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    Dozens of Serbian high school students have staged a sit-down protest demanding that authorities release a fellow student who was jailed during weekend anti-government protests in Serbia. The students marched Monday from their school in downtown Belgrade toward the main police station in the Serbian capital, where they sat on the ground. Authorities say they detained 18 people following incidents during demonstrations Saturday and Sunday against Serbia's populist President Aleksandar Vucic. Protesters on Saturday burst into the state-TV building in Belgrade. More skirmishes with police took place Sunday when protesters surrounded the Serbian presidency during Vucic's press conference. Protests against Vucic have been going on weekly for three months demanding democratic and media freedoms. Vucic has accused the protesters of violence, saying perpetrators will be punished.
  • On March 15, New Zealand changed. Some are calling it a loss of innocence, a reminder that distance doesn't bring protection against violence. Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern has vowed to change gun laws and investigate what went wrong. This is how 36 minutes of terror unfolded, according to witness accounts and livestream video. 1:32 p.m. Ardern and about 30 other people get a chilling email from Brenton Tarrant. He has attached a manifesto filled with racism and hatred as he tries to justify why he is about to carry out a massacre. Its 74 pages are riddled with contradictions. He talks about the years he spent roaming the world and how 'the varied cultures of the world greeted me with warmth and compassion.' Twelve pages in, he says he will target mosques in Christchurch and Linwood, as well as one in the town of Ashburton if he makes it that far. Tarrant, a 28-year-old Australian who the prime minister says wasn't on the radar of the country's intelligence or law enforcement agencies and held a valid gun license, writes that he planned and trained for an attack for a couple of years after moving to the city of Dunedin, about a five-hour drive south of Christchurch. He says he settled on Christchurch because the mosque there, with its prominent golden dome, is busier and looks more distinctively foreign. A member of Ardern's staff sees the email and, two minutes after it arrives, forwards it to parliamentary security. But Tarrant's plan is already in motion. He is sitting in his gold Subaru station wagon in a parking area in a black paramilitary outfit. He turns on a helmet camera and begins an internet livestream. 'Let's get this party started,' he says. ___ 1:41 p.m. It's Friday prayers, and the Al Noor mosque is filled with people. The imam, Gamal Fouda, has just finished the Khutbah, a sermon delivered in Arabic. He is starting the next part in which he translates it into English. The Khutbah is the most serious part of the prayer, where rapt attention is required and the worshippers are silent. The sermon is about cooperating with each other, doing good and stopping evil. As the gunman approaches the mosque, a man in the entrance calls out cheerfully, 'Hello, brother.' Tarrant fires nine shots, one after another, and walks past the first bodies. Fouda hears shooting in the hallway and sees people start to run. He stops speaking. 'It was chaos,' he says. The gunman's livestream shows him moving into the main prayer room and firing at everyone he sees. It is a big room and has few exits. An Algerian man smashes a window on one side of the room, Fouda says, and people start pouring out through the jagged glass. On the other side, the people there try to do the same. But the bodies begin piling up at the makeshift exits. 'And he was actually standing behind them, and he was shooting and shooting and shooting and shooting,' Fouda says. 'Tragedy. Tragedy.' Fifty-year-old Naeem Rashid, a teacher who moved to New Zealand from Pakistan with his family when he was 11, rushes up behind Tarrant, trying to grab the gun. Tarrant turns around and shoots him dead. Asif Shaikh, 44, tries to run but falls in the crush of bodies. He thinks about trying to make it to the exit when he sees somebody else make the same move and get shot. So he lies there, next to an old man who has been shot in the thigh. They are exposed and uncovered, but somehow they survive. Days later he still can't sleep, the sounds of gunshots ringing in his head. Kawthar Abulaban, 54, is in the women's prayer area with a couple of dozen other women. She hears a single shot at first, enough for some of them to jump up and ask, 'What's wrong?' Then a pause and a second shot and a dawning realization. Soon, there is a barrage of bullets. Dozens upon dozens upon dozens. The women scatter in all directions. Three huddle together in a cupboard in one of the bathrooms. But the shooter seems to be concentrating on shooting men, Abulaban says. She runs out of the mosque. Tarrant walks outside, where he shoots people on the sidewalk. Children scream in the distance as he returns to his car to get another gun. He walks back inside the mosque and shoots again at motionless bodies on the floor, methodically firing bullets into them over and over. He walks out again and shoots at a woman walking toward him on the street. She falls to the pavement and begs, 'Help me! Help me!' before he shoots her again. Since firing the first shot, the gunman has spent six minutes at the mosque. There are no sounds of sirens, no SWAT teams arriving. People are proud of New Zealand's friendliness. Unlike in most other countries, the police don't carry guns. They keep them in their cars for emergencies. The worst mass shooting up until now was nearly 30 years ago in the small town of Aramoana, where a gunman killed 13 people following a dispute with a neighbor. Tarrant gets back in his car. The song 'Fire' by Arthur Brown blasts from the speakers, the singer declaring, 'I am the god of hellfire!' When Paul Bennett, an ambulance driver, arrives later, he sees blood flowing along the terra cotta tiles. 'There was a river of blood coming out of the mosque,' he says. ___ 1:48 p.m. The shooter's rampage continues as he drives away from the Al Noor mosque. Yasir Amin and his father, Muhammad Amin Nasir, are walking along the sidewalk when a car stops and a man begins firing. They run, but at 67, Nasir can't keep up with his son. As Amin turns to yell at his father to get down, he sees the older man has already been hit and is falling. The gunman drives away. Nasir stares up at his son, unable to speak, blood pooling around his body. Amin grabs a phone from a nearby car and calls police. Father and son are taken to the hospital, where a critically wounded Nasir begins his recovery. Neighbor Len Peneha helps several people who have escaped the mosque take shelter in his house until police arrive. He walks into the mosque and sees bodies everywhere. 'It's unbelievable nutty,' he says. 'I don't understand how anyone could do this to these people, to anyone. It's ridiculous.' The gunman speeds toward the Linwood mosque. There are no sirens. He stops as two people cross the road in front of his car, unaware that anything out of the ordinary is going on. He blasts his horn at them and continues. There are so many bodies piled at the Al Noor mosque that it will take police more than a day to find one of them. In all, 42 people are dead there. ___ 1:50 p.m. Tarrant is speeding toward the Linwood mosque, weaving through traffic, blasting his music. It's been nine minutes since he fired his first shot. Finally, a single siren can be heard in the distance. The gunman talks as he drives: 'A lot of them survived, unfortunately. They all ran pretty quickly,' he says. 'The noise scared them. The women weren't in yet. I got the men first,' he says, before the livestream cuts out. ___ 1:55 p.m. The Linwood mosque is about 5 kilometers (3 miles) from the Al Noor mosque but isn't as grand. It's a plain building in a poor neighborhood. Inside, 33-year-old Elliot Dawson is praying with about 80 others when he hears the first shots. No one reacts at first because they're immersed in prayer. Latef Alabi, who is leading the prayers, peeks out the window. When he sees Tarrant in his black gear and helmet, carrying a big gun, he thinks it's a police officer and isn't worried. Then he sees bodies and hears the man yelling obscenities. 'I realized this is something else. This is a killer,' he says. The gunshots continue. Dawson's friend goes outside and comes running back in: 'Everyone, get down! Get down! Get down!' Dawson hurries to a bathroom, huddles in a stall and climbs onto the toilet so his feet won't be visible. He tries to squeeze through a window but can't fit. He wonders if this is the moment his life will end. Another man in the mosque, Abdul Aziz, picks up a hand-held credit card machine and rushes outside screaming, hoping to distract the attacker. As Tarrant runs back to his Subaru to get another gun, Aziz throws the machine at him. Aziz's two younger sons are yelling at him to come back inside. Tarrant has gotten a gun and returns, firing at him. Aziz runs, zigzagging through cars in the driveway. He picks up a gun that Tarrant has tossed aside, aims and fires, but it's empty. Tarrant runs back to his car again, probably to grab yet another weapon. 'He gets into his car and I just got the gun and threw it on his window like an arrow and blasted his window,' Aziz said. The windshield shatters: 'That's why he got scared.' The gunman is cursing at him, yelling that he is going to kill them all. But he drives away, and Aziz chases the car down the street to a red light before it makes a U-turn and speeds away. Seven people are dead at the Linwood mosque, a number many think could have been much higher if not for the actions of Aziz. One more person dies later at Christchurch Hospital and the death toll reaches 50. Dawson says that someday, he hopes to come back to the mosque to pray again. He later stands on the street outside the mosque, holding a sign that reads, 'We're all the same on the inside.' ___ 2:07 p.m. Two police officers ram Tarrant's car, forcing it off the road, and drag him out. The next day he is charged with one count of murder, with more charges expected. Many of the victims had moved to New Zealand to seek better lives in a country known for its beauty, friendliness and safety. Among the victims are engineers, business owners, students and a goalkeeper for the national futsal team. It is a modified form of soccer, typically played indoors. The youngest of the victims is Mucaad Ibrahim, 3, who had big brown eyes and always seemed to be laughing. He had an intelligence beyond his years, a friend says. And he loved watching his big brother play soccer.
  • British Prime Minister Theresa May was making a last-minute push Monday to win support for her European Union divorce deal, warning opponents that failure to approve it would mean a long — and possibly indefinite — delay to Brexit. Parliament has rejected the agreement twice, but May aims to try a third time this week if she can persuade enough lawmakers to change their minds. Her aim is to have the deal agreed before EU leaders meet Thursday for a summit in Brussels. But there was no sign of a breakthrough, and the government faces a deadline of the end of Tuesday to decide whether they have enough votes to pass the deal, so that a vote can be held on Wednesday. May's spokesman, James Slack, said Monday that the government would only hold a vote if there is 'a realistic prospect of success.' May is likely to ask for a delay to Brexit at the Brussels summit. If a deal is approved, she says she will ask the EU to extend the deadline until June 30 so that Parliament has time to approve the necessary legislation. If it isn't, she will have to seek a longer extension that would mean Britain participating in May 23-26 elections for the European Parliament — something the government is keen to avoid. May's goal is to win over Northern Ireland's small, power-brokering Democratic Unionist Party. The DUP's 10 lawmakers prop up May's Conservative government, and their support could influence pro-Brexit Conservatives to drop their opposition to the deal. Still, May faces a struggle to reverse the huge margins of defeat for the agreement in Parliament. It was rejected by 230 votes in January and by 149 votes last week. Influential Conservative Brexiteer Jacob Rees-Mogg said he would wait to see what the DUP decided before making up his mind on whether to support May's deal. 'No deal is better than a bad deal, but a bad deal is better than remaining in the European Union,' he told LBC radio. British Foreign Secretary Jeremy Hunt said Monday he saw 'cautious signs of encouragement' that the deal might make it through Parliament this week. After months of political deadlock, British lawmakers voted last week to seek to postpone Brexit. That will likely avert a chaotic British withdrawal on the scheduled exit date of March 29 — although the power to approve or reject a Brexit extension lies with the EU, whose leaders are fed up with British prevarication. EU leaders say they will only grant it if Britain has a solid plan for what to do with the extra time. 'We have to know what the British want: How long, what is the reason supposed to be, how it should go, what is actually the aim of the extension?' German Foreign Minister Heiko Maas told reporters in Brussels. 'The longer it is delayed, the more difficult it will certainly be.' Belgian Foreign Minister Didier Reynders agreed, saying: 'We are not against an extension in Belgium, but the problem is — to do what?' Opposition to May's deal centers on a measure designed to ensure there is no hard border between the U.K.'s Northern Ireland and EU member Ireland after Brexit. The mechanism, known as the backstop, is a safeguard that would keep the U.K. in a customs union with the EU until a permanent new trading relationship is in place. Brexit supporters in Britain fear the backstop could be used to bind the country to EU regulations indefinitely, and the DUP fears it could lead to a weakening of the bonds between Northern Ireland and the rest of the U.K. Talks between the government and the DUP are aimed at reassuring the party that Britain could not be trapped in the backstop indefinitely. May said in an article for the Sunday Telegraph that failure to approve the deal meant 'we will not leave the EU for many months, if ever.' 'The idea of the British people going to the polls to elect MEPs (Members of the European Parliament) three years after voting to leave the EU hardly bears thinking about,' she wrote. But May suffered a setback Monday when former Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson refused to support her deal. Johnson, a staunch Brexiteer, used his column in the Daily Telegraph to argue that the backstop left the U.K. vulnerable to 'an indefinite means of blackmail' by Brussels. ___ Lorne Cook reported from Brussels. Danica Kirka in London contributed to this story. ___ Follow AP's full coverage of Brexit at: https://www.apnews.com/Brexit
  • Russian President Vladimir Putin marked the fifth anniversary of Russia's annexation of Crimea from Ukraine by visiting the Black Sea peninsula on Monday, as NATO and the European Union once again strongly condemned the land grab. Putin began his trip by attending the launch of new power plants in Crimea, part of Moscow's efforts to upgrade the region's infrastructure. Ukraine has cut off energy supplies to the peninsula and blocked shipments of Crimea-bound cargo via its territory after Moscow annexed the region in 2014. 'The situation has changed radically,' Putin said, adding that the new power facilities will fully cover Crimea's needs. Russia's modernization effort has included the construction of a 19-kilometer (11.8-mile) bridge which opened last year across the Kerch Strait that links the Black Sea and the Sea of Azov. The $3.6-billion project gave Crimea a land link to Russia. Previously, a ferry crossing that was often interrupted by gales served as the only connection. Russia has also beefed up its military presence in Crimea with new navy ships, missiles and warplanes. Moscow's annexation of Crimea drew U.S. and EU sanctions against Russia that hurt its economy. NATO allies said in a statement Monday that 'we strongly condemn this act, which we do not and will not recognize.' They also criticized Russia's military buildup in Crimea and alleged rights abuses including 'arbitrary detentions, arrest, and torture' against members of the Crimean Tartar community. EU foreign policy chief Federica Mogherini said 'we stand in full solidarity with Ukraine, supporting its sovereignty and territorial integrity.' NATO and the EU also called for the release of Ukrainian seamen who were seized by Russia in November's standoff in the Black Sea. Putin claims that Russia 're-integrated' Crimea after the ouster of Ukraine's former pro-Russian president in 2014 to protect ethnic Russians who made up the majority of Crimea's population from Ukrainian nationalists. The Kremlin was also worried that a new Ukrainian government could annul Russia's lease on its key Black Sea navy base in Crimea and welcome NATO there instead. Crimea was first seized by Russian forces in the 18th century under Catherine the Great. The 27,000-square kilometer (10,425-square mile) territory, roughly the size of Massachusetts, became part of Ukraine in 1954 when Soviet leader Nikita Khrushchev transferred jurisdiction from Russia, a move that was a mere formality until the 1991 collapse of the Soviet Union meant that Crimea landed in an independent Ukraine. The Kremlin has argued that Khrushchev's move violated then-Soviet law, making the transfer illegitimate. Russian troops swept Crimea just days after the February 2014 ouster of Ukraine's Russia-friendly president, catching the West by surprise. The Russian forces blocked Ukrainian soldiers at their garrisons, setting the stage for a hastily-called referendum in Crimea that the West denounced as illegitimate. Putin on Monday hailed the referendum as a true expression of the Crimean people's will, charging that the Western refusal to recognize it shows 'disrespect for democratic principles.' He also vowed to support various economic projects in Crimea. During a meeting with local residents that involved religious leaders, Putin said he had invited Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan to attend the opening of a new mosque in the region and suggested also inviting Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu to visit a ceremony for unveiling a new synagogue. The Russian leader has said he put Russia's nuclear forces on combat readiness during the 2014 developments in Crimea and warned his Western counterparts that Moscow was ready to defend what it considered its land. The annexation gave Russia hundreds of miles of coastline along the Black Sea, a near-stranglehold on commerce in the Sea of Azov and access to vast potential energy riches on the Black Sea shelf. The U.S. and the EU responded to the annexation of Crimea and Moscow's support for a separatist insurgency in Ukraine's east with waves of sanctions that have limited Russia's access to global financial markets and to energy and defense technologies. The Kremlin fired back by cutting imports of most Western food. The annexation of Crimea, a lush peninsula which long has been a favorite vacation destination for Russians, helped bolster Putin's popularity at home and strengthened Moscow's positions in the Black Sea. However, public enthusiasm in Russia about the land grab has worn off over years amid the country's economic difficulties and a plunge in living standards. 'After Crimea was annexed, there was a sense of almost universal euphoria,' said Masha Lipman, a Moscow-based independent policy expert. She noted the majority of Russians still feel proud about the annexation of Crimea but 'it no longer works the way it had, it does not improve the mood.' A poll conducted earlier this month by the Public Opinion Foundation, a Moscow-based survey firm, showed that most Russians continue to support the annexation, but also indicated an increasing public awareness of its costs. The nation-wide survey of 1,500 had 46 percent of respondents saying the seizure of Crimea had a negative impact on the country's international standing, while 26 percent said it had a positive influence and the rest were undecided. It had a margin of error of no more than 3.6 percentage points. ___ Lorne Cook contributed from Brussels.
  • A Syrian asylum-seeker went on trial Monday in eastern Germany over the fatal stabbing in August of a German man that touched off far-right protests in the city of Chemnitz. Alaa S., whose last name wasn't given in line with German privacy laws, faces charges of manslaughter for the slaying last August of Daniel Hillig. As his trial opened in Dresden state court, where it was moved from Chemnitz due to security concerns, his attorney filed a motion for the charges to be dropped and S. to be set free, saying there was a lack of evidence against him. No pleas are entered in the German trial system, but S.'s defense team told the court he was not involved in the crime, the dpa news agency reported. Prosecutors argue the Syrian came to the aid of an Iraqi man who fell after a fight broke out between the Iraqi and Hillig for unknown reasons. The two foreigners are accused of then fatally stabbing him. The Iraqi is being sought on an international arrest warrant. Following the killing, thousands of neo-Nazis, members of the far-right Alternative for Germany party and others assembled in Chemnitz to protest migration.
  • NATO and the European Union are condemning Russia's 2014 annexation of Ukraine's Crimean Peninsula five years after Moscow declared the region Russian territory. NATO allies said in a statement Monday that 'we strongly condemn this act, which we do not and will not recognize.' They also criticized Russia's military buildup in Crimea and alleged rights abuses including 'arbitrary detentions, arrest, and torture' against members of the Crimean Tartar community. EU foreign ministers are marking the fifth anniversary of the annexation. EU foreign policy chief Federica Mogherini said: 'We stand in full solidarity with Ukraine, supporting its sovereignty and territorial integrity.' NATO and the EU also called for the release of Ukrainian sailors detained by the Russian navy and coast guard in waters off Ukraine in November.
  • A shooting on a Dutch tram left at least three people dead and several others injured in Utrecht, according to authorities. >> Read more trending news  The city’s mayor, Jan van Zanen, said three people were killed in the attack and nine others wounded, according to The Associated Press. Authorities have classed the incident as a possible terror attack. Update 10:25 a.m. EDT March 18: Utrecht Mayor Jan van Zanen said three of the nine people wounded in Monday’s shooting were seriously injured, according to The Associated Press. “We cannot exclude, even stronger, we assume a terror motive,” van Zanen said Monday. “Likely there is one attacker, but there could be more.” Police have identified a man wanted in connection to the shooting as Gokmen Tanis, 37. Update 10:10 a.m. EDT March 18: Utrecht Mayor Jan van Zanen said three people were killed and nine people were injured Monday in the Utrecht shooting, according to CNN and The Independent. Update 9:55 a.m. EDT March 18: Dutch police issued a correction Monday on the name of the man wanted in connection with the Utrecht shooting. Authorities said his name was spelled Gokmen Tanis. Officials initially identified the 37-year-old as Gokman Tanis. The Independent reported trains were not being allowed into Utrecht’s central train station in the wake of the shooting. Update 9:25 a.m. EDT March 18: Police in the Netherlands asked for the public’s help Monday locating a man wanted in connection to Monday’s shooting. Authorities warned against approaching the man, identified as Gokman Tanis, 37. Update 8:55 a.m. EDT March 18: The shooter behind Monday’s attack remained at large after the incident, according to Pieter-Jaap Aalbersberg, the Dutch anti-terror coordinator. “In Utrecht there was a shooting at several locations,' he said Monday at a news conference, according to The Independent. 'A lot is still unclear at this point and local authorities are working hard to establish all the facts. What we already know is that a culprit is at large.' Authorities continue to investigate the shooting. Original report: Utrecht police wrote Monday in a tweet that a “possible terrorist (motive) is part of the investigation” into the shooting, which occurred about 10:45 a.m. local time, according to CNN. >> See the tweet here The gunman remained at large Monday and may have fled the scene in a car, according to BBC News.  After the attack the country’s anti-terror coordinator, Pieter-Jaap Aalbersberg, raised the terror threat level in Utrecht to 5, its highest level. Check back for updates to this developing story.
  • The directors of Italy's premier opera house, Teatro alla Scala in Milan, are meeting to decide whether to accept controversial funding from Saudi Arabia. The meeting Monday came amid media reports last weekend that at least some of the 15 million euros ($17 million) had been deposited into an escrow account pending approval of the funding. The deal, which would include giving a seat on the La Scala board to Saudi Arabia's culture minister, has been hotly contested due to Saudi Arabia's human rights record. The kingdom is under increased scrutiny internationally since the killing of a Saudi journalist inside its consulate in Istanbul last October. The governor of Lombardy has called for the dismissal of the opera house's general manager, while a few workers have turned out in his defense.
  • The Latest on a shooting in a tram in the Netherlands (all times local): 3:10 p.m. The mayor of the Dutch city of Utrecht says that three people have been killed in an attack on a tram and adds that a 'terror motive' is the most plausible option. Jan van Zanen also said that nine have been wounded, three of them seriously. Van Zanen said that 'we cannot exclude, even stronger, we assume a terror motive. Likely there is one attacker, but there could be more.' Dutch authorities have named a 37-year-old Turkey-born man as linked to the tram shooting. ___ 2:55 p.m. Dutch Prime Minister Mark Rutte says that the Netherlands has been hit by an attack in Utrecht and that terrorism isn't excluded, after one person was killed in a tram shooting along with an unknown number of wounded.  Rutte says that 'our nation was hit by an attack in Utrecht. It is clear there were shots on tram passengers in Utrecht, that there are wounded,' without specifying how many. He said that 'a terror motive is not excluded.'  Rutte said that throughout the nation, 'there is a mix of disbelief and disgust.'    He said 'if it is terror attack then we have only one answer: our nation, democracy must be stronger that fanaticism and violence.' Dutch authorities have named a 37-year-old Turkey-born man as linked to the tram shooting. ___ 2:30 p.m. Dutch authorities have named a 37-year-old Turkey-born man as linked to the tram shooting in the central Dutch town of Utrecht. Police showed the picture of a bearded man sitting on public transport and dressed in a dark blue top with a hood tucked in his neck. Police identified him as Gokmen Tanis. It was the first image distributed of someone linked to the shooting. Police warned citizens not to approach the man but call authorities instead. __ This item has been corrected to show that the spelling of Turkey-born man's name is Gokmen, not Gokman. ___ 1:30 p.m. German police say they have upped surveillance on the country's border with the Netherlands and are on the lookout for the gunman behind a shooting in the Dutch city of Utrecht. Heinrich Onstein, a spokesman for the federal police in the border state of North Rhine-Westphalia, told The Associated Press on Monday that additional police had been added to watch not only major highways, but also minor crossings as well as railway routes. He says the federal police are in close contact with authorities in the Netherlands and have a description of the suspect. He says initially German authorities were told to look out for a red Renault Clio compact sedan but now have been told it was found abandoned in Utrecht. ___ 1:15 p.m. Heavily armed anti-terror officers have gathered in front of an apartment block close to the scene of a deadly shooting on a tram in the central Dutch city of Utrecht. Authorities say that a suspect is still on the run following the shooting late morning Monday in which one person was killed and police said multiple others were wounded. From the tram scene, security officials have moved to a location some 200 meters away where they are awaiting further instructions.  Police said they were searching for the shooter 'with all possible means.' ___ 12:35 p.m. The Dutch anti-terror coordinator has raised the threat alert to its highest level around the central Dutch town of Utrecht following the shooting incident on a tram in the city, with the shooter still on the run.  Anti-terror coordinator Pieter-Jaap Aalbersberg said in a statement that the 'threat level has gone to 5, exclusively for the Utrecht province,' referring to the highest level.  'The culprit is still on the run. A terror motive cannot be excluded,' he said in a Twitter message. He called on citizens to closely follow the indications of the local police.  Dutch police say they are looking for a least one person who might have fled by car. Spokesman Bernhard Jens did not exclude more people might be involved.  'We want to try to catch the person responsible as soon as possible,' Jens said. ___ 12:30 p.m. Police have erected a white tent over an area where a body appears to be lying next to a tram following reports of a shooting in the Dutch city of Utrecht. Earlier, footage showed what appeared to be a body lying under a white blanket. Police had said that there were 'multiple' people wounded in the shooting Monday morning. ___ 12:10 p.m. Police in the central Dutch city of Utrecht say they are investigating a shooting in a tram that left 'multiple' people injured and are considering the possibility of a 'terrorist motive.' Police, including heavily armed officers, flooded the area after the shooting that happened Monday morning on a tram at a busy traffic intersection. Dutch Prime Minister Mark Rutte called the situation 'very worrying' and the country's counterterror coordinator said in a tweet that a crisis team was meeting to discuss the situation. There have been no reports yet of any suspects arrested. ___ 11:40 a.m. Police in the central Dutch city of Utrecht say on Twitter that 'multiple' people have been injured as a result of a shooting in a tram in a residential neighborhood. Utrecht police say that trauma helicopters were sent to the scene Monday and they are appealing to the public to stay away to allow first responders to do their work. Further details were not immediately available.
  • French President Emmanuel Macron summoned top security officials Monday after police failed to contain resurgent rioting during yellow vest protests that transformed a luxurious Paris avenue into a battle scene. The prime minister promised to announce new measures later Monday to avoid a repeat of Saturday's violence, in which rioters set life-threatening fires, ransacked luxury stores and attacked police around the Champs-Elysees. The new surge in violence came as the 4-month-old yellow vest movement demanding economic justice has been dwindling. Images of the destruction — including from a bank fire that engulfed a residential building and threatened the lives of a mother and child — could further erode public support. But the renewed attention energized some protesters, who took to social networks to call for new protests this Saturday to occupy the avenue to demand lower taxes and more support for workers from big business. High-end boutiques along the Champs-Elysees remained closed and boarded up Monday, some of them ransacked and charred from arson fires set by rioters. The Finance Ministry held a meeting Monday with groups representing small businesses, restaurants, hotels, insurance companies and banks to estimate the economic impact of the protests. The Paris region's Chamber of Commerce said 91 businesses suffered consequences from Saturday's riot at the Champs-Elysees, 80 percent of which were severely damaged. It called for an 'emergency plan' to support the those shopkeepers and employees. One of the security officials meeting Monday with Macron, junior Interior Minister Laurent Nunez, acknowledged that the French police response to Saturday's rioting was 'a failure.' Nunez said Monday on RTL radio that police had prepared for an upsurge in violence but the protesters were exceptionally radicalized. He said police were 'less reactive' Saturday than in previous demonstrations, and notably more cautious about using rubber ball launchers because of numerous injuries they've caused at previous protests. Last month the French Parliament passed a bill backed by Macron's government to further prevent violence during protests and to help authorities maintain order. The 'anti-troublemakers' law has not yet taken effect since the Constitutional Council must assess it first. It would authorize regional prefects to prevent people seen as a serious threat to public order from protesting, and would force protesters involved in violence to pay for damage. It would also make it a crime for protesters to conceal their faces, punishable by up to one year in prison and a 15,000-euro ($17,000) fine. The bill has been criticized by rights groups, opposition members and even members of Macron's centrist party as going too far in restricting freedoms. Protesters had tried to raise their profile Saturday to mark end of a national debate that Macron had organized to respond to protesters' concerns about sinking living standards, stagnant wages and high unemployment. Many demonstrators, especially from the political extremes, feel the debate didn't address their real demands. Yet after offering French workers a series of economic concessions to address their complaints, Macron, the protesters' target, is now resurgent in the polls.

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  • Mass shootings at two mosques full of worshipers in Christchurch, New Zealand, left at least 50 people dead and dozens more injured Friday. >> Read more trending news  White supremacist Brenton Tarrant, 28, has been charged with one count of murder in the slayings and a judge said Saturday that it was reasonable to assume more charges would follow. >> Photos: Mass casualties reported in New Zealand mosque shooting Update 10:50 a.m. EDT March 18: President Donald Trump said Monday that the media was “working overtime to blame me for the horrible attack in New Zealand.” “They will have to work very hard to prove that one,” Trump wrote in a tweet. “So Ridiculous!” The gunman in last week’s attacks left a document in which he called himself a white nationalist and referred to Trump as “a symbol of renewed white identity.” In the past, Trump has drawn criticism for saying “both sides” were to blame for violence at a deadly white supremacist demonstration. >> Trump again blames ‘both sides’ for violence in Charlottesville Update 11:50 p.m. EDT March 17: Leaders of New Zealand’s Muslim community are planning a national memorial burial for all the victims of Friday’s deadly shooting rampages at two mosques in Christchurch, according to media outlets. The New Zealand Herald is also reporting that despite Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern’s expectations that the bodies of all the victims would be released to family members by Monday, that  isn’t expected to happen now, instead authorities believe it might be Wednesday before all the victims have been released. While Islamic leaders have said they are planning for a mass burial, the families will ultimately decide how they’ll proceed, the Herald reported. Not to far from the scene of the Linwood Mosque shooting, burial preparations are underway at Memorial Park Cemetery where workers are digging graves for the shooting victims behind a large temporary fence. Update 10:15 p.m. EDT March 17: The owner of a Christchurch gun store confirmed Sunday that he sold four guns and ammunition to alleged mosque shooter Brenton Tarrant in a “police-verified” online purchase, according to the New Zealand Herald. But the owner of the retail chain Gun City, David Tipple, said his store did not sell Tarrant any semi-automatic weapons. Tipple said he and staff are 'dismayed and disgusted' by Friday's shootings, The Associated Press reported. Tipple said the store did not notice any red flags in Tarrant’s gun purchases.  “We detected nothing extraordinary about this (gun) license holder,” he said. Meantime, counter-terrorism police executed search warrants on two homes in New South Wales, Australia, believed to be connected to the alleged shooter. Authorities searched a house in Sandy Beach near Coffs Harbor that is believed to belong to Tarrant’s sister, according to Australia’s News 9. They also raided a home in Lawrence that is believe to be connected to Tarrant’s mother. Authorities said they’re searching for anything that might help New Zealand investigators. “The community can be assured that there is no information to suggest a current or impending threat related to this search warrants,”the Australian Federal Police and NSW Police said in a joint statement, News 9 reported. Update 12:30 p.m. EDT March 17: Pakistan will observe a day of mourning for the victims of the shootings, The AP reported.  Vatican News reported Pope Francis offered prayers for those killed in the attacks.  “In these days, in addition to the pain of wars and conflicts that do not cease to afflict humanity, there have been the victims of the horrible attack against two mosques in Christchurch, New Zealand. I pray for the dead and injured and their families. I am close to our Muslim brothers and all that community. I renew my invitation for prayer and gestures of peace to combat hatred and violence.” Related: Photos: Mass casualties reported in New Zealand mosque shooting Update 7:41 a.m. EDT March 17: New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern said Sunday that members of her Cabinet will work to change the nation’s gun laws in the wake of Friday’s deadly mosque attacks, The Associated Press is reporting. In a news conference, Ardern added that officials will release the victims’ bodies to their families starting Sunday evening and should finish by Wednesday, the AP reported. Pope Francis on Sunday also prayed “for our Muslim brothers who were killed,” the report said.  Meanwhile, an online campaign has raised more than $3 million U.S. for the victims and their families. Learn more here. Update 5 p.m. EDT March 16: The death toll in the New Zealand mosque attacks has risen to 50. Police Commissioner Mike Bush confirmed in a news conference that 50 people died in the shooting attacks at two mosques in Christchurch, RNZ reported.  He also said that 36 are in the hospital with two in critical condition. Update 6:30 p.m. EDT March 15: The man suspected in at least one of the shootings that killed at least 49 people at two mosques in New Zealand has appeared briefly in court. Two armed guards brought Brenton Tarrant into court Friday. He showed no expression as District Court Judge Paul Kellar read one charge of murder to him. The court appearance lasted only about a minute and he was led back out in handcuffs. He was ordered to return to court again April 5. After Tarrant left, the judge said that while “there is one charge of murder brought at the moment, it is reasonable to assume that there will be others.” The gunman posted a 74-page manifesto on social media in which he identified himself as Tarrant and said he was a 28-year-old Australian and white supremacist who was out to avenge attacks in Europe perpetrated by Muslims. Update 5 p.m. EDT March 15: New Zealand’s prime minister said the “primary perpetrator” in the mosque shootings was a licensed gun owner and legally acquired the five guns used in the shootings. Jacinda Ardern said the country’s national gun laws will change after at least 49 worshippers were shot dead in the two mosques in Christchurch. Update 3:25 p.m. EDT March 15: President Donald Trump said he spoke Friday with Ardern and offered “any assistance the U.S.A. can give.” “We stand by ready to help,” Trump wrote. “We love you New Zealand!” Update 11:30 a.m. EDT March 15: New York police said the department is ramping up patrols around the city Friday and keeping in contact with officials at area mosques in the wake of the deadly shootings in Christchurch. 'To the Muslim community here in New York: We stand with you always, and we will remain vigilant in keeping you safe -- and making sure you feel safe, too,' Police Commissioner James O'Neill said Friday in a statement. 'The people we serve, in every neighborhood, must always be free from fear and have the immutable right to worship and live in peace.' Update 10:20 a.m. EDT March 15: The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge, William and Kate, and the Duke and Duchess of Sussex, Harry and Meghan, said Friday in a statement that their “hearts go out to the families and friends of the people who lost their lives in the devastating attack in Christchurch.” “No person should ever have to fear attending a sacred place of worship,” the statement said. “This senseless attack is an affront to the people of Christchurch and New Zealand, and the broader Muslim community. It is a horrifying assault on a way of life that embodies decency, community, and friendship.” Update 9:35 a.m. EDT March 15: Former President Barack Obama and former first lady Michelle Obama shared condolences for the people of New Zealand in a message posted Friday to social media. “We grieve  with you and the Muslim community,” said the message shared by President Obama. “All of us must stand against hatred in all its forms.” Update 8:55 a.m. EDT March 15: Pope Francis was “deeply saddened to learn of the injury and loss of life caused by the senseless acts of violence” in New Zealand, his cardinal secretary of state said Friday in a telegram. “He assures all New Zealanders, and in particular the Muslim community, of his heartfelt solidarity in the wake of these attacks,” Cardinal Secretary of State Pietro Parolin said. “Mindful of the efforts of the security and emergency personnel in this difficult situation, His Holiness prays for the healing of the injured, the consolation of those who grieve the loss of their loved ones, and for all affected by this tragedy.” Officials in New Zealand said 49 people were killed in a pair of attacks on mosques in Christchurch. Health officials said 48 patients were being treated for injuries ranging from minor to critical after the shootings. Update 7:49 a.m. EDT March 15: In a tweet early Friday, President Donald Trump sent “warm sympathy and best wishes” to the people of New Zealand after “the horrible massacre.” “Forty-nine innocent people have so senselessly died, with so many more seriously injured,” Trump said. “The U.S. stands by New Zealand for anything we can do. God bless all!” In a statement, White House press secretary Sarah Sanders called the attack “a vicious act of hate.”  “We stand in solidarity with the people of New Zealand and their government,” Sanders said. Queen Elizabeth II, who is head of the Commonwealth and New Zealand's monarch, said she was “deeply saddened” by the shootings, CNN reported. “I have been deeply saddened by the appalling events in Christchurch today,” the queen said. “Prince Philip and I send our condolences to the families and friends of those who have lost their lives. I also pay tribute to the emergency services and volunteers who are providing support to those who have been injured.” Update 5:01 a.m. EDT March 15: New Zealand police said a man in his late 20s has been charged with murder, TVNZ reported. The man was expected to appear in court Saturday morning, The Washington Post reported. Officials have not named the suspect. Police clarified that while four people were detained, only three were thought to have been involved in the shootings, the newspaper reported. Update 4:20 a.m. EDT March 15: New Zealand Police Commissioner Mike Bush confirmed in a news conference that 49 people died in the shooting attacks at two mosques in Christchurch, TVNZ reported. The attack at the Masjid Al Noor mosque near Hagley Park in central Christchurch left 41 people dead, and seven people were killed at the Linwood Avenue mosque, TVNZ reported. Another person died at a hospital, Bush said. Update 3:14 a.m. EDT March 15: Forty-eight patients are being treated for gunshot wounds at Christchurch Hospital, CNN reported. David Meates, chief executive of the Canterbury District Health Board, said the patients’ conditions ranged from critical to minor. One of four people taken into custody after the mass shooting attack at two mosques in Christchurch, New Zealand, said he was a 28-year-old Australian, according to The Associated Press. Australia Prime Minister Scott Morrison confirmed that the shooter was Australian-born. New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern said in a news conference, “It is clear that this can now only be described as a terrorist attack. From what we know, it does appear to have been well planned.” 'We were chosen (because) we represent diversity, kindness compassion, a home for those who share our values, refuge for those who need it and those values, I can assure you, will not and cannot be shaken by this attack,' Ardern said. 'We utterly condemn and reject you.' Update 2:37 a.m. EDT March 15: In a news conference Friday, New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern confirmed that 40 people died in the mosque attacks. Arden said 30 people were killed at the Masjid Al Noor mosque near Hagley Park in central Christchurch, and that 10 people were killed at the Linwood Avenue mosque, TVNZ reported. Twenty more people have been seriously injured, TVNZ reported. Update 2:24 a.m. EDT March 15: In a news conference Friday, Christchurch Mayor Lianne Dalziel expressed shock and anger after the mass shooting at the mosques. “I never could believe anything like this could ever happen in Christchurch,” she said. “I never thought anything like this could happen in New Zealand.” Dalziel told TVNZ, 'We need to come together and care for each other, we need to make this unite us, not divide us.' Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison called the shootings “a vicious attack.” 'We grieve. We are shocked, appalled and outraged as we stand here and condemn the attack that occurred today by an extremist right wing violent terrorist,” Morrison said. Update 1:43 a.m. EDT March 15: St. John Ambulance has transferred multiple patients to Christchurch Hospital and other local medical facilities, TVNZ reported. The news agency reported that injuries of the patients ranged from minor to critical. Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern is expected to address the country at 7 p.m. local time. Update 1:30 a.m. EDT March 15: New Zealand police tweeted Friday that while they cannot confirm the number of fatalities, “it is significant.” Police have asked all mosques throughout New Zealand to close, and advised people to stay away from them “until further notice.” Update 1:04 a.m. EDT March 15: Police confirmed Friday afternoon that the lockdown of schools in Christchurch has been lifted, TVNZ reported. Update 12:33 a.m. EDT March 15: At a news conference, New Zealand Police Commissioner Mike Bush said four people were in custody. Three are men and one is a woman, “as I understand it,” Bush said. There were improvised explosive devices found in vehicles after the shootings, Bush said. Update 12:16 a.m. EDT March 15:  “This is one of New Zealand’s darkest days,” Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern said at a news conference Friday afternoon. “Clearly what has happened here is an extraordinary and unprecedented act of violence.” A cricket match between Bangladesh and the New Zealand national team was canceled. The Bangladesh team was arriving for prayers at a mosque when the shooting occurred, but all members of the squad were safe, a team coach told Reuters. Update 11:15 p.m. EDT March 14: New Zealand authorities have confirmed that there have been multiple fatalities and one person is in custody: “Police is responding to a very serious and tragic incident involving an active shooter in central Christchurch.  One person is in custody, however Police believe there may be other offenders. This is an evolving incident and we are working to confirm the facts, however we can confirm there have been a number of fatalities.  Police is currently at a number of scenes. We understand that there will be many anxious people but I can assure New Zealanders that Police is doing all it can to resolve this incident. We urge New Zealanders to stay vigilant and report any suspicious behaviour immediately to 111.  We are mobilising resources nationally and support is being brought into the District. We are still working to resolve this incident and we continue to urge Christchurch residents to stay inside. We ask all mosques nationally to shut their doors, and advise that people refrain from visiting these premises until further notice.” Update 10:55 p.m. EDT March 14: New Zealand media said an additional shooting has occurred in a second mosque in the city of Christchurch. Original report: As many as 30 people have been injured or killed, a child care center manager told Radio New Zealand. Witness Len Peneha told The Associated Press he saw a man dressed in black enter the Masjid Al Noor mosque and then heard dozens of shots, followed by people running from the mosque in terror. Peneha, who has lived next door to the mosque for about five years, said the gunman ran out of the mosque, dropped what appeared to be a semi-automatic weapon in Peneha’s driveway and fled. Peneha said he went into the mosque to try and help, “I saw dead people everywhere,” he said. Police are urging people in the area to stay indoors and schools in the area have been placed on lockdown. About 300 people were inside the mosque, according to RNZ. The Associated Press contributed to this report.
  • A shooting on a Dutch tram left at least three people dead and several others injured in Utrecht, according to authorities. >> Read more trending news  The city’s mayor, Jan van Zanen, said three people were killed in the attack and nine others wounded, according to The Associated Press. Authorities have classed the incident as a possible terror attack. Update 10:25 a.m. EDT March 18: Utrecht Mayor Jan van Zanen said three of the nine people wounded in Monday’s shooting were seriously injured, according to The Associated Press. “We cannot exclude, even stronger, we assume a terror motive,” van Zanen said Monday. “Likely there is one attacker, but there could be more.” Police have identified a man wanted in connection to the shooting as Gokmen Tanis, 37. Update 10:10 a.m. EDT March 18: Utrecht Mayor Jan van Zanen said three people were killed and nine people were injured Monday in the Utrecht shooting, according to CNN and The Independent. Update 9:55 a.m. EDT March 18: Dutch police issued a correction Monday on the name of the man wanted in connection with the Utrecht shooting. Authorities said his name was spelled Gokmen Tanis. Officials initially identified the 37-year-old as Gokman Tanis. The Independent reported trains were not being allowed into Utrecht’s central train station in the wake of the shooting. Update 9:25 a.m. EDT March 18: Police in the Netherlands asked for the public’s help Monday locating a man wanted in connection to Monday’s shooting. Authorities warned against approaching the man, identified as Gokman Tanis, 37. Update 8:55 a.m. EDT March 18: The shooter behind Monday’s attack remained at large after the incident, according to Pieter-Jaap Aalbersberg, the Dutch anti-terror coordinator. “In Utrecht there was a shooting at several locations,' he said Monday at a news conference, according to The Independent. 'A lot is still unclear at this point and local authorities are working hard to establish all the facts. What we already know is that a culprit is at large.' Authorities continue to investigate the shooting. Original report: Utrecht police wrote Monday in a tweet that a “possible terrorist (motive) is part of the investigation” into the shooting, which occurred about 10:45 a.m. local time, according to CNN. >> See the tweet here The gunman remained at large Monday and may have fled the scene in a car, according to BBC News.  After the attack the country’s anti-terror coordinator, Pieter-Jaap Aalbersberg, raised the terror threat level in Utrecht to 5, its highest level. Check back for updates to this developing story.
  • The teams have been chosen and brackets set up for the 2019 NCAA Men’s Basketball Tournament. >> Read more trending news  The tournament begins Tuesday when the first of the “First Four” games are played, and gets into full swing on Thursday as the first round begins.  Here’s a look at the schedule for the 68-team field, tip-off times, channels and how to watch. How to watch: The games will be televised on four networks, CBS, TBS, TNT and truTV. Check your TV provider for channel information. If you have CBS via a TV service provider, you can see all the games broadcast on CBS there. The CBS Sports App will not be showing the games for free. The CBS All-Access TV app will have the games available via a paid subscription.  TNT, TBS and truTV are available via streaming once you authenticate your tv provider subscriptions. The games are available on an NCAA March Madness Live TV app available via Roku, Amazon Fire TV Stick and Apple TV set-top boxes. You can also get the games on Microsoft's Xbox videogame console and on the Android TV platform.  Below is the schedule for Tuesday and Wednesday’s “First Four” games and the schedule or the first round of the tournament which begins on Thursday. Check back here for an updated schedule of games as the tournament continues. All times are Eastern time. March Madness games schedule: Tuesday, March 19 – First Four 6:40 p.m.: Prairie View A&M vs. Fairleigh Dickinson – truTV After the conclusion: Temple vs. Belmont – truTV Wednesday, March 20 – First Four 6:40 p.m.: NC Central vs North Dakota State – truTV After the conclusion: St. John’s vs. Arizona State – truTV Thursday, March 21 – First Round 3:10 p.m.: Maryland vs. the winner of Tuesday’s Belmont/Temple game – truTV  12:40 p.m.: LSU vs. Yale – truTV  12:15 p.m.: Louisville vs. Minnesota – CBS  2:45 p.m.: Michigan State vs. Bradley – CBS 7:20 p.m.: Villanova vs. St. Mary’s – TBS  9:50 p.m.: Purdue vs. Old Dominion – CBS  1:30 p.m. Auburn vs. New Mexico State – TNT  4 p.m.: Kansas vs. Northeastern – TNT 9:40 p.m.: Wofford vs. Seton Hall – CBS  7:10 p.m.: Kentucky vs. Abilene Christian – CBS  7:27 p.m.: Gonzaga vs. the winner of Tuesday’s Farleigh Dickinson/Prairie View A&M game – truTV  9:57 p.m.: Syracuse vs. Baylor – truTV  4:30 p.m.: Marquette vs. Murray State – TBS  2 p.m.: Florida State vs. Vermont – TBS  6:50 p.m.: Nevada vs. Florida – TNT  9:20 p.m.: Michigan vs. Montana – TNT Friday, March 22 12:15 p.m.: Cincinnati vs. Iowa – CBS  12:40 p.m.: Ole Miss vs. Oklahoma – truTV  1:30 p.m.: Texas Tech vs. Northern Kentucky – TNT 2 p.m.: Kansas State vs. UC Irvine – TBS  2:45 p.m.: Tennessee vs. Colgate – CBS  3:10 p.m.: Virginia vs. Gardner Webb – truTV  4 p.m.: Buffalo vs. the winner of Wednesday’s Arizona State/St. John’s game – TNT  4:30 p.m.: Wisconsin vs. Oregon – TBS  6:50 p.m.: Utah State vs. Washington – TNT 7:10 p.m.: Duke vs. the winner of Wednesday’s North Carolina Central/North Dakota State game – CBS  7:20 p.m.: Houston vs. Georgia State – TBS  7:27 p.m.: Mississippi State vs. Liberty – truTV  9:20 p.m.: North Carolina vs. Iona – TNT 9:40 p.m.: VCU vs. UCF – CBS  9:50 p.m.: Iowa State vs. Ohio State – TBS  9:57 p.m.: Virginia Tech vs. St. Louis – truTV   The second round begins Saturday, March 23. The Sweet 16 round begins Thursday, March 28. The Elite Eight round begins Saturday, March 30. The final four play on Saturday, April 6. The National Championship game, held in Minneapolis, will be played Monday, April 8.     
  • Duval School leaders are inviting parents to a series of meetings on the school district’s aging public schools.  Over the last few months, Duval County Public Schools leaders have been sharing with community members and parents information about the district’s aging school problem. March 18th – kicks off the series of meetings that deal with draft recommendations for the district to move forward with all of the schools in the county. There is nothing extremely wrong with the schools. Leaders are stressing that all schools are both safe and operational. Superintendent Dr. Diana Green says they cannot ignore the impact the condition is having on the success of students and staff. “When facilities are not in good working order, our administrators spend a number of hours focusing on facilities instead of being instruction leaders and focused on the students.” According to a spokesperson for Duval County Public Schools – the draft scenarios include:  • Construction of 30 new schools as either replacement on-site or on new sites.  • 17 consolidations impacting 42 schools with children from those schools attending new or renovated school buildings. (Any buildings no longer in use as a result of the consolidations would be demolished and the land sold to prevent former schools from becoming a future blight.)  • Security upgrades at all schools and removal of the majority of portables from schools across the district.  • Cutting more than 5,000 student seats from the district’s inventory and improving the district’s facility utilization rate. Click here to see the dates and locations for each meeting.
  • Jacksonville-based FIS is buying Worldpay for approximately $35 billion.  FIS says the merge agreement expands its capabilities by enhancing its acquiring and payment offerings. The combined company will retain the name FIS and will be headquartered in Jacksonville.  In a statement announcing the acquisition, FIS says the combination of stock and cash values Worldpay at an enterprise value of approximately $43 billion. Worldpay is a leading payment technology company that processes over 40 billion transactions annually, supporting more than 300 payment types across more than 120 currencies. “Scale matters in our rapidly changing industry,” said Gary Norcross, chairman, president and chief executive officer, FIS. “Upon closing later this year, our two powerhouse organizations will combine forces to offer a customer-driven combination of scale, global presence and the industry’s broadest range of global financial solutions. As a combined organization, we will bring the most modern solutions targeted at the highest growth markets. The long-term value we will create for clients and for shareholders will set the bar in our industry and will create a range of new career opportunities for our employees. I have never been more excited about the future of FIS.”

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