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    Elizabeth Warren was paid nearly $2 million for legal work stretching back three decades, her campaign disclosed Sunday night, amid calls from a top Democratic presidential rival that the Massachusetts senator should be more forthcoming about what she earned from past corporate clients. In May, Warren released a list of close to 60 cases she worked on as an attorney going back to the 1980s. Fifteen pages of new data now shows what she was paid in nearly 40 of those — about $1.9 million. The list includes “all the income she earned from each case that we have been able to determine from public records, Elizabeth’s personal records, and other sources,” Warren spokeswoman Kristen Orthman said. “If Democrats are going to defeat Donald Trump, or whoever the Republican Party might replace him with, we must nominate a candidate who can create the most robust possible contrast against Republicans on conflicts of interest and corruption issues,” Orthman said in a statement. “Elizabeth does not sell access to her time — no closed door big dollar fundraisers, no bundling program, no perks or promises to any wealthy donor.” The new information comes against the backdrop of an escalating feud between Warren and Mayor Pete Buttigieg of South Bend, Indiana. Last week, Warren decried the mayor’s attending of closed-door fundraisers, saying, “I think that Mayor Pete should open up the doors so that anyone can come in and report on what’s being said.” She added, “No one should be left to wonder what kind of promises are being made to the people that then pony up big bucks to be in the room.” Buttigieg and his campaign shot back that Warren should release more of her past tax returns, shedding additional light on what she earned as an attorney for rich and powerful firms — setting the stage for Sunday’s disclosure. Warren had previously released 11 years of tax returns. The pair have also clashed over Buttigieg’s past work for powerful consulting firm McKinsey & Co. from 2007 to 2010. Buttigieg on Friday released a summary of the work he did — but he has not heeded Warren’s calls to make public a full client list, citing a nondisclosure agreement he signed with McKinsey. Warren’s campaign said Sunday’s disclosure provides more information on her business income than releasing additional, past tax returns would because her tax documents don’t fully itemize earnings the same way the details it released do. A steady rise in the polls throughout the summer landed Warren among the Democratic primary front-runners, but polling in recent weeks has suggested her support is plateauing or beginning to slip. At the same time, Buttigieg has seen his polling numbers improve enough to become a front-runner himself, with the lead-off Iowa caucuses now less than two months away. Among the clients for whom Warren consulted were the attorneys for Rabobank, a Dutch financial institution that became a creditor in the Enron bankruptcy; former directors of Getty Oil, who were involved in Texaco’s bankruptcy; and women whose allegations of harm from silicone breast implants produced by Dow Corning were imperiled when the company filed for bankruptcy. The cases listed involve Warren serving as a consultant, mediator or expert witness in addition to those in which she served as counsel. Her largest disclosed payday was nearly $187,000 for a case originally filed in 1995. Her campaign said Warren “represented a well-known chain of department stores to make sure that it could stay alive and pay its creditors. Elizabeth succeeded, and the company continued to employ people across its many stores.” Warren taught at Harvard Law School before being elected to the Senate in 2012.
  • It might not be indescribably beautiful, but a 20-foot-tall inflatable leg lamp is on display outside the “A Christmas Story” house. >> Read more trending news  The giant leg lamp, reminiscent of the one that brought joy to Ralphie’s dad in the classic Christmas movie, was inflated Sunday outside the Cleveland house featured in the movie. The inflatable leg lamp replaced a 20-foot inflatable Ralphie clad in an Easter bunny outfit.
  • Elizabeth Warren said Sunday she believes Americans are ready for a presidential ticket with two women at the top, rejecting concerns from some Democrats that a woman can't beat President Donald Trump. 'Sure, why not?' the Democratic presidential candidate told The Associated Press in an interview ahead of a town hall campaign event in Charleston. “I think (voters) would support a lot of different combinations.” In the aftermath of Hillary Clinton's 2016 defeat, some Democrats have expressed hesitation about nominating another woman to take on Trump in 2020. But Warren argued that women notched historic wins during the 2018 midterms, suggesting voters are worried less about gender than the message candidates are offering. Her comments come less than a week after California Sen. Kamala Harris abruptly dropped out of the race, prompting debate about whether a party that says it values diversity is shortchanging candidates of color and women. Other than Warren, the Democratic top tier is currently all male. They are also all white. Warren has said she'd consider tapping Harris as a running mate. She also told the AP she would be “open” to asking former Vice President Joe Biden to reprise his old job. “Look, it would be presumptuous of me to be talking about individuals, but I'm open to getting this right because that's what we want to do,' Warren said. 'We want to build a Democratic ticket and a stronger Democratic Party that's ready to get out there and compete at the national level, at the state level, at the local level.” Her openness to teaming with Biden is notable because the two candidates represent distinctly different visions of the Democratic Party's future. Warren has embraced calls for systemic reforms to the nation's economy and health care. Biden has urged more pragmatic approaches and has specifically rejected Warren's $20 trillion plan to transition the U.S. to a single-payer health care system as unworkable. Biden has the advantage in South Carolina, where he's leading in the polls because of his deep ties to the black community. He told the AP in October that Warren “doesn’t affect my strategy, period' in the state. But her trip to South Carolina on Sunday suggests she won't cede the state to Biden. She has upped her efforts to appeal to black voters, especially women. She delivered a well-received speech at a historically black college in Atlanta last month and a group of more than 100 black female activists endorsed her candidacy. In the interview and the town hall that followed, Warren went after her billionaire opponents, particularly former New York City Mayor Mike Bloomberg. She has decried his multimillion-dollar ad spending as a way to try to buy the election, especially considering his decision not to compete in early-voting states, including South Carolina. “The problem with the billionaires is that there's just no limit on how much they can spend. They can reach in their pockets and just spend and spend and spend,' Warren told the AP. “That means they get to buy a bigger share of democracy than anyone else, and that's a real problem.” But Warren said the problem extends to candidates willing to hold big-dollar fundraisers in lieu of relying on a small-dollar donor base, referring to recent criticism she levied against fellow Democratic hopeful Pete Buttigieg. “If the only way we're going to get a Democratic candidate is that you've either got to be a billionaire, or go suck up to the billionaires, then buckle up, because it means we're going to have a government that just keeps working better for the billionaires and not for everyone else,' Warren said. Regardless of who emerges from the crowded Democratic field, Warren said the party will have to find ways to attract Republicans who are disenchanted by Trump's presidency. “We're going to need as many Democrats as we can to build up our turnout, and we're also going to need some Republicans to help us, some Republican women, some Republican men, who are turned off by how Donald Trump behaves,” Warren said. “I think we've got a path to victory, and I think the energy and enthusiasm of women is really what's going to carry us across the finish line with a good margin.' She said women will “not only help us win the White House but, just as has been happening, help us win up and down the ticket.” ___ Meg Kinnard can be reached at http://twitter.com/MegKinnardAP
  • A “model prisoner” escaped jail Saturday while he was delivering meals to other inmates, authorities said. >> Read more trending news  Andrew J. Viles, 34, walked out of the jail around 4:30 p.m., the Chicago Tribune reported. He was wearing a dark coat, light-colored blue jeans and dark shoes. It is unclear how he got a change of clothes. Viles was jailed June 1 for burglary and violating parole for a burglary conviction but had earned the trust of those who oversaw him, the Tribune reported. “Viles had been a model inmate,” the Grundy County Sheriff’s Office told the Tribune. “He had earned the role of jail trustee within the facility. This trustee role allowed him certain privileges, including assisting with meal service.” He was apprehended Sunday and taken back into custody.
  • The Senate’s top Democrat said Sunday that congressional leaders have reached a “real breakthrough” deal to give 12 weeks of paid parental leave to millions of federal workers as part of the annual defense policy bill. Sen. Charles Schumer said the agreement over the National Defense Authorization Act was reached late Friday night and a vote is expected later this week. The establishment of President Donald Trump’s proposed Space Force is also included in the bill. Trump administration officials have said Space Force is urgently needed to preserve U.S. dominance in space. A proposal from the Pentagon released earlier this year suggested the service would have about 15,000 personnel and begin in 2020. Space Force would reside within the Air Force, similar to how the Marine Corps exists within the Navy. The must-pass bill includes a provision that would allow more than 2 million federal government workers to take paid leave to care for a new baby or for an adopted child. Parental leave was a priority for high-ranking Democrats, including Schumer and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi. The provision is a victory for federal workers, who would face benefit cuts under the Trump administration’s budget submission. Under the current federal law, civilian workers are eligible for 12 weeks of unpaid leave. “It’s a real breakthrough for families,” Schumer said, adding that Democrats hope the move will encourage more private employers to offer similar parental leave benefits. “Not only does it mean that federal employees will get what they’re entitled to, the federal government is a pacesetter,” Schumer added. “If you work for a private company, this means the pressure on your employer will be much greater to give you parental leave as well when the blessed event of a child comes around, or god forbid your child is really sick and needs serious care.” Ivanka Trump, the president's daughter and adviser, said Friday that such a provision would “mark a HUGE step forward towards making paid leave a reality for all Americans.
  • Fighting to be in the next Democratic presidential debate, Cory Booker concluded a nearly 800-mile, 12-county tour of Iowa on Sunday by criticizing the Democratic party for allowing “elites' and “money' to control who gets on stage and urging voters to offer his name when pollsters call. “Iowa never lets elites decide,' he told a crowd at his campaign office in Cedar Rapids on Sunday. “Let's let Iowa have another comeback story.” Just six candidates are qualified for the Dec. 19 debate, and Booker is not one of them. He's met the threshold of donors required to qualify but he has yet to hit the polling qualifications — either 4% support in at least four polls or 6% support in two early-state polls. The deadline is Thursday, and he's yet to hit the mark on a single poll. Booker said such measurements benefit candidates who can afford to air television ads and do not reflect the feelings of Iowa voters. Over his four-day trip, Booker frequently received standing ovations at events ranging from town halls to forums with Teamsters union members and farmers. He brought several voters close to tears, shared corny jokes and gleefully posed for photos with voters, sometimes alongside his girlfriend, actress Rosario Dawson. “I'm a little upset with the (Democratic National Committee) right now because they seem to be trying to make the decisions for you,” he told a Sunday afternoon crowd gathered in a Dubuque bar. Xochitl Hinojosa, a spokeswoman for the DNC, called the party's debate rules “inclusive' and said no candidate who has gone on to be the party's nominee has polled lower than 4% at this point in past primaries. “While we are legally required to have objective criteria for each debate, our qualifying criteria has stayed extremely low throughout this entire process,' she said in an emailed statement. “We’ve never seen a political party take this many steps to be inclusive.' As Booker seeks momentum, he's sharing a message focused far more on emotion and values than on policy and purity tests. He said his policy chops compare to any of his rivals, but it will take a leader who can help Americans see and care for each other to make progress on thorny issues like gun control and climate change. “We've lost elections with the person who had the best 15-point policy plans,” he said. “Underneath this has got to be the gut, it's got to be the heart, it's got to be who's going to to represent that spirit, who's going to get folks up and recognize that democracy is not a spectator sport.' It was a message that resonated with Renee Meyer, a former elementary school art teacher from Dubuque. “He just moves you; he wants you to rise to a higher calling and I think we all need that,' Meyer, 63, said. It was her second time seeing Booker speak. She hopes to see him on the December debate stage, but she also likes Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren and South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete Buttigieg. Sunil Malapati, a 47-year-old college chemistry teacher, said he was leaning toward caucusing for Booker but Sunday's event “more or less sealed the deal.” “There's a certain authenticity you can't fake,' he said. Booker has just four more days to see enthusiasm reflected in the polls. If he's not on stage, he has committed to campaigning in Iowa that day. Warren, Buttigieg, former Vice President Joe Biden, Sens. Bernie Sanders and Amy Klobuchar, and businessman Tom Steyer will also be onstage. It could be the party's first debate of the presidential cycle featuring all white candidates.
  • In his rise to the top tier of the Democratic race for president, Pete Buttigieg has impressed voters with his unflappable demeanor. But that moderate bearing is being tested as his opponents challenge him to reveal more about his two years working for an international consulting company. How Buttigieg handles the heat will be another measure of the durability of his improbable run, now that the mayor of South Bend, Indiana, is seen as a serious threat to front-running candidates, especially in Iowa. To date, the more intense inspection — much of it invited publicly by rival Elizabeth Warren — doesn't appear to be slowing Buttigieg's progress in Iowa, where he's attracting large, excited crowds. But with more than eight weeks until Iowans march to their caucuses, there is still time for a drumbeat to begin. “The more heat there is, I welcome that,' Buttigieg told reporters in Waterloo Friday. “We’re talking about the American presidency and you should be able to show you can handle tough decisions, tough questions.' In the face of new questions about transparency — most notably about his three years with international consulting firm McKinsey & Co. — the South Bend, Indiana, mayor says he is taking steps to provide transparency, though stopping short of revealing the clients he's legally bound to keep confidential. The new questions about Buttigieg's role at McKinsey, including some time spent working in wartime Iraq and Afghanistan, come after his November rise to the top of Democratic preference polls in Iowa and New Hampshire, where voting for the 2020 presidential nomination begins. After shying away for months from criticizing her rivals by name, Warren, a Massachusetts senator who shot to the top of Iowa polls last summer, has called on Buttigieg to release the names of his McKinsey clients, disclose his campaign's most influential donors and open his fundraisers to the news media. Now fighting to catch Buttigieg in Iowa and New Hampshire, Warren has begun mentioning him by name in the context of her campaign's central theme: ending corporate influence in public policy, especially in light of President Donald Trump's refusal to release his income tax records. “We've got a chance as Democrats to say we're going to do this a different way and that different way does not involve going behind closed doors with millionaires and billionaires,” Warren told reporters in New Hampshire Saturday. The Buttigieg campaign released the names of about two dozen fundraising bundlers for the first quarter in April, but hasn’t since then. Buttigieg has said he would consider naming more and opening fundraising events to public but declined to give a timeline for a decision. He has released tax information, and given a timeline for his work at McKinsey, describing projects he worked on without naming corporate clients. But Buttigieg declined to declined to say whether he would break the agreement should the firm deny his request to release him. “Well, then they’re putting me in a difficult position,” he said Saturday. It's a first look at how the Cinderella campaign of this onetime asterisk in the Democratic field is responding to his increasing time under the microscope. The questions appeared to have no impact on Buttigieg's weekend campaign events, which drew large and excited crowds across Democrat-rich eastern Iowa. Cathy Ondler of Cedar Rapids, who stood among 1,000 people at tiny Cornell College in Mount Vernon, Iowa, to see Buttigieg Saturday, said he spent little time at McKinsey when he was just out of college, though she was familiar with the questions. “I don't think he has anything to hide,” the 44-year-old finance director for a nonprofit group said. Ondler is considering supporting Buttigieg or Minnesota Sen. Amy Klobuchar. Former state Rep. Nate Willems, a 40-year-old labor lawyer and former state representative from Mount Vernon, doesn't expect to support Buttigieg, but said, “He's getting picked apart on Twitter, not among everyday Iowa Democrats.” Still, Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot put Buttigieg on the spot Friday, urging him to break the non-disclosure agreement to send a message in the age of Trump. “Shouldn't you break that NDA so that you have the moral authority and the high ground against somebody like Trump, who hides behind the lack of transparency to justify everything that he's doing?' the Chicago mayor asked Buttigieg during a one-on-one question session at a conference in Waterloo. “I’m going to give them a chance to do the right thing,” he replied. __ Associated Press writer Hunter Woodall in Rochester, New Hampshire, contributed to this report.
  • A petition started at Change.org is seeking to keep former NFL quarterback Michael Vick from being honored at the 2020 NFL Pro Bowl. >> Read more trending news  The creator, Joanna Lind, wrote that she “was absolutely disgusted” and asked the NFL to take “responsibility for the behavior of its current and former players.'”To honor a man who had zero regard for animals is unacceptable,' Lind wrote in the petition, which has more than 362,000 signatures. Sports Illustrated reports Vick was chosen to serve as one of the Pro Bowl captains. He served 18 months in prison in 2007, when he was found guilty of running a dogfighting ring. The 2020 Pro Bowl takes place Jan. 26 in Orlando at Camping World Stadium.
  • Fresh out of boot camp, Cameron Walters proudly told his father in Georgia during their nightly video chat that he had passed the exam qualifying him to stand watch and help secure building entrances at Naval Air Station Pensacola in Florida. When news broke the next morning of shots being fired on the base, Shane Walters called his son's cellphone repeatedly throughout the day. There was no answer. The 21-year-old airmen apprentice from Richmond Hill had been killed along with two other sailors by a gunman authorities later identified as a military aviation student from Saudi Arabia. Shane Walters told The Associated Press on Sunday that his son died standing watch at the classroom building where the shooter opened fire. “He was just looking forward to getting his wings and being a part of flying and whatever job they gave him,” Shane Walters said. “He just wanted to earn his wings. He was looking so forward to having those wings pinned on his chest.” The attack also killed 23-year-old Joshua Watson, a recent graduate of the U.S. Naval Academy from Enterprise, Alabama, and 19-year-old Airman Mohammed Sameh Haitham of St. Petersburg, Florida. Eight others were wounded. On Sunday afternoon, the caskets of the three fallen sailors were escorted aboard an aircraft, bound for Dover, Delaware. A military mortuary is based there. Funeral plans were not immediately known. “Friday's senseless act of violence took these young men from us, physically wounded eight others and the hearts of countless more,' said Rear Admiral Gary A. Mayes, the Navy's Southeast Region commander, during a Sunday news conference in Pensacola. 'On behalf of the entire Navy, I extend my sincere and deepest sympathies to the families of the sailors whose lives were taken during this heinous act.” Authorities said two sheriff's deputies were wounded and eight others were hurt before a deputy killed the gunman, identified as 2nd Lt. Mohammed Alshamrani of the Royal Saudi Air Force. Haitham's stepmother, Brenda Delgado Haitham, said Sunday that the family was still trying to come to grips with the tragedy. “I continue to speak about him in present tense because it still hasn’t sunk in that he’s no longer here,” she said in a statement to the AP. Brenda Haitham said her stepson, whom she called “Mo,” had been a star high school athlete who ran track and played basketball. “After he graduated high school, he told his father and I that he was following his mother's footsteps and join the Navy,” she said. “... Our hearts are broken, and he will be missed by many.” Watson's brother posted on Facebook that his sibling “died a hero” after giving first responders information on the shooter's location though he was mortally wounded by gunfire. 'After being shot multiple times he made it outside and told the first response team where the shooter was and those details were invaluable,' Adam Watson wrote. The Navy praised all three flight school students for their “exceptional heroism and bravery in the face of evil.' 'When confronted, they didn’t run from danger; they ran towards it and saved lives,' Capt. Tim Kinsella, the commanding officer of Naval Air Station Pensacola, said in a statement Saturday. Cameron Walters had just arrived in Pensacola after graduating from boot camp in Great Lakes, Illinois, on Nov. 22, the sailor's father said. Before enlisting, Walters had worked for a gun manufacturer headquartered near his hometown of Richmond Hill, about 20 miles (32 kilometers) outside of Savannah. Walters joined the Navy, in part, because his father had served. “Partly to follow in his dad’s footsteps, to get a better purpose in life,” Shane Walters said. “He was just that kind of kid.” He described his son as athletic, playing sports including basketball and soccer. Not surprising for a young man living near the coast, Cameron Walters also loved boating and fishing. When Walters’ birthday came around in June, his father said, the young man liked to spread out the celebration for as much as two weeks surrounding the actual day. “When it came close to his birthday, he didn’t think he should have to take out the trash. And it’s not even his birthday yet,” Shane Walters said. “We’re supposed to have a cake every night. Things like that.” ___ AP writers Tamra Lush in St. Petersburg, Florida, and Bobby Caina Calvan in Tallahassee, Florida, contributed to this story.
  • The College Football Playoff pairings were set Sunday, and for the first time since 2015, four Power 5 conference championships earned berths to the Dec. 28 games. >> Read more trending news  The CFP selection committee said top-ranked LSU will face No. 4 Oklahoma in Atlanta in the Chick-fil-A Peach Bowl at 4 p.m. EST, while No. 2 Ohio State will compete against No. 3 Clemson in the PlayStation Fiesta Bowl in Glendale, Ariz., at 8 p.m. EST, ESPN reported. The semifinal games will be televised on ESPN. The two winners will meet Jan. 13 at the Mercedes-Benz Superdome in New Orleans to determine the national champion. LSU, Ohio State and Clemson are all 13-0. Oklahoma is 12-1. LSU regained the No. 1 ranking with a convincing 37-10 victory against Georgia in the Southeastern Conference championship game Saturday. According to ESPN, the win was LSU’s fifth against an Associated Press top-10 team this season, tying a record for the most in a single season since the AP Poll was established in 1936. “Our goal was to go to the SEC championship and win it; that was one of our goals,” LSU coach Ed Orgeron told ESPN on Sunday. “... But we’re not done yet. That wasn’t our final destination. I’m very proud of our offense, I’m very proud of our defense and all our coaches, but we still have some work to do.” Ohio State extended its winning streak to 19 games by rallying past Wisconsin, 34-21, in the Big Ten championship game Saturday. Clemson cruised past Virginia 62-17 in the Atlantic Coast Conference championship game. Oklahoma needed overtime to defeat Baylor, 30-23, in the Big 12 championship game, KOKI-TV reported.

The Latest News Headlines

  • Police in Titusville, Florida, said a man was arrested after a 9-year-old girl was accidentally shot Saturday afternoon. >> Read more trending news  Police said Titusville resident Dustin Adkins, 34, was arrested and is now facing charges including aggravated child neglect with great bodily harm and possession of a firearm by a convicted felon. Adkins is on probation for manslaughter involving the shooting death of a child, police said. The shooting occurred as four young juveniles were with an adult relative target shooting in the woods near State Road 407 and I-95, authorities said. Police said that at some point, the adult left the children unsupervised, and the 9-year-old girl was shot by a sibling accidentally while the sibling was shooting at a target. 'It is outrageous that this adult provided firearms and ammunition to these young children,' said Deputy Chief Todd Hutchinson. 'Especially given his past arrest and conviction.' Police said the family transported the child to the hospital. The child was critically injured and is in stable condition, officers said. After a lengthy search, officers found several firearms on a trail hidden under a disposed tire in the wooded area, officials said. No other details were made available.
  • An Arkansas officer was killed in a shooting outside the Fayetteville Police Department on Saturday night, authorities said. >> Read more trending news  Update, 11:22 a.m. EST Dec. 8: Fayetteville police Chief Mike Reynolds identified the officer who was shot and killed outside the Fayetteville Police Department on Saturday night and also identified the shooter, KFSM reported. Reynolds said Officer Stephen Carr was alone in the parking lot waiting for his partner when the suspect, London T. Phillips, 35, approached and fatally shot him, the television station reported. Original story: According to a Fayetteville police news release, the shooting occurred just after 9:40 p.m. in the parking lot behind the police station. Officers in the building heard gunfire and rushed outside to find their colleague down and the suspected shooter fleeing, the release said. Police then chased the suspect, who exchanged fire with officers in a nearby alley, KTHV reported. The suspect was shot, authorities said. The officer and suspect both died from their injuries, according to the news release. Officials have not released the name of the slain officer or suspected shooter. No further information was immediately available. Read more here or here.
  • A suspect died Friday morning after opening fire at Florida’s Naval Air Station Pensacola, killing at least three people and injuring seven others. >> Read more trending news  Authorities said the shooting was reported just before 7 a.m. local time in a classroom building at NAS Pensacola. Responding deputies with the Escambia County Sheriff’s Office exchanged gunfire with the suspected shooter, killing him, officials said. Here are the latest updates: Update 3:42 p.m. EST Dec. 8: Officials are still trying to determine whether Ahmed Mohammed al-Shamrani acted alone or was part of a terrorist group Friday when he opened fire at Florida’s Naval Air Station Pensacola, The Washington Post reported. Rachel Rojas, the special agent in charge of the FBI’s Jacksonville division, said at a news conference that the agency’s main goal is to determine whether the Saudi air force lieutenant worked as “part of a larger network,” the newspaper reported. Rojas said Shamrani’s weapon, a 9mm Glock, was purchased legally, but she did not describe how Shamrani obtained it and brought it onto the base, according to the Post. Update 10:38 p.m. EST Dec. 7: The third victim of the Naval Air Station Pensacola shooting was identified as Cameron Scott Walters, 21, of Richmond Hill Georgia. “The Sailors that lost their lives in the line of duty and showed exceptional heroism and bravery in the face of evil,” Capt. Tim Kinsella, commanding officer at the installation, said in a release. 'When confronted, they didn’t run from danger; they ran towards it and saved lives. If not for their actions, and the actions of the Naval Security Force that were the first responders on the scene, this incident could have been far worse.” Update 9:58 p.m. EST Dec. 7: Two of the three victims in the deadly shooting at Naval Air Station Pensacola were identified. Mohammed “Mo” Haitham, of St. Petersburg, Florida, was killed as he tried to stop the shooter, The Tampa Bay Times reported. Haitham, 19, joined the Navy after graduating high school last year. He was assigned to flight crew training and was expected to graduate later this month. “He said he was going to get his flight jacket for Christmas,” his mother, Evelyn Brady, who also served in the Navy, told the Times. Update 3:08 p.m. EST Dec. 7: Authorities said Mohammed Saeed Ashamrani, the Saudi student who fatally shot three people at Florida’s Naval Air Station Pensacola hosted a dinner party earlier in the week, and he and three other people watched videos of mass shootings, The Associated Press reported Saturday. The official was briefed by federal investigators, according to the AP. Rep. Matt Gaetz, R-Florida, whose district includes the Pensacola area, tweeted he received condolences from Saudi Ambassador Reema Al-Saud, WEAR-TV reported. Update 11:05 a.m. EST Dec. 7: Family members identified one of the victims fatally shot at Florida’s Naval Air Station Pensacola, the Pensacola News Journal reported Saturday. Joshua Kaleb Watson, 23, a recent graduate of the U.S. Naval Academy who reported to Pensacola two weeks ago, was one of the three people killed during Friday’s shooting, the newspaper reported. Watson’s brother, Adam Johnson, confirmed the death in a Facebook post, the News Journal reported “Joshua Kaleb Watson saved countless lives today with his own,” Adam Johnson wrote Friday night. ”After being shot multiple times he made it outside and told the first response team where the shooter was and those details were invaluable. 'He died a hero and we are beyond proud but there is a hole in our hearts that can never be filled.” Watson’s father, Benjamin Watson, told the News Journal his son was the officer on deck at the time of the shooting. Joshua Watson was shot at least five times, his father told the newspaper. Update 11:05 a.m. EST Dec. 7: Family members identified one of the victims fatally shot at Florida’s Naval Air Station Pensacola, the Pensacola News Journal reported Saturday. Joshua Kaleb Watson, 23, a recent graduate of the U.S. Naval Academy who reported to Pensacola two weeks ago, was one of the three people killed during Friday’s shooting, the newspaper reported. Watson’s brother, Adam Johnson, confirmed the death in a Facebook post, the News Journal reported. Update 9:30 p.m. EST Dec. 6: The shooter has been identified as Mohammed Saeed Alshamrani according to WKRG. He is one of hundreds of international military members who are receiving training there. In a news conference Friday night, the FBI declined to comment on his possible motivations. “There are many reports circulating, but the FBI deals only in facts,” said Rachel L. Rojas, the FBI’s special agent in charge of the Jacksonville Field Office. “This is still very much an active and ongoing investigation.” Update 2:25 p.m. EST Dec. 6: Authorities declined to confirm the identity of the person who shot several people Friday morning at Naval Air Station Pensacola, killing three people before being shot and killed by deputies. “I think there’s obviously going to be a lot of questions about this indivdual being a foreign national, being a part of the Saudi Air Force and then to be here training on our soil and to do this,” Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis said Friday morning at a news conference. “The FBI is working with (the Department of Defense), they’re working with (the Florida Department of Law Enforcement), they’re working with Escambia County sheriff’s to answer those questions.” DeSantis said he spoke earlier Friday with President Donald Trump. “One of the things that I talked to the president about is given that this was a foreign national in the employ of a foreign service ... obviously the government of Saudi Arabia needs to make things better for the victims,' DeSantis said. 'I think that they, they are going to owe a debt here, given that this was one of their individuals.” Authorities confirmed at a news conference that the suspect used a handgun in Friday’s shooting. Capt. Tim Kinsella, commanding officer of NAS Pensacola, said the suspect was at NAS Pensacola for aviation training. Earlier in the day, deputies said the suspect opened fire just before 7 a.m. local time in a classroom building at NAS Pensacola. Authorities continue to investigate. Update 1:45 p.m. EST Dec. 6: Authorities in Pensacola are expected to provide an update Friday afternoon on the investigation into the deadly shooting at Naval Air Station Pensacola that left four people dead. Update 1:20 p.m. EST Dec. 6: President Donald Trump said Friday afternoon that he’s spoken to Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis and received a full briefing on the deadly shooting at Naval Air Station Pensacola. “My thoughts and prayers are with the victims and their families during this difficult time,” Trump said. “We are continuing to monitor the situation as the investigation is ongoing.” Update 12:50 p.m. EST Dec. 6: An official told The Associated Press that the person who opened fire Friday at Naval Air Station Pensacola, killing three people and wounding several others before being shot and killed by authorities, was an aviation student from Saudi Arabia. Authorities are investigating to determine whether the shooting was terrorism-related, according to the AP. Military from around the globe attend the Naval Air Station in Pensacola. Authorities are expected to hold a news conference at 12:30 p.m. local time Friday to update the public on the investigation. Update 11:50 a.m. EST Dec. 6: Authorities expect to hold a news conference at 12 p.m. local time Friday to provide more updates on the shooting that left four people dead at Naval Air Station Pensacola.  Update 11:05 a.m. EST Dec. 6: Authorities said a total of 11 people were injured or killed in Friday morning’s shooting, including the suspected shooter. The injured included two responding deputies with the Escambia County Sheriff’s Office, Sheriff David Morgan said Friday at a news conference. One deputy was shot in the arm and the other was shot in the knee, Morgan said. They were both expected to survive. Morgan described walking through the scene left by Friday’s attack as being similar to “being in a movie.” “You just don’t expect this to happen here at home,” he said. Authorities continue to investigate. Update 10:45 a.m. EST Dec. 6: Officials are holding a news conference to update the public on Friday morning’s deadly shooting at Naval Air Station Pensacola. Update 10:25 a.m. EST Dec. 6: Vice President Mike Pence said he’s monitoring the situation in Florida after a shooting left two victims and a suspect dead at Naval Air Station Pensacola. “Praying for the victims & their families,” Pence wrote Friday morning in a Twitter post. “We commend the first responders for their swift action in taking down the shooter & getting those on base to safety.”  Update 10:20 a.m. EST Dec. 6: White House officials said President Donald Trump has been briefed on the deadly shooting reported Friday morning at Naval Air Station Pensacola.  Update 10:15 a.m. EST Dec. 6: Officials with Naval Air Station Pensacola said the base will closed for the day Friday after a shooting left three people dead earlier in the day. Authorities said at least three people, including the suspected shooter, were killed in the incident. Reports indicated at least eight other people were wounded in the shooting. The incident happened two days after authorities said a U.S. sailor shot and killed two civilian employees before turning the gun on himself at the Pearl Harbor Naval Shipyard. One other person was injured in that shooting. Naval Air Station Pensacola employs more than 16,000 military and 7,400 civilian personnel, according to officials. Update 10:10 a.m. EST Dec. 6: Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Florida, said his office has been in “close contact with all the relevant officials & closely monitoring events” after a shooter opened fire at Naval Air Station Pensacola on Friday morning, killing two people. Authorities said the shooter also died. “Please pray for everyone impacted by this horrible situation,” Rubio said in a Twitter post. Update 10 a.m. EST Dec. 6: A spokesman at Ascension Sacred Heart Hospital told CNN that hospital officials expected to get three patients who had been injured in Friday morning’s shooting, down from the six expected earlier in the day. Hospital spokesman Mike Burke told the news network most victims were taken to Baptist Hospital because of its proximity to the base. Kathy Bowers, a spokeswoman for Baptist Hospital, earlier told the Pensacola News Journal that the hospital had received five patients wounded in Friday’s shooting. Update 9:45 a.m. EST Dec. 6: Officials with the U.S. Navy have confirmed that a second person has died after a shooter opened fire Friday morning at Naval Air Station Pensacola.  Update 9:35 a.m. EST Dec. 6: Officials told the Pensacola News Journal two people were confirmed dead after Friday morning’s shooting, in addition to the shooter. Naval officials previously said at least one person had been killed. Update 9:20 a.m. EST Dec. 6: At least 11 people were hospitalized in the immediate aftermath of Friday’s deadly shooting, according to The Associated Press. Ascension Sacred Heart spokesman Mike Burke told the AP six people were taken to the hospital after a shooter opened fire at Naval Air Station Pensacola early Friday. The Pensacola News Journal previously reported five other people were taken to Baptist Hospital with injuries. Naval officials said at least one victim was killed in Friday’s shooting. Authorities continue to investigate. Update 9:10 a.m. EST Dec. 6: Officials with the U.S. Navy said at least one person died Friday morning in a shooting at Naval Air Station Pensacola in Florida. Authorities said the suspected shooter was also dead Friday morning. Update 9 a.m. EST Dec. 6: An official with Baptist Hospital told the Pensacola News Journal five patients were taken to the hospital after Friday morning’s reported shooting. Authorities continue to investigate. Update 8:55 a.m. EST Dec. 6: Authorities with the Escambia County Sheriff’s Office said a suspected shooter was dead Friday morning at Naval Air Station Pensacola. Original report: Authorities are responding Friday morning to reports of shots fired at Naval Air Station Pensacola, according to base officials. Authorities at NAS Pensacola said both gates to the base were closed Friday morning as authorities investigated. Officials with the U.S. Navy said the base was on lockdown around 7:45 a.m. local time. A spokeswoman for ECSO told the Pensacola News Journal deputies were working to “take down” what was described as an active shooter around 7:30 a.m. local time. Officials with the Escambia County Sheriff’s Office told WEAR-TV injuries were reported. Details on the number of people wounded and the extent of their injuries was not immediately available. The Associated Press contributed to this report. Check back for updates to this developing story.
  • For the people who work for Cure Violence, their mission is personal. Rod Lawson told Action News Jax he lost a brother and nephew back-to-back to gun violence.  “I know the pain it brings to the family,” he said. “I know the pain we’re still going through.”  Anthony Smith said he’s experienced the same pain – on the job.  “When I went to the shooting response, I found out it was my family member, my nephew, is the one that got shot that was lying in the house dead,” he said.  Lawson and Smith are among 15 violence interrupters that go into neighborhoods to try to stop retaliation.  In the six months since Cure Violence rolled out in Jacksonville, the city says interrupters mediated 52 conflicts in the streets.  The city says they stopped 37 shootings, 11 of which they believe would’ve been deadly.  “That’s them working with two parties that have a conflict and getting them to resolve that peacefully,” Damian Cook said.  Cook is the Cure Violence implementation director. Action News Jax asked Cook if the city considers Cure Violence a success, despite all the recent shootings. That includes 11 just this week.  “We are seeing the results. It would’ve been much worse, unfortunately. That’s what we see from this,” he said.  He and the men working on the front lines to stop the violence say changes won’t come overnight.  “It’s gonna work, and their minds are changing,” Smith said. “I understand how you feel but we don’t need to take the initiative to retaliate on anybody. Let’s stop it right now and let’s move forward.”  Lawson said if he can help save at least one life, that means a lot to him.  “We just started up. Just give us time. We can’t stop everything. I can’t stop everything. Just give us time, and we need people to help us too,” he said.  Action News Jax also talked with a UF Health Jacksonville trauma surgeon who treats a lot of shooting victims.  She said they’re working on adding another person to the Cure Violence team who would respond directly to the hospital after a shooting.
  • A new 5G cell phone tower in Ponte Vedra Beach continues to cause outrage and alarm. Action News Jax first told you in May when Bolles parents pushed back because they said the tower was too close to campus.  Action News Jax learned the Planning and Zoning Agency approved new plans to move it away from the school and onto the south side of the property.  The relocation area is 1,315 feet SSW of the previously-approved location, approximately 1,465 feet from the Bolles School, and 925 feet from the nearest residential structure.  Peter Kemp lives in the Woodlands Creek neighborhood and said neighbors are upset.  “Now they’re just punting it over to our side,” Kemp said.'  Kemp said parents are afraid of potential health risks.  “If it’s a concern for Bolles it should be concerned for residence in this neighborhood too,” Kemp said.  He said it’s also an eyesore.  “People might not want to buy this neighborhood and decrease our value of our property,” Kemp said.  Kemp said neighbors plan to appeal the decision.

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