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'Buresh Blog': WAS dry!.... First 10 days of Oct. in the tropics.... Buresh on Instagram!
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'Buresh Blog': WAS dry!.... First 10 days of Oct. in the tropics.... Buresh on Instagram!

'Buresh Blog': WAS dry!.... First 10 days of Oct. in the tropics.... Buresh on Instagram!

'Buresh Blog': WAS dry!.... First 10 days of Oct. in the tropics.... Buresh on Instagram!

"Talking the Tropics With Mike" - updated every day during the hurricane season (through Nov. 30th)....

Speaking of the tropics.... the first 10 days or so of Oct. have become rather notorious in recent years.  Hurricane Joaquin in 2015 over the SW Atlantic which contributed to the sinking of the cargo ship El Faro... hurricane Matthew in 2016 which hammered our local NE Fl./SE Ga. coast.... & hurricane Michael last year - 2018 - the most powerful hurricane to ever hit the Fl. Panhandle.

Joaquin track:

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Matthew track:

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Michael track:

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Well... September was dry which was continuing into the first week of Oct. then came "Rainy Days & Monday's" on Oct. 7th.  A tremendous soaker from the I-95 corridor to the coast with amounts approaching a half foot at some of the beaches.  While inland areas have been the driest & again missed out on the heaviest rain, beneficial rains occurred over virtually the entire viewing area except for inland SE Ga.  The combination of a weak stalled front, winds off the Atlantic, an upper level disturbance & warm/humid air lifting across the area (isentropic lift)

set up bands of heavy rain virtually all day long.

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Rainfall as provided by the Jax N.W.S. for the month of September:

FL   JASPER                                0.48
FL   BEAUCLERC                             2.74
FL   JACKSONVILLE BEACH                    4.88 
FL   LAKE CITY                     0.26                
FL   LAKE CITY 2 E                    0.71      
FL   GLEN ST MARY 1 W                0.68                  
FL   CRESCENT CITY                         2.64            
FL   GAINESVILLE RGNL AP             0.93         
FL   HASTINGS 4NE              3.75                                          
FL   OCALA                    2.01                                               
FL   WHITE SPRINGS 7N               0.45           
FL   JACKSONVILLE CRAIG MUNI AP      3.05     
FL   JACKSONVILLE INTL AP        2.35             
FL   JACKSONVILLE NAS          3.19             
FL   FEDERAL POINT                2.66                                      
FL   BUNNELL                 5.99                           
FL   PALM COAST                            6.19
FL   NORTHEAST PALM COAST                  7.56 
FL   NORTH PALM COAST                      7.20 
FL   WEST PALM COAST                       7.29
FL   WEST PALM BEACH              7.29            
FL   WEST CENTRAL PALM COAST               7.89 
FL   FLAGLER BEACH                 4.35                  
 
GEORGIA:             
GA   ALMA BACON CO AP        0.20                                              
GA   NAHUNTA 6 NE            1.70                  
GA   FARGO 17 NE            0.70                                    
GA   BRUNSWICK             1.39                 
GA   BRUNSWICK MALCOLM MCKINNON AP       2.76

Our Oct. night skies courtesy Sky & Telescope:

Oct. 17 (evening): The waning gibbous Moon rises about 2½ hours after sunset with Aldebaran 3° to 4° to its right.
Oct. 21–22 (all night): The moderate Orionids meteor shower peaks in the evening. The radiant, northeast of Betelgeuse, stands high by midnight local time. However, light from the last-quarter Moon will interfere somewhat.
Oct. 26 (dawn): The thinnest sliver of the almost-new Moon, Mars, and Porrima form a triangle low on the eastern horizon just before sunrise. Binoculars will help.
Oct. 29 (dusk): Right after sunset, look toward the southwest to find the Moon, not quite 2 days old, and Venus less than 5° apart.
Oct. 31 (dusk): The waxing crescent Moon, Jupiter, and Saturn briefly gracing the skies in the southwest after sunset.
 
Nov. 1 (dusk): Saturn, the waxing lunar crescent, and Jupiter form a line 22° long in the south-southwest after sunset.
Nov. 3: Daylight-Saving Time ends at 2 a.m. for most of the U.S. and Canada.
 
Moon Phases
First Quarter: October 5, 12:47 p.m. EDT
Full Moon: October 13, 5:08 p.m. EDT (Full Beaver Moon; also Full Frosty Moon)
Last Quarter: October 21, 8:39 a.m. EDT
New Moon: October 27, 11:38 p.m. EDT

AND - after "great demand" :) ...... I am now professionally on Instagram!  Apparently this is "the thing to do" but at least a few years late.... according to my kids & co-workers.  A shout out to Nora Clark on our Action News Jax digital team for her enthusiasm regarding this endeavor & for at least trying to get this ol' chief meteorologist up to date.  Give me a follow if you wish.

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The Latest News Headlines

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