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    The Latest on President Donald Trump's visit to Japan (all times local): 11:20 a.m. President Donald Trump says he has a good feeling about getting North Korea to give up its nuclear weapons. Speaking Monday alongside Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe in Tokyo, Trump said the U.S. has come a long way with North Korea. He says 'we'll see what happens,' but that he's built respect with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un. Kim did fire off a series of short-range missile tests earlier this month that national security adviser John Bolton says violated U.N. Security Council resolutions. Trump says, though, that he personally feels that lots of good things will come with North Korea and he hopes that 'something constructive can be done.' ___ 11:10 a.m. President Donald Trump says he and Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe 'understand each other very well' as the leaders opened bilateral talks at Akasaka Palace. Abe opened the event by telling Trump, 'It was a tremendous honor for us to welcome you.' With that and other flattery, Abe said the leaders would leaders would begin a summit to discuss North Korea and other 'challenges of the international community.' Among other topics they'll discuss the upcoming G20 summit next month. Trump said 'We are working on the imbalance of trade.' He added that the Japanese 'are incredible people with a truly amazing prime minister who's my friend.' ___ 10:20 a.m. After his visit with Japan's new emperor, President Donald Trump is at Tokyo's official state guest house meeting with Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe. Trump, Abe and their respective teams will be meeting Monday and having lunch together. Trump and Abe will also be participating in a joint press conference at Akasaka Palace. It's the second lengthy day of meetings for the pair, who spent Sunday playing golf together, taking in a sumo match and having a couples dinner with their wives. Trump will be attending a state banquet in his honor Monday evening, and participating in a Memorial Day event Tuesday before heading home. ___ 9:40 a.m. President Donald Trump and Japan's Emperor Naruhito walked along a red carpet in the courtyard of the Imperial Palace after meeting on Monday. Trump is the first world leader to meet Naruhito since he ascended to the throne on May 1. The president, who is on a state visit to Japan, is being treated to a welcome ceremony full of pomp and pageantry. Trump stood at attention alone atop a platform before he walked along a red-carpeted route to review troops. He also passed in front of a group of schoolchildren feverishly waving U.S. and Japanese flags. Trump wore a red tie that matched the color of the carpet. He was accompanied by first lady Melania Trump. ___ 9:25 a.m. President Donald Trump is at Japan's Imperial Palace meeting the new emperor. The president and his wife, first lady Melania Trump, are kicking off Monday's formal visit with handshakes and greetings with Emperor Naruhito and Empress Masako. Trump is the first world leader to be meet Naruhito, who ascended to the throne on May 1, opening what is called the era of 'Reiwa,' (RAY-wah) or 'beautiful harmony.' Trump will go later to the Japanese state guest house for meetings, a working lunch and joint news conference with Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe. The president will also be the guest of honor at an imperial banquet at the palace hosted by the emperor. Trump opened a four-day state visit to Japan on Saturday.
  • The Latest on President Donald Trump's visit to Japan (all times local): ___ 11:20 a.m. President Donald Trump says he and Japanese Prime Minister have talked about Iran amid rising tension between Tehran and Washington. With Abe at his side, Trump told reporters at Akasaka Palace on Monday that 'nobody wants to see terrible things happen, especially me.' The U.S. president also said that 'I do believe Iran would like to talk and if they'd like to talk, we'll talk also,' adding that Abe has a 'very good relationship with Iran.' Japanese media has reported that Abe is considering a visit to Iran next month. The Kyodo News agency, citing unidentified government sources, said on Friday that Abe's visit would be likely in mid-June. Earlier this month, Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif visited Tokyo. ___ 11:10 a.m. President Donald Trump says he and Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe 'understand each other very well' as the leaders opened bilateral talks at Akasaka Palace. Abe opened the event by telling Trump, 'It was a tremendous honor for us to welcome you.' With that and other flattery, Abe said the leaders would leaders would begin a summit to discuss North Korea and other 'challenges of the international community.' Among other topics they'll discuss the upcoming G20 summit next month. Trump said 'We are working on the imbalance of trade.' He added that the Japanese 'are incredible people with a truly amazing prime minister who's my friend.' ___ 10:20 a.m. After his visit with Japan's new emperor, President Donald Trump is at Tokyo's official state guest house meeting with Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe. Trump, Abe and their respective teams will be meeting Monday and having lunch together. Trump and Abe will also be participating in a joint press conference at Akasaka Palace. It's the second lengthy day of meetings for the pair, who spent Sunday playing golf together, taking in a sumo match and having a couples dinner with their wives. Trump will be attending a state banquet in his honor Monday evening, and participating in a Memorial Day event Tuesday before heading home. ___ 9:40 a.m. President Donald Trump and Japan's Emperor Naruhito walked along a red carpet in the courtyard of the Imperial Palace after meeting on Monday. Trump is the first world leader to meet Naruhito since he ascended to the throne on May 1. The president, who is on a state visit to Japan, is being treated to a welcome ceremony full of pomp and pageantry. Trump stood at attention alone atop a platform before he walked along a red-carpeted route to review troops. He also passed in front of a group of schoolchildren feverishly waving U.S. and Japanese flags. Trump wore a red tie that matched the color of the carpet. He was accompanied by first lady Melania Trump. ___ 9:25 a.m. President Donald Trump is at Japan's Imperial Palace meeting the new emperor. The president and his wife, first lady Melania Trump, are kicking off Monday's formal visit with handshakes and greetings with Emperor Naruhito and Empress Masako. Trump is the first world leader to be meet Naruhito, who ascended to the throne on May 1, opening what is called the era of 'Reiwa,' (RAY-wah) or 'beautiful harmony.' Trump will go later to the Japanese state guest house for meetings, a working lunch and joint news conference with Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe. The president will also be the guest of honor at an imperial banquet at the palace hosted by the emperor. Trump opened a four-day state visit to Japan on Saturday.
  • Under a blazing hot sun at Japan's Imperial Palace, President Donald Trump on Monday became the first world leader to meet the new emperor of Japan. The president, who is on a four-day state visit, was the center of attention at a grand outdoor welcome ceremony where he took a solo walk down red carpets, reviewing Japanese troops as the guest of honor. The pomp and pageantry then gave way to meetings with Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe about trade and other world issues. Trump's 'state call' opened with handshakes and greetings from Naruhito, who ascended to the throne on May 1, and his wife, Empress Masako. As he approached the emperor, Trump said, 'How are you? Thank you very much.' The first lady told the empress, 'Nice to meet you.' After exchanging pleasantries inside the palace, the couples emerged and walked to a raised platform as the national anthems of both countries were played. Trump showed little emotion, but waved near schoolchildren feverishly waving U.S. and Japanese flags. Some of the children suffered from the heat and were later seen siting with cups of water and cool compresses on their foreheads. At the White House last week, Trump noted the significance of his meeting with the emperor. Naruhito took the throne after his father stepped down, the first abdication in Japan's royal family in about two centuries. 'It's a very big thing going on with the emperor. It's something that hasn't happened in over 200 years,' Trump said. 'I am the guest, meaning the United States is the guest.' Trump stressed that Abe 'very specifically' said Trump is the guest of honor. 'With all the countries of the world, I'm the guest of honor at the biggest event that they've had in over 200 years,' Trump said. It's not the emperor who chose Trump as his first state guest. It was Abe, who is seen by some as using the invitation to meet Naruhito to curry favor with Trump who is threatening to impose potentially devastating tariffs on Japan's auto industry, among other tensions in the relationship.. After leaving the Imperial Palace, Trump went to the Akasaka Palace, the Japanese state guest house with lush manicured grounds, for meetings, a working lunch and joint news conference with Abe. The president also will be the guest of honor at an imperial banquet at the palace hosted by the emperor. ___ Follow Colvin and Superville on Twitter at https:://twitter.com/colvinj and https://twitter.com/dsupervilleap
  • Greek Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras called for an early national election following the defeat of his party at the European Parliament elections. Tsipras said from the Syriza party offices that 'the result does not rise to our expectations ... I will not ignore it or quit.' Tsipras credited his government for pulling the country out of the austerity imposed by Greece's creditors and said that voting for Sunday's winner, the conservative New Democracy, would be turning back to 'the darkness of austerity, the darkness off crisis, the oligarchs, the International Monetary Fund.' The government's term expires in October and before Sunday night's announcement, government officials insisted that elections would be held at the end of the term. But a long and, it is said, contentious meeting of government ministers and party officials, ended with the announcement of the early election. Tsipras said he will visit the Greek president to request the early dissolution of parliament after the second round of local and regional elections on June 2. This puts the election date at June 30 at the earliest. In the run-up to the election, Tsipras brought to Parliament a series of measures that amounted to handouts and defied the conservatives to vote against them. They did not, but accused Tsipras of a desperate gambit for votes. With just over a third of voting precincts reporting, New Democracy is leading with 33.62% to Syriza's 23.86%. The socialists of the Movement for Change follow with 7.16%, ahead of the Communist Party (5.75, the far-right Golden Dawn (4.86%), the hard-line nationalist Greek Solution (4.04%) and Diem25, the pan-European movement of Syriza's first finance minister Yanis Varoufakis (3.15%). If the results hold, New Democracy will win seven European Parliament seats; Syriza will get six; the socialists, the communists and Golden Dawn two each; and Greek Solution and Diem25 one each. New Democracy also stands to make important gains in the second round of the local and regional elections next Sunday.
  • Germany's governing parties slid to their worst post-World War II showing in a nationwide election Sunday amid discontent with their stuttering performance over the past year, while the Greens surging to second place in the European Parliament vote amid increasing concern about climate change. Chancellor Angela Merkel's center-right Union bloc won 28.9% of the vote and the Social Democrats, their partners in an often-cantankerous 'grand coalition' of what have traditionally been Germany's biggest parties, got 15.8%. Five years ago, they took 35.4% and 27.3%, respectively. The Greens powered past the Social Democrats into second place, increasing their score to 20.5% — nearly double their 10.7% showing in 2014. It was a less satisfying evening for the far-right Alternative for Germany, which celebrated increasing its presence in the European Parliament but fell short of its showing in Germany's 2017 national election. The party took 11% of the vote, up from 7.1% five years ago. Party co-leader Joerg Meuthen said Brexit and the scandal surrounding the far-right Freedom Party that brought down the government in neighboring Austria hadn't helped. It wasn't immediately clear whether the outcome would further destabilize Merkel's national governing coalition, following long-running speculation that its end could be hastened by poor results Sunday. The Social Democrats appeared on course for another disastrous result in a state election also held Sunday in Bremen, a longtime stronghold. Three further state elections in eastern Germany await this fall, as does as a previously agreed review of the coalition's work halfway through the scheduled parliamentary term. Merkel has said she won't run for a fifth term in the next national election, which isn't due until 2021, but questions have swirled over whether the government will last that long. It took six months to form that government after Germany's last election, and its image was tarnished by infighting last year. Merkel largely stayed out of this campaign, which was a first test for Annegret Kramp-Karrenbauer, her successor since December as leader of the Christian Democratic Union party. Kramp-Karrenbauer told supporters in Berlin that 'this election result does not do justice to the expectations we have of ourselves as a major party.' She said the government hasn't yet 'given the convincing answers that citizens in Germany demand,' conceding that climate protection and adapting to 'the digital world' had been weak points. In the days before the election, a prominent YouTuber racked up millions of views with a video skewering the CDU's policies on climate change and other issues. Kramp-Karrenbauer promised the party will 'roll up our sleeves.' Senior Social Democrats, meanwhile, sought to head off speculation about the future of the party's often-criticized leader, Andrea Nahles. Vice Chancellor Olaf Scholz, a Social Democrat, said that 'calling for personal consequences won't get us anywhere.' Scholz congratulated the Greens, who gained at the major parties' expense and appear to have done very well among young voters. He said it was clear that 'we need a really clear response to the question for humanity of climate change' and pledged that his party won't make the 'wrong compromises.' Katrin Goering-Eckart, one of the Greens' leaders in Berlin, told The Associated Press that it was 'a sensational result.' Asked about possible implications for the governing coalition, she said that is a question for the parties concerned, but 'you can't govern sensibly without climate protection. That definitely has to change.' Germany will likely miss its goal of cutting carbon emissions by 40% by 2020. A government-appointed expert panel has agreed that coal burning should end by 2038, though activists would like to see that happen earlier. As for the other parties in Germany's parliament, the pro-business Free Democrats won 5.4% of the vote and the Left Party 5.5%. A seat distribution wasn't immediately released, but projections for ARD public television pointed to Merkel's Union bloc winning 29 seats, the Greens 21, the Social Democrats 16, Alternative for Germany 11 and the Free Democrats and Left Party five each. Germany's remaining nine seats were expected to be shared out among several small parties. Unlike in German national elections, parties don't have to get 5% of the vote to win seats in the EU legislature. ___ Associated Press writer Frank Jordans in Berlin contributed to this report.
  • British Environment Secretary Michael Gove on Sunday became the eighth lawmaker to enter the race to succeed Prime Minister Theresa May, as other contenders staked out uncompromising positions on Brexit. Gove said Sunday that 'I can confirm that I will be putting my name forward to be prime minister of this country' when May steps down as Conservative leader on June 7. Other candidates for the top job include former Brexit Secretary Dominic Raab, Foreign Secretary Jeremy Hunt and ex-House of Commons leader Andrea Leadsom. The current favorite is former Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson, whom Gove backed in the 2016 Conservative leadership contest before deciding to run for the job himself. The winner of that race was May. She announced her departure Friday, admitting defeat in her three-year quest to deliver Brexit after failing three times to get her Brexit deal though Parliament. Her successor as party leader will be selected by Conservative lawmakers and party members, and will automatically become prime minister. The leadership contest is dominated by candidates vowing to take Britain out of the European Union even if there is no divorce deal in place. On Sunday, Raab joined Johnson, Leadsom and another candidate, Esther McVey, in vowing to leave on the EU-set deadline of Oct. 31, deal or no deal. 'I will not ask for an extension,' Raab said. 'I would fight for a fairer deal in Brussels ... and if not I would be clear that we would leave on (World Trade Organization) terms in October,' he told the BBC. Most businesses and economists think leaving the EU without agreed terms and a transition period would cause economic turmoil and plunge Britain into recession. But many Conservatives think embracing a no-deal Brexit may be the only way to win 'leave'-supporting voters back from the newly-formed Brexit Party led by Nigel Farage. Any attempt to take Britain out of the EU without a deal will be fiercely resisted by Parliament, and could see pro-Europeans leave the Conservative Party. 'Parliament has voted very clearly to oppose a no-deal exit,' Treasury chief Philip Hammond said Sunday. 'It would be very difficult for a prime minister who adopted no deal as a policy ... to retain the confidence of the House of Commons,' he told the BBC.
  • A yellow vest protest march was taken over by black-hooded demonstrators and turned violent in Brussels, forcing authorities to detain a few hundred people. The yellow vest demonstration was intended to be against social injustice on the day of European Parliament elections. But it degenerated into disorder, with some protesters pelting buildings and smashing barricades. Police intervened to disperse the violent demonstrators. Brussels police spokeswoman Ilse Van de Keere said around 350 people were briefly detained but were released later Sunday. Police on horseback patrolled the historic center and scuffles broke out in different areas.
  • A far-right, anti-immigrant party made huge gains in Belgium's northern Flanders region, according to near-complete results late Sunday. The result looks set to complicate a national coalition government. Belgium is split along linguistic lines, with French-speaking Wallonia in the south and Dutch-speaking Flanders in the north, and governments invariably are coalitions made up of parties from both regions. The anti-immigrant Vlaams Belang party surged to 18 seats in the 150-seat parliament, up from three in 2014. It will be the second-biggest party in Flanders behind the nationalist N-VA party, which has 25 seats, after losing five. In Wallonia, technical problems long affected the projection of results, but in the end, the socialists emerged as the biggest party there despite losses, and still beat Prime Minister Charles Michel's MR free-market liberals. In bilingual Brussels, the Greens had a major surge in support. Belgium has been without an active government since December when Michel's coalition fell apart over an immigration issue.
  • The Social Democrats, Germany's main center-left party, appears headed for its worst-ever result in a state election in Bremen, which it has run for 73 years, as well as a dire showing in the European Parliament election. Exit polls for ARD and ZDF television put support for the Social Democrats at 24.5% and the center-right Christian Democratic Union, Chancellor Angela Merkel's party, up to 26.5%. The Social Democrats could finish second in the northwestern city-state, Germany's smallest, for the first time. The polls put support for the Greens in Bremen up to 18.5%. That party is currently the Social Democrats' junior coalition partner in Bremen, and could decide whether or not it keeps its hold on the state government. The exit polls put the far-right Alternative for Germany up at 7% support.
  • Britain's governing Conservative Party was all but wiped out in the European Parliament election as voters sick of the country's stalled European Union exit flocked to uncompromisingly pro-Brexit or pro-EU parties. The main opposition Labour Party also faced a drubbing in a vote that upended the traditional order of British politics and plunged the country into even more Brexit uncertainty. The big winners were the newly founded Brexit Party led by veteran anti-EU campaigner Nigel Farage and the strongly pro-European Liberal Democrats. With results announced early Monday for all of England and Wales, the Brexit Party had won 28 of the 73 British EU seats up for grabs and almost a third of the votes. The Liberal Democrats took about 20% of the vote and 15 seats — up from only one at the last EU election in 2014. Labour came third with 10 seats, followed by the Greens with seven. The ruling Conservatives were in fifth place with just three EU seats and under 10% of the vote. Scotland and Northern Ireland are due to announce their results later. Farage's Brexit Party was one of several nationalist and populist parties making gains across the continent in an election that saw erosion of support for the traditionally dominant political parties. Conservative Foreign Secretary Jeremy Hunt said it was a 'painful result' and warned there was an 'existential risk to our party unless we now come together and get Brexit done.' The results reflect an electorate deeply divided over Britain's 2016 decision to leave the EU, but united in anger at the two long-dominant parties, the Conservatives and Labour, who have brought the Brexit process to deadlock. Britain is participating in the EU election because it is still a member of the bloc, but the lawmakers it elects will only sit in the European Parliament until the country leaves the EU, which is currently scheduled for Oct. 31. Farage's Brexit Party was officially launched in April and has only one policy: for Britain to leave the EU as soon as possible, even without a divorce agreement in place. Farage said his party's performance was 'a massive message' for the Conservatives and Labour, and he said it should be given a role in future negotiations with the EU. 'If we don't leave on Oct. 31, then the scores you have seen for the Brexit Party today will be repeated in a general election — and we are getting ready for it,' said Farage. But the election leaves Britain's EU exit ever more uncertain, with both Brexiteers and pro-EU 'remainers' able to claim strong support. Labour and the Conservatives, who in different ways each sought a compromise Brexit, were hammered. The result raises the likelihood of a chaotic 'no deal' exit from the EU — but also of a new referendum that could reverse the decision to leave. The Conservatives were punished for failing to take the country out of the EU on March 29 as promised, a failure that led Prime Minister Theresa May to announce Friday that she is stepping down from leading the party on June 7. Britain's new prime minister will be whoever wins the Conservative party leadership race to replace her. The favorites, including ex-Brexit Secretary Dominic Raab and former Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson, have vowed to leave the EU on Oct. 31 even if there is no deal in place. Most businesses and economists think that would cause economic turmoil and plunge Britain into recession. But many Conservatives think embracing a no-deal Brexit may be the only way to win back voters from Farage's party. Labour was punished for a fence-sitting Brexit policy that saw the party dither over whether to support a new referendum that could halt Brexit. Labour foreign affairs spokeswoman Emily Thornberry said the party needed to adopt a clearer pro-EU stance. 'There should be a (new Brexit) referendum and we should campaign to remain,' she said. ___ For more news from The Associated Press on the European Parliament elections go to https://www.apnews.com/EuropeanParliament ___ Follow AP's full coverage of Brexit at: https://www.apnews.com/Brexit

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  • It's underway all summer. The Blue Star Museums 2019 program has kicked off, allowing the nation's active-duty military personnel and their families, including National Guard and Reserve, to visit participating museums free of charge.  The 2019 program officially started on Saturday, May 18th, which is Armed Forces Day, and will run through Labor Day on Monday, September, 2nd.  Locally, military families will be able to visit the following museums free of charge:  Jacksonville  -Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens  -Mandarin Museum & Historical Society  -MOCA Jacksonville  -Ritz Theatre & LaVilla Museum  Jacksonville Beach  -Beaches Museum  St. Augustine  -Lightner Museum  -St. Augustine Lighthouse & Maritime Museum  To find museums outside of Northeast Florida, click HERE. The Blue Star Museums program is a collaboration among the National Endowment for Arts, Blue Star Families, the Department of Defense, and participating museums.
  • A judge sentenced the man who admitted to killing a Wisconsin couple last year before holding their 13-year-old daughter captive for three months to life in prison without the possibility of supervised release. >> Read more trending news Jake Thomas Patterson, 21, appeared before a Barron County judge for sentencing in the killing of James and Denise Closs and the kidnapping of their daughter, Jayme, according to the Duluth News Tribune. He pleaded guilty in March to two counts of intentional homicide for gunning down James Closs, 56, and Denise Closs, 46, in the early morning hours of Oct. 15. He also pleaded guilty to one count of kidnapping for abducting Jayme. >> Man pleads guilty to kidnapping Wisconsin teen Jayme Closs, killing her parents Update 4:30 p.m. EDT May 24: A judge sentenced Patterson to life in prison without the possibility of parole for each of the intentional homicide charges to which Patterson pleaded guilty. The judge also gave Patterson the maximum sentence -- 40 years -- for kidnapping Jayme. Update 4:20 p.m. EDT May 24: In a brief, tearful statement in court, Patterson said he “would do like, absolutely anything to take back what I did.” “I would die,” he said. “I would.” Patterson’s attorneys asked a judge to sentence him to life in prison without the possibility of parole until 2072 for the killings of James and Denise Closs. The sentencing hearing is ongoing. Update 3:30 p.m. EDT May 24: In a statement read by an attorney Friday in court, Jayme said Patterson took many things from her but that, “He can never take my spirit away.” “He thought he could make me like him, but he was wrong,” she said. “He can’t stop me from being happy and moving forward with my life. I will go on to do great things in my life, and he will not. Jake Patterson will never have any power over me.” Chris Gramstrup, an attorney representing Jayme, read the victim impact statement in court. “He stole my parents from me,” Jayme said in the statement. “He stole almost everything I loved from me. For 88 days, he tried to steal me, and he didn’t care who he hurt or who he killed to do that. He should stay locked up forever.” Prosecutors said Jayme and her mother heard Patterson shoot and kill James Closs as they huddled together in a bathtub. Denise Closs called 911 as Patterson tried to batter down the bathroom door. Once he broke down the door, he wrestled the phone from Denise Closs and ordered her to tape Jayme’s mouth, hands and feet, prosecutors said. He told authorities that he thought she was doing a bad job, so he put down his shotgun to do it himself. Once Jayme was restrained, authorities said he picked up his shotgun again and, with Jayme feet from her mother, shot Denise Closs in the head. He then dragged Jayme to his car, threw her in the trunk and drove her to his home, where she was held captive for 88 days. Through Gramstrup, Jayme said her parents “did all they could to make me happy and protect me.” “He took them away from me forever,” Jayme said. “I felt safe in my home and I love my room and all of my belongings. He took all of that too. I don’t want to even see my home or my stuff because of the memory of that night. My parents and my home were the most important things in my life.” She said that since her escape in January, “It’s too hard for me to go out in public.” “I get scared and I get anxious,” she said. Prosecutors said Jayme escaped from Patterson’s home Jan. 10 after he left her alone. Original report: Barron County Sheriff Chris Fitzgerald said members of Jayme’s family are expected to give statements at Friday’s hearing, MPR News reported. The court proceeding is expected to last several hours, according to CNN. Under Wisconsin law, Patterson will face a mandatory life sentence for each of the homicide convictions, the Duluth News Tribune reported. The main question for Friday will be whether Patterson will eventually be eligible for parole, according to the newspaper. >> Who is Jake Thomas Patterson? Suspect in Jayme Closs kidnapping identified Authorities said Patterson admitted to targeting Jayme after seeing her get on a school bus while he was driving home from work one day. He told investigators he did not know the Closses before the attack. Jayme told authorities she woke early on the morning of Oct. 15 when the family dog started barking. She woke her parents and then hid with her mother in a bathroom. Investigators said Patterson shot and killed James Closs before he found Jayme and Denise Closs in the bathroom. >> Jayme Closs kidnapping: Suspect charged in Closs murders, bail set at $5 million Jayme said Patterson killed her mother before dragging her to his car and driving her to what would turn out to be his home in Douglas County. He was arrested after Jayme escaped Jan. 10 from his home and flagged down a woman walking her dog. >> Jayme Closs to be given $25K reward after she saved herself from accused kidnapper Jayme told investigators Patterson made her hide under the bed in his bedroom for as many as 12 hours at a time without food, water or bathroom breaks. She escaped after Patterson left her alone in the home 88 days after he first abducted her. Jayme is living with her aunt and uncle, the Stevens Point Journal reported.
  • The Jacksonville Sheriff's Office is actively investigating on the Westside, after a man called 911, claiming he had just shot someone attempting to break into his home. Police say this happened on North Dover Cliff Drive in the Pilgrims Trace neighborhood.  When officers arrived, they say they found a man dead in a nearby roadway. He has not yet been identified, but he's described by JSO as a black male between 30 and 40-years-old.  The investigation is still in its early states, but JSO says it does not appear that the two knew each other. We're told the homeowner is being cooperative with investigation.  Police are asking anyone with information on what happened to come forward.
  • House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerry Nadler said he was OK on Friday after he appeared to nearly faint during a news conference in New York City. >> Read more trending news Nadler, D-N.Y., was appearing Friday at a news conference about plans to expand the city’s use of speed cameras in school zones when New York Mayor Bill de Blasio appeared to notice he looked pale, WABC-TV reported. Video from the news conference showed Nadler looking ill and weak as the mayor asked him if he wanted some water.  The New York Daily News reported that paramedics called a code blue emergency after Nadler appeared to suffer from a brief dizzy spell. He was given water and an orange and later taken by ambulance to Lenox Hill Hospital, according to the Daily News. “Appreciate everyone’s concern,” Nadler said in a statement posted later Friday on Twitter. “Was very warm in the room this morning, was obviously dehydrated and felt a bit ill. Glad to receive fluids and am feeling much better. Thank you for your thoughts.”
  • A Colorado man arrested in Utah earlier this year for threatening to “kill as many girls as (he saw)” has been sentenced to serve up to five years in prison, despite prosecutors’ recommendation that he serve probation.  Christopher Wayne Cleary, 27, of Denver, pleaded guilty to a charge of attempt to make a terroristic threat as part of a plea deal with Utah County prosecutors, according to The Deseret News. Cleary, who was arrested in Provo in January, was already on probation in Colorado on two previous convictions of stalking women, the newspaper reported.  Cleary expressed remorse over his words. “I’m just sorry for what happened,” Cleary told the court, according to the News.  Prosecutors in Utah negotiated a plea deal with Cleary for a third-degree felony charge instead of the second-degree felony with which he was initially charged, the News reported. In exchange for his plea -- which would let them secure a felony conviction -- they agreed to recommend no jail time. The plea bargain was aimed at helping Colorado authorities send Cleary to prison for violating his probation in the stalking cases, the News reported.  >> Related story: Man upset over not having girlfriend accused of mass shooting threat to girls Fourth District Judge Christine Johnson on Thursday declined to take the state up on its recommendation, citing her uncertainty of whether Cleary would serve any jail time for probation violation in Colorado, the newspaper said. “I don’t want to be in the position of guessing what Colorado is going to do,” Johnson said during Cleary’s sentencing hearing.  Cleary was arrested Jan. 19, the same day multiple women’s marches were being held in Utah and throughout the country, based on an alarming Facebook post he wrote the night before, the News said. In the post, he bemoaned his lack of romantic prospects and, like several mass shooters who have targeted women, blamed the opposite sex for his plight. “All I wanted was a girlfriend,” Cleary wrote, according to a police affidavit obtained by The Denver Post. “All I wanted was to be loved, yet no one cares about me. I’m 27 years old and I’ve never had a girlfriend before, and I’m still a virgin. This is why I’m planning on shooting up a public place soon and being the next mass shooter ‘cause I’m ready to die and all the girls the turned me down is going to make it right by killing as many girls as I see.” Another post stated, “There’s nothing more dangerous than (a) man ready to die,” the Post reported.  Cleary’s threats alarmed state and federal authorities in Colorado and neighboring Utah, where they traced his cellphone the following day. He was arrested at a McDonald’s in Provo and charged with making a terroristic threat.  Following his arrest, Cleary told investigators he was “upset and not thinking clearly” when he wrote the Facebook posts. According to the Post, he deleted the threats after other people called him and threatened him. Court records obtained by multiple newspapers paint a disturbing portrait of Cleary, who was accused of stalking and harassment by at least eight women and girls dating back at least seven years. The News reported that Cleary was also accused of threatening to bomb a grocery store in 2013 and threatened to commit a mass shooting at a mental health facility in 2016.  >> Read more trending news An 18-year-old Arvada woman called police on New Year’s Eve 2015 and reported that Cleary, with whom she’d been chatting on Facebook, began harassing her online and over the phone after she declined to go on a date with him. According to the Post, the woman told detectives he would use aliases, including one alias on Facebook named John Coleman. “I’ve been watching you,” the person claiming to be Coleman wrote to her on Facebook. “Soon here, you’ll be lying in your deathbed.” During that investigation, Arvada detectives found details of a previous criminal investigation in which Cleary told another woman who spurned his advances she should kill herself, the Post reported. He also posted her name and phone number in an online sex ad, offering her services for $20, court records show. In a prior misdemeanor harassment case from earlier in 2015, Cleary was convicted after talking a woman into posing naked for him and then posting the picture to a fake Facebook page in her name, the newspaper reported.  A harassment case from Denver found Cleary accused of writing threatening messages to a 17-year-old girl, including a message that said, “I own multipul (sic) guns. I can have u dead in a second. One day I’ma snap and kill everyone,” according to court documents. A second Denver case involved a 19-year-old woman who said she lived with Cleary in a hotel room for two weeks, during which time he choked her and urinated on her, the court documents said.  Cleary was convicted in October 2016 on two counts of stalking and harassment involving two of the three alleged victims in Arvada, the Post said. He was sentenced to two years of probation.  Cleary was arrested in yet another stalking case less than a year later. A 43-year-old Lakewood woman who had dated him called 911 Aug. 5, 2017, to report Cleary was stalking her. He was arrested outside the woman’s house. According to the Post, Cleary told investigators the woman was the only person who loved him and he was lonely without her. The woman told police she and Cleary had a sexual relationship -- contradicting Cleary’s claim earlier this year that he was a virgin. The victim told police Cleary, who began stalking her when she broke off the relationship, had called her 45 times that day, threatening her and telling her he hoped she would die.  “I am going to burn your house down,” Cleary told her, according to court records. “I am going to send people to your house to kill you.” Cleary also posted her phone number and address on Craigslist “soliciting sexual acts and rape,” according to a probable cause statement in the case. The woman said she’d received multiple phone calls from strangers due to the ad. The woman told police she lost 20 pounds and began having nightmares and anxiety attacks because of the stalking, the Post reported.  Cleary pleaded guilty to charges of felony stalking and making threats, the newspaper said. A judge in Jefferson County sentenced him last May to three years of probation.  Despite having violated his probation on the Arvada cases, he was not jailed following his guilty plea in the case involving the Lakewood woman, the Post reported. Pam Russell, a spokeswoman for the Jefferson County District Attorney’s Office, said Cleary’s mental health played a part in his sentencing in that case, as well as in his 2016 stalking conviction, which was handled in Adult Mental Health Court.  “The courts decided to let his mental health issues be a big component of his treatment,” Russell told the Post.  Cleary’s defense attorney in the most recent case, Dustin Parmley, said this week that his client’s violent words are related to his mental illness, which he was reportedly diagnosed with at age 10. Cleary told investigators he takes medication for an impulse control disorder.  Parmley said Cleary’s words have never turned to action. Investigators found no evidence that Cleary had weapons or attempted to obtain any, the Post said.  The newspaper reported that four of the criminal investigations into Cleary ended without charges filed against him.  Cleary will serve his time in Utah before being transferred to Colorado to face probation violation charges there, the News reported. An official with the Utah Board of Pardons and Parole told the paper his earliest hearing could take place as soon as September. The News said the board could potentially set a release date at that time, or members could decide to keep him in prison. Cleary could serve the entire five years of his sentence before being returned to Colorado. 

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