On Air Now

Listen Now

Weather

cloudy-day
46°
Clear
H 55° L 37°
  • cloudy-day
    46°
    Current Conditions
    Clear. H 55° L 37°
  • clear-night
    48°
    Evening
    Clear. H 55° L 37°
  • clear-night
    38°
    Morning
    Clear. H 50° L 35°
Listen
Pause
Error

The latest top stories

00:00 | 00:00

Listen
Pause
Error

The latest traffic report

00:00 | 00:00

Listen
Pause
Error

The latest forecast

00:00 | 00:00

Top National Stories

    When a police detective said last week that a man suspected of strangling a suburban Chicago teen in 1976 may have killed as many as a dozen girls and young women, the question that screamed louder than all others was: How did nobody notice? Today, as Lisle Police Detectives Chris Loudon and detectives in other communities where Bruce Lindahl lived try to retrace his steps, what is emerging is a terrifying murder mystery created by a man Loudon describes as a serial killer, a monster hiding in plain sight. “Bruce stayed under the radar,” he said. When authorities discovered Lindahl's body, dead from a knife wound, in a Naperville apartment in 1981, he was known to various police departments as a loser who had been arrested many times but who had no felony convictions on his record. As with many serial killers, he was a loner, he didn’t have a wide circle of friends and he moved often. He was also a “smooth talker,' Loudon said. “We talked to women who said he could talk you into doing things,” he said. Many photos of naked women were discovered in Lindahl's apartment after he died. He also took pains to hide his actions. Of the females who investigators believe Lindahl abducted and killed, only two bodies have been found. One was Pamela Maurer, the 16-year-old whose body was found next to a road in Lisle in 1976. Because she was found within hours of her death, DNA evidence remained on her body that investigators used — eventually — to link her death to Lindahl, whose body was exhumed last year. Lindahl tried to make it appear that Maurer had been hit by a car, police said. The other victim was Debra Colliander, who disappeared days before she was due to testify at trial that she had been kidnapped and raped by Lindahl. By the time her body was found in a shallow grave on a farm two years later, any DNA evidence was long gone, a victim of the elements. In the 1970s and early 1980s, detectives relied on electric typewriters and telephones, not sophisticated computer systems and cellphones. National databases detailing and connecting unsolved homicides or unidentified remains didn’t exist. The National Center for Missing & Exploited Children was not created until three years after Lindahl’s death. Loudon and other investigators have had to scour musty evidence rooms for typed or handwritten reports from that time. Often, police departments only learned of similar crimes in neighboring communities by accident. “What I’ve seen in cases from that time is a cop happens to catch a news blurb that someone got arrested and it rings a bell with another case,” said Kendall County Sheriff's Detective Sgt. Caleb Waltmire, who is investigating Colliander's death. As concerns DNA evidence, the 1970s might as well as have been the Stone Age, and advances in forensics came slowly. In 1993, when the bodies of seven people were found shot to death in a cooler at a suburban Chicago restaurant, detectives bagged up a half-eaten piece of chicken and saved it in the hope that one day DNA analysis could unlock a clue. That chicken proved crucial in the 2007 conviction Juan Luna, one of two suspects in the killings. There have also been advances in police procedure. After the discovery of more than two dozen boys and young men in a crawl space at John Wayne Gacy’s Chicago-area home, law enforcement agencies were criticized for failing to connect the missing victims sooner. Their discovery prompted a concerted effort to share information on runaways and other people reported missing. Police forces must now accept a missing person case immediately, rather than leaving a 72-hour grace period, said Cook County Sheriff’s Lieutenant Jason Moran, who led the investigation in which unidentified Gacy victims were exhumed so they could be identified. Law enforcement must also confirm the return of a missing person by laying eyes on that person, Moran said. That practice wasn’t followed by detectives who believed a friend of a missing teen in the late ‘70s who said he had seen the boy. Police later discover that teen's body among the victims at Gacy’s home. Gacy was convicted of killing 33 young men and was executed in 1994. Loudon said he has seen no indication as he reviews missing persons reports that police departments didn't take missing person cases seriously around the time Maurer died. Nonetheless, as he reached out to the relatives of those reported missing, some told him his was the first call they have ever received updating them on their loved ones. Moran is not surprised. “The ‘60s and ‘70s with the sex and drugs and kids who put their thumb in the air to (hitchhike) to the beach for two weeks ... meant there were a lot of missing kids at the time and so the cases didn’t get the attention they really required,” he said. Even less effort went into finding runaways. “It’s not right, but once they heard this person has run away 10 times, there was a sense they’d return three days later,” Moran said. Chillingly, it all added up to a perfect environment for Lindahl, if he was a serial killer, to stalk and capture his victims. “Because of the culture, society, the drugs, the weak family bonds ... it was easier for serial killers to operate at that time,' Moran said.
  • That was sew nice. A stray cat in Wisconsin lost her ears to an infection, but now she has some new ones after a woman crocheted her some new ones, WTMJ reported. The cat, named Lady in a Fur Coat, had to have her ear flaps removed according to the Dane County Humane Society. The feline was bought into the Humane Society in December and began treatment for chronic ear infections, spokeswoman Marissa DeGroot told CNN. The cat’s appearance was a little unsettling, so Ash Collins, who works at the Humane Society, decided to crochet Lady an ear bonnet, CNN reported. It took some gentle persuasion and treats, but the cat finally was fitted into her new purple ears. “It’s amazing because we see these strays and medical cases come in and I think we’re always surprised by their resiliency,” DeGroot told CNN. Less than 24 hours after the Humane Society posted the cat’s story on Facebook, Lady was adopted.
  • A New Hampshire man died Sunday night when his snowmobile fell through the ice on the largest lake in Maine, authorities said. Steven K. Allard, 56, of South Hampton, was returning from snowmobiling with his wife on Moosehead Lake when his vehicle broke through the ice on the west side of the lake, the Bangor Daily News reported. Allard’s snowmobile fell into the ice near the mouth of the Moose River, according to Mark Latti, a spokesman for the Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife. Allard was pulled from the lake at 10:15 p.m. but he was unresponsive, Latti told the Daily News. Allard was taken to an area hospital, where he was pronounced dead, Latti said. “Snowmobilers need to stay aware of their surroundings and understand that ice conditions can change quickly,” Sgt. Bill Chandler, of the Maine Warden Service, told the Daily News. “This section of the lake, where the Moose River flows into Moosehead Lake, always has poor ice, and that is why there are marked trails on the lake so that snowmobilers can avoid the bad ice in this area.”
  • A woman was shot Friday night after an argument at an Applebee’s restaurant in South Carolina, authorities said. Joseph Raekwon Rapp, 23, of Greenwood, was charged with attempted murder and possession of a weapon during a violent crime, The State newspaper of Columbia reported. The woman, whose name and condition were not disclosed, was shot twice in the upper body, according to Greenville police. She was taken to an area hospital for surgery, WHNS reported. According to a news release, Rapp and the woman were arguing in the crowded restaurant around 9:21 p.m., WSPA reported. Greenwood police Maj. T.J. Chaudoin said the relationship between the two was not immediately clear, but describe the incident as a domestic situation, the Index-Journal of Greenwood reported. “Obviously there were a lot of people eating here tonight who were very startled,” Chaudoin told the newspaper. Rapp fled the restaurant but later turned himself in at the Greenwood County Detention Center, the newspaper reported. According to the public index, Rapp was out on bond while awaiting trial, the Index-Journal reported.
  • Police in Fayetteville, North Carolina, said a man broke into a home and forced a woman and a 1-month-old boy into a car at gunpoint, according to WTVD. The home invasion and kidnapping happened Monday at 1:12 a.m. Wani Thomas broke into a home on Tangerine Drive and forced Jasmine Livermore and the baby boy, Nathaniel Thomas, into a vehicle, police said. Authorities are currently searching for all three. Thomas is considered armed and dangerous and last seen wearing a brown jacket with blue jeans. Livermore, 20, was last seen wearing gray pants, a brown shirt and a camouflage jacket. Anyone with information should call Fayetteville police at (910) 676-2597 or Cumberland County Crimestoppers at (910) 483-8477.
  • Virginia officials prepared for a large gun-rights rally at the state Capitol Monday morning as Lobby Day began under heightened security. As crowds grew in Richmond, Virginia State Police and the Richmond Police Department were bracing for the rally, hosted by the Virginia Citizens Defense League. The group is opposing legislation that would limit access to firearms across the state, CNN reported. The group chartered about 50 buses statewide so people could come to the capital, WSLS reported. Annually Martin Luther King Jr. Day, the Virginia Citizens Defense League holds Lobby Day to advocate for gun rights, NBC News reported. The event normally attracts a few hundred demonstrators, but this year’s rally is expected to be larger. Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam declared a temporary state of emergency at Capitol Square after he enacted a gun ban for the rally after reports of possible violence during the demonstration, WRIC reported. Northam was concerned over extremist and white nationalist groups disrupting the peaceful demonstrations with violence, similar to the 2017 rally in Charlottesville, CNN reported. Police were searching people’s belongings early Monday as they descended upon Capitol Square, according to WRIC. Fences, blockades, emergency vehicles and tactical units were at the capital when the crowd began arriving, WTOP reported. The Federal Aviation Administration decided to restrict flights over the Capitol after Northam said weaponized drones could be deployed, NBC News reported.
  • Presidential politics move fast. What we're watching heading into a new week on the 2020 campaign: ___ Days to Iowa caucuses: 14 Days to general election: 288 ___ THE NARRATIVE With voting to begin in just two weeks, the sprint to the Iowa caucuses is decidedly complicated by the beginning of President Donald Trump's historic impeachment trial in the Senate. The proceedings will prevent the two leading progressive candidates, Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren, from spending as much time in the kickoff caucus state as they'd like, giving an advantage to moderate rivals Joe Biden and Pete Buttigieg. At the same time, the progressive movement is struggling to project a united front after a dispute over gender threatened to splinter the left. Taken together, the evolving dynamics add yet another layer of uncertainty to the already unsettled Democratic primary fight at a critical moment. ___ THE BIG QUESTIONS How excited are black voters about these Democrats? The week opens with Martin Luther King Jr. Day — and a spotlight on the Democratic Party's critical relationship with African American voters. The party's best-known black candidates, Kamala Harris and Cory Booker, have already been knocked out the race. On paper, Joe Biden has maintained a dominant advantage over the rest of the field among black voters, but the ultimate Democratic nominee will not only need to win black voters in the primary, he or she will need to convince them to turn out in greater numbers in 2020 than they did in 2016. We'll be talking to plenty of African American leaders and watching how the candidates are received at multiple forums dedicated to King and racial justice across various states, including Iowa and South Carolina. Will impeachment change the primary? History is being written in Washington this week as the Senate begins Trump's impeachment trial on Tuesday. While the proceedings are not expected to lead to the Republican president's removal, they could play a major role in the first voting contest of the Democratic Party's primary season. Four Senate Democrats running for president, Amy Klobuchar, Michael Bennet, Sanders and Warren, are required to attend each day of the trial, which will severely limit their ability to rally supporters on the ground in Iowa. Will it hurt them? Will it ultimately help Biden and Buttigieg? And stepping back, will it diminish the importance of Iowa's Feb. 3 caucuses? Can Trump peel off any Bernie bros? All of a sudden, Republicans, led by Trump, are deeply concerned about whether Sanders is being treated fairly by the Democratic Party. Perpetuating a conservative conspiracy theory, the president claimed last week that establishment Democrats “are rigging the election” against Sanders by forcing him to stay in Washington for the impeachment trial just two weeks before the Iowa caucuses. The conspiracy ignores the fact that Warren, Klobuchar and Bennet are in the same position as Sanders. It's laughable to think Trump and GOP leaders are genuinely concerned about Sanders, but it's not quite so crazy to imagine some disaffected Sanders supporters ultimately supporting Trump this fall — or sitting out the election altogether — if Sanders doesn't emerge as the Democratic nominee. In a general election that may come down to razor-thin margins in a handful of swing states, it wouldn't take many angry Sanders supporters to make a real impact. Will the unity illusion hold? Less than a week has passed since the progressive alliance between Warren and Sanders was shattered with a “he said, she said” dispute tinged with sexism. The liberal leaders have avoided any further public criticism of each other since the Jan. 14 debate, but tensions remain, particularly among their most passionate supporters. Democrats cannot afford any permanent divisions in their energized left wing if they hope to defeat Trump in the fall. And rank-and-file primary voters have little appetite for Democrat-on-Democrat violence. That makes the Sanders-Warren rift a critical dynamic to watch moving forward. Does Bernie have a woman problem? Even before the Warren accusation, it was no secret that many female supporters of Hillary Clinton had been nursing a years-long grudge against Sanders. They blamed him for not working hard enough to help the party's first female nominee after their divisive 2016 primary battle. Sanders didn't do himself any favors with those voters on Sunday when he described gender (and age) as a political “problem.' It was an inarticulate answer at best to a dangerous question that Sanders should have been better prepared to answer. Given the decisive role women have played in helping Democrats in the Trump era, Sanders and his party need to do better. ___ THE FINAL THOUGHT Democrats have yet to prove they can assemble a coalition capable of defeating Trump. And on the eve of the Iowa caucuses, the party is facing new questions about its leading candidates' standing with women, African Americans and far-left activists. It's risky to assume that Trump's turbulent presidency alone will be enough to bring everyone together behind the Democratic nominee in November. That makes the delicate discussions over gender and race playing out now all the more dangerous. ___ 2020 Watch runs every Monday and provides a look at the week ahead in the 2020 election. ___ Follow Peoples at https://twitter.com/sppeoples ___ Catch up on the 2020 election campaign with AP experts on our weekly politics podcast, “Ground Game.”
  • When his trial opens in the coming days, Harvey Weinstein’s defense team is expected to go on the offensive against the women who have accused him of rape and sexual assault, in part by questioning if they acted like victims afterward. New York City prosecutors intend to counter with a strategy that’s taken hold since the 2018 retrial of comedian Bill Cosby: calling a sex crimes expert as a witness to dispel assumptions about how rape and sexual assault victims behave after an attack. In fact, Weinstein’s prosecutors are using the very same expert, Dr. Barbara Ziv. She was the first prosecution witness at Cosby’s retrial and is expected to testify early in Weinstein’s trial this month. Ziv, a forensic psychiatrist who has spent decades working with sex offenders and victims, is likely to be an important potential bulwark against Weinstein’s defense that he had consensual relationships with the two women at the center of the case. One of the women, who accuses Weinstein of raping her in a Manhattan hotel room in 2013, sent him warm emails in the months after the alleged assault. “Miss you big guy,' said one note. 'There is no one else I would enjoy catching up with that understands me quite like you,' said another. There was similar evidence at Cosby’s trial that he had remained in contact with some of his victims. Ziv testified that victims frequently avoid or delay reporting assaults to police, often keep in contact with the perpetrator, remember more details over time and differ in their emotional responses. Cosby’s jury ultimately returned a guilty verdict in the first big celebrity trial of the #MeToo era. Prosecutors are now rethinking how they try sexual assault cases, especially those involving intimate partners, mentors, work friends and other potentially fraught relationships. Through experts like Ziv, they can immediately focus the jury’s attention on victim behavior and frame the way jurors hear later testimony. That approach can help prosecutors bust myths and preemptively weaken defense strategies. “I think that makes sense. It’s basically a quick education for the jury, and it’s true the jury starts to see things through that lens,” said Laurie Levenson, a criminal law professor at Loyola Law School in Los Angeles. In addition to the alleged rape, Weinstein, 67, is charged with sexually assaulting another woman, Mimi Haleyi, in 2006. If convicted, he could be sentenced to life in prison. Opening statements are expected as soon as this week, following two weeks of jury selection. Weinstein’s lead lawyer, former Chicago prosecutor Donna Rotunno, said in a pretrial interview with Vanity Fair that while some women might have regretted having sex with the former producer, “regret sex is not rape.” She said the email correspondence between Weinstein and both women is evidence that, at the time, neither considered what happened to be a crime. “I think a woman who is a victim of rape is going to look at that and say, ‘That’s not what rape victims do.' If you were really raped, this is not what you do,” she said. Defense attorney Kathleen Bliss took similar aim at Cosby’s accusers in scorching closing arguments in April 2018. She called trial accuser Andrea Constand 'a con artist” and witness Janice Dickerson, one of five other accusers to testify for the prosecution, “a failed starlet” and “aged-out model” who had seemingly “slept with every man on the planet.” Given the cultural moment, some defense lawyers question that strategy. The goal, they say, should be to discredit accusers without eviscerating them. Eviscerating them could turn off a jury. In Weinstein’s case, the task is all the more daunting. News reports about his alleged predation of scores of women — from high-profile actresses to production assistants — launched the #MeToo movement in late 2017. “Of course, a lawyer has to go in there and attack credibility and attack inconsistencies. It’s just how you do it,” said defense lawyer Brian McMonagle, who won a mistrial in the first Cosby trial when the jury deadlocked. “There’s a way to do it without being despicable.” Traditionally, prosecutors call trial experts toward the end of their case to try to repair any damage done to their witnesses. But in sex assault cases, that may be tough to do once jurors form opinions. “One of the big differences (at the Cosby retrial) was using the victim expert early in the trial. I think that served to help educate the jury on rape myths and victim behavior,” said Kevin Steele, the suburban Philadelphia district attorney who oversaw both Cosby prosecutions. The practice isn't limited to the courtroom. Experts and victims are also working with police to help them understand victim behavior. They can have the same misconceptions as juries, said former prosecutor Kristen Feden, who gave closing arguments in Cosby’s retrial and now represents sex assault victims in private practice. The police training, she said, “certainly changes the way they investigate.' Constand, who lives in Toronto, is doing training sessions with law enforcement groups there. She first went to police about Cosby in 2005, a year after the encounter — only to be rebuffed by Steele’s predecessor, who declined to press charges in part because she'd stayed in contact with Cosby and didn't immediately tell law enforcement. “I can't tell them how to prosecute these cases, but I can tell them about the internal experiences, and barriers to reporting,” Constand said in a recent interview. Cosby, 82, who like Weinstein had scores of accusers, is now serving three to 10 years in prison for drugging and molesting Constand. He'd been a friend and mentor to Constand at Temple University, where she worked for the women's basketball team and he, a beloved alumnus and campus icon, served on the Board of Trustees. Rotunno, in Vanity Fair, said the #MeToo movement had gone too far. “Women may rue the day that all of this started when no one asks them out on a date, and no one holds the door open for them, and no one tells them that they look nice,' she said. In Levenson’s view, defense lawyers need to focus on the facts to win #MeToo cases. “If you’re going to attack the witnesses, you better have very good ammunition. You better not be going on stereotypes or assumptions,” she said. “It has to be very specific information that undercuts their credibility. The general smear campaign, I don’t think works anymore.”
  • At least two people are dead and five hurt after gunfire erupted at a club in San Antonio on Sunday night, authorities said. According to The Associated Press, the shooting happened about 8 p.m. local time during an argument at the Ventura, a club along the city’s River Walk. At least seven people were shot, including a 21-year-old man killed inside the venue and another person who died en route to the hospital, police told WOAI-TV. Investigators have not yet released a description of the suspect, who was still on the run, the outlets reported. Read more here or here.
  • An armed security guard shot and killed a man suspected of fatally shooting a woman and injuring 15 more people outside a bar in Kansas City, Missouri, police said Monday. A motive for the attack shortly before midnight Sunday outside 9ine Ultra Lounge was not immediately clear. Kansas City Police Capt. David Jackson told reporters that responding officers found “a chaotic scene.” A man and a woman were killed and police believe the shooter is the deceased man, Jackson said. It was not clear if the gunman targeted anyone in particular, he said. A spokesman said a gunman opened fire on a line of people waiting to enter the bar. A preliminary investigation indicates an armed security guard killed the shooter, Jackson said. At least 15 went to hospitals with injuries related to the shooting, police said. It's unclear whether all the injured victims suffered gunshot wounds. At least three people are in critical condition, police said. Also late Sunday, two people were shot to death and at least five were injured in an attack outside a bar in San Antonio, Texas. The suspected gunman was still on the loose Monday, police said. A Facebook post on 9ine Ultra Lounge's page advertised Sunday night's “Sold Out Sundays” event, which appeared to be a celebration of the Kansas City Chiefs. The Chiefs — featured on the event's artwork — beat the Tennessee Titans on Sunday to advance to the Super Bowl. “It just put such a tragic end to such a wonderful day in Kansas City,” Jackson County Prosecutor Jean Peters Baker said at the scene, referencing the win. “It's just hard to stand here and talk about this kind of tragedy on really one of the best days Kansas City has had in a long time.”

The Latest News Headlines

  • Police in Fayetteville, North Carolina, said a man broke into a home and forced a woman and a 1-month-old boy into a car at gunpoint, according to WTVD. The home invasion and kidnapping happened Monday at 1:12 a.m. Wani Thomas broke into a home on Tangerine Drive and forced Jasmine Livermore and the baby boy, Nathaniel Thomas, into a vehicle, police said. Authorities are currently searching for all three. Thomas is considered armed and dangerous and last seen wearing a brown jacket with blue jeans. Livermore, 20, was last seen wearing gray pants, a brown shirt and a camouflage jacket. Anyone with information should call Fayetteville police at (910) 676-2597 or Cumberland County Crimestoppers at (910) 483-8477.
  • The Jacksonville Fire and Rescue Department rescued a man that was stuck in a tree in Atlantic Beach Sunday afternoon.  Video taken from the scene shows a ladder truck ascending into a large oak tree.   JFRD tweeted that the man was rescued from the tree safely and was taken to the hospital with non life-threatening injuries.
  • As many as six people were shot in a violent weekend across Jacksonville. And the common thing in all these cases, no arrests. Two of the shootings happened within a block of each other on Justina Road in Arlington.  A man was sitting at a bus stop by when he was shot by someone in a red SUV on Saturday afternoon.  Hours later a person was shot nearby and hospitalized with injuries.  Late Sunday night a man was shot in the leg on Old Kings near Edgewood. The man was taken to a local hospital with non-life-threatening injuries.  On Friday night two men in their 20's were injured in a shooting off Kings Road on the northwest side.  One man was hit in the lower leg and the other was struck in the upper torso. Both were taken to a local hospital for treatment.  JSO says the shooting happened in a Shot Spotter area, and the technology system captured three gunshots.  On Friday around 8pm, a man in his 30’s was shot and killed on Brooklyn Road in the Moncrief area. JSO detectives were trying to locate any witnesses or video surveillance. 
  • Coming off a weekend in the 70's, a strong cold front brought drenching rain on Sunday afternoon, followed by a chill. Action News Jax Meteorologist Corey Simma is tracking temps well below average.  “Mostly sunny and cold with temperatures in the 50’s all day. And then clear and cold Monday night and Tuesday morning with some patchy inland frost”, said Simma.   Tuesday looks to be the coldest day this week, as we’ll struggle to reach 50 degrees. A breeze will keep it feeling even colder. We stay below average on Wednesday, with temperatures only in the 50’s.  The mid-60’s return on Thursday, and on Friday we’ll be near 70 but with scattered showers. 
  • The Jacksonville Humane Society and Animal Care and Protective Services announced the city of Jacksonville, once again, earned the no-kill designation for the year of 2019. According to Best Friends Animal Society, “A no-kill community is a city or town in which every brick-and-mortar shelter serving and/or located within that community has reached a 90% save rate or higher and adheres to the no-kill philosophy, saving every animal who can be saved.'  According to a release put out by the JHS, the save rate for APCS was 90 percent and for JHS it was 95 percent, making a citywide save rate of 93 percent.  In total, 16,874 animals entered the JHS shelters in 2019, which is a significant decrease from 19,366 animals in 2018, according to the JHS.  According to JHS, Jacksonville earned the distinction of being the largest city in the United States to earn a no-kill status. The city has maintained that status until last year when ACPS save rate fell to 86 percent.  “Examining the data and trends in 2017 and 2018 resulted in our renewed focus on cats and kittens in 2019,” said Deisler. “As a community, we had to take a look at ourselves ask – what can we do to save those lives? We knew that with the help of our community, a return to no-kill was possible. We are excited about the results from 2019 and even more excited for 2020. Thank you, Jacksonville!”

The Latest News Videos