On Air Now

Listen Now

Weather

cloudy-day
76°
Thunderstorms
H 77° L 73°
  • cloudy-day
    76°
    Current Conditions
    Thunderstorms. H 77° L 73°
  • partly-cloudy-tstorms-day
    79°
    Afternoon
    Thunderstorms. H 77° L 73°
  • partly-cloudy-tstorms-day
    78°
    Evening
    Sct Thunderstorms. H 79° L 74°
Listen
Pause
Error

The latest top stories

00:00 | 00:00

Listen
Pause
Error

The latest traffic report

00:00 | 00:00

Listen
Pause
Error

The latest forecast

00:00 | 00:00

Top National Stories

    Stormy weather is threatening to delay SpaceX’s first astronaut launch. A SpaceX rocket is scheduled to blast off Wednesday afternoon from Kennedy Space Center, carrying a Dragon capsule with NASA astronauts Doug Hurley and Bob Behnken to the International Space Station. It will be the first time astronauts launch from Florida in nine years and a first for a private company. The manager of NASA's commercial crew program, Kathy Lueders, said everything was progressing well — at least on the ground. “Now the only thing we need to do is figure out how to control the weather,” she said Monday evening as rain continued to drench the area. “We're continuing to be vigilant and careful and make sure we do this right.” Forecasters put the odds of acceptable launch weather at 40%. But that doesn’t include the conditions all the way up the U.S. and Canadian coasts and across the sea to Ireland — a complicated mix of measurements unique to the Dragon crew capsule. The Dragon’s emergency escape system can kick in, if necessary, all the way to orbit. If that happens, the capsule will need relatively calm wind and seas in which to splash down. SpaceX will have at least two recovery ships deployed off Florida, and NASA will have two military cargo planes ready to take off. Additional planes will be stationed in New York and England to assist with a potential water rescue, according to Lueders. Hans Koenigsmann, a vice president for SpaceX, said the launch control team will incorporate global weather patterns and models to determine whether it's safe to launch. “If the weather gods are working with us,' he said, liftoff will occur at 4:33 p.m. SpaceX has a split-second launch window. The good news is that the tropical weather headed toward Cape Canaveral should be gone in a couple days, with conditions also improving up the Eastern Seaboard later in the week. If SpaceX doesn't launch Wednesday, its next attempt would be Saturday. ___ The Associated Press Health and Science Department receives support from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute’s Department of Science Education. The AP is solely responsible for all content.
  • On a day when Americans honor veterans, a Florida man got a double treat -- a parade to honor his military service and his 90th birthday, which fell on Memorial Day this year. Vincent Delmore, who served in the U.S. Army Air Corps, was expecting a quiet birthday since most of his family lives in his native Connecticut, the Naples Daily News reported. Family and friends had different ideas, organizing a parade of patrol cars and friends through his neighborhood. Family members showed up, too. “It was a complete surprise,” Delmore told the Daily News in a telephone call. “I don’t know how many (patrol) cars there were with lights on.” Family members living in Tampa and Orlando made the drive to southwest Florida to visit. It was exciting for the 90-year-old man, who joked about his age to the Daily News. “Make sure not to put my picture in the obituary section,” he told the newspaper.
  • A UPS driver made an Oklahoma woman’s Memorial Day weekend when he delivered a package to her home in Mayes County. Video from Chelsie Ashley’s front door in Adair shows the driver deliver her a package and notice her American flag, displayed on the front of her home, had rolled up in the wind. The driver stopped on his way off her porch to unravel it, leaving it flowing right through the breeze again. Ashley said she was getting ready for the day and checked the app on her phone to see who was at her door as he was leaving. “He didn’t know anyone was watching him, but he just did it just to do it,' Ashley told KOKI-TV. “I thought it was so cool what he was doing when no one was looking.' Ashley told KOKI it was important to have something uplifting and positive right now, and shared the video on her Facebook page.
  • California churches can resume in-person services but worshippers will be limited to 100 people and they should wear masks, avoid sharing prayer books and skip the collection plate under state guidelines released Monday. The California Department of Public Health released a framework under which county health departments can approve the reopening of churches, mosques, synagogues and other houses of worship that have mostly shuttered their doors since Gov. Gavin Newsom’s March stay-at-home order designed to slow the spread of the coronavirus. The guidelines also urge houses of worship to avoid large gatherings for holidays, weddings and funerals and warn that activities such as singing or group recitation — which are intrinsic to many faith gatherings — “negate” the safety benefits of social distancing. Worshippers have been eagerly awaiting their turn after Newsom began relaxing constraints on stores and other secular outlets as part of a four-phase plan to reopen California’s economy, saying progress is being made in reducing the spread of COVID-19. Some 47 of 58 counties have received permission to move deeper into the reopening by meeting state standards for controlling the virus. The state on Monday cleared the way for in-store shopping to resume statewide with social distancing restrictions, although counties get to make their own choices of whether to permit it. Churches are included in the next phase of the reopening plan, which could come in the next few weeks. But several thousand churches have vowed to defy the current stay-at-home order for May 31, which is Pentacost, a major holiday for many Christians. As of Monday, California had at least 94,558 confirmed cases of COVID-19, more than 3,000 hospitalizations and 3,795 deaths.
  • Elon Musk and Grimes tweaked their baby’s unusual name -- but not by much. Musk, the CEO of Tesla, and Grimes, a singer, decided to comply with California health codes and the state constitution, which says only the 26 alphabetical characters of the English language can be used, USA Today reported. Sunday on Instagram, Grimes told her followers that the couple had slightly changed their son’s name from “X Æ A-12” to “X Æ A-Xii.” “Roman numerals,” Grimes said. “Looks better tbh ... one dash is allowed.” Musk shared photos of his newborn son on May 5, a day after Grimes gave birth, People reported. After the couple announced the boy’s name, California officials said the unusual name was not allowed. “A name like ‘X Æ A-12’ would not be allowed,” Matt Conens, of the Office of Public Affairs of the California Department of Public Health, wrote in an email to USA Today. “Vital records must be completed with the 26 alphabetical characters of the English language and appropriate punctuation such as hyphens, apostrophes, periods, and commas.” Those rules are spelled out in the department’s handbook. So, what does the baby’s name mean? Grimes, whose real name is Claire Elise Boucher, said the 'X' stands for “the unknown variable,” CNN reported. 'Æ' is the Elven spelling of AI, or shorthand for artificial intelligence and the word for “love” in several languages, including Japanese. “A-12 = precursor to SR-17 (our favorite aircraft). No weapons, no defenses, just speed. Great in battle, but non-violent,” Grimes said. The 'A' in the name also represents “Archangel,” which is Grimes’ favorite song, CNN reported.
  • The Trump administration’s new strategy for coronavirus testing puts much of the burden on states while promising to provide supplies such as swabs and material to transport specimens. The plan, which was delivered Sunday to members of Congress, drew harsh criticism Monday from Democrats. In a joint letter, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, Senate Democratic leader Chuck Schumer, New Jersey Rep. Frank Pallone Jr. and Washington Sen. Patty Murray said the administration “still does not have a serious plan for increasing testing to stop the spread of the virus.” The report comes as the U.S. death toll from the pandemic is approaching 100,000. President Donald Trump, who has been eager to revive the economy by loosening coronavirus-related restrictions, vowed Monday, “Together we will vanquish the virus and America will rise from this crisis to new and even greater heights.” The 81-page document from the Department of Health and Human Services says, “State plans must establish a robust testing program that ensures adequacy of COVID-19 testing, including tests for contact tracing, and surveillance of asymptomatic persons to determine community spread.” It says the federal government will “ensure that States have the collection supplies that they need through December 2020.” To that end, the administration plans to acquire and distribute 100 million swabs and 100 million tubes of viral transport media. The HHS document, which The Washington Post first reported, recommends that all states “have an objective of testing a minimum of 2 percent of their population in May and June.” The Democratic lawmakers, who released the HHS report along with their joint letter, said it “confirms that President Trump’s national testing strategy is to deny the truth that there aren’t enough tests and supplies, reject responsibility and dump the burden onto the states.” “The Trump Administration still does not take any responsibility for ramping up our nation’s testing capacity, instead pushing the burden onto the states — forcing states to compete with each other to procure vital supplies to administer tests from the private market,” the lawmakers wrote. They also called on Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell to act on the $3 trillion virus release package passed earlier this month by the House, saying it would “deliver a clear strategy and $75 billion for the testing and contact tracing necessary to stop the spread of this vicious virus.”
  • Two people were killed early Monday after a car crashed into a Houston motel and caught fire, authorities said. The vehicle slammed into the Super 8 Motel in northern Harris County near the North Freeway around 1:45 a.m., KTRK reported. The crash left a large hole and extensive damage in the front office of the motel, police said. “The guy went off the road and crashed right into the hotel,” Chris Young, who witnessed the crash, told KRPC. Harris County Precinct 4 investigators said it appeared the car flipped onto its side before hitting the building, according to KHOU. It was not clear if both victims were in the car or staying at the motel, the television station reported. However, some witnesses told KRPC the victims were in the sedan. The motel manager also said the people in the car had been killed, KTRK reported. The motel manager told KTRK that no employees were injured, although a clerk was standing behind the counter when the crash occurred. The manager said the motel’s sprinkler system prevented the fire from spreading, the television station reported. “Once they actually got (the fire) put out, we could see the back portion of the vehicle that was actually in the lobby,” Young told KPRC.
  • Richard Branson's Virgin Orbit failed Monday in its first test launch of a new rocket carried aloft by a Boeing 747 and released over the Pacific Ocean off the coast of Southern California. The inaugural launch had appeared to be going well until moments after the rocket was dropped from beneath the left wing of the jumbo jet dubbed Cosmic Girl. “We’ve confirmed a clean release from the aircraft. However, the mission terminated shortly into the flight. Cosmic Girl and our flight crew are safe and returning to base,” Virgin Orbit said in its official Twitter commentary on the launch. There was no immediate word on what went wrong with the rocket, which carried a test satellite. Will Pomerantz, Virgin Orbit’s vice president for special projects, commented during a preflight briefing Saturday that about half of first rocket launches fail. “History is not terribly kind, necessarily, to maiden flights,” he said. Chief Executive Officer Dan Hart said during the briefing that there had been numerous tests, discussions and introspection to verify that the system was ready. “In the end the questions are always, has everything been thought about and are there any gaps or seams, and those are the questions you only learn when you commit to flight,” Hart said. The highly modified jumbo jet took off from Mojave Air and Space Por t in the desert north of Los Angeles and flew out just beyond the Channel Islands, where the drop occurred. The rocket was supposed to fall for a few seconds before the first of its two stages ignited and hurtled it down the coast toward the South Pole for insertion of its demonstration payload into a low Earth orbit. The purpose of the flight was to gather data on every step of the launch process rather than to have a useful satellite in orbit; the demonstration payload was described as an inert mass and the intended orbit was very low to avoid contributing to the problem of space junk. The attempt followed five years of development of the 70-foot-long (21.3 meter) LauncherOne rocket. How long the setback will affect the company was not immediately clear. It has six additional rockets under construction in its factory. “The team’s already hard at work digging into the data, and we’re eager to hop into our next big test ASAP,” the company tweeted. “Thankfully, instead of waiting until after our 1st flight to tackle our 2nd rocket, we’ve already completed a ton of work to get us back in the air and keep moving forward.” A successful launch by Virgin Orbit would have marked a dramatic step in getting back on track after the coronavirus pandemic sent most employees home earlier this year while work spaces, procedures and mission control were adjusted. Virgin Orbit is targeting the market for launching satellites ranging in size from toasters to household refrigerators. The time is right for the small satellite launch market, Hart said on Saturday. Technology advancements have enabled satellites much smaller than traditional payloads to do “real work” in space, typically from low Earth orbit, and for markets ranging from commercial to national security, he said. While other companies are developing rockets for the small satellite market and builders of big rockets like SpaceX can carry them into orbit in a ride-share arrangement with large satellites, Virgin Orbit’s air launch system based on the aviation industry’s workhorse 747 is intended to put a satellite up when and where a customer needs it, Hart said. “We can fly to space from any place that can host a 747, which is almost any place,” he said. Virgin Orbit says it has dozens of missions on the books for customers including the U.S. Space Force and the Royal Air Force. Internationally, it is working on plans for launches from the United Kingdom and Japan. Hart did not provide a specific dollar value for the missions it has on the books but characterized it as “hundreds of millions.” Air launch technology dates back decades, including use by X-15 rocket planes in the 1950s and ’60s. For satellites the method is currently in use by what is now Northrop Grumman’s Pegasus rocket program, which has had several dozen launches since 1990. Virgin Orbit, headquartered in Long Beach, California, began as a sister company of Virgin Galactic but has since separated. Virgin Galactic is preparing to begin flights carrying passengers into the lower reaches of space from southern New Mexico.
  • A lawyer for the family of a Connecticut murder suspect pleaded Monday for his surrender as police involved in a multi-state search for the 23-year-old college student circulated a photo of a person matching his description walking along railroad tracks in Pennsylvania. Peter Manfredonia, a University of Connecticut senior, is suspected of killing Ted DeMers, 62, and Nicholas Eisele, 23, before forcing Eisele's girlfriend into her car and fleeing the state with her. The woman, 23, was located Sunday at a rest stop near Paterson, New Jersey, with her 2016 Volkswagen Jetta, police said, and was not hurt. Manfredonia, who is believed to be armed with several guns stolen during a home invasion, was last seen Sunday wearing a white T-shirt, dark shorts and carrying a large duffel bag near train tracks in East Stroudsburg, Pennsylvania. Paterson is about a 90-minute drive from Derby. East Stroudsburg is about an hour farther west on Interstate 80. A lawyer for Manfredonia's family, Mike Dolan, said the suspect has struggled with mental health issues and has “sought the help of a number of therapists.' “Peter, if you are listening, you are loved,” Dolan said at a news conference Monday. “It is time to let the healing process begin. It’s time to surrender. You have your parents’ and your sisters’ and your family’s entire support. So, Peter, from your parents, we love you, please turn yourself in.” Connecticut State Police plan to hold a press conference Tuesday. Manfredonia, a finance and mechanical engineering major from Sandy Hook, is suspected of killing DeMers and assaulting another man, possibly with a sword or machete, in Willington on Friday after they found Manfredonia walking along a road and offered him a ride back to his motorcycle. The second victim, Nicholas Eisele, was found dead at his home Sunday in Derby, which is about 60 miles (96 kilometers) southwest of Willington and just west of New Haven. Eisele, a 2016 Newtown High School graduate, worked with his father in a landscaping and irrigation business. State police described him as an acquaintance of Manfredonia's. Earlier on Sunday, a Willington man reported being held against his will by Manfredonia, who then left with food, several guns and the man’s truck, which was later found abandoned near Osbornedale State Park, about a mile from Eisele's home. Eisele's family set up an online fundraiser to help cover funeral expenses and far exceeded the goal of $10,000 in just a few hours. On the page, friends and family shared memories, including his love of his mother's German shepherds, Trooper and Sandy.
  • An Iowa woman is accused of trying to stab a cat with a kitchen knife and then trying to drown it, authorities said. Rosemary Kay Buelow, 21, of Des Moines, was charged with animal torture in connection with the Sunday morning incident, the Des Moines Register reported. Police officers responded to a call at 2 a.m. Sunday, the newspaper reported. Buelow told police her “aggressive” cat had bitten her while she was showering and she stabbed the animal in self-defense. Des Moines Police Department Sgt. Paul Parizek told the Register. “Officers discovered serious inconsistencies and, upon further investigation, learned that Buelow had stabbed the cat, and then attempted to drown it because she didn’t want to care for it anymore and she did not believe that any shelter would take the cat,” Parizek told the newspaper. According to a criminal complaint, Buelow allegedly stabbed the cat three times in the back before attempting to drown the animal in a bathtub. The condition of the cat was unknown. Buelow was being held at the Polk County Jail on a $2,000 bond, the Register reported.

The Latest News Headlines

  • On a day when Americans honor veterans, a Florida man got a double treat -- a parade to honor his military service and his 90th birthday, which fell on Memorial Day this year. Vincent Delmore, who served in the U.S. Army Air Corps, was expecting a quiet birthday since most of his family lives in his native Connecticut, the Naples Daily News reported. Family and friends had different ideas, organizing a parade of patrol cars and friends through his neighborhood. Family members showed up, too. “It was a complete surprise,” Delmore told the Daily News in a telephone call. “I don’t know how many (patrol) cars there were with lights on.” Family members living in Tampa and Orlando made the drive to southwest Florida to visit. It was exciting for the 90-year-old man, who joked about his age to the Daily News. “Make sure not to put my picture in the obituary section,” he told the newspaper.
  • QUICK FACTS:  On a rainy Memorial Day, some families would have considered the movie theater for entertainment. But in Florida, movies theaters cannot fully reopen yet.  A Jacksonville movie theater, Sun-Ray Cinema in Five Points, is offering a new program to continue serving guests.  Watch the video below to learn about the program that allows for a controlled environment, social distancing and entertainment with family and friends.
  • A UPS driver made an Oklahoma woman’s Memorial Day weekend when he delivered a package to her home in Mayes County. Video from Chelsie Ashley’s front door in Adair shows the driver deliver her a package and notice her American flag, displayed on the front of her home, had rolled up in the wind. The driver stopped on his way off her porch to unravel it, leaving it flowing right through the breeze again. Ashley said she was getting ready for the day and checked the app on her phone to see who was at her door as he was leaving. “He didn’t know anyone was watching him, but he just did it just to do it,' Ashley told KOKI-TV. “I thought it was so cool what he was doing when no one was looking.' Ashley told KOKI it was important to have something uplifting and positive right now, and shared the video on her Facebook page.
  • The annual Memorial Day observance at the Jacksonville National Cemetery gives families the chance to pay tribute to their fallen heroes. The ceremony looked a lot different this year because of COVID-19.  Valerie Burks was among hundreds who came to the cemetery to honor those who made the ultimate sacrifice.  “This is a special day for us just to thank them,” said Burks.  The day holds a special meaning for her family. Her son Samuel L. Banks who served in the U.S. Army died in 2006.  “It’s been over six years; my son was 29 when he died of leukemia and he had done two tours in Iraq,” Burks added.  For many who served this holiday is personal.  “Sometimes the masks are getting wet because of tears so a lot of emotions being showed,” said U.S. Army veteran Roosevelt Knight Jr.  “This is something that we all should get out and support and continue to support,” explained Navy veteran Ace Wright.  Burks says military service is what her son wanted to do  “He was a very dedicated father and loved the military,” Burks said.  Now in the years after his death, she still carries his picture in her phone.  “He was tall and a very big guy. He loved momma’s cooking,” said Burks.  The flyover that was supposed to happen Monday afternoon got canceled because of the weather.
  • An appointment to get stimulus money from the City of Jacksonville, but no one to help. That’s what several people ran into Monday when they were scheduled to pick up their money, but did not know they had to reschedule because of the Memorial Day holiday.  To get the stimulus money, there is a process people have to go through. The preloaded card can be picked up by appointment only.  People like Cher Jamison are frustrated they were allowed to make an appointment on a holiday when everything is closed.  “I’m in line with about eight other people, nobody is here. Call the library, but nobody is answering because it’s a holiday,” Jamison said while standing in the rain.  Bernando Santana, who waited Monday morning, discovered an email from Sunday to reschedule when it was too late.  “An email the day before, and on a Sunday. I don’t check my emails on the weekend,” Santana said.  Santana and Jamison made their appointments weeks ago. They were given a confirmation to show up at 10 a.m. on Memorial Day.  They were instructed to go to the Ed Ball Building, but there was a sign on that door instructing people to go to the library.  Action News Jax reached out to the city to ask why these appointments were made in the first place and to ask if any emails were sent before the 24th.  “The city expects you to do your part, but they didn’t really go out of their way as far as I’m concerned,” Jamison said.

The Latest News Videos