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    Greek authorities say they have identified a suspect accused of the brutal killing and rape of American scientist Suzanne Eaton. In a statement Thursday, police identified the man as 27-year-old Yiannis Paraskakis, from the port of Chania on the island of Crete. Police have published photographs of the suspect. Paraskakis has been charged with the rape and murder of Eaton, 59, who disappeared on July 2 while attending a conference near Chania and whose body was found six days later in an abandoned underground storage site used during World War II. Police said the suspect told them he had hit Eaton twice with his car before abducting her. A public prosecutor waived the suspect's privacy rights citing public safety concerns, and the need to assist an investigation of his possible involvement in other offenses.
  • A Moroccan court has convicted on terror charges the three main defendants in the trial over the brutal slaying of two Scandinavian women hiking in the Atlas Mountains, and sentenced them to death. A fourth suspect who fled the scene was given life in prison. After several hours of deliberation, the court handed 19 accomplices jail terms ranging from five to 30 years. None of the men reacted as the sentences were read out, but families of those convicted rushed out of the crowded courtroom crying. Maren Ueland, 28, from Norway, and Louisa Vesterager Jespersen, 24, from Denmark, were knifed to death in December. The slayings were recorded on video and posted online. The men claimed allegiance to the Islamic State group. All 23 addressed the court ahead of the verdicts, most begging for leniency. The main defendants asked Allah for forgiveness. Jounes Ouzayed and Rashid Afatti, are carpenters while Abdessamad Al Joud is a street merchant. The man who fled the murder scene is Khaiali Abderahman. In his closing arguments in June, the prosecutor asked the court to sentence the top suspects to death, and described the three main defendants as 'human beasts.' A Swiss man, Kevin Zoller, among the accomplices, received a 20-year sentence. The lawyer for Vesterager's family said he was '100% satisfied' with the verdicts. Khalid El Fataoui noted that Louisa Vesterager's mother had asked the court in a letter at an earlier hearing this month to sentence the killers to death. 'We obtained what she asked for.
  • Luciano De Crescenzo, an Italian writer, actor and director, has died in Rome after being hospitalized for a few days. He was 90. The publishing house Mondadori announced his death on Thursday. Born in Naples on Aug. 20, 1928, De Crescenzo gained famed in 1977 with his best-seller 'Così parlò Bellavista' ('Thus spoke Bellavista'), a collection of anecdotes about his beloved Naples. Over the years, De Crescenzo became an internationally successful author. His books sold almost 20 million copies in Italy and abroad and were translated in 25 countries. De Crescenzo was particularly successful in delivering philosophy to the general public with his books. In the 1980s, he debuted as actor in 'Il pap'occhio,' ('In the Pope's Eye'), a comedy directed by Renzo Arbore and starring Oscar-winning actor Roberto Benigni.
  • Serbian police say they have arrested a man over a bomb scare that forced the evacuation of a Lufthansa flight to Frankfurt and caused a long delay. Police said Thursday that the man, born in 1954, faces charges of causing panic and unrest. They say he phoned the Belgrade airport early Thursday and made the false bomb claim. His motive wasn't immediately clear. The alert forced around 130 passengers already on the plane to disembark from the Airbus A320 which was taken off the runway for inspection by special police officers with sniffer dogs. Police later said no bomb was found and the plane eventually took off after an eight-hour delay. Lufthansa says some of the passengers have been rebooked on other flights.
  • The Latest on developments related to tensions between U.S and Iran (all times local): 8:30 p.m. Iran's state TV English-language channel has released video of a ship seized by Iranian Revolutionary Guard forces accused of smuggling fuel out of the country. The Press TV report showed the ship's registration number on its bridge, matching that of the MT Riah, a UAE-based vessel that turned off its location tracker as it entered Iranian territorial waters early Sunday. Iranian state media earlier Thursday said a tanker was seized with a crew of 12 aboard for smuggling fuel from Iranian smugglers to foreign customers and was intercepted south of Iran's Larak Island in the strategic Strait of Hormuz. It did not name the vessel or identify the nationalities of the crew onboard. A U.S. official had expressed suspicion that the Panamanian-flagged Riah had been seized in Iranian territorial waters. ___ 2:55 p.m. Iran's state TV says Revolutionary Guard forces have seized a foreign tanker with 12 crew accused of smuggling oil. The seizure comes as tensions mount between the United States and Iran over the unravelling nuclear deal between Tehran and world powers. Thursday's report says the tanker was smuggling fuel from Iranian smugglers to foreign customers and was intercepted south of Iran's Larak Island in the strategic Strait of Hormuz. The TV didn't identify the tanker or say which country the crew were from. An oil tanker based in the United Arab Emirates traveling through the Strait of Hormuz drifted off into Iranian waters and stopped transmitting its location over two days ago. U.S. officials have expressed suspicion that the Panamanian-flagged oil tanker Riah had been seized in Iranian territorial waters.
  • It may not be as famous as Japanese anime legend Studio Ghibli, but Kyoto Animation has many core fans and is known as a team of skilled animators that provides top-quality work for others and can produce its own hits, such as 'Lucky Star,' ''K-On!' and the 'Haruhi Suzumiya' series. The company hit by a deadly fire on Thursday also has a unique founding history. The company was started in 1981 by a former animator who recruited housewives from her neighborhood in Uji city south of Kyoto, where she married and moved from Tokyo, the center of the animation industry. Yoko Hatta previously had worked at Mushi Production, a studio for the works of anime legend Osamu Tezuka, who created Astro Boy and Kimba the White Lion. The company better known as KyoAni doesn't have a major presence in Japan but has won gradual recognition while providing secondary animation work for major productions. Their work included a 1998 'Pokemon' feature that appeared in U.S. theaters and a 'Winnie the Pooh' video. While providing work for top artists, the company has been able to make and feature its own stories in Japanese TV anime and comic series. Some of its mega-hits include 'Lucky Star' in 2008, 'K-On!' in 2011 and 'Haruhi Suzumiya' in 2009. The company was preparing for a planned release of a new feature animation film 'Violet Evergarden,' a story of a woman who professionally writes letters for clients. Places featured in the hit animation stories have become pilgrimage destinations for anime fans. Among them is Washinoniya Jinja, a shrine in Saitama prefecture just north of Tokyo, a scene in the TV animation series 'Lucky Star,' or 'Raki Suta,' based on comics by Kagami Yoshimizu. Years after the TV animation ended, the area still attracts fans of Raki Suta girls, with goods featuring the characters sold at its neighborhood stores, and a portable shrine decorated with the anime characters appearing at an annual festival in September. Ryusuke Hikawa, a pop culture expert at Meiji University, said Kyoto Animation became a brand name for 'a general company that can provide high-quality presentation and animation,' while demonstrating its capability even away from Tokyo. 'Kyoto Animation demonstrated that a top brand can come from outside the capital,' Hikawa told an interview with NHK television. 'It was a major breakthrough, and was a revolutionary change to the Japanese animation industry.' The company's 160 employees work at studios in Uji and Kyoto and an office in Tokyo. The company also trains aspiring animators, produces and sells novelty goods featuring its characters. A store selling such items is near the studio damaged by Thursday's fire in which authorities say 33 people were killed. The attack shocked animation fans across in and outside Japan. Even Prime Minister Shinzo Abe mourned for the victims as he tweeted that he was speechless at the magnitude of the damage. Anime fans expressed anger, prayed and mourned for the victims on social media. A cloud-funding site was set up to help the company rebuild. ___ Follow Mari Yamaguchi on Twitter at https://www.twitter.com/mariyamaguchi
  • The U.S. decision to exclude Turkey from an American-led fighter jet program goes against the 'spirit of alliance,' the Turkish government said Thursday, and called on its NATO ally to reverse the decision. In a major break with a longtime ally, U.S. President Donald Trump's administration on Wednesday said Turkey is being kicked out of the F-35 program because it is buying the Russian S-400 air defense system. Washington says the S-400 would compromise the F-35 program and aid Russian intelligence. In a statement, Turkey's Foreign Ministry rejected that assertion. 'This unilateral step is incompatible with the spirit of alliance and is not based on any legitimate justification,' the ministry said. 'Not only is it unfair to keep Turkey out of a program of which it is a partner but the claim that the S-400 will weaken the F-35 is invalid.' The ministry said: 'We call on the United States to come back from this mistake that will cause irreparable damage to our strategic ties.' On Thursday, Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan's spokesman, Ibrahim Kalin, held a telephone conversation with White House national security adviser John Bolton, during which he expressed Turkey's unease over the U.S. decision, according to a statement from Erdogan's office. During the call, Kalin said 'one-sided impositions' would prevent the healthy progress of Turkish-U.S. ties. Despite the tensions, the two also discussed a possible date for Trump to visit Turkey, according to the statement. Turkey began taking delivery of components of the Russian system last week. A Russian cargo plane carrying more parts of the system landed at an air base near Ankara for a seventh day running on Thursday. Erdogan has said the system will be fully operational by April. On Wednesday, Ellen Lord, the Pentagon's chief weapons buyer, told a news conference that the U.S. has suspended Turkey from the F-35 program and is beginning the process of its formal removal. The U.S. government is concerned that the S-400 could be used to gather data on the capabilities of the F-35, and that the information could end up in Russian hands. Turkey has called for the establishment of a committee that would include NATO officials to study the risks. Turkey refused to bow to U.S. pressure to cancel the S-400 agreement with Russia, saying the deal is a matter of national sovereignty and that the agreement was a done deal. Erdogan has said his government hopes to co-produce high-tech weaponry systems with Russia in the future, further defying the U.S. and other NATO allies. On Thursday, the head of Russia's state-controlled Rostech corporation said Moscow would be willing to sell Turkey its Su-35 fighter jets if Ankara 'expresses interest.' The head of Turkey's defense industry body, Ismail Demir, said meanwhile that Turkey would look into possible 'alternatives' and would also speed up efforts to develop Turkey's own fighter jet project, state-run Anadolu Agency reported. He also said Turkey has fulfilled all of its obligations concerning the F-35 program and that Washington could lose $8 million per aircraft following Turkey's exclusion, Anadolu reported. Turkey is both a producer and a customer of the F-35s. It makes more than 900 components for the stealth aircraft, which is sold internationally. Lord, the Pentagon official, said Turkey stands to lose $9 billion in future earnings as an F-35 parts supplier. She said the process of fully removing Turkey is underway and should be completed by March 31. She refused to say whether the decision could be reversed.
  • Congolese soldiers and police will enforce hand-washing and fever checks now that the deadly Ebola outbreak has been declared an international health emergency , authorities said Thursday. Soldiers and police will 'force' people who resist taking the key steps to help contain the disease that has killed more than 1,600 people in the past year , said the outbreak response coordinator at Congo's health ministry, Dr. Aruna Abedi. 'It's not possible that someone refuses to wash their hands and have their temperature checked at a very critical moment in this outbreak,' Abedi told reporters in Goma, the city of more than 2 million people where a first Ebola case was announced early this week. The major regional crossroads is on the Rwanda border and has an international airport. The World Health Organization's rare emergency declaration Wednesday night for the second-worst Ebola outbreak in history came after a WHO expert committee declined on three previous occasions to recommend it, to the impatience of some health experts who for months had expressed alarm. Congo's increased use of soldiers and police could bring objections from some residents and health workers in an outbreak taking place in what has been called a war zone. This outbreak is like no other, unfolding in a turbulent part of northeastern Congo where dozens of rebel groups are active and wary communities had never experienced the disease before. Health workers have faced misinformation and even deadly attacks that have hampered the critical work of tracing contacts of infected people and deploying an experimental but effective Ebola vaccine. Wednesday's declaration quickly led to fears among some Congolese authorities and residents that governments might close borders or take other measures that could hurt the local economy. Congo's health minister has resisted the characterization of the outbreak as a health emergency. Rwanda's government said surveillance measures at the border would be tightened, but traffic was flowing normally through the border on Thursday. One Congolese, 25-year-old Clovis Mutsuva, told The Associated Press that while the declaration might bring in needed funds to help contain the outbreak, any border closures would make locals 'more unhappy.' A lot of key local merchandise such as fuel comes from Kenya and neighboring Uganda, Mutsuva said. 'This scares us because Goma risks becoming isolated from the rest of the world,' added Katembo Kabunga as some people in the city received vaccinations. While the risk of regional spread remains high, the risk outside the region remains low, WHO chief Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said after Wednesday's announcement. Last month saw the first confirmed cases in Uganda and a case just 70 kilometers (43 miles) from the border with South Sudan, where a recently ended civil war badly weakened the health system. The international emergency 'should not be used to stigmatize or penalize the very people who are most in need of our help,' Tedros said. WHO has estimated 'hundreds of millions' of dollars would be needed to stop the outbreak. Some aid groups say they hope the declaration will spark a radical shift in Ebola response efforts to help address community resistance. The medical charity Doctors Without Borders said the outbreak is still not under control. This is the fifth such declaration in history. Previous emergencies were declared for the devastating 2014-16 Ebola outbreak in West Africa that killed more than 11,000 people, the emergence of Zika in the Americas, the swine flu pandemic and polio. WHO defines a global emergency as an 'extraordinary event' that constitutes a risk to other countries and requires a coordinated international response. WHO was heavily criticized for its sluggish response to the West Africa outbreak, which it repeatedly declined to declare a global emergency until the virus was spreading explosively in three countries and nearly 1,000 people were dead. ___ Maliro reported from Beni, Congo. ___ Follow Africa news at https://twitter.com/AP_Africa
  • Secretary of State Mike Pompeo on Thursday said that China was responsible for the 'stain of the century' of human rights abuses, citing mass detentions of Muslims and other minorities. Pompeo denounced China for its large-scale detentions in the western Xinjiang region , where an estimated 1 million Muslim Uighurs, Kazakhs and other minorities are believed to be held in internment camps. China is 'home to one of the worst human rights crises of our time,' Pompeo said at an international religious freedom conference that he hosted. He also accused China of intimidating countries into staying away from the gathering. Chinese officials describe the Xinjiang camps as vocational training centers and say they are necessary to curb religious extremism. Pompeo, an evangelical Christian, has made promoting religious freedom a priority since becoming America's top diplomat. But critics of the Trump administration have questioned the commitment, noting that its restrictive migration policies threaten religious minorities. The conference was held just days after the International Rescue Committee and the U.N. refugee agency warned that the administration's sharp reductions in admissions of refugees and asylum-seekers put many, including religious minorities, at risk. In a report released on the eve of the conference, the IRC said that so far this year the administration has slashed admissions of Iranian Christians by 97%, Iraqi Christians by 96%, Iraqi and Syrian Yezidis by 97% and Rohingya Muslims from Myanmar by 77%, compared with the last government spending year of the Obama administration. 'The Trump administration cannot cheer on the world to protect religious minorities in one breath, while substantively cutting its own protections for these groups in the next,' said Nazanin Ash, the group's vice president of Global Policy & Advocacy. The Trump administration has also been criticized for not taking a tougher line on China's religious record by imposing sanctions. Some believe that administration officials have not taken that step for fear of endangering trade talks with China. Vice President Mike Pence, speaking at the same conference, said U.S. trade talks with China would not get in the way of America's commitment to religious freedom. 'Whatever becomes of our negotiations with Beijing, you can be assured the American people will stand in solidarity of the people of all faiths in the People's Republic of China and we will pray for the day that they can live out their faith freely without fear of persecution,' he said.
  • The European Union said Thursday it's implementing a new monitoring system to ensure that all member states are complying with the bloc's rule of law requirements. Frans Timmermans, a vice president at the executive European Commission, said in Brussels that an annual review of all 28 EU members will be held to determine if any issues have surfaced. He said that the purpose isn't to point the finger at any individual country, but to put in place a regular oversight process — to 'improve the common understanding of what the rule of law is and create a strong rule of law culture across the EU.' The move results from the EU's decision to begin sanction procedures over changes to the justice systems in Poland and Hungary, which are widely seen as violating EU law. The main thrust of the new measures is to pre-empt changes that could be considered as bad practice. 'We will continue ensuring the right application of the rule of law across Europe because we believe it goes to the very heart of the functioning of the European Union,' Timmermans told a news conference. He stressed that countries have every right to reform their justice systems but that they have to do so within EU law. Poland has been in particular focus of late. The commission's dispute with Poland is largely centered on a new Disciplinary Chamber at the Supreme Court that can see judges punished when their decisions and actions are deemed wrong or inappropriate. The commission found the reasoning provided by the Polish authorities as unsatisfactory. The government has been pointing to recently reported cases of mistaken convictions and of dishonesty. This week, the commission stepped up the pressure on Poland to reverse the changes. 'The way the disciplinary chamber is organized leads to a level of political steering and interference which does pose a problem for the independence of judges and we were not convinced by the reply of the Polish government so we will take this a step further,' Timmermans said. Poland, he added, has been given two months to make corrections. 'If that does not lead to a satisfactory reply, we of course will take the issue to the European Court of Justice.' Timmermans said he has 'no doubt that the next commission will be as forceful, as concrete, as clear and as determined' in defending the rule of law. The next commission will take office later this year and will be headed by Ursula von der Leyen. Timmermans will continue in his role.

The Latest News Headlines

  • If you are one of the average Americans who eat 23 pounds of ice cream a year, then Sunday will be a good day for you. It’s National Ice Cream Day, and restaurants across the country are offering deals on cones, cups and shakes. >> Read more trending news  If any food deserves its own day, ice cream would be it. The creamy treat is an $11 billion industry that generates $1.6 billion in wages, according to the International Dairy Foods Association's economic report. According to ice cream makers and retailers, Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Ohio and Wisconsin are the country’s most successful ice cream markets.  Below are some deals you can snag on ice cream treats this weekend. Note: Not every restaurant in a chain may be honoring the deals, so be sure to check with local ice cream shops to confirm which deals are available before you go. Baskin-Robbins: On Sunday, guests can purchase two prepacked quarts of any ice cream for just $7.99. On Wednesday, July 31, fans can “Celebrate 31” with $1.70 scoops. The deal is valid on 4-ounce single scoops only. Waffle cones and toppings are extra. The deal cannot be combined with other offers and is valid at participating U.S. stores. Carvel: Buy one cup or cone of soft ice cream and get a free cup or cone free all day Sunday. Cold Stone Creamery: Cold Stone Creamery has a buy one, get one free offer when you sign up by Thursday for the Cold Stone rewards program on the company's website.  Dairy Queen: Dairy Queen has a buy one Cupfection treat for 99 cents, get one free offer through Sunday at participating locations. Limit one per customer. Dippin' Dots: Participating Dippin’ Dots locations will be giving away a free mini cup of Dippin’ Dots during a two-hour window on Sunday. Customers should check their local store for the hours. GODIVA Boutiques: Godiva Boutiques will offer 50% off soft serve and parfaits at participating locations.  Johnny Rockets: Get a free milkshake when you purchase an entree on National Ice Cream Day. McDonald’s: At participating locations, McDonald’s is offering a summer deal in which you can get a vanilla cone for $1. Monkey Joe's: On Sunday, kids can get a free ice cream cup with a paid admission while supplies last. This offer cannot be combined with any other offers.  PetSmart: PetsHotel at participating PetSmart locations is offering a free doggie ice cream topped with dog biscuit treats on Saturday and Sunday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. each day. Potbelly Sandwich Shop: Get a large hand-dipped milkshake free on Sunday when you purchase an entree. Mention National Ice Cream Day at the register to claim the deal. Your Pie: Get a free scoop of Italian gelato with any purchase Sunday. Yogurtland: Buy one ice cream, get one free when you visit Yogurtland on Sunday from 1 p.m. to 6 p.m.
  • Kentucky police officials have charged a Louisville attorney with assault after he allegedly attacked a colleague with a Lysol can during a fight in the courthouse. Lindsey Scott, 63, is charged with second-degree assault in the incident, according to WDRB in Louisville. He was booked into and released from the metro jail. >> Read more trending news  Jefferson County Sheriff’s Office officials said another defense attorney, James “J.R.” Moore, was working on some of his cases around 8 a.m. Wednesday in an attorney workroom next to a district courtroom. At some point, Scott entered the room. “Some sort of altercation developed,” Lt. Col. Carl Yates, a spokesman for the Sheriff’s Office, told the news station. Scott is accused of hitting Moore with the aerosol can, causing cuts to his head. When deputies got to the room, Moore was restraining Scott and both were covered with blood, Yates said. The workroom had to be shut down and cleaned of the blood. Surveillance footage released to local news stations by the Sheriff's Office shows the bloody scene, as well as a handcuffed Scott sitting on a bench with blood covering his white suit. Moore was sent to the hospital, where he told WAVE 3 News in Louisville he received about a dozen staples to his head. Scott, who told deputies he was suffering chest pains, was taken to the hospital as well, but was later booked into the jail. Moore later posted a message on Facebook about the skirmish. “Today, I was totally blindsided while peacefully eating my breakfast,” Moore wrote, according to WAVE 3 News. “First thing I felt was a thud. Just a scalp wound. “My friends need not be concerned. All concerns should be for my perpetrator. Something is apparently very wrong in his life. He is a good man.” Other attorneys also expressed shock over the incident, saying both Moore and Scott are well-known and well-liked. Wednesday’s incident is not the first time Scott has been behind bars. According to the Courier-Journal, the attorney was at the center of a sensational court case in the 1980s when, as a corporal in the U.S. Marine Corps, he was convicted of raping and attempting to kill a fellow Marine’s wife at the Quantico military base in Virginia. Scott, a Louisville native, was sentenced to 30 years in prison, but the verdict was later overturned on the grounds he received ineffective counsel from his civilian lawyer, the Courier-Journal reported. The Washington Post in 1988 covered his second military trial, at the end of which he was exonerated by the military jury of charges of attempted murder, rape, sodomy and abduction. Scott, who had spent four years in Fort Leavenworth, wept silently, the Post reported. “In the tiny spectators’ gallery, Scott’s ailing mother, Mildred, began to shout in a gravelly voice, ‘Thank you, Jesus! Thank you, Lord Jesus! Thank the Lord for giving me back my innocent child!’ before she was pulled from the courtroom by four or five supporters,” the Post story read. The Post reported there was one significant difference in evidence between the first and second trials: the recollection of a former security officer at a Zayre department store in Woodbridge, about 12 miles from Quantico, who testified she saw Scott shopping in the store at the time the victim was being attacked on the base. Her testimony backed up Scott’s claim that he had spent the evening of the attack shopping for his pregnant wife’s birthday, which was the following day, the Post said. The victim also had trouble identifying Scott in the days after the attack, saying each time that other men in the photos and lineup resembled him. The Post reported she said she picked Scott out of the lineup because, “He scares me the most.” No physical evidence linked Scott to the crime, the newspaper said. The case relied on circumstantial evidence, including the determination that the woman's throat was slashed with a serrated knife. Scott had borrowed a serrated knife from his apartment manager that day and never returned it, the Post reported. He told investigators he inadvertently threw it away after using it to clean his stove. Scott also lived in the same apartment complex as the 23-year-old woman and her husband and, because he was a military policeman training as a criminal investigator, would have had knowledge of police procedures regarding evidence gathering. The woman's attacker knew her address, her husband's name and his job, as well as the 'jargon' used by military police, the Post said. According to investigators, the assailant lured the woman from her home by calling and saying her husband had been in an accident, then offering to drive her to the hospital. He instead took her to a wooded area and assaulted her, leaving her for dead, authorities said. The victim picked Scott's car out of a lineup, telling authorities it was the one in which she had been sexually assaulted, the Post reported. Scott's supporters argued that race was a factor in his conviction because he is black and his alleged victim was white. “I maintained my innocence from the beginning,” Scott told reporters after the not guilty verdict. “It was proven today by a jury of my peers that I was innocent. I’m innocent. I’m free.” Gary R. Myers, one of Scott's defense attorneys, told the Post after the verdict: 'I think (jurors) just came to the conclusion that it was a tossup, and a tossup is not a guilty verdict.' Scott’s case was the basis of a 1999 movie, “Dangerous Evidence: The Lori Jackson Story,” which focused on the civil rights activist who fought to have the courts take a second look at Scott’s conviction. WAVE 3 News reported that those who know Scott said his experiences motivated him to go into law. The Courier-Journal reported that, at age 43 in 1999, he began law school at the University of Louisville. According to the Kentucky Bar Association, Scott was admitted in October 2002. He is in good standing and has no record of public discipline.
  • The Jacksonville Sheriff’s office is asking for your help finding a missing 11-year-old. Addison Terry is described as 5’2”, 107 lbs., with blue eyes and brown hair. She was last seen wearing a blue shirt. Terry ran away from the Youth Crisis Center on Parental Home Road on the Southside last night, according to JSO. YCC’s website shows they provide short term crisis care, mental health counseling, skills-based group training, and transitional living services for children and families. JSO says Terry may be in the Orange Park area, or other parts of Clay County or Jacksonville. If you have any information about her location, you’re asked to contact JSO at 904-630-0500 or JSOCrimeTips@jaxsheriff.org.
  • A federal judge in New York declined Thursday to grant bail to wealthy financier Jeffrey Epstein as he awaits trial on allegations of sex trafficking. >> Read more trending news  Update 12 p.m. EDT July 18: Lisa Bloom, the attorney for three of Epstein's accusers, issued a statement after a judge denied Epstein bail. 'We are pleased that the judge denied bail,' Bloom said on Twitter. 'It gives us hope that justice may truly be possible against this sex offender who has hurt so many for so long.' Update 11:35 a.m. EDT July 18: U.S. District Judge Richard Berman has rejected Epstein's bail application, citing danger to others and the community. Prosecutors had asked Berman to hold Epstein, 66, without bail, arguing in court on Monday that Epstein is a flight risk and danger to the community who has shown no remorse for victimizing dozens of girls as young as 14 between 2002 and 2005. Attorneys for Epstein had argued he poses no flight risk, as evidenced by his conduct since pleading guilty in 2008 to two counts of soliciting a minor for prostitution after he was accused of molesting girls in Palm Beach County, Florida. Update 9:50 a.m. EDT July 18: An Austrian passport found by authorities during a search of Epstein's Manhattan mansion included several stamps inside, 'including stamps that reflect use of the passport to enter France, Spain, the United Kingdom, and Saudi Arabia in the 1980s,' prosecutors said in a letter filed Thursday in court. Authorities said the passport, issued in the 1980s and bearing Epstein's image but not his name, was found July 6 in a safe. Attorneys for Epstein claimed in court filings that the Austrian passport had never been used. 'Epstein -- an affluent member of the Jewish faith -- acquired the passport in the 1980s, when hijackings were prevalent, in connection to Middle East travel,' Epstein's attorneys said. 'The passport was for personal protection in the event of travel to dangerous areas, only to be presented to potential (kidnappers), hijackers or terrorists should violent episodes occur.' It was not immediately clear how Epstein obtained the passport. Update 12:40 p.m. EDT July 15: Two of Epstein's alleged victims on Monday asked Berman not to allow the 66-year-old to be released on bail pending his trial. Both spoke at his bail hearing in New York. Courtney Wild said she was 14 years old when Epstein started sexually abusing her in Palm Beach, Florida, according to Courthouse News. She told the court that if Epstein were to be granted bail, he would be 'a scary person to have walking the streets,' CNN reported. Annie Farmer said she met Epstein when she was 16 years old and that he behaved inappropriately, though she declined to give details, according to Courthouse News. She also asked Berman not to grant bail to Epstein. Prosecutors said Monday that during a search of Epstein's home safe, authorities found a bogus passport that listed a Saudi Arabia residence, 'piles of cash' and 'dozens of diamonds.' The passport, issued in the 1980s, had Epstein's photo on it but a different name. Prosecutors said previously that federal agents found a trove of nude photos during the raid on Epstein's mansion following his arrest on sex trafficking charges. Update 10:30 a.m. EDT July 15: Epstein will remain incarcerated until at least Thursday, when a judge said he'll likely rule on whether to grant bail to the 66-year-old, CNN reported. Several of Epstein's alleged victims were in court Monday, according to Courthouse News. Prosecutors said Friday in a court filing that multiple victims have told government officials that they want Epstein detained until his trial because they fear his release will give him the opportunity to harass them. Original report: Epstein's attorneys have asked a judge to allow their client to be detained at his Manhattan mansion until trial and offered to put up a 'substantial' bond to ensure his compliance with the proposed terms of his release. Among other things, Epstein's attorneys proposed he be fitted with a GPS device and said their client would agree to ground his private jet. In a response filed Friday, prosecutors argued Epstein should be held without bond due the severity of his charges and his financial means. Prosecutors said they believe Epstein might have tried to influence witnesses after discovering that he had paid a total of $350,000 to two individuals, including a former employee, in the last year. Authorities said that several more women have come forward to accuse Epstein of sexually abusing them since charges against the New York hedge fund manager were made public last week. Officials have said authorities found 'hundreds or thousands of nude and seminude photographs of young females in his Manhattan mansion on the night of his arrest,' evidence which they say eliminates 'any doubt that the defendant is unrepentant and unreformed.' Epstein is accused of sexually exploiting and abusing dozens of girls at his homes in New York and Florida, heading a sex trafficking scheme that saw his victims recruiting other girls to be abused. He pleaded not guilty last week to sex trafficking and sex trafficking conspiracy charges. Epstein avoided significant jail time and federal prosecution in 2008 as part of a deal overseen by then-U.S. Attorney Alex Acosta. As part of the non-prosecution agreement, Epstein pleaded guilty to a pair of lesser charges and agreed to register as a sex offender. He served 13 months in jail as part of the deal. Acosta said his office 'proceeded appropriately, based on the evidence' in 2008, but scrutiny of the once-secret deal, detailed in a series of in-depth reports published last year by The Miami Herald, prompted him to resign last week from his role as President Donald Trump's secretary of labor. The Associated Press contributed to this report.
  • The Democratic National Committee announced Wednesday the 20 candidates who will take part in the second debate of the 2020 presidential race. The debate, set to take place over a two-night span in Detroit on July 30 and 31, will see the 20 candidates who were at the first debate, with the exception of Rep. Eric Swalwell, D-California. Swalwell dropped out of the race shortly after the first debate. Montana Gov. Steve Bullock will take Swalwell’s place. To be on the stage for the Detroit debates, candidates had to qualify either by having received donations from 65,000 unique donors in at least 20 states or by getting 1 percent support in three polls sanctioned by the DNC. Here is a look at who is in, who is out and what’s ahead for the second debate.  Here are all the candidates who qualified for the second debate: Sen. Michael Bennet, D-Colorado Former Vice President Joe Biden Sen. Cory Booker, D-New Jersey Montana Gov. Steve Bullock South Bend, Indiana, Mayor Pete Buttigieg Former HUD Secretary Julian Castro New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio Former Rep. John Delaney, D-Maryland Rep. Tulsi Gabbard, D-Hawaii Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand, D-New York Sen. Kamala Harris, D-California Former Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper Washington Gov. Jay Inslee Sen. Amy Klobuchar, D-Minnesota Former Rep. Beto O’Rourke, D-Texas Rep. Tim Ryan, D-Ohio Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vermont Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Massachusetts Author Marianne Williamson Entrepreneur Andrew Yang Who is out? Five other candidates failed to make the cut for the July debates: former Sen. Mike Gravel, D-Alaska; Miramar, Florida, Mayor, Wayne Messam; U.S. Rep. Seth Moulton, D-Massachusetts; former U.S. Rep. Joe Sestak, D-Pennsylvania, and billionaire activist Tom Steyer. Only Gravel met the fundraising criteria. None of the five met the polling criteria. Who is debating on which night? CNN will hold a live drawing on Thursday at 8 p.m. ET to determine which candidates will appear on which debate night. What about the next one? According to the DNC, to qualify for the debates in September and October, candidates must have 2% in four qualifying polls and at least 130,000 individual donors. The first two debates allowed candidates to qualify by having either the showing in the polls or enough unique donors.

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