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    The Latest on migration into Europe (all times local): 3 p.m. Police in North Macedonia say a patrol has discovered 30 migrants in an abandoned truck parked on a local road in the southeast of the country. Police announced Sunday they spotted an abandoned truck Saturday afternoon near the town of Strumica, which borders with Greece, and discovered 30 migrants - 24 Pakistanis, three Iraqis, two Syrians and one Sudan national. The migrants are believed to have entered illegally from Greece and to have paid smugglers to take them north through Serbia toward Europe's prosperous heartland. Police said they were taken to a camp near the southern town of Gevgelija pending deportation to Greece. Police say they detained a total of 10,017 migrants who entered the country illegally in the first half of the year. ___ 1 p.m. Police in Croatia say a migrant has died after a van carrying 12 of them plunged into a river near the border with Slovenia. Police say the crash happened early Sunday after the van driver refused to stop at a checkpoint and was chased by a patrol. The driver, presumably a migrant smuggler, managed to get out of the sinking vehicle, fleeing into a nearby minefield and a search for him is ongoing. Police rescued 11 migrants from the sinking van by breaking its windows, but a woman died at a hospital. Last week, Slovenia started erecting additional fences on its southern border with Croatia after a considerable increase in the number of migrants trying to illegally cross between the two European Union-member states.
  • Greece's fire service says it has arrested two people in southern Greece suspected of starting fires, one of them who did so three times. The suspects, 47 and 43 years old, were arrested by firefighters in separate cases Saturday, in the Peloponnese. One is charged with starting a fire in a forest early Saturday and the other of starting three, including one last Sunday and two in less than an hour Saturday. Hot, dry, windy weather has helped fuel dozens of wildfires across the country and the fire service has deployed almost 700 firefighters in the past 24 hours. The most serious fire, on the eastern island of Samos, is now under control, but authorities had to evacuate four hotels Saturday and house the guests in an indoor stadium overnight.
  • Paris is celebrating the American soldiers, French Resistance fighters and others who liberated the City of Light from Nazi occupation exactly 75 years ago. Firefighters unfurled a huge French flag Sunday from the Eiffel Tower, recreating the moment when a French tricolor stitched together from sheets was hoisted atop the monument 75 years ago to replace the swastika flag that had flown for four years. People dressed in World War II-era military uniforms and dresses are parading in southern Paris, retracing the entry of French and U.S. tanks into the city on Aug. 25, 1944. Long the jewel of European cities, Paris suffered relatively little damage in World War II, but its citizens were humiliated, hungry and mistrustful after 50 months under the Nazis. The liberation of Paris was both joyous and chaotic. It was faster and easier for the Allies than their protracted battle through Normandy and its gun-filled hedgerows. But the fight for the French capital killed nearly 5,000 people, including Parisian civilians, German troops and members of the French Resistance whose sabotage and attacks and prepared the city for the liberation. After invading in 1940, the Nazi hierarchy ensconced themselves in Paris' luxury hotels, and hobnobbed at theaters and fine restaurants. Collaborationist militias kept order, and French police were complicit in the most dastardly act of the Occupation: the 1942 roundup of around 13,000 Jews at the Vel d'Hiv bicycle stadium before their eventual deportation to the Auschwitz death camp in German-occupied Poland. The Parisians who weren't deported or didn't flee used ration tickets to eat, wooden soles on shoes to replace scarce leather and sometimes curtains for clothes. The black market thrived. The D-Day landings on June 6, 1944 helped change the tide of the war, allowing the Allies to push through Normandy and beyond to other German-occupied lands around Western Europe. The message went out to the French Resistance in Paris that the Allies were advancing. Resistance member Madeleine Riffaud, now 95, described to The Associated Press killing a Nazi soldier on July 23, 1944, on a Sunday afternoon on the Solferino bridge. Riffaud was spotted as she escaped on her bicycle, then arrested, tortured and jailed before being freed in a prisoner exchange days before the liberation of the city. Seventy-five years later, she doesn't take the killing lightly. 'To carry out an action like that isn't playing with dolls,' she said. On Aug. 19, 1944, Paris police officers rebelled and took over police headquarters. On the night of Aug. 24, the first Allied troops entered southern Paris. The grand entrance of French Gen. Philippe Leclerc de Hauteclocque's 2nd Armored Division followed by Allied forces would come the following day. The German military governor of Paris, Gen. Dietrich von Choltitz, was arrested at his headquarters at the Meurice Hotel and signed the surrender. Paris buildings still bear the bullet holes of fighting. A group of U.S. World War II veterans is back in Paris for Sunday's events. They described to the AP their memories, some brought to tears by the horrors of the Nazi regime. Steve Melnikoff, 99, of Cockeysville, Maryland, came ashore on Omaha Beach on D-Day. He calls war 'nasty, smelly, terrible.' But he maintains that 'it was important for someone to do this,' to stop Hitler from taking over more of the world. Harold Radish, 95, arrived in France in 1944, fought his way to Germany — and then was captured. After he was freed, he visited Paris. He described the liberated city as 'a new thing. Something good had changed, the world was gonna get a little better.' Images of Parisian women kissing American soldiers on liberation day have imprinted themselves on later generations. AP reporter Don Whitehead, who was in Paris on Aug. 25, 1944, described both the exaltation and the violence that punctuated the day. 'When the last enemy resistance crumbled at the gate to Paris, then this heart of France went mad ... Men and women cried with joy. They grabbed the arms and hands of soldiers and cheered until their voices were hoarse. When the column stopped I was smothered, but pleasantly, with soft arms and lips giving not one kiss but the usual French double one,' he continued. 'One old man came up, saluted, and said with tears in his eyes: 'God bless America. You have saved France.'' ___ Deborah Gouffran contributed to this report. ___ For more AP coverage of World War II: https://www.apnews.com/WorldWarII
  • Countries have agreed to protect more than a dozen shark species at risk of extinction, in a move aimed at conserving some of the ocean's most awe-inspiring creatures who have themselves become prey to commercial fishing and the Chinese appetite for shark fin soup. Three proposals covering the international trade of 18 types of mako sharks, wedgefishes and guitarfishes each passed with a needed two-thirds majority in a committee of the World Wildlife Conference known as CITES on Sunday. 'Today we are one step closer to protecting the fastest shark in the ocean, as well as the most threatened,' said Jen Sawada, who directs The Pew Charitable Trusts shark conservation work. The move isn't final but is a key sign before an official decision at its plenary this week. Conservationists applauded and exchanged hugs after the tallies. Opponents variously included China, Iceland, Japan, Malaysia and New Zealand. The U.S. voted against the mako shark measure, but supported the other two. Rima Jabado, a shark expert and lead scientist of the Gulf Elasmo project, said many of the species included in the CITES proposals are classified as 'critically endangered.' Jabado said there has been an 80% decline in the number of wedgefishes, based on available data. Like giant guitarfishes, the enigmatic wedgefish has an elongated triangle-shaped head and can be found in oceans in Southeast Asia, the Arabian Sea and East Africa. Makos are the world's fastest sharks, reaching speeds of up to 80 mph (nearly 130 kph). But they often get caught up in the nets of fishing trawlers hunting for tuna. Jabado said some species of sharks and rays are becoming so difficult to find in the wild that scientists only often see them when they are on sale at local fish markets. 'How are we ever going to save these species if we only see them when fishermen bring them in?' she said, adding that even if actions are taken now, it will be decades before shark populations start to recover. Losing more sharks and rays could also have other unintended consequences since they are top ocean predators and help to balance the ecosystems, Jabado said. Scientists warn that although warming oceans and climate change are also hurting sharks, it is the demand for shark fin soup that is threatening to drive some species to extinction. The Pew Trust estimates that between 63 million and 273 million sharks are killed every year, mostly to feed the shark fin trade centered in Hong Kong. Dried shark fin can draw up to $1,000 per kilogram. The fins are often turned into shark fin soup, a Chinese delicacy that symbolizes good fortune, in which the gelatinous fin is served in a broth whose recipe dates back to the 10th-century Song Dynasty. Fishermen often slice off a shark's fin while the animal is still alive before tossing the writhing carcass back into the ocean. While Chinese celebrities like retired basketball star Yao Ming are trying to persuade diners to abandon the soup, many aren't convinced. 'Shark fin soup is a Chinese tradition so why should I stop eating it?' Wilson Kwan said outside a seafood restaurant in London's Chinatown. 'I know some people say it's cruel to sharks, but sharks are killers too.' Last year, there were an estimated 66 unprovoked shark attacks on humans globally, including four fatalities, according to the Florida Museum, which tracks such incidents. It is exceedingly rare for sharks to bite humans — and when they do, it's often because they have mistaken them for seals or other prey. Conservationists say movies like 'Jaws' have unfairly maligned society's perception of sharks and in turn, made it difficult to garner support to protect them. 'People would be outraged if they were serving dolphins in restaurants,' said Graham Buckingham of the British shark group, Bite-Back. 'But because it's a shark, they think it's perfectly OK.' ___ Maria Cheng reported from London.
  • Doctors at the hospital where Spain's former monarch Juan Carlos I underwent heart surgery say he is making a satisfactory recovery almost 24 hours after the operation. Lucía Alonso, the managing director of Madrid's Quironsalud University Hospital, said Sunday the 81-year-old king emeritus is awake and breathing without support. Alonso says in a statement that Juan Carlos is sitting up in bed and 'is in good spirits.' The triple bypass procedure Saturday was scheduled after the former king had a checkup two months ago. The hospital said the operation was successful and without complications. Juan Carlos abdicated in 2014 in favor of Felipe, ending a near 39-year reign. He retired from public duties last May.
  • Pope Francis said Sunday that the Amazon forest is vital for our Earth and is urging prayers that fires there are quickly controlled. Francis added his voice to the chorus of international concern that the blazes in Brazil will have grave repercussions on the world's environmental health. The pontiff, who is from the neighboring South American nation of Argentina, told the public in St. Peter's Square that 'we're all worried' about the vast Amazon fires. He warned that that green 'lung of forest is vital for our planet.' Francis said 'let us pray so that, with the efforts of all, they are controlled as quickly as possible.' The blazes have sparked anti-government protests in Brazil and became a pressing issue for leaders at the Group of Seven summit in France. Backed by military aircraft, Brazilian troops on Saturday deployed in the Amazon to fight the fires. Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro also tried to temper global concern, saying that previously deforested areas had burned and that intact rainforest was spared. Even so, the fires were an issue of top concern at the G-7 summit. French President Emmanuel Macron said Sunday that leaders of major democracies are nearing an agreement on how to help fight the fires and repair the damage. He said agreement would involve both technical and financial mechanisms 'so that we can help them in the most effective way possible.' It's not clear, however, whether Brazil would welcome the help. The Brazilian military operations came after widespread criticism of Bolsonaro's handling of the crisis. On Friday, the president authorized the armed forces to put out fires, saying he is committed to protecting the Amazon region. About 44,000 troops will be available for 'unprecedented' operations to put out the fires, and forces are heading to six Brazilian states that asked for federal help, Defense Minister Fernando Azevedo said. The states are Roraima, Rondonia, Tocantins, Para, Acre and Mato Grosso. France's president thrust the Amazon fires to the top of the agenda of the G-7 summit after declaring it a global emergency and threatening to torpedo a European Union trade deal with Brazil and other South American countries. France claims a small part of the Amazon in its overseas department of French Guiana. German Chancellor Angela Merkel, also at the summit, came down against blocking the EU-Mercosur trade accord, but said she was in favor of treating the Amazon fires as an urgent threat.
  • The first fissures emerged among G-7 leaders on Sunday over how to deal with Iran, as U.S. President Donald Trump denied he had signed on to an agreement on giving France a leading role as a go-between with the world's major democracies. Trump had tried to play down tensions among Group of Seven leaders after an intimate dinner Saturday in the southwest French resort of Biarritz, but came out swiftly to dispute France's claim that they had agreed to let President Emmanuel Macron deliver a message to Iran on their behalf. For several months, Macron has taken a lead role in trying to save the 2015 nuclear accord, which has been unraveling since Trump pulled the U.S. out of the agreement. No details were provided on what the G-7 message to Iran would be but Macron said the goal is to prevent Iran from getting nuclear weapons and avoid a further escalation in tensions in the Middle East. 'I haven't discussed that,' Trump said Sunday morning. He described the dinner as 'very, very good' and blamed the media for anything that implied otherwise. But it seemed from other accounts that the previous night's dinner had been tense and the divide between him and the rest of the G-7 were clear. British Prime Minister Boris Johnson, greeting Macron for a morning meeting, congratulated the French president and shook his hand. 'You did very well last night. My God that was a difficult one. You did brilliant, you did brilliant,' he said. Johnson himself was critical of the U.S. trade war with China, which has been casting shadows over the world economy. The G-7 leaders regrouped on Sunday morning to focus on what they can do to boost growth at a time of heightened uncertainty. Manufacturers around the world are smarting from the trade dispute between the U.S. and China, which has led to new import taxes on hundreds of billions of dollars-worth of goods. Businesses don't know where tariffs will be imposed next. The White House had said putting the economy on the agenda was Trump's idea, but the G-7 has for over four decades always included a focus on the economy: it was founded as a response to the Arab oil embargo in the 1970s and the recession that followed. The backdrop is particularly worrying this year, with the U.S. economy slowing and Germany and Italy close to recession. Meanwhile, Britain is due to leave the EU in October and there is no agreement on how it should happen, raising the possibility of a disorderly exit that could wreak havoc for business in Europe. The G-7 summit includes the heads of Britain, France, Germany, Japan, Canada and Italy as well as a representative of the 28-country EU. In the nearby town of Bayonne, protesters demanded Macron do more to protect French workers and the planet. A mix of activists, some wearing yellow vests, carried portraits of the French president as they marched Sunday in solidarity with environmental activists who removed official portraits of Macron from town halls around France earlier this year to protest his climate change policies. Internationally, Macron is a vocal champion of fighting climate change, and has challenged Trump on the issue. At home in France, however, activists accuse him of lagging on promises to wean France from fossil fuels. ___ Zeke Miller contributed.
  • The Latest on the reported crash of two Israeli drones in Lebanon, following Israeli attacks on Iranian targets in neighboring Syria (all times local): 12:45 a.m. Lebanese Prime Minister Saad Hariri has described the crash of two Israeli reconnaissance drones over Beirut as a violation and 'aggression' against Lebanese sovereignty. He said Sunday that the developments overnight constitute a threat to regional stability and an attempt to push the situation toward more escalation. Hariri's comments were the first by a senior Lebanese official after two Israeli drones crashed in a Hezbollah stronghold in southern Beirut. Israeli warplanes regularly violate Lebanese airspace and have struck inside neighboring Syria from Lebanon on several occasions, angering Hezbollah and Lebanese officials, who have complained to the United Nations in the past. ___ 12:15 a.m. An Iranian general says Israeli strikes in Syria did not cause any damage or casualties among Iranian forces there. The semi-official ILNA news agency quoted Gen. Mohsen Rezaei on Sunday as denying claims by the Israeli military that it thwarted an imminent Iranian drone attack on Israel, calling that a 'lie.' Israeli warplanes struck targets near the Syrian capital, Damascus, overnight. Rezaei, a senior commander in Iran's Revolutionary Guard, says 'the defenders of Syria and Iraq will soon give an answer' to recent attacks by Israel and the United States. Iran is a key ally of Syrian President Bashar Assad and has sent military advisers and militias to aid his forces. Israel has repeatedly struck Iran-linked targets in Syria, saying it won't tolerate a permanent Iranian presence there or the transfer of advanced weapons to Hezbollah. In recent days, U.S. officials have said that Israeli strikes have also hit Iranian targets in Iraq, in what would be a significant expansion of Israel's campaign targeting Iranian military entrenchment in the region. ___ 10 a.m. A spokesman for Lebanon's Hezbollah says two Israeli drones crashed in Beirut without the militant group firing on them. Mohammed Afif says a small, unmanned reconnaissance drone fell on the roof of a building housing Hezbollah's media office in the Moawwad neighborhood in Dahyeh, the group's stronghold in the southern part of the Lebanese capital. He says a second drone which appeared to have been sent by Israel to search for the first drone less than 45 minutes later exploded in the air and crashed nearby — an explosion heard by residents of the area. Afif told The Associated Press Sunday: 'We did not shoot down or explode any of the drones.' He says Hezbollah leader Hassan Nasrallah will give the 'appropriate' response in a televised appearance later Sunday.
  • Police in Finland say two officers have been shot and wounded while on duty in the southern town of Porvoo. Finland's police chief, Seppo Kolehmainen, said Sunday the officers were in stable condition. The shooting took place shortly after midnight in an industrial area in Porvoo, about 50 kilometers (30 miles) northeast of Helsinki, after police were alerted about undisclosed activity at the site. Police said that an attempted murder investigation is underway and they are looking for several suspects. Police haven't immediately provided details on a motive. A major search that included heavily-armed officers and helicopters was launched soon after the shooting.
  • After protests brought Zimbabwe's capital to a standstill earlier this month, Harare has returned to its normal bustle and Tedius Marara is back to his daily business: selling cash at a busy market. With inflation soaring and cash in short supply, many Zimbabweans transfer funds using their mobile phones and pay a premium to get currency. Marara is one of many cash vendors doing a roaring trade. People huddle around his wooden stall, one eye on their mobile phone screens and another on a small counter brimming with coins. 'These are my banks nowadays,' said Mishy Tshuma, a customer referring to her mobile phone and the makeshift stall. To get cash, she has to pay Marara on a transfer by her phone and pay a hefty premium. And in a country where cash is king, she has little choice but to pay the extra amount. Tshuma said she has to transfer 135 Zimbabwe dollars from her bank through her phone to get $100 Zimbabwe dollars in cash, and that is for coins. For notes, the premium jumps to 40%. Like many things that are in short supply in Zimbabwe, such as electricity, water and gas, cash is scarce and the country's economic problems are blamed for rising tensions. The shortage of currency notes and coins shouldn't be much of a problem in a country ranked by a World Bank 2018 report as having one of the highest numbers of people in sub-Saharan Africa using cell phone transfers, what is called mobile money. More than 80% of all transactions in the country are conducted through mobile money, according to the Reserve Bank of Zimbabwe, the country's central bank. The World Bank says increased use of mobile money is a welcome sign of a greater proportion of the population engaged in the banking sector. Yet, in Zimbabwe it is more a matter of the difficulty and the cost for ordinary folk of getting ready access to cash. Many retailers and service providers demand payments in cash only. Others, including street vendors, charge a higher price for goods paid for using mobile money or bank cards. Those able to pay in cash get sizeable discounts of up to 50%. With many factories closed or operating only for a few hours due to widespread power cuts that last up to 19 hours a day, Zimbabwe imports most of its goods. Businesses need cash to buy foreign currency from the illegal black market to restock, said Harare-based economist John Robertson. Many Zimbabweans travel by bus or freight trucks to neighboring South Africa to buy essential items such as cooking oil, rice, toilet paper and toothpaste and they need cash to buy South African rand on the black market. 'Cash will continue to have a much higher value than money sitting in the bank,' said Robertson. The frantic hunt for cash often turns into begging. At the long lines to buy gasoline or diesel and in supermarkets, women, men and children move from person to person asking for cash. 'Can I use my phone to pay for your goods, if you pay me cash?' they plead. Enterprising people are cashing in on the shortage to sell cash at a premium to desperate people. Some people still wait in long lines outside their banks in the faint hope of being allowed to withdraw a bit of cash. But many have long given up because banks are usually unable to dispense cash, even to their own account holders. Cash vendors become their only option, despite the steep fees that they charge. 'Paying extra to cash out is allowing someone to steal your money. Say no to 30% or 40% extra,' says an advertisement by Econet, a telecommunication firm that handles the bulk of the country's mobile money transactions. Cash vendors said they are recording booming business in spite of such warnings by telecoms firms and the police. 'It's not easy getting this cash. I also fork out money to get it so my customers have to pay more if I am to make any profit,' said Marara, between serving a stream of clients at a busy market. He said he can sell up to 2,000 Zimbabwe dollars (about U.S $200) for a 40% profit on a good day. He buys the cash from public transport taxis operators, fruit vendors and supermarkets. 'They charge me (premiums of) between 15% and 20%,' said Marara. The cash shortages are just one of many problems facing the once prosperous country, where inflation peaked at a decade high of 175% last month before the finance minister suspended the country's inflation reports. The continuing price increases of gas, school fees, food items and government services mean Zimbabwe 'will still have a high rate of inflation' even if it is not announced officially, said economist Robertson. 'It is puzzling that the finance minister can suspend publication of inflation statistics, is it adult viewing?' joked Robertson. 'I reckon inflation was way above 200% in July and it's on its way to 300%,' he said. For many, such as Harare resident Tshuma, who lose a large part of their wages to cash vendors, they are learning to do with less. 'These (cash) vendors are killing us,' she said. 'After paying for the cash we can't buy what we need because we can't afford it.' ___ Follow Africa news at https://twitter.com/AP_Africa

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  • Officials are investigating after an explicit video was shared “inadvertently and unknowingly” from a Mississippi teacher’s phone, authorities said. >> Read more trending news  According to a statement from Horn Lake police, the department received information regarding the video Wednesday.  DeSoto County Schools are conducting an investigation into the video, which reportedly showed explicit content of a teacher in the district. Police said if there was a “criminal element regarding the release of the video,” Horn Lake officers will then initiate a full investigation. School officials have not identified the teacher who was seen in the video, and the contents of the video have not been released at this time. The school district did confirm to WHBQ that the teacher involved is no longer an employee there. Again, officials told WHBQ that the video was shared without the teacher’s knowledge.
  • The Jacksonville Sheriff's Office is asking for the public's help identifying a suspect they say committed a burglary involving a battery in Arlington. According to police, their investigation has revealed that a suspect entered a victim's home overnight while she was asleep. Police say the suspect woke up the victim, threatened and battered her, and then took some of her belongings.  If you have information on who this individual is, you're urged to contact the sheriff's office at (904) 630-0500 or Crime Stoppers at 1-866-845-TIPS.
  • In a series of tweets Friday, President Donald Trump announced new retaliatory tariffs against China, bumping up taxes by 5 percentage points.  >> MORE: China, Trump ratchet up tensions with new tariffs >> Read more trending news  Here’s a look at trade tariffs and what they do. What is a tariff? A tariff is a tax on imports or exports that increases their prices. Tariffs are used by governments to make foreign products less attractive to consumers in order to protect domestic industries from competition. Money collected under a tariff is called a duty or customs duty. What types of tariffs are there?There are two types of tariffs – an ad valorem tariff and a specific tariff. An ad valorem tariff is a tariff that is a fixed percentage of the value of an imported good. If the price of the imported good goes up, the ad valorem tariff goes up. If it goes down, the tariff goes down. For instance, if a company exports an item to the United States costing $50 and the ad valorem tariff on that product is 20 percent, the company would have to pay the tariff -- $10 in this case -- to export the product to the U.S. If the price of the item goes up to $75, the company will have to pay a tariff of $15 to sell the item in the US. A specific tariff is a fixed amount of money placed on the item no matter the cost. Say there is a $20 specific tariff on that $50 item. The company exporting the item to the US would have to pay $20 to sell the item in the U.S. If the item goes up in cost to $75, the company will still have to pay $20 to export the item. Why should I care if the US government puts a tariff on items? The manufacturer pays for that, right? Sure, manufacturers pay the tariff upfront, but the cost of the tariff will be passed along to the consumer. Or, if the cost of the tariff is too high for those exporting goods, then they stop exporting goods. Tariffs affect the cost of goods you buy, and the U.S. buys many more products than it sells. So, why slap tariffs on goods if it will hurt the US consumer? The theory is that as goods made by people outside the U.S. get more expensive, manufacturers within the country will either increase their production of the product or other companies will begin to produce the product, thus strengthening the U.S. economy.
  • The Baker County Sheriff's Office is announcing an arrest, following an incident Thursday were a young child was found unresponsive in a hot car. According to the sheriff's office, the 3-year-old boy's mother is now being charged with child neglect. Deputies say 23-year-old Katie Davis failed to provide the toddler with proper care and supervision.  Investigators say the boy's father had been at work all night and went to bed at approximately 7:00 AM, Thursday morning. They say that Davis also went back to sleep around that same time with the child, despite having slept some the night before.  Investigators say when Davis woke up around 1:30 PM, she realized the boy was no longer in the bed. We're told that she then discovered him inside the couple's car outside, where some of his toys had been kept.  Deputies say Davis and her husband were able to get him out by smashing one of the windows and unlocking the doors.  The boy was airlifted to Wolfson Children's Hospital in Jacksonville, Thursday afternoon. Deputies said Friday he's recovering and stable.
  • According to many polls, Americans – especially those who say they are Democrats -- are not that fond of the Electoral College. Neither are many of the Democratic candidates for president. >> Read more trending news  With just over 14 months until the 2020 presidential election, a movement to change the way electoral votes are awarded and who will be elected president has gained some steam. The National Popular Vote Compact (NPV), which has its roots in the most contested presidential election in U.S. history, sets in state law a policy that awards all a state’s electoral votes to the candidate who wins the national popular vote. Under the Electoral College system used today, 48 states have a “winner-take-all” system that awards all the state’s electoral votes to the person who gets a majority of votes in that state. The Electoral College does not take into consideration that national popular vote. Sixteen states, along with the District of Columbia, have passed the NPV agreement. They are California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Hawaii, Illinois, Massachusetts, Maryland, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, Oregon and Rhode Island. While legislation has been passed in the 16 states and the District of Columbia, the agreement would not go into effect until states with a collective 270 electoral votes — the number needed to win the presidency — agree to join. Currently, the District of Columbia and the 16 states in the agreement hold a combined total of 196 electoral votes, meaning the pact would need enough new state members to get 74 electoral votes.Supporters say the system would give the person who got the most votes country-wide the presidency he or she deserves. Opponents say states would be forced to hand over electoral votes to a candidate who did not win that state. For instance, in the 2016 election, a state such as Florida, in which President Donald Trump earned more votes, would have had to pledge its 29 electoral votes to Trump’s opponent, Hillary Clinton, who won the national popular vote in the 2016 election. The Electoral College of today was established by the Twelfth Amendment to the Constitution which replaced the method for electing the president and vice president provided in Article II, Section 1, Clause 3. Under the system, when voters cast a ballot for president, they are actually choosing members of the Electoral College, called electors, who are pledged to that presidential candidate. Following the election for president, electors then meet to choose the president. Electors almost always vote for their state’s popular vote winner, and some states have laws requiring them to do so. However, electors are not bound by federal law to vote for a specific candidate – for instance, the one who won the popular vote in their state. In 29 states and the District of Columbia, electors are bound by state law or by a pledge they sign to vote for the candidate who won the popular vote of the state they represent. Five men have won the presidency in the Electoral College while not winning the country’s popular vote: John Quincy Adams in 1824, Rutherford B. Hayes in 1876, Benjamin Harrison in 1888, George W. Bush in 2000 and Donald Trump in 2016. The National Popular Vote campaign goes back to Democratic presidential candidate Al Gore's loss to Bush in 2000, according to The Associated Press. Gore won the popular vote but lost the election over a vote count in Florida.

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