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    Multiple attempts to locate 12 boys and their soccer coach missing in a flooded cave complex in northern Thailand for nearly two days have failed, but officials said Monday they believe they're still alive. The boys, aged 11-15, are believed to have entered the Tham Luang Nang Non cave in Chiang Rai province with their coach late Saturday afternoon. A mother reported that her son never returned from soccer practice that day, setting off the search. 'We are still searching right now,' Chote Narin, an officer at Mae Sai district police station, said Monday afternoon. 'We've found traces but no people yet.' He said footprints and handprints were found inside the cave complex and officials believe the boys are still alive. He said the fact that they're athletes should help them endure the situation. Navy SEAL divers were trying to reach a large chamber deep inside the cave complex where officials thought the students might be. The chamber is about 4 kilometers (2.5 miles) from the entrance of the cave, which is thought to be about 6-8 kilometers (4-5 miles) long. Kamolchai Kotcha, an official at the forest park where the cave is located, said Monday morning that attempts to reach the chamber had failed as the passage is extremely small, 'flooded and covered with sand and mud.' 'Right now, our family is hoping that the children trapped inside will have formed a group and are safe and waiting for officials to go in and save them in time. That's what I'm hoping,' Noppadol Kantawong, the father of one of the missing boys, told Thai PBS on Sunday. Footage on Thai television showed bicycles, backpacks and soccer cleats left outside the entrance to the cave. The area was filled with soldiers and rescue personnel. The cave is a tourist attraction but can flood severely during Thailand's rainy season, which runs from June to October. According to Kamolchai, tourists trapped in the cave by past floods have been rescued after the water receded a few days later.
  • Recep Tayyip Erdogan, who has dominated Turkish politics for the past 15 years, was set on Monday to extend his rule with sweeping new powers after winning landmark presidential and parliamentary elections. Turkey's High Electoral Board declared Erdogan, 64, the winner of Sunday's polls, which usher in a new executive presidential system that was approved in a referendum last year. Under the system, the office of the prime minister is eliminated and executive powers are transferred to the president, who can rule with only limited checks and balances. The Turkish leader, who is accused by critics of adopting increasingly authoritarian tactics but is loved by supporters for bringing prosperity and stability, may be facing rough times ahead, however. Analysts predict an economic downturn amid rising inflation and a struggling currency. His win could deepen Turkey's rift with Western allies, who are already concerned by setbacks in democracy and human rights as well as Turkey's closer ties with Russia. Still, Turkey's currency, the lira, rallied on Monday over Erdogan's victory, which allows the country to avoid instability in the short-term. In his victory speech, Erdogan said he would work toward achieving his goal of making Turkey one of the world's top 10 economies by 2023, when the Turkish Republic marks its centenary. He also pledged a more 'determined' fight against outlawed Kurdish rebels and alleged members of a movement led by U.S.-based cleric Fethullah Gulen, whom he accuses of orchestrating a 2016 failed coup against his government. Gulen denies involvement. 'Turkey made its choice in favor of a more determined fight against the PKK (Kurdistan Workers Party) and (Gulenists),' Erdogan said. 'We will go after terror organizations with stronger determination.' Under the new system, Erdogan will appoint ministers, vice presidents and high-level bureaucrats, issue decrees, prepare the budget and decide on security policies. According to unofficial results that have yet to be confirmed by the electoral board, Erdogan garnered 52.5 percent of the votes, while his ruling Justice and Development Party, or AKP, won 42.5 percent in the parliamentary vote. Erdogan's closest contender, Muharrem Ince of the main opposition Republican People's Party, won 30.7 percent. Erdogan's AKP fell short of a parliamentary majority but a better-than-expected performance by its nationalist ally should allow the party to control the 600-seat legislature. Ince, who complained of unfair elections, has yet to formally concede defeat. A prominent journalist said, however, that he received a message from the politician acknowledging Erdogan's victory. Ince was scheduled to hold a news conference later on Monday. The pro-Kurdish People's Democratic Party, whose presidential candidate Selahattin Demirtas was forced to campaign from jail, received the more than 10 percent of votes required to win seats in parliament, spilling thousands of its supporters into the streets in celebration.
  • Defense Secretary Jim Mattis laid out plans for a less contentious, more open dialogue with Chinese leaders as he travels to Asia, less than a month after he slammed Beijing at an international conference for its militarization of islands in the South China Sea. Speaking to reporters on his plane Sunday en route to a stop in Alaska, Mattis avoided any of the sharp criticism of China that he had voiced recently. Instead, he insisted that he is going into the talks with Chinese leaders without any preconceived notions, and wants to focus on larger, more strategic security issues. According to officials, a key topic of the discussions later this week will be the denuclearization of the Korean peninsula and the role China can play, considering its longstanding friendship with North Korea. 'I want to go in right now without basically poisoning the well at this point. I'm going there to have a conversation,' said Mattis. 'I do not want to immediately go in with a certain preset expectation of what they are going to say. I want to go in and do a lot of listening.' Mattis' more diplomatic tack reflects the U.S. administration's recognition of China's crucial influence on Korea as negotiations move ahead to get North Korea to abandon its nuclear program. One senior U.S. official said that while Mattis will willingly lay out America's position on China's military buildup in the South China Sea and other points of contention, the Pentagon chief doesn't want to open the conversations with 'the irritants.' Instead, the goal is to have higher quality talks about the two countries' military relationship, said the official, who spoke on condition of anonymity to discuss internal deliberations on the trip. Last month, however, Mattis abruptly disinvited China from a multinational exercise in the Pacific that will begin in a few days, in retribution for Beijing putting weapons systems on manmade islands in the South China Sea. And days later he publicly threatened 'much larger consequences in the future' if the militarization continued. China recently has deployed anti-ship missiles, surface-to-air missiles, electronic jammers and other equipment on the Spratly Islands, and landed a bomber aircraft at Woody Island. China says it is within its rights to build up defenses on islands in the South China Sea that it believes are its sovereign territory. Many nations fear that Beijing will use the construction on the islands to extend its military reach and potentially try to restrict navigation in the South China Sea. It's all but certain the Chinese will raise those issues with Mattis, as well as Beijing's long-held opposition to increasing U.S. contacts with Taiwan. China claims the self-ruled island as its territory. For the U.S., however, North Korea will be a primary topic in the talks with senior Chinese leaders. And while the U.S. would like to see China use its influence to reinfore the denuclearization negotiations with North Korea, it also wants Beijing to remain committed to enforcing sanctions against the North, as part of the pressure campaign. China also is likely pleased that the U.S. has suspended any major military exercises with South Korea as part of the nuclear negotiations. Mattis said Sunday that the Pentagon cancelled two Marine military exchanges as well as the larger Ulchi Freedom Guardian exercise this fall, because the defense department considered them consistent with what President Donald Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un had agreed on at the summit about two weeks ago. The U.S. has also long been frustrated that China doesn't share much information about any war scenarios or other contingencies it has in place in the event of a conflict on the Korean peninsula or the collapse of the North Korean government. By improving its relationship with Beijing, Washington believes it could better prepare for any problems and be able to coordinate more effectively with China. This is Mattis' first trip to China, both personally and as defense secretary. He said he has been in Hong Kong several times. The last Pentagon chief to visit China was Chuck Hagel in April 2014. But both Mattis and his immediate predecessor, Ash Carter, have spent a great deal of time in Asia, in the wake of the much-vaunted U.S. increased emphasis on the Indo-Pacific region. Mattis has traveled to Asia seven times during his 17-month tenure as defense secretary, and this marks his third visit so far this year. During his stop in Alaska, Mattis will visit a key element of the America's missile defense system at Fort Greely, the strategic missile interceptors. Sen. Dan Sullivan, R-Alaska, flew with Mattis from Washington and is expected to go to Fort Greely with him. The Pentagon budget calls for increasing the number of interceptors from 44 to 64, and that additional 20 will be located at Fort Greely. Critics question the reliability of the interceptors, arguing that years of testing has yet to prove them to be sufficiently effective against a sophisticated threat. In addition, Mattis will travel to South Korea and Japan to meet with his defense counterparts as well as other national leaders.
  • The rival Koreas are discussing the possible relocation of North Korea's long-range artillery systems away from the tense Korean border, the South's prime minister said Monday, as the countries forge ahead with steps to lower tensions and extend a recent detente. North Korea has deployed an estimated 1,000 artillery pieces along the border, posing a significant threat to Seoul and the metropolitan area. In a speech marking the 68th anniversary of the outbreak of the 1950-53 Korean War, Prime Minister Lee Nak-yon said that 'moving (North Korea's) long-range artillery to the rear is under discussion,' as he explained what types of good-will steps between the sides have been taken in recent months. Lee's comments appear to be Seoul's first official confirmation of media reports that South Korea demanded that the North reposition its forward-deployed artillery pieces during inter-Korean military talks this month. Seoul's Defense Ministry, which has denied those reports, said it had no immediate comment on Lee's speech. A 2016 South Korean defense white paper described the North's long-range artillery as one of the country's biggest threats, along with its nuclear and missile programs. Seoul, a capital city with 10 million people, is about 40-50 kilometers (25-30 miles) from the border. South Korean media speculated that during the June 14 military talks, the North likely demanded that South Korea and the United States withdraw their own artillery systems from the border as a reciprocal measure. About 28,500 U.S. soldiers are deployed in South Korea. Also Monday, military officers from the two Koreas met to discuss how to fully restore their military hotline communication channels, according to the South's Defense Ministry. The results of the talks were expected later Monday. The talks came a day after Seoul said it would 'indefinitely suspend' two small-scale annual military drills with the United States. The drills involving marines from the allies were supposed to occur from July to September, according to a statement from South Korea's Defense Ministry. It said South Korea is willing to take unspecified additional measures if North Korea is continuously engaged in 'productive' negotiations. Last week, South Korea and the United States announced the suspension of their larger, annual military exercises called the Ulchi Freedom Guardian, part of their efforts to increase the chances of successful nuclear diplomacy with North Korea. Some experts say the drills' suspension could weaken the allies' combined defense posture against North Korea.
  • Indonesia has identified the suspected location of an overcrowded ferry that sank last week in a deep volcanic crater lake but will need international help to recover the wreck, the chief of the national search and rescue agency said Monday. The ferry had some 200 people on board, about five times over capacity, but only 18 people including the boat's captain survived the sinking in rough weather June 17 on Lake Toba. The rescue agency said in a statement Sunday an object that was possibly the ferry was at a depth of 490 meters (1,607 feet). Few bodies have been recovered and officials have said many of the dead are likely trapped inside the vessel. Separately, police said four people including transport officials have been arrested on suspicion of negligence that led to the sinking. The search agency chief, Muhammad Syaugi, said in a television interview that Indonesia needs international help to recover the wreckage. Sonar equipment from Indonesia's navy was deployed on Friday. Divers could reach depths of only 50 meters (164 feet) in the lake's cold and dark waters. Anguished relatives have criticized the search effort but Syaugi defended it, saying there had been an 'all out' effort. The object believed to be the ferry is about 20 meters long (66 feet) and 5 meters (16 feet) wide, Syaugi said, consistent with its dimensions. 'We will do our best to salvage this wreck,' he said. 'Because we do not have robots, we are trying to find from other countries, but most of them have tools to lift a vessel from just 100 meters depth and the wreck must be cut first.' 'For us, the most important thing is to get as many victims as possible,' Syaugi said. Ferry tragedies are common in Indonesia, an archipelago of more than 17,000 islands, with weak enforcement of safety regulations often to blame. Lake Toba, formed out of an ancient super volcano, is a popular sightseeing destination on the island of Sumatra and among the destinations that Indonesia's government is promoting as a magnet for domestic and foreign tourists. North Sumatra police chief Paulus Waterpau told Indonesian TV that the boat's captain and three regional transport officials including the head of the port authority at Lake Toba and the head of North Sumatra province's transport office were arrested. 'We've arrested them because of negligence that resulted in people losing their lives,' he said. ___ This story has been corrected to show search and rescue agency chief's name is Muhammad Syaugi, not one name Syaugi.
  • Australia said on Monday it would negotiate a security treaty with Vanuatu, weeks after the Australian prime minister warned China against building a military base on the South Pacific island nation. Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull announced the negotiations during a visit to the Australian Parliament House by Vanuatu Prime Minister Charlot Salwai Tabimasmas. 'We agreed to commence negotiations on a bilateral security treaty on common security interests, such as humanitarian assistance and disaster response, maritime surveillance and border security, police and defense cooperation,' Turnbull said in a statement. Turnbull said he and Salwai had reinforced their commitment to a deep and enduring economic and security partnership. A Vanuatu government spokesman did not immediately respond to a request for comment on Monday. In May, China and Vanuatu denied media reports that the Chinese had approached the former joint British-French colony, population 280,000, about building a permanent military presence in the South Pacific. Turnbull said at the time Australia 'would view with great concern the establishment of any foreign military bases in those Pacific island countries and neighbors of ours.' New Zealand Prime Minster Jacinda Ardern said her country takes 'a strong position in the Pacific against militarization.' Vanuatu's Infrastructure Minister Jotham Napat told Australian Broadcasting Corp. last week that Salwai would use his Australian visit to ask Turnbull for Australia to help pay for a high-speed telecommunications cable from Sydney to Vanuatu. The request follows the Australian government announcement last week that it would pay most of the 137 million Australian dollar ($101 million) price tag for such an undersea cable to South Pacific neighbors Papua New Guinea and Solomon Islands. Australia stepped into that project after the Solomons government signed a contract with the Chinese telecommunications giant Huawei in 2017 to build a cable to the Sydney broadband hub. The Solomons consequently scrapped the Huawei deal. Huawei has been flagged by U.S. intelligence officials as a national security threat because of its links to the Chinese Communist Party. Australia has barred Huawei on security grounds from bidding for contracts in a national broadband network which is currently being rolled out Australia-wide.
  • Harry Kane led England into the round of 16 at the World Cup then gave a nod to Scottish DJ Calvin Harris. Kane was asked after England's 6-1 victory over Panama to pick a song to play on a Brazilian program as reward for his hat trick in the victory. Caught off guard by the request, the striker mulled the question from the Brazilian reporter. 'I'll go 'One Kiss' by Calvin Harris and Dua Lipa,' he offered Sunday. Dua Lipa is British, and both she and Harris were thrilled with Kane's selection. 'Yes I'm Scottish but I don't care the legend Harry Kane picked our song,' Harris posted on Twitter with a clip from Kane's post-match news conference. Dua Lipa acknowledged the shout-out by reposting a tweet about Kane's selection. Fans of both the soccer player and the artists also flooded social media supporting Kane's song choice. ___ More AP World Cup coverage: https://apnews.com/tag/WorldCup
  • Sweden midfielder Jimmy Durmaz says the racist abuse aimed at him over social media following the 2-1 loss to Germany at the World Cup has been 'completely unacceptable.' After coming on as a substitute, Durmaz gave away the free kick that led to Toni Kroos curling in an injury-time winner in Saturday's group game. Durmaz has since been subjected to online abuse, including threats to his family. Before a training session on Sunday, Durmaz — standing in front of the rest of the Sweden squad and beside coach Janne Andersson — read out a statement to the media from a mobile phone. 'When you threaten me, when you call me 'Arab devil,' 'terrorist,' 'Taliban,' then you have gone far beyond the limit,' Durmaz said in the statement, which was published on the Swedish Football Association's website. 'And even worse, when you go after my family, my children, threaten them. Who does such a thing? It is completely unacceptable.' Durmaz was born in Sweden to Assyrian parents who emigrated from Turkey. 'I am Swedish and I am proud to play in the Swedish national team. That's the biggest thing you can do as a football player,' he said in the statement. 'I will never let any racists destroy that pride. We must all stand against all forms of racism.' The Swedish FA has reported the abuse toward Durmaz to police. 'We do not tolerate a player being exposed to threats and violations,' said Hakan Sjostrand, secretary general of the Swedish FA. 'It is unpleasant and very upsetting to see the treatment that Jimmy Durmaz has suffered. Completely unacceptable.' The loss to Germany left Sweden tied on three points with its opponent. Both countries are three points behind Mexico with one game left. Sweden plays Mexico in Yekaterinburg on Wednesday, with Germany taking on South Korea at the same time.
  • Mohamed Salah told Egypt team officials and teammates that he is considering retiring from international play because he is angry about being used as a political symbol while the World Cup squad was based in Chechnya, two people close to the player told The Associated Press Sunday. Salah — the Muslim world's most popular soccer player today — said he was particularly annoyed with a team banquet hosted by Chechen leader Ramzan Kadyrov, who used the dinner to grant Salah 'honorary citizenship,' according to the two people. Both spoke on the condition of anonymity because of the sensitivity of the subject. Egypt soccer federation spokesman Osama Ismail said that Salah has not complained to the federation. 'Only what Salah writes on his Twitter account should be counted on.' Chechnya, a predominantly Muslim region in southern Russia, was devastated by wars between separatists and Russian forces. Kadyrov, a former rebel who switched his loyalties to Moscow, faces accusations of gross human rights violations, including abductions and killings. Salah, who also took part in a photo opportunity with Kadyrov, has been criticized by the British media for allowing the Chechen leader to use him to improve the government's international image. Salah had not responded publicly to the criticism while the team was based in Grozny, the Chechen capital. Salah's meetings with Kadyrov carry the potential to hurt his popularity in Europe, where he has been something of an ambassador for moderate Islam. News of Salah's disapproval of Kadyrov's actions leaked out just after the Egyptian squad left Grozny. The team is now in Volgograd for Monday's game against Saudi Arabia which, like Egypt, has also been eliminated. Salah will now turn his attention back to his club play. Last season, Salah led Liverpool to the Champions League final and was named player of the year in the Premier League after scoring 44 goals in all competitions. If Salah were to quit the Pharaohs, it would be a major embarrassment to the federation and the government, which decided to base the team in Grozny. A populace that sees Salah as a hero would likely be furious, with the blame going to a government facing growing popular discontent over its decision to hike the price of fuel, drinking water and electricity. Egypt coach Hector Cuper, was cagey when asked Sunday about Kadyrov's use of Salah to make political gains. He said FIFA listed Grozny as one of the cities that could be used as a World Cup training base. Human Rights Watch and other groups unsuccessfully tried to persuade FIFA to drop Grozny from the list of possible team bases. The banquet Friday night was held at Kadyrov's presidential palace in Grozny, and the Chechen leader posed with Salah for pictures while pinning a medal on his chest. 'It is a deserved honor,' Kadyrov wrote on Russian social media, adding that Salah's presence had driven 'unprecedented interest in football.' Kadyrov said he wants Egypt to return to Chechnya after the World Cup for a friendly against local club Akhmat Grozny, which is named after Kadyrov's assassinated father. A video clip of the ceremony showed Kadyrov seated at a table flanked by Salah and Hany Abo Rida, chairman of Egypt's football federation. Dancing troupes and singers performed for Kadyrov and his guests, with Salah grim-faced at times.
  • Saudi Arabia’s state-run television station said Sunday that the country’s air defense intercepted two ballistic missiles launched over Riyadh, Reuters reported. >> Read more trending news The attack, which the station alleged was  launched by Yemen’s Houthi militia, is at least the sixth to target Riyadh since December. Six blasts were heard and bright flashes were seen in the sky over the Saudi capital city, Reuters reported. There were no reported casualties or damage, a witness told Reuters. There was no comment from Saudi officials authorities or from the Saudi-led coalition fighting in Yemen against the Houthi movement.

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  • A 5-year-old girl is dead after police say a pickup truck struck her in the SeaWorld San Antonio parking lot. >> Read more trending news  According to the San Antonio Express-News, the vehicle hit the child Sunday night as she and her parents were getting ready to leave the tourist attraction. Police said she 'got away from' her parents in the parking lot and 'darted between two vehicles' before she was struck and killed, the newspaper reported. WOAI's David Caltabiano tweeted that no charges have been filed against the truck's driver, who stopped to help after hitting the girl.  Read more here or here.
  • The Jacksonville Sheriff’s Office is asking for the community’s help as they try to find 74-year-old Charles Sapp.  Sapp lives on the Westside and was last seen on June 17th, when he told someone he was going for a drive.  The 74-year-old has several medical conditions including possible short-term memory loss. According to JSO, Sapp should be driving a 2003 Hyundai XG350 with Florida tag “ACFT42.” Police say Sapp’s car has a different color paint on the hood and the driver side rear bumper is peeling.   If you have any information, you are asked to call the Jacksonville Sheriff’s Office at 904.630.0500.
  • It was another violent weekend in Jacksonville, with more than half a dozen shootings reported in just two days. There is no indication any of these incidents are related, and in some of the investigations the suspects are known and speaking with police or in custody. WOKV will be gathering more information about these incidents through Monday.  The violence started in the very early hours of Saturday. Just after midnight, officers responded to a person shot in a home on Glenn Mottin Way in Mandarin. An adult man was taken to the hospital with life-threatening injuries, and the person responsible for the shooting has spoken with police, according to JSO. We’re working to learn more about the circumstances of the shooting, and whether there will be any arrests.  Just before 6AM, officers responded to a person shot in the Amtrak parking lot on Clifford Lane in Northwest Jacksonville. The victim in this case suffered non-life-threatening injuries and the suspect is in custody. JSO says this incident had nothing to do with Amtrak, despite its location. We’ll update you as we learn more about the suspect and motive.  Saturday night, just after 9PM, JSO responded to a shooting on Barnhill Road. A Hispanic man told investigators he had been shot during a robbery attempt. Robbery detectives are leading this investigation, with no suspect information available at this time. We’re told this victim’s injuries are not life threatening.  Around the same time, police responded to reports of a person shot on Noah Road on the Northside. Two people in a home were involved in a dispute, during which one person was shot, according to JSO. We’re told both people were injured and taken to the hospital, but the person who was shot is in stable condition. No word yet on any arrests, but we will update you as more information is available.  JSO was dispatched to a shooting on Atlantic Blvd around 10PM. Officers found a black male victim, who had been shot multiple times- although the shooting apparently happened several blocks away, and the victim walked to where he was found in order to get help. The victim’s injuries are life-threatening.  Early Sunday, JSO responded to a person shot on Jefferson Street. The female victim was taken to the hospital, but died as a result of her injuries. JSO says the victim was shot on the basketball court at the Julius Guinyard Park. There is no suspect information at this point.  Around 1PM, police were called to the Quality Inn at Dix Ellis Trail on the Southside. A black male in his 20s was found dead, but police say the victim identified as a woman. Our partner Action News Jax reports the victim was transgender, which marks three transgender individuals killed in Jacksonville in recent months. JSO says the suspect is a black man who appears to have fled the scene in a beige colored vehicle. Police aren’t giving many other details at this time, but we’re told there were witnesses.  Around 7PM Sunday, a JSO officer on patrol found a man lying dead on the ground on University Blvd Ct, which is off University and Philips. Homicide detectives are investigating, but there is no information right now about what the victim’s cause of death was or his identity. At this point, this death is classified as “undetermined”.  If you have any information about any of these investigations, you can contact JSO at 904-630-0500 or JSOCrimeTips@jaxsheriff.org. You can also submit an anonymous tip by calling Crime Stoppers at 1-866-845-TIPS.  A fatal shooting is also being investigated by Jacksonville Beach Police. 23-year-old Leon Bennett was killed following a fight outside of The Pier Restaurant. JBPD has released several videos they hope will help lead to the one or more suspects responsible, and if you have any information on that incident, you can call 904-270-1661.
  • A young man is dead, after a fight in Jacksonville Beach leads to a shooting. Jacksonville Beach Police say there was first a fight on the sidewalk in front of The Pier Restaurant on 1st Street North early Sunday morning. The victim then walked north along 1st Street, until several black male subjects drove up in a white four-door sedan-style vehicle. One of the suspects in that car shot the suspect, and the vehicle then fled west on 7th Avenue North.  The victim was taken to the hospital, but later died. He has been identified as 23-year-old Leon Bennett.  Police released a video that was posted on Instagram, which they say shows an “involved party” in their investigation of this shooting. They’re asking for your help identifying the man in the middle of the street, who a woman is on top of in this video. Police say he appears to have light skin and to be bald, and is seen here wearing all black with white-soled shoes.  JBPD is also asking for the public’s help identifying any person seen in another video, which was posted on YouTube. This video is believed to show the fight that happened moments before this shooting.  If you have any information about the identity of the people in these videos, you’re asked to contact JBPD Detective Kulcsar at 904-270-1661.
  • As Republicans struggled again to gather a majority in the House this week for an immigration reform bill, President Donald Trump on Sunday seemed to hint that the effort might be a waste of time, blaming Democrats for their opposition to GOP plans, and demanding major changes in how the U.S. legal system deals with those illegally entering the United States. “When somebody comes in, we must immediately, with no Judges or Court Cases, bring them back from where they came,” the President tweeted on Sunday, making the argument that illegal immigrants deserve no legal standing in court, no due process after being detained. But the U.S. Supreme Court has held the opposite, ruling in a 1982 case that “illegal aliens…may claim the benefit of the Equal Protection Clause, which provides that no State shall ‘deny to any person within its jurisdiction the equal protection of the laws.'” “Summarily removing individuals with no opportunity for a hearing, even if they might have viable legal objections to their removal, would likely violate due process,” said Steve Vladeck, a professor at the University of Texas Law School. That idea was one of a number of tweets this weekend on immigration from the President: We cannot allow all of these people to invade our Country. When somebody comes in, we must immediately, with no Judges or Court Cases, bring them back from where they came. Our system is a mockery to good immigration policy and Law and Order. Most children come without parents… — Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) June 24, 2018 It’s very sad that Nancy Pelosi and her sidekick, Cryin’ Chuck Schumer, want to protect illegal immigrants far more than the citizens of our country. The United States cannot stand for this. We wants safety and security at our borders! — Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) June 23, 2018 House Republicans could easily pass a Bill on Strong Border Security but remember, it still has to pass in the Senate, and for that we need 10 Democrat votes, and all they do is RESIST. They want Open Borders and don’t care about Crime! Need more Republicans to WIN in November! — Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) June 25, 2018 Mr. Trump’s comments came as House Republicans were still preparing a vote this week on a backup immigration reform bill – but no date for the vote had been set, as GOP leaders have struggled to corral a majority on the issue. In Congress, Mr. Trump’s idea to deny due process rights to illegal aliens landed with a big thud in both parties. “Removing due process from immigration cases is yet another example of Trump’s extreme immigration policy and disregard for the rule of law,” said Rep. Frank Pallone (D-NJ). “No person shall be…deprived of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law,” tweeted Rep. Justin Amash (R-MI), quoting the text of the Fifth Amendment to the Constitution. “Due process is a bedrock American legal principle,” said Rep. Jerry Nadler (D-NY). Democrats spent much of the weekend trying to focus more attention on the effort to reunite children of illegal immigrant families, who were separated from their parents under a Trump Administration effort to deter illegal immigrants from trying to cross the U.S. southern border. 'Enough is enough.' We must continue to protest, to speak out, and keep working until all families are reunited who have been torn apart by Trump's heartless immigration policies. pic.twitter.com/J3qlrVveHA — Mike Capuano (@mikecapuano) June 24, 2018 @RepTedDeutch speaking against Trump Administration immigration family separation policy. @CBSMiami pic.twitter.com/VSpodc1f9W — Carey (@ccoddcbs4news) June 24, 2018 But others on Capitol Hill saw the current immigration debate in much a different light. “America is heading in the direction of another Harpers Ferry,” said Rep. Steve King (R-IA), a strong backer of the President’s calls for tough action on illegal immigration, referring to John Brown’s raid in 1859, in a bid to start a slave revolt. “After that comes Ft. Sumter,” King said in a tweet, referring to the first shots of the Civil War.  

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