ON AIR NOW

LISTEN NOW

Weather

cloudy-day
83°
Partly Cloudy
H 91° L 76°
  • cloudy-day
    83°
    Current Conditions
    Partly Cloudy. H 91° L 76°
  • cloudy-day
    78°
    Morning
    Partly Cloudy. H 91° L 76°
  • cloudy-day
    89°
    Afternoon
    Mostly Cloudy. H 92° L 77°
LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

The latest top stories

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

The latest traffic report

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

The latest forecast

00:00 | 00:00

Top National Stories

    The newest elephant at San Diego Zoo Safari Park has joined the rest of the herd. Video posted by the zoo this week shows Umzula-zuli taking his first tentative steps in the elephant enclosure — under the watchful eye of his mother, Ndula. Zookeeper Mindy Albright says the other 12 elephants sniffed the new baby and trumpeted their welcome. The healthy male African elephant calf was born Sunday, which happened to be World Elephant Day. Umzula-zuli — or Zuli, for short — tipped the scales at 270 pounds — making it the largest elephant ever born at the safari park.
  • A Rhode Island gubernatorial candidate has brought a campaign volunteer in a chicken suit to challenge a rival to debate. Republican Patricia Morgan visited Cranston City Hall on Wednesday to personally challenge Mayor Allan Fung to a series of primary debates. She did not go alone. Morgan took 'Al the Debate Chicken', who was a volunteer dressed in a chicken suit. Morgan has repeatedly faulted Fung for his refusal to participate in the typical pre-primary debates that take place for gubernatorial campaigns. A spokesman for Fung's campaign says the candidate has agreed to debate on Woonsocket-based WNRI radio's 'The John DePetro Show' on Aug. 31. He did not address the appearance of the chicken at the mayor's office.
  • If you quit smoking and gain weight, it may seem like you're trading one set of health problems for another. But a new U.S. study finds you're still better off in the long run. Compared with smokers, even the quitters who gained the most weight had at least a 50 percent lower risk of dying prematurely from heart disease and other causes, the Harvard-led study found. The study is impressive in its size and scope and should put to rest any myth that there are prohibitive weight-related health consequences to quitting cigarettes, said Dr. William Dietz, a public health expert at George Washington University. 'The paper makes pretty clear that your health improves, even if you gain weight,' said Dietz, who was not involved in the research. 'I don't think we knew that with the assurance that this paper provides.' The New England Journal of Medicine published the study Wednesday. The journal also published a Swedish study that found quitting smoking seems to be the best thing diabetics can do to cut their risk of dying prematurely. The nicotine in cigarettes can suppress appetite and boost metabolism. Many smokers who quit and don't step up their exercise find they eat more and gain weight — typically less than 10 pounds (4.5 kilograms), but in some cases three times that much. A lot of weight gain is a cause of the most common form of diabetes, a disease in which blood sugar levels are higher than normal. Diabetes can lead to problems including blindness, nerve damage, heart and kidney disease and poor blood flow to the legs and feet. In the U.S. study, researchers tracked more than 170,000 men and women over roughly 20 years, looking at what they said in health questionnaires given every two years. The people enrolled in the studies were all health professionals, and did not mirror current smokers in the general population, who are disproportionately low-income, less-educated and more likely to smoke heavily. The researchers checked which study participants quit smoking and followed whether they gained weight and developed diabetes, heart disease or other conditions. Quitters saw their risk of diabetes increase by 22 percent in the six years after they kicked the habit. An editorial in the journal characterized it as 'a mild elevation' in the diabetes risk. Studies previously showed that people who quit have an elevated risk of developing diabetes, said Dr. Qi Sun, one the study's authors. He is a researcher at the Harvard-affiliated Brigham and Women's Hospital. But that risk doesn't endure, and it never leads to a higher premature death rate than what smokers face, he said. 'Regardless of the amount of weight gain, quitters always have a lower risk of dying' prematurely, Sun said. ___ The Associated Press Health & Science Department receives support from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute's Department of Science Education. The AP is solely responsible for all content.
  • The government has made only incremental improvements to its troubled efforts to care for thousands of migrant children detained entering the U.S. without their parents, perpetuating a problem the Trump administration has aggravated with its 'zero tolerance' immigration crackdown, a bipartisan Senate report said Wednesday. The 52-page study said no federal agency takes responsibility for making sure children aren't abused or used in human trafficking once the government places them with sponsors, who sometimes aren't their parents or close relatives. Immigration judges are ordering the deportation of growing proportions of these children partly because the government does little to ensure they get to court, and officials haven't provided sufficient mental health services for some of them, the report said. 'Major deficiencies persist that leave the children at significant risk for trafficking and abuse and undermine our immigration system,' said the report by the Senate Homeland Security Committee's investigations subcommittee. It said a recent attempt at coordination between the departments of Health and Human Services and Homeland Security 'does little to offer hope that federal agencies are working to improve' children's safety, and it called the situation 'untenable.' The report comes as attention has focused on another set of migrant children: more than 2,000 who were separated from their parents as part of President Donald Trump's policy of aggressively prosecuting immigrants entering the country without authorization. Though most of those children have been reunited with their parents or others, the costs involved 'have stretched thin' HHS' 'already limited resources,' the report said. The authors wrote that when they asked that agency to detail its efforts to check on children placed with sponsors, 'HHS told the subcommittee that it can either work to reunite families or update data — but not both.' More than 200,000 unaccompanied children have entered the U.S. without legal status over the past six years, and most problems started under President Barack Obama, the report said. 'This is an incredibly difficult issue and it's not a partisan one,' said Sen. Rob Portman, R-Ohio, the subcommittee chairman. The panel's top Democrat, Delaware Sen. Tom Carper, took a more partisan tone, saying, 'This administration continues to make an already challenging reality for migrant children even more difficult and more dangerous.' When unaccompanied children are apprehended, Homeland Security must quickly transfer them to Health and Human Services, which then tries placing them with parents, relatives or others until a court hearing — a wait that typically takes 480 days. If a sponsor can't be found, children are held in facilities often run by government contractors. Once they're with sponsors, HHS has trouble tracking them. In figures originally released in April, when officials tried calling 7,635 children late last year who'd been placed sponsors, they were uncertain where about 1 in 5 were. Twenty-eight others had run away. Since 2015, HHS has been checking on children 30 days after going to sponsors. The report called that 'a small step in the right direction' but added, 'It is concerning that HHS apparently takes no action to address the alarming situations it discovers when it makes those calls.' It also said that in about 1 in 7 instances, it couldn't reach the sponsors, which 'should be a significant red flag,' the report said. The report said HHS usually doesn't notify state and local authorities when it puts children with sponsors in their communities, letting some fall through the cracks when it comes to attending school. When HHS by law turns over children to DHS when they reach 18, it often doesn't provide required recommendations for appropriate care. HHS has stopped providing legal services to children newly placed with sponsors because it believes it has only 'shaky' authority to do so. And no agency makes sure the children appear at their immigration court proceedings, with many sponsors failing to honor their agreement to get them there, the report said. The children's lack of legal advice and a shortage of judges have contributed to a backlog of total immigration cases that has grown to 734,000, including 80,000 involving these children, the report said. Of 9,600 cases involving children that were completed in the first half of this year, judges were ordering 53 percent of them to be deported without the children even appearing, up from 41 percent in 2016. The investigations subcommittee, which is holding a hearing on the topic Thursday, has been studying the problem since 2015, when it learned eight children had been placed with members of a trafficking ring. The panel complained that despite years of prodding, it took DHS and HHS until last month to produce an agreement delineating their responsibilities. That pact 'only reflects longstanding protocol, not improvements,' the report said.
  • Police in upstate New York have charged the mother of a missing baby with multiple felonies after the remains of a child were found near her home. Schenectady police say Heaven Puleski has been under investigation since family members reported her 4-month-old child Rayen Puleski hadn't been seen since July. Puleski has been charged with felony tampering with physical evidence and concealment of a human corpse after talking to detectives Tuesday. She had pleaded not guilty Wednesday and is in county jail on $20,000 bail. A message left with her attorney has not been returned. On Monday, Schenectady police had said more tests are needed to determine whether the remains behind the 38-year-old woman's apartment are those of her baby. Local police, state investigators and FBI agents are investigating.
  • Almost a year after an 8-year-old biracial boy was nearly hanged, the New Hampshire attorney general's office says a legal dispute is preventing it from releasing a report on its investigation. Allegations have surfaced that several teenagers taunted the boy in Claremont with racial slurs on Aug. 28 and then pushed him off a picnic table with a rope around his neck. The boy's grandmother had said his injuries were treated at a hospital. The attorney general's office says Wednesday that once its investigation was complete, it sought a court order to release the report, 'due to confidentiality constraints and the ages of the children involved.' The office says the report hasn't been released because litigation over whether it may be released 'is ongoing.' It didn't provide further details.
  • A couple whose flattened trailer tire accidentally started a massive fire in Northern California has received more than 100 cards and letters with supportive messages telling them not to feel guilty. The outpouring of support for an 81-year-old man and his wife started after Rachel Pilli made a Facebook post offering to forward compassionate messages to the couple, the Record Searchlight in Redding, California, reported Wednesday. Pilli doesn't know the couple, but said a firefighter who knows them told her the woman blames herself and cries day and night. She decided to send them a card with a supportive message and then posted about the couple on social media. 'I couldn't imagine the grief,' she said. 'If I were the one responsible for the accident I couldn't imagine the shame and the torture I'd feel.' The blaze that has destroyed nearly 1,100 homes and killed eight people started on July 23 with a spark from a vehicle driving on a flat tire, fire officials said. It was 67 percent contained as of Wednesday. Pilli said she has received more than 100 cards and letters and they keep coming. People have also sent bouquets of flowers and gifts for the couple. Pilli, a doctor and mother of three, and a friend are reading the letters before they send them to the couple to make sure all are encouraging. Thus far, they have been. She said she hopes the couple 'feel the love and forgive themselves.' 'I think the fire has caused us to look into each other's eyes and discover the human kindness in us,' Pilli said. 'People have been so generous. It's a beautiful story of hope and community.
  • A family of seven, including five young children, died on a remote Oregon road in a head-on collision on their way to an end-of-summer vacation in Las Vegas, a family member said Wednesday. Erika Carter Boquet, 29, was driving her 2016 Toyota 4 Runner eastbound on Oregon Highway 78 when an oncoming vehicle veered into her lane, authorities said. Boquet, of Tacoma, Washington, and her children Isabella, 11; Elisabeth, 8; and Tytis, 6, were killed, Boquet's brother, Jesse Tate, told The Associated Press. Another relative and her two children also perished in the Monday crash. Tate declined to name them because of the wishes of their immediate family. 'It's a tragedy I wouldn't wish on anyone else,' Tate, 30, of Spanaway, Washington, told The Oregonian/OregonLive in an earlier interview. Oregon State Police listed the other victims as Kyla Marie Brown, 28; Arianna Marie Brown, 10; and 2-year-old Xavier King Johnson. Authorities did not provide details about the relationships between the victims. The driver and sole occupant of the other car, 48-year-old Mark Robert Rundell, of Prairie City, Oregon, also died. The crash happened in a remote part of Oregon about 130 miles west of the Idaho border. Tate first learned of it from relatives who contacted him on social media. He then called his father, who told him who was involved, he said. Boquet volunteered at a Tacoma-based nonprofit she created called Last Stop that provides resources to low-income families. The group hosted an Easter egg hunt earlier this year, Tate said, and Boquet hoped to have a backpack drive before the school year began. She aimed to one day build a park in Tacoma. 'She was outgoing, personable, made friends everywhere she went, and her kids took after her,' Tate said. 'They all just cared about everyone around them.' A GoFundMe page to help bring the bodies home and pay funeral costs had raised more than double its goal of $10,000 on Wednesday. ____ Follow Gillian Flaccus on Twitter at http://www.twitter.com/gflaccus
  • A Georgia woman who mailed a secret U.S. report to a news organization faces the 'longest sentence' ever behind bars for a federal crime involving leaks to the news media, prosecutors said in a court filing. Former National Security Agency contractor Reality Winner, 26, is scheduled to be sentenced Aug. 23 by a U.S. District Court judge in Augusta. She pleaded guilty in June to a single count of transmitting national security information when she worked as a translator at an NSA facility in Augusta. Winner's plea deal with prosecutors calls for imprisonment of five years and three months. But the sentencing judge isn't bound by that agreement. Winner's crime carries a maximum penalty of 10 years. The Trump administration has made prosecuting government employees who leak sensitive information to the media a high priority, and Attorney General Jeff Sessions pledged to clamp down on leaks last year. In a court filing Tuesday, federal prosecutors in Winner's case said the 63-month sentence they're recommending is plenty stiff to deter other government workers from leaking sensitive information, even if it could be tougher. 'The government advises the Court that despite the agreed-upon sentence being below the applicable guidelines range, it would be the longest sentence served by a federal defendant for an unauthorized disclosure to the media,' the prosecutors wrote. They cited several prior cases. Former FBI explosives expert Donald Sachtleben was sentenced in 2013 to three years and seven months in prison for leaking secret information, including intelligence he gave to The Associated Press for a story about a U.S. operation in Yemen in 2012. Former CIA officer Jeffrey Sterling in 2015 received 3 ½ years in prison for leaking details of a secret mission to thwart Iran's nuclear ambitions. CIA veteran John Kiriakou received 2 ½ years in prison in 2013 for leaking a covert officer's identity to a reporter. In Winner's case, prosecutors noted the plea deal allowed the U.S. government to avoid disclosing secret information in a public courtroom. If Winner stood trial, they said, prosecutors would have been forced to reveal the classified report she leaked and have witnesses explain its contents. 'The Intelligence Community assessed that this further disclosure of the Intelligence Report and explaining its contents would compound the exceptionally grave harm to national security already caused by the defendant,' the prosecutors' court filing said. Authorities have never described the report Winner leaked or identified the news organization that received it. The Justice Department announced Winner's June 2017 arrest the same day The Intercept published an article on a classified NSA report suggesting Russian hackers attacked a U.S. voting software supplier before the 2016 election. The NSA report was dated May 5, the same as the document Winner had leaked.
  • White House spokeswoman Sarah Huckabee Sanders says the White House values diversity, but she would not say how many black staffers there are in the West Wing. Pressed by reporters Wednesday for a specific number, Sanders said: 'I'm not going to go through and do a count.' The lack of diversity in President Donald Trump's administration has come under fresh scrutiny in the wake of a new tell-all book from former aide Omarosa Manigault Newman, who was the highest ranking African-American official on Trump's staff. Sanders added: 'We would love to diversify our staff and continue to do so.

The Latest News Headlines

  • A Missouri woman who applied for a customer service job was shocked Monday when she received an email stating that her “ghetto” name had lost her the position.  Hermeisha Robinson, 27, of Bellefontaine Neighbors, posted the email response from Mantality Heath on her Facebook page.  “Thank you for your interest in careers at Mantality Health,” the email read, according to Robinson’s post. “Unfortunately, we do not consider candidates that have suggestive ‘ghetto’ names. We wish the best in your career search.” The email was signed Jordan Kimler, a nurse practitioner with the company. According to the company’s website, Mantality Health provides treatment to men suffering from low testosterone. It has multiple locations in several states.  Robinson wrote that she was upset to be turned away from a position she felt she was well qualified for. “My feelings are very hurt and they even got me second-guessing my name, trying to figure out if my name is really that ‘ghetto,’” she wrote. “I would like for everyone to share this post because discrimination has to stop!” Share the post her friends did. As of Wednesday morning, it had been shared more than 10,000 times.  One of the people sharing Robinson’s post was her cousin, Miltina Burnett. Burnett wrote on Facebook that the response made Robinson -- who was named after her late father, Herman -- question whether she should “change her name to fit in corporate America.” “Don’t ever change who you are to become more like them,” Burnett wrote. “They had no right to say what they said to her.” The St. Louis Post-Dispatch spoke with Mantality Health owner Kevin Meuret, who on Tuesday said that the company’s email system was hacked by someone outside Missouri. Meuret said he believes the hacker may be an angry former employee.  “I’m a father of three daughters, and that young lady getting that (response) is horrible,” Meuret told the Post-Dispatch. “That young lady opened something that must have felt like a freight train, and that’s unacceptable.” Burnett shared images of private messages she received from Mantality Health employees about the alleged hacking.  Company officials believe the hacking may have been done through Indeed.com, where Robinson submitted her application. Mantality Health’s website has a statement addressing the situation. “The password for the outside job board site used by Mantality was compromised on Aug. 13, 2018,” the statement reads. “We are currently working with law enforcement to identify the perpetrator and consider appropriate legal action. We share the anger and frustration of those who received these bogus emails.” Meuret told KMOV News 4 that they believe about 20 applicants got emails similar to Robinson’s. Dorneshia Zachery was one of them, the news station reported.  “The company looked at my name and said, ‘We don’t care about what you’ve done in life; your name is going to dismiss you completely,’” Zachery told News 4.  Meuret told the news station that the emails are deplorable. “This is not a reflection of who we are as a company,” he said.  The company has gotten the Chesterfield Police Department involved in the case, as well as St. Louis County’s cybercrimes division.  “We will continue to pursue this even if it becomes a federal matter,” Meuret told the Post-Dispatch.  >> Read more trending news Indeed.com officials told News 4 that they have found no signs of hacking on their end. “Account security is of utmost importance to Indeed and something that we diligently monitor,” the company’s statement read. “Account holders are responsible for use of their password and we recommend frequent updates and complete confidentiality of your password. Our investigation into this particular account shows no evidence of compromise.” Cybersecurity experts told the Post-Dispatch that the incident was likely an internal break-in and not a “high-tech hacking event.” “If you have a guy who knows everything about the infrastructure of the company, it’s going to happen,” Jianli Pan, a cybersecurity professor at the University of Missouri-St. Louis, told the newspaper. “It’s up to the company how important it is for them to keep their systems secure. But that’s not free. It takes money and training and designating some expert to be in charge of such issues.” Companies, particularly small ones, should have a checklist of things to do when an employee leaves, according to Joe Scherrer, Washington University’s program director of graduate studies in information systems management and cybersecurity management. The checklist should include eliminating all access to email, social media and all other communication means, Scherrer told the Post-Dispatch.  “You should scrub them out of the company. I know that sounds harsh, but it’s how to prevent this from happening,” Scherrer told the newspaper. 
  • The two people filling the seats of suspended Democratic Jacksonville City Council members have now been sworn in. It was a quick ceremony Thursday, with City Council President Aaron Bowman delivering brief remarks about it being an exciting day for Jacksonville, and Ju’Coby Pittman (D) and Terrance Freeman (R) then each taking the oath of office. Both were appointed by the Governor, who previously suspended Katrina Brown and Reggie Brown, who have been federally indicted on fraud and related charges.  Pittman is the President of Clara White Mission, Inc. She is stepping in to Katrina Brown’s seat, representing District 8.  “My first thing is to meet the constituents. I want to go out, have a town meeting. I want to go to the churches, I want to go to the businesses, and just listen to what their issues are,” she says.  Freeman, the regional director for Ygrene Energy Fund, will serve the remaining term of Reggie Brown, representing District 10. Freeman lived in Mandarin, but confirms he is renting some rooms in a home in District 10, where his family of six will live so that he can represent that district.  “My first order of business- we’ll be at an HOA meeting on Monday, be at a church on Sunday, getting out and meeting people. I love meeting people and getting a chance to hear what’s important to them,” Freeman says.  Bowman welcomed them to the Council, noting that budget season is right around the corner and committee work resumes next week.  Katrina Brown and Reggie Brown have both pleaded not guilty. Their trial is tentatively slated for early September. They face charges for allegedly using shell businesses to draw down on an SBA-backed loan that was supposed to be used for Katrina Brown’s failing family BBQ sauce business. They each face additional charges, including Katrina Brown allegedly defrauding banks for loans, and Reggie Brown allegedly failing to file a tax return.
  • Just a couple of weeks before two now-suspended Jacksonville City Council members were slated to face a jury on federal charges, including fraud and money laundering, the trial has been pushed off. There was a joint motion by the government and Katrina Brown and Reggie Brown to continue the trial. It had been slated for September 4th, but is now scheduled for February 4th.  The defendants were jointly named in a 38-count federal indictment, relating to Katrina Brown’s family BBQ sauce business. The indictment says Katrina Brown did not disclose that the business was failing, and instead she and Reggie Brown used shell businesses to draw down on a federally-backed loan for the business, for work that was never done.  Katrina Brown is also charged with using fraudulent information to try to secure bank loans for the business, and Reggie Brown is also charged with not filing a tax return one year and not disclosing money he received from this alleged scheme to the IRS.  Both defendants deny any wrongdoing.  Both Democratic City Council members were suspended from the governing body, following the indictment. Governor Rick Scott has appointed Ju’Coby Pittman and Terrance Freeman are their replacements, and both have since been sworn in.
  • The Jacksonville Sheriff's Office is releasing surveillance photos of an armed robbery suspect they're working to identify. According to JSO, this suspect was caught on camera robbing Tunis Seafood, Wings, and Subs on Emerson Street, back on August 9th.  Police say he entered the business, approached the counter, and handed the employee a note demanding money. At that time, investigators say he displayed a gun. The suspect was last seen on foot, after getting cash.  If you know who this man is, you're urged to contact the sheriff's office at (904) 630-0500 or Crime Stoppers at 1-866-845-TIPS.
  • President Donald Trump is revoking former CIA Director John Brennan’s security clearance, White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders said Wednesday. >> Read more trending news The announcement came weeks after Huckabee Sanders told reporters that Trump was looking in to the process required to revoke security clearances from half a dozen former Obama administration officials.  Huckabee Sanders cited Brennan's 'erratic conduct and behavior' as the reasoning behind the revocation and accused him of 'lying' and 'wild outbursts.' Brennan has been critical of Trump, calling his performance at a joint press conference last month with Russian President Vladimir Putin in Finland 'nothing short of treasonous.' Huckabee Sanders did not say Wednesday that Brennan leveraged his security clearance for financial gain -- an allegation she levied at some former intelligence officials last month. >> Trump wants to revoke security clearances for ex-Obama intelligence officials, White House says During a July 23 news briefing, Huckabee Sanders said Trump was exploring options to remove security clearances from former officials who have “politicized and, in some cases, monetized their public service.” Huckabee Sanders said Wednesday that officials continued to look at revoking the clearances of other former officials, including former FBI Director James Comey and former FBI Deputy Director Andrew McCabe.

The Latest News Videos