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Buresh Blog: Very warm October.... October rainfall... check your irrigation system
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Buresh Blog: Very warm October.... October rainfall... check your irrigation system

Buresh Blog: Very warm October.... October rainfall... check your irrigation system

Buresh Blog: Very warm October.... October rainfall... check your irrigation system

We're in the last month of the Atlantic hurricane season.  Only two hurricanes - going back to 1851 - have made landfall on U.S. soil during the month of Nov.  "Yankee" hit Miami Nov. 4, 1934 & "Kate" hit the Fl. Panhandle Nov. 22, 1985.  More in "Talking the Tropics With Mike".

For the 2nd year in a row, we're having a very warm autumn.  October was the 6th warmest on record for Jacksonville & the warmest since 1981.  Every month this year so far has been above avg.:

And October was a dry month for NE Fl...  wetter for SE Ga.  From our Jax N.W.S.:

FL JASPER 2.59 

BEAUCLERC 5.05 

JACKSONVILLE BEACH 7.62 

LAKE CITY 2 E 2.95

GLEN ST MARY 1 W 3.40  

SOUTH PONTE VEDRA BEACH SHOP 5.20 

CRESCENT CITY 5.57  

GAINESVILLE RGNL AP 3.59 

HASTINGS 4NE 4.23 

WHITE SPRINGS 7N 2.17 

JACKSONVILLE CRAIG MUNI AP 6.57 

JACKSONVILLE INTL AP 3.30 

JACKSONVILLE NAS 4.89  

MAYPORT NAVAL STATION 7.58 

BELL 4NW 3.57 

FEDERAL POINT 5.69 

GEORGIA:

PRIDGEN 5.45 

ALMA BACON CO AP 3.48  

NAHUNTA 6 NE 4.30 

BRUNSWICK 7.35 

BRUNSWICK MALCOLM MCKINNON AP 5.36  

WOODBINE 8.90

Speaking of rainfall....now that we're in standard time, residents are only allowed to water their yards & landscaping once a week.  Though typically drier this time of year, days or shorter & temps. are cooler so less water is generally needed.  From St. Johns River Management District:

Starting Sunday, Nov. 3, homeowners and businesses will fall back to once-a-week landscape irrigation across the 18 counties of the St. Johns River Water Management District. Nov. 3 is the day that Eastern Standard Time begins. "Healthy lawns in our area require no more than one day a week of irrigation during cooler weather, based on scientific analysis from the University of Florida," said St. Johns River Water Management District Executive Director Dr. Ann Shortelle. "So, when you change your clocks Saturday night, be sure to also reset your sprinkler timers to water only on the designated day for your address. And thanks for doing your part to protect Florida's water resources!"

The district's new Water Less campaign features four seasonal themes, starting with "Fall Back" in November to encourage once-a-week watering as temperatures begin cooling. Public water supply is the largest category of water use in the district's 18-county region — about 565.5 million gallons of water a day. The bulk of this water is for residential water use, and landscape irrigation can account for more than 50 percent of total water use at residential locations. Because lawns need significantly less water in Florida's winter months, watering restrictions are in place to ensure that water used for irrigation is used efficiently.

During Eastern Standard Time, landscape irrigation is limited to no more than one day a week on the following schedule:

• Saturday at addresses that end in an odd number or have no address

• Sunday at addresses that end in an even number

• Tuesday at nonresidential addresses

• No irrigation is allowed between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m.

Irrigation restrictions apply to all landscape watering not currently regulated by a consumptive use permit, which typically includes residential, commercial and industrial landscapes, and includes water withdrawn from ground or surface water, from a private well or pump, or from a public or private water utility. Golf courses, plant nurseries, agricultural crops, and sports recreational areas generally have consumptive use permits that specify their irrigation limitations.

Massive Amazon wildfires made headlines in Sept. with the typical flippant blame placed solely on climate change.  But as is often the case, there are extenuating circumstances:

A new NASA study shows that over the last 20 years, the atmosphere above the Amazon rainforest has been drying out, increasing the demand for water and leaving ecosystems vulnerable to fires and drought. It also shows that this increase in dryness is primarily the result of human activities.

Scientists at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, analyzed decades of ground and satellite data over the Amazon rainforest to track both how much moisture was in the atmosphere and how much moisture was needed to maintain the rainforest system.

"We observed that in the last two decades, there has been a significant increase in dryness in the atmosphere as well as in the atmospheric demand for water above the rainforest," said JPL's Armineh Barkhordarian, lead author of the study. "In comparing this trend to data from models that estimate climate variability over thousands of years, we determined that the change in atmospheric aridity is well beyond what would be expected from natural climate variability." 

So if it's not natural, what's causing it?

Barkhordarian said that elevated greenhouse gas levels are responsible for approximately half of the increased aridity. The rest is the result of ongoing human activity, most significantly, the burning of forests to clear land for agriculture and grazing. The combination of these activities is causing the Amazon's climate to warm.

When a forest burns, it releases particles called aerosols into the atmosphere - among them, black carbon, commonly referred to as soot. While bright-colored or translucent aerosols reflect radiation, darker aerosols absorb it. When the black carbon absorbs heat from the sun, it causes the atmosphere to warm; it can also interfere with cloud formation and, consequently, rainfall.

Why It Matters

The Amazon is the largest rainforest on Earth. When healthy, it absorbs billions of tons of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) a year through photosynthesis - the process plants use to convert CO 2 , energy and water into food. By removing CO 2  from the atmosphere, the Amazon helps to keep temperatures down and regulate climate.

But it's a delicate system that's highly sensitive to drying and warming trends.

Trees and plants need water for photosynthesis and to cool themselves down when they get too warm. They pull in water from the soil through their roots and release water vapor through pores on their leaves into the atmosphere, where it cools the air and eventually rises to form clouds. The clouds produce rain that replenishes the water in the soil, allowing the cycle to continue. Rainforests generate as much as 80% of their own rain, especially during the dry season.

But when this cycle is disrupted by an increase in dry air, for instance, a new cycle is set into motion - one with significant implications, particularly in the southeastern Amazon, where trees can experience more than four to five months of dry season.

 

"It's a matter of supply and demand. With the increase in temperature and drying of the air above the trees, the trees need to transpire to cool themselves and to add more water vapor into the atmosphere. But the soil doesn't have extra water for the trees to pull in," said JPL's Sassan Saatchi, co-author of the study. "Our study shows that the demand is increasing, the supply is decreasing and if this continues, the forest may no longer be able to sustain itself."

Scientists observed that the most significant and systematic drying of the atmosphere is in the southeast region, where the bulk of deforestation and agricultural expansion is happening. But they also found episodic drying in the northwest Amazon, an area that typically has no dry season. Normally always wet, the northwest has suffered severe droughts over the past two decades, a further indication of the entire forest's vulnerability to increasing temperatures and dry air.

If this trend continues over the long term and the rainforest reaches the point where it can no longer function properly, many of the trees and the species that live within the rainforest ecosystem may not be able to survive. As the trees die, particularly the larger and older ones, they release CO 2  into the atmosphere; and the fewer trees there are, the less CO 2  the Amazon region would be able to absorb - meaning we'd essentially lose an important element of climate regulation.

The study, "A Recent Systematic Increase in Vapor Pressure Deficit Over Tropical South America," was published in October in Scientific Reports. The science team used data from NASA's Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument aboard the Terra satellite.

NASA/JPL-Caltech, NASA Earth Observatory:

Night skies into early Dec. courtesy skyandtelescope.com

Top: The path of Mercury across the Sun's disk on November 11th. Cardinal directions are in a celestial frame of reference; the Sun will appear tilted counterclockwise 40 to 60 from this view at sunrise (depending on your latitude) and clockwise by roughly the same amount in late afternoon. Bottom: Here's where the November 11th transit of Mercury will be observable.  DO NOT try to observe this with the naked eye! Credit: Sky & Telescope

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Nov. 9–11 (dawn): Mars passes 2 to the upper left of Spica, the blue-white alpha star in Virgo.

Nov. 11 (daytime): Tiny Mercury transits (crosses) the Sun, with the midpoint occurring at 10:20 a.m. EST. This 5 -hour event is entirely visible from the eastern U.S.; roughly west of Mississippi River, the transit is under way at sunrise. This is a telescopic event (not visible without optical aid). Never look at the Sun directly, by eye or through a telescope, without using an approved solar filter. See skyantelescope.com for more details.

Nov. 16–17 (all night): The typically weak Leonid meteors should peak tonight; waning gibbous Moon will interfere.

Nov. 22–24 (dusk): Venus and Jupiter pass one another low in southwest, separately by 2 or less.

Nov. 27–30 (dusk): Three planets and the waxing crescent Moon grace the southwestern sky. The Moon climbs higher each evening, visiting Venus and then Saturn along the way. Jupiter is lowest on the horizon.

 

Dec. 1 (dusk): Saturn, Venus, and Jupiter form an 18 long string above the southwestern horizon after sunset. The waxing crescent Moon guards the trio of planets from upper left is to their upper left.

Dec. 10 (dusk): Venus and Saturn are less than 2 apart not far above the southwestern horizon.

 

Moon Phases

First Quarter: November 4, 5:23 a.m. EST

Full Moon: November 12, 8:24 a.m. EST (Full Beaver Moon; also Full Frosty Moon)

Last Quarter: November 19, 4:11 p.m. EST

New Moon: November 26, 10:06 a.m. EST

Read More

The Latest News Headlines

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  • In day two of the search for evidence in Susan Mauldin’s disappearance case, the FBI revealed they have concentrated on a baseball diamond size area in the Chesser Island landfill located in Folkston, Georgia. Dozens of people from the FBI, State Attorneys office, and Clay County Sheriffs office are helping in the search efforts that began Tuesday.  Experts from the FBI lab in Quantico, Virginia and tech hazard units are assisting in the search.  The FBI said they preserved an area of the landfill early in the investigation at the request of the Clay County Sheriffs office. The FBI did not allow additional dumping in that area which is now being searched by case detectives.  The landfill is laid out in a grid pattern, trash can be traced back to a specific date, and location.  It has been the center of other local high-profile cases like Joleen Cummings, and Somer Thompson.  The search comes months after Mauldin disappeared in October. Neighbors told Action News Jax the last time they saw Mauldin she had plans to meet with Binderim.  Mauldin moved to the United States from England, neighbors said she had no children and lived alone.  This search is the first major break in the case since Corey Binderim, an unlicensed contractor, was named a person of interest in Mauldin’s disappearance back in November. He’d done work in her home, neighbors say there was a falling out over money.  Binderim was arrested on an unrelated fraud charge in Duval County.
  • One organization is counting how many homeless people are living in our area to help get funding for vital programs aimed at helping them. Wednesday morning volunteers with Changing Homelessness bundled up and scoured the beaches looking for people sleeping outside for the 2020 census survey.  Nate has lived outside for the past 10 years.  'It can be tough, thank God we're not in Detroit or Minnesota or something,' he said.  The group is counting people like Nate because its needed to get funding for programs that help the homeless.  More than 1,600 people in Northeast Florida are homeless, according to the count in 2018.  The group is giving out surveys to people living out on the streets.  They're asking questions like how long it's been since they've stayed in permanent housing and where they'll be sleeping tonight,especially with the weather being so cold.  Justin Foster volunteered by handing out surveys.  'It's important to see where the homeless population is and who exactly we need to direct the resources, is it people of color, is it queer people of color, is it veterans, stuff like that,' Foster said.  The cold is having an impact on the number of people they’re able to count too.  'We actually didn't see as many as we many as we thought there was going to be because most of them were at he cold shelters at the shelters in Neptune Beach, so it's good to know what people know where to do when it's cold,' Foster said.  Only 30 surveys in the beaches area were filled out Wednesday morning.  Foster told me it made her more aware of whose living in the streets in her community.  'We found in this area that it was definitely people in their 40s, 50s, and 60s,' she said.  Changing Homelessness says it could take several weeks until they figure out how many people are homeless in Northeast Florida because they’re still collecting data throughout the week.
  • With each passing day, the family and friends of missing Pittsburgh artist Tonee Turner grow more concerned about finding her and bringing her home safe. Turner, 22, was last seen around 6 p.m. Dec. 30 in the Squirrel Hill area of the city, according to Pittsburgh police officials. WPXI reported that she was last seen at Dobra Tea, a Bohemian-style tea shop she often frequented. “She’s bubbly and caring,” Turner’s sister, Sydnee Turner, told NNPA Newswire. “She made a practice of caring for herself holistically.” The newswire reported that a firefighter found Tonee Turner’s belongings -- her wallet, cellphone and keys -- the evening she vanished about 3 miles from the tea shop on the Homestead Grays Bridge pedestrian walkway. Missing persons posters emphasize that it is completely out of character for the young woman to vanish without contacting her family or friends. Well-known in her community, Tonee Turner’s disappearance has garnered lots of local attention and some national media coverage. A GoFundMe page set up to help fund the family’s search has raised $10,535, surpassing its goal of $10,000. Police investigators spent New Year’s Day trying to piece together a timeline of Tonee Turner’s last known movements, WPXI reported. Sydnee Turner wrote on Jan. 1 that the family believed she might be traveling down Interstate 80 near Homestead and sought to confirm her safety. “We do not trust anyone she is traveling with,” Sydnee Turner wrote on Facebook. “Friends in other states, I need your help the most right now. Friends in Ohio, Utah, Nevada, anything near route I-80, please look for my sister. “Call if you have the faintest suspicion. We need to BRING TONEE HOME.” Tonee Turner, a full-time metal fabricator at Studebaker Metals in Braddock, also serves as a beloved ceramics teacher at Braddock Carnegie Library’s Bathhouse Ceramics Studio. A vigil was held earlier this month at the library for Tonee Turner. A Jan. 2 post on the library’s Facebook page pleaded for information on her whereabouts. “There are a lot of different pieces of information. And what we hope is that the leads, lead to Tonee,” the post read. “And that Tonee knows the amount of care that exists for her.” The ceramics studio has paused its open studios for a few weeks as the library works to support Turner’s co-workers through their sorrow. “This pause in open studio reflects the grief we are feeling and honoring its demands,” read a statement from Dana Bishop-Root, associate director of the library association. “Thank you for your understanding. Thank you for your continued support and care for Tonee Turner and all of the staff members of the BCS.” The young artist has also been very active in the Braddock Youth Project, first as a participant and then as an AmeriCorps team leader. “When her AmeriCorps term ended with us, she continued to work with our partners, Braddock Tiles and the Braddock Library Ceramics Studio,” a post on the project’s Facebook page read. “She later was hired on as a full-time metal fabricator at Studebaker Metals. “So many have grown accustomed to feeling her radiate love amongst different parts of the Braddock community. We are sending out our love to Tonee's family and all others who know and love her, and we are taking part in lighting white candles to lift Tonee up as detectives and her family search for answers.” Akayla Bennett told NNPA Newswire she’s known the missing woman for about a year. “She danced over to me and gave me a big hug, and I knew her soul was beautiful at that moment that I met her,” Bennett said. Bennett and Sydnee Turner described Tonee Turner as an artist, an educator and an avid dancer. Her sister said she is studying Flamenco and Kathak, a form of Indian dance. “If you’ve gone to concerts in Pittsburgh, you’ve probably seen Tonee in front, dancing her little heart away,” Bennett told the newswire. “Whether she was alone or with friends, that didn’t matter to her when it came to dancing.” Tonee Turner is black with wavy shoulder-length hair that she sometimes wears in a wrap, police officials said. She is 5 feet, 2 inches tall and weighs about 130 pounds. Anyone with information on her whereabouts is asked to dial 911 or contact the Pittsburgh Bureau of Police at 412-323-7800.

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