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    A North Carolina burglary suspect who was fought off by an 11-year-old boy with a machete was caught Sunday, nearly two days after he slipped away from the hospital where he was treated for a head wound. His capture came after a manhunt and finger-pointing about who was to blame for his escape. Sgt. Shane Brown of the Burlington Police Department said Jataveon Dashawn Hall was arrested in an apartment there Sunday afternoon. Hall, 19, was returned to Orange County, where the sheriff's office said he faces charges including breaking and entering and assault. Authorities said the boy was alone in the house in Mebane, about 40 miles (65 kilometers) northwest of Raleigh, on Friday morning when Hall broke in after another suspect rang the doorbell and a third waited outside. Hall forced the boy into a closet and was stealing electronics when the boy emerged, grabbed a machete and hit the suspect in the head with the blade, drawing blood, according to the sheriff's office. The boy swung a second time but missed. Authorities didn't say where the machete had been stored. Hall and the other suspects then fled. 'When Hall realized he was bleeding, he dropped the electronics,' left the home and departed with another man and a woman, the sheriff's office said. It wasn't clear if Hall had an attorney; no phone listing for him could be found. It was what happened after Hall sought treatment that raised questions about how he was guarded. Hall went Friday afternoon to a UNC Hospital branch in Hillsborough, seeking treatment, according to Orange County Sheriff Charles Blackwood, who said Hall was never in the custody of his office that day. Deputies were notified, and one waited in a public area of the hospital for more investigators to arrive, the sheriff's office said, adding that 'at this point, Hall was only a suspect and there was no legal authority to hold him.' The sheriff then obtained warrants and asked hospital police to notify his office before discharging Hall, which Blackwood described as standard practice. Hall was transferred to UNC Medical Center in Chapel Hill because of the severity of his wound. But surveillance video shows Hall left the second hospital with his head wrapped in a bandage and wearing a hospital gown and blue socks around 8 p.m. Friday. A nurse noted in his chart shortly thereafter that he had left. However, the sheriff's office said they weren't notified until the next morning when they called to inquire about him. The reason for the delay wasn't clear. 'I am not in the business of assigning blame,' the sheriff said in a statement Sunday. 'However, it has become clear to me that another statement was necessary to defend the actions of my deputies and investigators and to place this matter in the correct context.' UNC Health Care noted Sunday morning the sheriff didn't place a deputy to guard Hall, saying suspects under treatment 'remain the legal responsibility of law enforcement.' The hospital system added that 'nurses and physicians cannot be both caregivers and law enforcement at the same time.' A sheriff's spokeswoman didn't immediately respond to an email Sunday afternoon asking if the other two suspects had been identified or caught. The boy's mother, Kaitlin Johnson, told WTVD-TV she was upset Hall had escaped from the hospital, adding, 'It was infuriating.' ___ Follow Drew at www.twitter.com/JonathanLDrew
  • President Donald Trump has lashed out at The New York Times, saying it engaged in a 'virtual act of treason' for a story that said the U.S. was ramping up its cyber-intrusions into Russia's power grid. The Times reported on Saturday that the U.S. has bored into Russian utility systems in an escalating campaign meant to deter future cyber activity by Russia. It comes as the U.S. looks for new ways to punish Russia's meddling in the 2016 presidential election and prevent a recurrence. The Times, in its official public relations account, called Trump's accusation 'dangerous' and said it had told officials about the story before it was published and no security issues were raised. The newspaper, basing its reports on three months of interviews with current and former government officials, said this campaign was conducted under new cyber authorities granted by Trump and Congress. But it also reported that two administration officials believed the president had not been briefed in detail, fearing he might countermand the action against Russia or reveal sensitive information to foreign officials. In a pair of tweets sent Saturday night, Trump asserted the story wasn't true and denounced reporters as 'cowards.' 'Do you believe that the Failing New York Times just did a story stating that the United States is substantially increasing Cyber Attacks on Russia. This is a virtual act of Treason by a once great paper so desperate for a story, any story, even if bad for our Country,' he wrote. The story reported the deployment of American computer code into Russia's grid and other targets to act as a deterrent. The newspaper also said the U.S. Cyber Command, part of the Department of Defense, has explored the possibility that Russia might try to initiate selective blackouts in key states to disrupt the 2020 election. In a second tweet, Trump added about the story: 'ALSO, NOT TRUE! Anything goes with our Corrupt News Media today. They will do, or say, whatever it takes, with not even the slightest thought of consequence! These are true cowards and without doubt, THE ENEMY OF THE PEOPLE!' The New York Times' response also noted that the paper described the article to government officials before publication. 'As our story notes, President Trump's own national security officials said there were no concerns.' The paper said there was no evidence the US had actually activated the cyber tools.
  • Clutching signs and umbrellas against a drenching downpour, scores of people protested Sunday outside a South Florida facility that has become the nation's biggest location for detaining immigrant children. A coalition of religious groups and immigrant advocates said they want the Homestead detention center closed. Protesters held signs that read 'Homes Instead!' and 'Stop Separating Families' as they beat drums and sang civil rights-era protest songs. 'Shut it down! Shut it down!' protesters shouted. Lucy Duncan, an official with the American Friends Service Committee, asked protesters for a moment of silence to remember children who have died in federal custody, though not at the Homestead facility. She poured water into a potted plant as each of the seven names was read. 'It's a moral outrage,' Duncan said. 'We need for justice to break through. We need to remember those names.' Organizer Kristin Kumpf said 800 people from 22 states had RSVP'd for the protest being held on Father's Day. Immigrant advocates have filed legal documents trying to force President Donald Trump's administration to quickly release immigrant children from the Florida detention center, which officials said in April could house up to 3,200 migrant teens. The advocates accuse the administration of violating a decades-old settlement that they say requires immigrant children to be promptly released to relatives or other sponsors, or sent to child care facilities. The immigrant advocates have filed court papers with hundreds of pages of teens describing 'prison-like' conditions endured in the Homestead facility. The children testified that they are allowed limited phone calls and told to follow numerous strict rules or risk prolonging their detention or facing deportation. Many said they had limited access to their social workers and described frustration at the process of reunification with relatives or sponsors. 'The law is not being followed in this case,' said Danielle Levine Cava, a Miami-Dade County commissioner who spoke at the protest.
  • The Trump name graces apartment towers, hotels and golf courses. Now it is the namesake of a tiny Israeli settlement in the Israel-controlled Golan Heights. Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu's Cabinet convened in this hamlet Sunday to inaugurate a new settlement named after President Donald Trump in a gesture of appreciation for the U.S. leader's recognition of Israeli sovereignty over the territory. The settlement isn't exactly new. Currently known as Bruchim, it is over 30 years old and has a population of 10 people. Israel is hoping the rebranded 'Ramat Trump,' Hebrew for 'Trump Heights,' will encourage a wave of residents to vastly expand it. 'It's absolutely beautiful,' said U.S. Ambassador David Friedman, who attended Sunday's ceremony. Noting that Trump celebrated his birthday on Friday, he said: 'I can't think of a more appropriate and a more beautiful birthday present.' Israel captured the Golan Heights from Syria in the 1967 Mideast war and annexed it in 1981. Most of the international community considers the move illegal under international law. But during a visit to Washington by Netanyahu in March, just weeks before Israeli elections, Trump signed an executive order recognizing the strategic mountainous plateau as Israeli territory. The decision, the latest in a series of diplomatic moves benefiting Israel, was widely applauded in Israel. 'Few things are more important to the security of the state of Israel than permanent sovereignty over the Golan Heights,' Friedman said. 'It is simply obvious, it is indisputable and beyond any reasonable debate.' After the Cabinet decision, Netanyahu and Friedman unveiled a sign trimmed in gold with the name 'Trump Heights' and adorned with U.S. and Israeli flags. Trump retweeted photos Friedman posted of the event and thanked Netanyahu 'and the State of Israel for this great honor!' Addressing the ceremony, Netanyahu called Trump a 'great friend' of Israel and described the Golan, which overlooks northern Israel, as an important strategic asset. 'The Golan Heights was and will always be an inseparable part of our country and homeland,' he said. Developing Ramat Trump will not be easy. Ringed by high yellow grass and land mines, it is roughly 20 kilometers (12 miles) from the Syrian border and a half hour drive from the nearest Israeli town, Kiryat Shmona, a community of about 20,000 people near the Lebanese border. According to Israeli figures, almost 50,000 people live in the Golan, including about 22,000 Jewish Israelis and nearly 25,000 Arab Druze residents. While Israel has encouraged and promoted settlement in the Golan, its remote location, several hours from the economic center of Tel Aviv, has been an obstacle. The area is home to small agriculture and tourism sectors but otherwise has little industry. The eight-year Syrian civil war, which at times has resulted in spillover fire into the Golan, also could present an obstacle to luring new residents. Rosa Zhernakov, a resident of Bruchim since 1991, said the community was excited by Sunday's decision. 'We hope it will benefit the Golan Heights,' she said, standing outside her bungalow on one of Bruchim's few streets. She said the revitalization of the settlement will mean 'more security' for residents from any possible return of the Golan Heights to Syria as part of a future peace treaty. Syria has demanded a return of the strategic territory, which overlooks northern Israel, as part of any peace deal. After the devastating civil war in Syria, the prospects of peace talks with Israel anytime soon seem extremely low. Vladimir Belotserkovsky, 75, another veteran resident, said he welcomed any move to build up the settlement. 'We certainly thank, and I personally, am satisfied by the fact that they're founding the new settlement named for Trump,' he said. Ramat Trump joins a handful of Israeli places named after American presidents, including a village for Harry S. Truman, who first recognized the Jewish state, and George W. Bush Plaza, a square the size of a modest living room in central Jerusalem. Following Sunday's decision to rename the community, developing the settlement still requires overcoming several additional bureaucratic obstacles. With Netanyahu running for re-election in the second national election this year, it remains unclear whether he will be able to complete the task. Zvi Hauser, an opposition lawmaker who formerly served as Netanyahu's Cabinet secretary, called Sunday's ceremony a cheap PR stunt. 'There's no funding, no planning, no location, and there's no real binding decision,' he said.
  • The Los Angeles Police Department is gathering evidence and video footage in an administrative investigation into an off-duty officer who shot and killed a man authorities say attacked him inside a Southern California Costco Wholesale warehouse store. Authorities remained tight-lipped Sunday, not responding to requests for comment about what provoked the Friday night confrontation and whether anyone but the officer was armed. Two others were critically injured in the shooting in Corona, which is about 40 miles (64 kilometers) east of Los Angeles. Los Angeles Police Commission President Steve Soboroff said Sunday it is Chief Michel Moore's decision whether to put the officer on leave, but it remained unclear if that happened. The officer's identity has not been released. The officer opened fire after Kenneth French, 32, of Riverside, 'assaulted' him 'without provocation' as the officer held his young child, Corona police said Saturday. Bullets struck French and two of his family members, according to police. The officer was the only person who fired shots in the store, police said. The officer was treated and released at a nearby hospital. The officer's child was not injured, the department said. The department's policies allow off-duty officers to carry concealed weapons as long as they are authorized for on-duty use, according to the LAPD manual. The LAPD will continue its internal probe as Corona police and the Riverside County district attorney's office conduct a separate investigation into the shooting. The LAPD said Sunday it had no further information. Corona police and the district attorney's office did not respond to requests for comment Sunday. A relative of French's reached on Facebook declined to comment Sunday and asked for privacy. Joseph Giacalone, a professor at the John Jay College of Criminal Justice and a retired New York City Police Department sergeant, said it's justifiable to use deadly force even in a crowded store if the attacker has a weapon. 'If the guy pulled out a pocketknife and approaches him, game over,' Giacalone said Sunday. Police have not said if French had any weapons or if the officer identified himself as police before firing. Giacalone said video footage from Costco's cameras and shoppers' cellphones will be critical to the dual investigations. While it's not unusual for police to delay releasing information such as an officer's name in a shooting for safety reasons, Giacalone said it's important to get details out as quickly as possible. 'People start filling in the timelines for you' in the meantime, he said. The shooting prompted a stampede of frightened shoppers, some who fled the store as others sought cover inside. Witnesses reported seeing an argument between two people near a freezer section when shots rang out at least six times. The Costco reopened later Saturday.
  • Youthful dressing and streetwear were in focus on the third day of Milan Fashion Week previews of (mostly) menswear for next spring and summer. It's a game of sophisticated materials and edgy styling, of pushing boundaries and reaching for that increasingly significant, but typically not economically independent young customer. Highlights on Sunday included Palm Angels, DSquared, Sunnei, John Richmond and Missoni. _____ SUNNEI ZEN Sunnei took a leap in sophistication with its co-ed collection featuring highly researched materials and calm, Zen-like styling. For the unveiling, founders Loris Messina and Simone Rizzo brought the fashion crowd to the white-washed concrete of a future public art space beneath a disused overpass in Milan. Providing a snapshot of the 4-year-old brand's technical sophistication, the looks included textured yet translucent knitwear, which from the front row looked soft as a sponge. On closer inspection, the outside of the designs felt resistant and a little bit scratchy. The super-light knitwear lent itself to layering - over knit pants for men and a long knit dress or skirt for women. There were matching knitwear duffels, and maxi bags took on the micro-bag trend shown on other runways. While cargo pants come in for some disparagement, the designers embraced their utility without worrying that stuffed compartments would ruin the line. In fact, the male silhouette was boxy, with oversized shirts over wide fitting shorts. Short denim jumpsuits were wide enough to suggest a dress and ensure comfort, while a lemon yellow belted jacket created a male peplum over a matching cargo trouser. Tie-back caps finished the looks. For women, there were super wide elephant pants that could be worn with ruched bandeau tops, perhaps layered with a sheer tunic. Satiny skirt outfits came cinched with scrunchy belts that gave a springy feel. Models wore platform sandals that added as much as 5 inches (12 centimeters) in height. The collection featured colors of soothing white, mix-and-match green tones, sky blue and denim along with neutrals black and brown. Rizzo and Messina declared wryly on one pullover vest, 'I HATE 'FASHION.'' The phrase clearly meant someone who tries too hard. The pair achieved the ultimate ease in Milan. _____ JOHN RICHMOND TAPS 1980S DNA He's a biker or a punker, unafraid to wear a 1980s skirt or to layer trousers or shorts with fishnets. John Richmond says the young man of today is ready for anything. And for Spring/Summer 2020, Richmond dipped back into his archive to bring back the punk skirt that graced the 1984 cover of Britain's The Face magazine, earning him a place in fashion history. The updated cotton version comes in straightforward gray and khaki, worn with showy coordinated bombers with panels of snakeskin print or metallic detailing. 'Kids nowadays wear anything. You know they've broken all the rules. So you get guys wearing jeans which are hardly there. It's all changed,' Richmond said. Snakes and snakeskin prints were the chief motifs of the co-ed collection - but no snakeskin itself. The collection featured architectural shoulders for her, accented by a cinched waist and flowing, pleated trousers for undulating movement. She might add a skin-fitting tattoo top that Richmond said was 'a montage of iconography, with rings and Bowie and all kinds of things.' There were slinkier looks for evening, including a sequined snake slithering suggestively over the shoulder. Richmond has an eye on sustainability in his broader collection, and says it is easier to find eco-polyester. The looks in stores - not on the runway - will include reused vintage. Part of the philosophy includes using footwear that is on the market. Here, Richmond collaborated with Converse for men's high-tops finished in sequins and studs with snakes or JR insignia. Richmond has been relaunching his historic brand after losing control in a business dispute for two seasons. He says it is now growing each season and as part of his latest chapter, he plans to open stores in Milan and Dubai this year and Malaysia next year. ____ MARCELO BURLON GIVES AN EASY RIDE Argentine designer Marcelo Burlon's County of Milan collection brought together extremes of technical active wear and tailored suits. The looks included Lycra running tops worn with a chino and topped with a bucket hat as easily as with runner's leggings and a flat runner's pack or with a notched suit jacket and matching trousers. A graphic top and trousers touted 1969 motorcycle road trip film 'Easy Rider' in movie poster style. The spray painting effect on sneakers and jeans gave the impression the garments had been tagged by a street artist. For more sophisticated looks, there were polo shirts down up in fading-in-and-out color gradients of black to yellow. For women, there was a long, high-slit tank dress with the same effect. A blazer gave a tailored finish to a zip-up athletic top and bike shorts. Women's jeans were worn looser and wider than the men's. Burlon also showed off his children's line with a mini-model dressed in a two-button royal blue suit. There was a double-breasted version for adults.
  • The Senate's top Democrat called on the Federal Aviation Administration Sunday to heed warnings from federal safety investigators and require all helicopters be equipped with flight data recorders, commonly known as a 'black box.' Sen. Charles Schumer's call for action comes days after a helicopter crashed on the roof of a Manhattan skyscraper , killing the pilot. The helicopter was not equipped with a flight data recorder or a cockpit voice recorder, according to federal investigators. The National Transportation Safety Board has pushed the FAA to implement its data recorder safety recommendation for years. In documents reviewed by The Associated Press, the NTSB said the FAA has maintained it has been unable to justify the mandate because 'the benefits of recorders are difficult to identify and quantify because the absence of a recorder will never cause an accident.' Large commercial planes and some private aircraft are required, under FAA regulations, to have two so-called 'black boxes' that record information — a flight data recorder that monitors altitude and other instrumentation, and a cockpit voice recorder, which records radio transmissions and sounds in the cockpit. But there is no such requirement for helicopters. 'To know that the NTSB has been trying for years, without success, to compel the FAA to take action as it relates to making helicopters more valuable to safety by installing flight data recorders is cause for serious concern,' Schumer, D-N.Y., said in a statement to the AP. The FAA said in a statement it was supporting the NTSB's investigation into the New York crash and that it was 'premature to consider any actions pending the outcome of the investigation.' The NTSB has been recommending data recorders on helicopters for several years and pushed the FAA to enact new regulations after a medical helicopter crashed in Missouri in 2011, killing four people. Safety investigators said the pilot had been texting and recommended the FAA require all newly manufactured nonexperimental helicopters be required to have both flight data recorders and cockpit voice recorders. The FAA has not enacted any such requirement. 'In the name of safety, the FAA must take another look at the NTSB's reports on chopper crashes similar to the one in New York City just last week and propel the safety measures that have been collecting dust for far too long,' Schumer said. In a notice to the FAA last year, the NTSB said 159 aircraft involved in crashes from 2005 to 2017 had no form of recording equipment. The NTSB, which is charged with investigating transportation crashes across the U.S., said it was more difficult to investigate with the lack of information. Of those 159 crashes, the NTSB was not able to determine the probable cause for 18 of them, the agency said. It argues federal investigators would have more information to conduct critical safety probes if the data recorders were installed. This week's crash was the second in Manhattan in a month and led renewed calls for restricting helicopter flights over the city. U.S. Rep. Carolyn Maloney, a Democrat who represents the area where the crash occurred, said last week that the FAA must ban 'non-essential' flights over Manhattan and pledged to hold the FAA 'accountable' for the crash. Officials have said the helicopter's pilot, 58-year-old Tim McCormack, was not authorized to fly in limited visibility, raising questions about why he took off in the first place in rain and dense fog. ___ Follow Balsamo on Twitter at www.twitter.com/MikeBalsamo1
  • Secretary of State Mike Pompeo is reaching out to wary foreign leaders to frame alleged Iranian attacks in a Middle East oil shipping route as a problem for the world at large, especially for Asian countries vitally dependent on that oil. Pompeo, in a series of Sunday television interviews, emphasized the U.S. international outreach in the wake of what the U.S. says were Iranian attacks Thursday on two oil tankers near the Strait of Hormuz . 'I made a bunch of phone calls yesterday. I'll make a whole bunch more calls today. The world needs to unite,' Pompeo said. He did not say what kind of action the Trump administration envisioned. 'We are going to work to build out a set of countries that have deep vested interest in keeping that strait open to help us do that,' Pompeo said. That echoed comments from acting Defense Secretary Patrick Shanahan this past week when he said the U.S. goal is to 'build international consensus to this international problem.' Iran has denied being involved in the attacks and accused America of promoting an 'Iranophobic' campaign against it. Pressed on whether any new U.S. military deployment to the region was possible, Pompeo said that 'of course' remained among the options that President Donald Trump may consider to keep shipping safe through the narrow strait, a strategic choke point for oil shipments from the Middle East. Trump last year withdrew the U.S. from an international agreement, signed in 2015 by President Barack Obama, to limit Iran's nuclear program. Trump has reinstated economic sanctions and recently ended waivers that allowed some countries to continue buying Iranian oil. That has deprived Iran of oil income and has coincided with what U.S. officials said was a surge in intelligence pointing to Iranian preparations for attacks against U.S. forces and interests in the Gulf region. The U.S. has accelerated the deployment of the USS Abraham Lincoln aircraft carrier battle group to the region, sent four nuclear-capable B-52 bombers to Qatar and bolstered its defenses in the region by deploying more Patriot air defense systems. Some European allies have called for a careful investigation of responsibility, worried that Trump was escalating tensions with a country he has long called a top U.S. enemy. Pompeo stressed that the U.S. gets relatively little of its energy supplies through the strait, which lies between the Persian Gulf and the Gulf of Oman. The U.S. Energy Information Administration says 16 percent of U.S. petroleum imports came from the Persian Gulf countries in 2018. By contrast, about 80% of oil through the shipping passage supplies energy-hungry countries in Asia, including China, Japan, India and South Korea. Those countries have skin in the game, he said. 'I'm confident that when they see the risk — the risk of their own economies and their own people and outrageous behavior of the Islamic Republic of Iran, they will join us in this,' Pompeo said. Pompeo said intelligence officials had 'lots of data, lots of evidence' that Iran was responsible. Pressed for specifics, Pompeo pointed to grainy black-and-white footage already released by the U.S. American officials say the footage shows Iranian Revolutionary Guard troops removing an unexploded mine from a Japanese tanker. The tanker's crew gave an apparently different account, saying 'flying objects' targeted the vessel. Pompeo said the administration had shared the video and other unspecified evidence with Germany and other nations. Asked if the U.S. had a credibility problem with allies worried Trump could be seeking a pretext to move against Iran, the secretary of state said, 'We're not selling anything. These- these are simple facts.' Pompeo spoke on 'Fox News Sunday' and CBS's 'Face the Nation.
  • Jonathan Toews says he just wants his contract to be worth what it says on paper. Right now, it's not that simple. Under terms of the collective bargaining agreement, NHL owners and players divide hockey-related revenue 50/50, and if player salaries exceed that split a certain percentage is withheld in escrow to make it even. The Chicago Blackhawks captain and fellow players have lost upward of 10% of their pay to escrow over the past seven seasons, which is why 25 of 31 NHL Players' Association representatives surveyed by The Associated Press and Canadian Press named escrow as the biggest bargaining issue with September deadlines looming to terminate the current CBA effective the fall of 2020. 'A. escrow and B. escrow,' Toews said when asked the two biggest issues in labor talks. Olympic participation, the definition of hockey-related revenue, post-career health care, concerns about youth squeezing out older players because of the salary cap and money were the other topics player reps pointed to as important to them. Escrow, though, is a point of contention in locker rooms around the league. It is expected to be a significant topic in talks ahead of the owners' Sept. 1 and players' Sept. 15 deadline to opt out of this CBA and set the clock ticking toward another potential work stoppage. 'I think we, as players, are really educating ourselves on the economics of the game and how it works and why escrow is the way it is,' New Jersey Devils player rep Cory Schneider said. 'There are a lot of things that go into it, and we understand from the owners' side how it works. But for us that's definitely something that, it fluctuates quarter to quarter, year to year, so you never really know what it's going to be and it's hard to really understand what you're earning or what your worth is when you're getting a big chunk of it taken back. 'I don't know if we're going to eliminate it. Obviously we'll figure that part out. But at least some way to mitigate it or control it better for us just to know what to expect.' The CBA sets aside some part of a player's salary in a bank account throughout the year. After the season, total revenue is calculated and if the league is not at its 50% share, it gets the escrow money to make up the difference. NHLPA executive director Don Fehr said escrow has been discussed in talks with Deputy Commissioner Bill Daly and expects more to come. But there's no quick fix to reduce or eliminate escrow without changing substantial things about the economics of the league. 'Obviously it's an irritant to players and from time to time it can be a big one,' Fehr said. 'But the question is how you do it. I mean, you can fix escrow by cutting salaries. I don't think players are interested in doing that. So it has to become something that you address in a manner which makes sense for the players and addresses their concerns.' A handful of players voiced their concern that revenues aren't growing enough to compensate for the natural growth of salaries — and the cap — over time. Because seven of 31 teams are based in Canada, the fluctuation of the Canadian dollar affects everything, and players would like to find a solution to the entire financial picture, including a look at what counts as hockey-related revenue. 'There's definitely a concern and always an emphasis on the revenues and us growing the game,' Toronto Maple Leafs player rep John Tavares said. 'That's a top priority because I think when we see growth, we're obviously going to see it on the business side. When you feel the hit of escrow on top of whatever taxes we have to pay, it's definitely something that guys notice and something you don't enjoy seeing. It's important to us, but in saying that the bigger picture is the growth of the game. When that happens, when we do those things right, that'll lead to more revenues that will hopefully lead to some adjustments.' Commissioner Gary Bettman calls escrow 'a function of the cap' and said it's going to be higher when that upper limit on salaries is higher. 'There are things you can do, either immediately or over time (where) you can manage the cap differently, which would manage the escrow, and those are things that obviously we need to be talking about,' Bettman said. It's not the only thing. Many players have expressed their desire to guarantee Olympic participation, though it seems impossible to collectively bargain because the International Ice Hockey Federation and International Olympic Committee are also involved. Countless business and political factors will go into whether the NHL sends its players to the Beijing Games in 2022. One issue mentioned by players that can be bargained is how players are taken care of after they retire. Vancouver Canucks player rep Bo Horvat said medical coverage, treatment for concussion issues and other things matter. He's not alone in prioritizing that with talks ongoing and some optimism of maintaining labor peace because the issues are at least more straightforward than the last round of talks in 2012-13. 'Post-career stuff, health care stuff, lots of little things like that that are important to players as far as livelihood going forward,' Minnesota Wild player rep Devan Dubnyk said. 'The good news is there's not anything major, but certainly some things we're going to want to be talked about.' ___ Follow AP Hockey Writer Stephen Whyno on Twitter at https://twitter.com/SWhyno ___ More AP NHL: https://apnews.com/NHL and https://twitter.com/AP_Sports
  • The chief executive of Boeing said the company made a 'mistake' in handling a problematic cockpit warning system in its 737 Max jets before two crashes killed 346 people, and he promised transparency as the aircraft maker works to get the grounded plane back in flight. Speaking before the industry-wide Paris Air Show, Boeing CEO Dennis Muilenburg told reporters Boeing's communication with regulators, customers and the public 'was not consistent. And that's unacceptable.' The U.S. Federal Aviation Administration has faulted Boeing for not telling regulators for more than a year that a safety indicator in the cockpit of the top-selling plane didn't work as intended. Boeing and the FAA have said the warning light wasn't critical for flight safety. But the botched communication has eroded trust in Boeing as the company struggles to rebound from the passenger jet crashes in Indonesia and Ethiopia. 'We clearly had a mistake in the implementation of the alert,' Muilenburg said. Pilots also have expressed anger that Boeing did not inform them about the new software that's been implicated in the fatal crashes. Muilenburg expressed confidence that the Boeing 737 Max would be cleared to fly again later this year by U.S. and all other global regulators. 'We will take the time necessary' to ensure the Max is safe, he said. The model has been grounded worldwide for three months, and regulators need to approve Boeing's long-awaited fix to the software before it can return to the skies. Muilenburg called the crashes of the Lion Air and Ethiopian Airlines jets a 'defining moment' for Boeing, but said he thinks the result will be a 'better and stronger company.' In the United States, Boeing has faced scrutiny from members of Congress and the FAA over how it reported the problem involving a cockpit warning light. The company discovered in 2017 that a warning light designed to alert pilots when sensors measuring the angle of a plane's nose might be wrong only worked if airlines had purchased a separate feature. The angle-measuring sensors have been implicated in the Lion Air crash in Indonesia last October and the Ethiopian Airlines crash in March. The sensors malfunctioned, alerting software to push the noses of the planes down. The pilots were unable to take back control of the planes. Boeing told the FAA of what it learned in 2017 after the Indonesia crash. Pilot Dennis Tajer, a spokesman for the union that represents American Airlines pilot, the Allied Pilots Association, said it's good Muilenburg was willing to revisit the cockpit alert problem and to acknowledge Boeing mishandled conveying information. But Tajer said he thinks Boeing made a series of unprecedented communication missteps that have 'created a massive headwind to rebuilding trust.' Restoring trust in the Max is Boeing's No. 1 priority, Muilenburg said — ahead of an upgraded 777 and work on its upcoming NMA long-range jet. The Max, the newest version of Boeing's best-selling 737, is critical to the company's future. The Max was a direct response to rival Airbus' fuel-efficient A320neo, one of the European plane maker's most popular jets; Airbus has outpaced Boeing in sales in the category. The Max crashes, a slowing global economy, and damage from tariffs and trade fights threaten to cloud the mood at the Paris Air Show. Along with its alternating-years companion, the Farnborough International Airshow near London, the Paris show is usually a celebration of cutting-edge aviation technology. Muilenburg forecast a limited number of orders at the Paris event, the first major air show since the crashes, but said it was still important for Boeing to attend to talk to customers and others in the industry. He also announced that Boeing was raising its long-term forecast for global plane demand, notably amid sustained growth in Asia. Boeing expects the world's airlines will need 44,000 planes within 20 years, up from a previous forecast of 43,000 planes. Muilenburg projected that within 10 years, the overall aviation market — including passenger jets, cargo and warplanes — would be worth $8.7 trillion, compared to earlier forecasts of $8.1 trillion. Both estimates are higher than the ones from Airbus, which sees slower growth ahead. However, Airbus is heading into the Paris show with confidence. It is expected to announce several plane sales and unveil its A321 XLR long-range jet. Airbus executives said the Max crashes aren't affecting their sales strategy, but are a reminder of the importance to the whole industry of ensuring safety. ___ Rachel Lerman in San Francisco contributed to this report.

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  • An Alabama woman was charged in the shooting death of her husband, an Army sergeant stationed at Fort Benning, just days after he filed for a restraining order against her.  >> Read more trending news  Brittnay Ryals Paonessa, 27, was charged Friday with the murder of 26-year-old Brandyn Paonessa, The Associated Press reported.  Brandyn Paonessa died Thursday afternoon after getting shot in the abdomen with a shotgun in the front yard of a Phenix City home, authorities said.  Local media outlets reported the shooting occurred just three days after the soldier filed for an emergency protection from abuse order against his wife. The court filings indicate Paonessa was concerned with his wife’s mental well-being, and said she was “very unstable,” Montgomery-based WSFA reported.  He reportedly accused her of stalking him and his family, as well as driving a truck into their home with their children inside. The couple married in 2013 and the youngest of their four children is two months old.  The infantryman joined the Army in September 2013 and completed two combat deployments to Afghanistan, the Columbus Ledger-Enquirer reported.  Brittnay Paonessa is being held at the Lee County Detention Facility on a $150,000 bond.
  • A Springfield, Ohio, man who pleaded guilty to killing his neighbor’s dog with a baseball bat in April avoided jail time and was sentenced to community service. Jeffrey Sagraves was ordered to 40 hours of community service and to pay $300 in fines for burglary and cruelty to a companion animal. >> On WHIO.com: Springfield man accused of killing dog with baseball bat He was facing a maximum of 18 months in jail for burglary and 12 months for cruelty to a companion animal. In October, Sagraves called 911 to report that there were two pit bulls in his backyard attacking his cat, according to Clark County Common Pleas Court documents. During the call, he reportedly told dispatchers that the dogs belonged to his neighbor and threatened to kill the dogs if police didn’t show up soon The cat died during the attack, according to court records. >> Read more trending news  Minutes later, a neighbor, Lisa Marie Everhart, called 911 and said a man identified as Sagraves reportedly broke into her home and hit her dog in the head with a wooden bat. She was visibly upset, as well as her young children, who were screaming and crying, according to a court affidavit. Everhart was charged with a misdemeanor for failing to confine her dogs.
  • President Donald Trump took to Twitter on Saturday to slam The New York Times for its report that the United States has increased cyberattacks on Russia's power grid. >> Read more trending news  'Do you believe that the Failing New York Times just did a story stating that the United States is substantially increasing Cyber Attacks on Russia,' Trump tweeted shortly after 9 p.m. Saturday. 'This is a virtual act of Treason by a once great paper so desperate for a story, any story, even if bad for our Country.' He continued: 'ALSO, NOT TRUE! Anything goes with our Corrupt News Media today. They will do, or say, whatever it takes, with not even the slightest thought of consequence! These are true cowards and without doubt, THE ENEMY OF THE PEOPLE!' >> See the tweets here Earlier Saturday, the newspaper, citing 'current and former government officials,' reported that the U.S. 'is stepping up digital incursions into Russia's electric power grid.'  The news comes at least seven years after U.S. officials began putting 'reconnaissance probes' in Russia's grid, the Times reported. 'But now the American strategy has shifted more toward offense, officials say, with the placement of potentially crippling malware inside the Russian system at a depth and with an aggressiveness that had never been tried before,' the Times reported, adding that the move is part-warning, part-preparation for launching U.S. attacks 'if a major conflict' with Russia develops. Two unnamed officials with the Trump administration said they did not think the president had received detailed briefings about the U.S. implants in the Russian electric system, according to the Times.  Officials have hesitated to give him the details over worries that he might divulge information to foreign officials or react unfavorably, sources told the Times. Read more here.
  • A two month, multi-agency investigation has ended with the arrests of two suspects involved in a Romanian skimming ring that affected nearly 400 residents across Northeast Florida and Southeast Georgia.   Specifically, more than 80 Putnam County residents were affected with more than 300 others in areas like Jacksonville, Keystone Heights, Newberry, and into Southeast Georgia. The Putnam County Sheriff's Office plans to release further details on Monday, June 17th, but WOKV has learned the identities of the two suspects arrested.  Arrest reports from the Jacksonville Sheriff's Office identify the two as 35-year-old Elena Matei and 18-year-old Plopsor Matei.  Both are facing a variety of charges, from using or possessing a skimming device to bank fraud.  While the arrest reports are heavily redacted, it does show Capital City Bank told investigators they’ve had to reimburse their customers about $46, 360 due to cards being compromised due to skimmers. The reports also show that SunTrust Bank told investigators it is at a loss of $6,230. The Putnam County Sheriff's Office says in addition to the Jacksonville Sheriff's Office, the US Secret Service, the Florida Highway Patrol, the Clay County Sheriff's Office, the Florida Department of Law Enforcement, and the North Florida Financial Crimes Task Force also helped with the investigation.
  • A 16-year-old Indiana boy died Wednesday when he and his father were robbed during an arranged meetup with someone they’d met through an online sales app, according to multiple reports. >> Read more trending news Gary police and the Lake County Coroner’s Office told the Chicago Sun-Times that Johnny Peluyera, of Merrillville, Indiana, and his father had arranged to sell an Xbox. After arriving at the meetup location, they were robbed by two men, the newspaper reported. Authorities responded around 6 p.m. Wednesday to reports of the shooting, which took place near the intersection of 51st Avenue and Maryland Street, according to the Post-Tribune. In a statement obtained by the northwest Indiana newspaper, Gary police Cmdr. Jack Hamady said Johnny was reportedly sitting in the front passenger side of his father’s vehicle when he was shot in the back. The robbers fled the area and remained at-large Friday. “I just completely don’t understand,” Johnny’s mother, Kelly Arroyo, told WGN-TV. “I don’t understand how somebody – over an Xbox – can take somebody’s life.” Arroyo described her son to WGN-TV as a “wonderful kid who loved video games and cars.” She said he had recently gotten his driver’s license. Johnny is survived by his parents and a sister, according to WGN-TV. Gary police told the Post-Tribune that online buyers and sellers should only agree to meet in public places, such in a police station parking lot. Authorities continue to investigate.

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