in Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii.

Update 8:35 a.m. PST Nov. 8: Deputies said the 28-year-old former U.S. Marine who opened fire on a crowd gathered Wednesday at Borderline Bar & Grill used a Glock 21 .45-caliber gun that was modified with an illegal extended magazine.

Ventura County Sheriff Geoff Dean said the gun used by Ian David Long was designed to hold a magazine of 10 rounds, with one additional round in the chamber.

 

“We have no way to know how many rounds he actually had in there,” Dean said Thursday morning at a news conference.

Authorities believe Long legally bought the gun. Officials with the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives are investigating.

Dean said Long appeared to have shot himself after killing a dozen others at the bar Wednesday night. In the aftermath of the attack, authorities were working to determine any connection between Long and Borderline Bar & Grill.

“We haven’t found any correlation,” Dean said. “We’ll probably know more after we execute the search warrant at his house -- that maybe there was a motive for this particular night -- but at this point we have no information leading to that at all.”

Dean said authorities do not believe the shooting was random, although Long appeared to choose his targets at-random once inside the bar.

>> Thousand Oaks shooting: Survivors of Las Vegas shooting were at California bar shooting

“He’s a resident of this area. Common sense would speculate that there’s some reason he went here,” Dean said. “It’s not like he was driving down the freeway and decided, ‘I’m going to get off here.’”

Twelve people were killed and about a dozen others were wounded in Wednesday’s attack. Dean said one person suffered a minor gunshot injury while between eight and 15 others were injured while jumping out windows or diving under tables to escape the bullets.

Officials have not identified any of the victims aside from Sgt. Ron Helus, a Ventura County sheriff’s deputy slain while responding to reports of the shooting.

“Ron was a great guy. He was close to everybody,” Dean said. “He was a hard worker and hearts are broken all over.”

 

Update 7:55 a.m. PST Nov. 8: President Donald Trump ordered flags to be flown at half-staff Thursday in honor of the 12 people killed when a gunman opened fire at Borderline Bar & Grill, a country dance bar in Thousand Oaks.

 

Update 7:25 a.m. PST Nov. 8: The man identified as the gunman who killed 12 in a shooting Wednesday night at Borderline Bar & Grill in Thousand Oaks was a U.S. Marine Corps veteran, Ventura County Sheriff Geoff Dean said. Citing Department of Defense records, CNN reported that Ian David Long, 28, was on active duty with the Marines from August 2008 to March 2013.

Dean said authorities had several previous contacts with Long including a call to his home in April, when deputies found him acting irate and irrationally.

The sheriff said a mental health crisis team was called at that time and concluded that Long did not need to be taken into custody.

Update 7 a.m. PST Nov. 8: Ventura County Sherif Geoff Dean identified the gunman who killed 12 at Borderline Bar & Grill on Wednesday night as Ian David Long, 28.

Update 6:40 a.m. PST Nov. 8: Some of the people who fled from the shooting Wednesday night at the Borderline Bar & Grill in Thousand Oaks had previously survived the shooting that killed nearly 60 people in Las Vegas last year, according to CBS News.

Nicholas Champion told the news network that he and several other people who were in the bar when shots rang out Wednesday had survived the Route 91 shooting last October in Las Vegas.

“It’s the second time in about a year and a month that this has happened,” he told CBS News. “It’s a big thing for us. We’re all a big family and unfortunately this family got hit twice.”

 

Update 5:55 a.m. PST Nov. 8: A procession for Sgt. Ron Helus, the deputy who was shot and killed Wednesday in a shooting at Borderline Bar & Grill in Thousand Oaks, is scheduled to take place at 10 a.m. Thursday.

 

Helus was a 29-year veteran of the Ventura County Sheriff’s Office. He is survived by his wife and son, deputies said.

“Ron’s selfless, heroic actions will never be forgotten,” deputies said Thursday morning in a statement. “Our hearts go out to his family and friends during this difficult time.”

Update 5:30 a.m. PST Nov. 8: Law enforcement officials have identified the gunman who killed 12 people at Borderline Bar & Grill in Thousand Oaks, according to The Associated Press.

 

An unidentified law enforcement official told the AP the gunman was a 29-year-old man who used a .45-caliber handgun and a smoke device during Wednesday’s attack. His name has not been released.

Update 4:51 a.m. PST Nov. 8: President Donald Trump took to Twitter Thursday morning to address the California shooting.

“I have been fully briefed on the terrible shooting in California,” Trump tweeted. “Law Enforcement and First Responders, together with the FBI, are on scene. 13 people, at this time, have been reported dead. Likewise, the shooter is dead, along with the first police officer to enter the bar....”

In a second tweet, he added: “....Great bravery shown by police. California Highway Patrol was on scene within 3 minutes, with first officer to enter shot numerous times. That Sheriff’s Sergeant died in the hospital. God bless all of the victims and families of the victims. Thank you to Law Enforcement.”

  

Update 3:42 a.m. PST Nov. 8: Ventura County Sheriff Geoff Dean described Sgt. Ron Helus, the deputy who was killed in the shooting, as “hard-working” and “dedicated.”

“He gave it his all, and tonight, as I told his wife, he died a hero because he went in to save lives, to save other people,” Dean told reporters early Thursday.

Helus, of Moorpark, worked for the department for 29 years. He is survived by a wife and son, Dean said.

Update 3:08 a.m. PST Nov. 8: Ventura County Sheriff Geoff Dean provided the following details during a news conference early Thursday:

  • 11 people killed at the scene
  • Suspect also dead inside
  • Sgt. Ron Helus with the Ventura County Sheriff's Office died at the hospital
  • 10 to 12 other victims injured inside the bar
  • Others with minor injuries took themselves to hospitals
  • Suspect not yet identified
  • Unclear whether there is a terrorism link

Update 2:08 a.m. PST Nov. 8: NBC News and the Los Angeles Times are reporting “multiple fatalities” in the shooting at Borderline Bar & Grill. The number of dead is not yet known.

The Ventura County Sheriff’s Office said the gunman is dead inside the bar. 

Hundreds of people were at the country music bar during the shooting, which occurred during college night. Several students from Pepperdine University reportedly were there.

 

Update 1:33 a.m. PST Nov. 8: The Los Angeles Times and other local news outlets are reporting that at least 11 people were injured in the shooting. Their condition was not immediately known.

Authorities said the shooter is believed to be “contained” in the bar. They said they do not believe there’s a threat to nearby residents.

 

Update 1:17 a.m. PST Nov. 8: Ventura County Sheriff’s Office Capt. Garo Kuredjian told reporters early Thursday that at least six people, including a sheriff’s deputy, were shot, according to The Associated Press. The deputy is being treated at an area hospital, the AP reported.

Kuredjian said the scene was still active.

Read more here.

Original report: A gunman opened fire at a bar in Thousand Oaks, California, late Wednesday, injuring multiple people, area news outlets are reporting.

According to the Ventura County Star, a man armed with a semiautomatic handgun fired 30 shots at the Borderline Bar & Grill starting around 11:20 p.m. PST, police and witnesses said. Multiple people were hurt, including a sheriff’s deputy, the Star reported. The deputy’s injuries were not life-threatening, CBS News reported.

>> Read more trending news 

About 12:30 a.m. PST, the suspect “was still believed to be inside the bar,” the Los Angeles Times reported. Witnesses said the shooter was a bearded man who was wearing all black, according to the Star.

 

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Read More

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