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The Buresh Blog

    Daily updates on the tropics - 'Talking the Tropics With Mike'..... Our summer of discontent continues on.  As of July 16th, Jacksonville has officially had 20 days at or above 97 degrees which is 2nd most to 1998 when we already had 24 such days.  That stat might 'ring a bell' for long time First Coast residents as that was the year when Central & Northern Florida was literally burning up as wildfires roared deep into the summer as heat was combined with a very slow start to the wet season.  This year - while it's been hot - we've had relatively timely rains for the most part. El Nino Update: It appears the weak El Nino - ongoing since late last fall/winter - is on its way out.  The map below shows some lingering warm water over the West Pacific but either near avg. or even below average over the Central & especially Eastern Pacific. The forecast trend on the modeling - & it is JUST MODELS - is for a continued El Nino decline to neutral status into autumn. This has potentially great implications on the hurricane season.  El Nino seasons are often accompanied by an increase in shear which at least limits the number of tropical systems.  However, a neutral state might imply at least a somewhat more active season - especially later in Aug. through early Oct. - which, afterall, is essentially the peak of the hurricane season.  Pardon this public service announcement: one should always be prepared well in advance for the hurricane season. The week of July 15th marks the 50th anniversary of the amazing Apollo 11 landing on the moon & first walk by humans on the moon. Interesting Twitter feed * here *.  Action News Jax.com has an array of related articles/info./pics & video: Apollo 11: Events mark the 50th anniversary of the moon landing Former Navy seal first to welcome crew of Apollo 11 back to earth after historic moon landing [wftv] Apollo 11 mission control meticulously restored for 50th anniversary of moon landing Photos: Apollo 11 mission control rebuilt for 50th anniversary of moon landing Apollo 11 flight manual from historic moon landing could go for $9M at auction 11 things you probably didn't know about the historic moon landing  NCD VIDEO:  What You Need to Know - Buzz Aldrin NCD VIDEO:  Most Iconic NASA Moments   And - yes - I can clearly remember(!) watching the walk on the moon when I was 5 years old in the living room of my aunt's house on a black & white t.v. :) And .... lastly... not weather or space related but fun none-the-less - the movie remake of 'The Lion King'.  Somehow I'm not sure it will live up to its billing, but my daughters & I have plans for a big night to take it in.  We've seen 'The Lion King' on stage 7 times!  So we're not stopping now. :) 
  • For daily updates on the tropics: 'Talking the Tropics With Mike'.  All eyes on the Gulf of Mexico where slow tropical development will be possible this week.  Primary impacts on the local area - Jacksonville/NE Fl./SE Ga. - looks to be heavy rain with potentially greater impacts to the west.  Next name on the list: 'Barry'. July & early Aug. night skies courtesy 'Sky and Telescope': July 9 (all night): Saturn arrives at opposition, meaning it’s opposite the Sun in the sky. It rises at sunset and sets at sunrise. The magnificent ringed planet is upper left of the Teapot in Sagittarius and just below the Teaspoon asterism.   July 12–15 (dusk): Waxing gibbous Moon provides eye-catching pairings as it passes from Scorpius into Sagittarius. The first evening it forms a trio with Jupiter and Antares, sliding to the left side of Jupiter on July 13th, and ending up nestled against Saturn on the last evening, less than 2° separating the two.   July 16 (day): A partial lunar eclipse is visible over most of the globe; only North America and northeastern Asia will be excluded from viewing any of the phases.   July 20 (night): As the waning gibbous Moon rises in the east-southeast, contemplate the moment 50 years ago when humankind first stepped onto our closest celestial neighbor.   July 29–30 (all night): The Delta Aquariid meteor shower peaks, providing up to 25 shooting stars per hour from very dark locations. This shower lasts several nights, so the peak is not the only time to look. Best in hours before dawn.   Aug. 4–5 (dusk): Thin waxing lunar crescent is in Virgo. On the 4th when it’s some 3° right of star Porrima. On the 5th, it’s 7° upper right of Spica.   Aug. 9 (dawn): Mercury is farthest west of the Sun. Look for it for the next two weeks low on the east-northeastern horizon. Binoculars will improve the view.   Aug. 9 (evening): The waxing gibbous Moon and Jupiter are around 2° apart, with Antares to the pair’s lower right.   Moon Phases New Moon: July 2, 3:16 p.m. EDT (total solar eclipse) First Quarter: July 9, 6:55 a.m. EDT Full Moon: July 16, 5:38 p.m. EDT (Buck Moon; partial lunar eclipse) Last Quarter: July 24, 9:38 p.m. EDT
  • Updated every day through the hurricane season: 'Talking the Tropics With Mike'...... mid to late July should be a period where we see our first true activity of the Atlantic hurricane season.  Casting a wary eye on upward 'vertical velocities' that will be spreading across the Atlantic Basin the next few weeks which often correlates with an uptick in tropical activity.  Not a sure thing but something to watch. We're in another hot/dry stretch of weather to begin the month of July.  Our 'wet season' finally kicked in mid June only to sputter again late in the month.  In many spots, rainfall is more than 2' below avg. since June 1st - a big problem since avg. temps. are in the 90s daily.  Our avg. June temp. of 82.4 degrees was the 11th hottest on record for the month. July averages: Low / High - 1st: 72 / 91 degrees... 31st: 73 / 92 Rainfall: 6.55' Sunrise / Sunset - 1st - 6:28am / 8:33pm.... 31st - 6:44am / 8:21pm - lose 26 min. of daylight. June rainfall from our Jax N.W.S.: FL   JASPER                      6.66 FL   MAYO                                  9.13 FL   BEAUCLERC                             5.64 FL   JACKSONVILLE BEACH                    6.33 FL   FERNANDINA BEACH          8.10 FL   LIVE OAK                      2.04 FL   LAKE CITY                             6.24 FL   LAKE CITY 2 E                    5.06 FL   GLEN ST MARY 1 W                2.61                 FL   PALM COAST 6 NE          9.04         FL   CRESCENT CITY                         8.55             FL   GAINESVILLE RGNL AP             9.61     FL   HASTINGS 4NE              6.22                    FL   OCALA                    7.23                          FL   WHITE SPRINGS 7N               4.08           FL   JACKSONVILLE CRAIG MUNI AP      4.01  FL   JACKSONVILLE INTL AP        4.41           FL   JACKSONVILLE NAS          3.89 FL   JACKSONVILLE WHITEHOUSE FIELD         5.00   FL   BELL 4NW                 6.92             FL   FEDERAL POINT                7.87                                                                                            GA   PRIDGEN                              7.11 GA   ALMA BACON CO AP        3.87 GA   NAHUNTA 6 NE            7.75                   GA   FARGO 17 NE            3.31                GA   BRUNSWICK             6.58      GA   BRUNSWICK MALCOLM MCKINNON AP       5.25 GA   WOODBINE                     7.16 Just in time for the long Independence Day weekend, the Environmental Working Group just updated it’s Guide to Sunscreens with 150 more SPF products.   The link to the 2019 Sunscreens Guide: * here*.   Lists of products by category: Best Beach and Sport Sunscreens * here *   Best Moisturizers with SPF * here *   Best Lip Balms with SPF * here *   Best Sunscreens for Kids * here *   And remember, sunscreen is just one tool in the sun safety toolbox.   Dress in protective clothing, such as light cotton fabric with a tight weave and wide-brimmed hats that shade the face, scalp, neck and ears.   Choose a lotion instead of a spray. Sunscreen sprays pose inhalation risks and provide inadequate protection. If you must use a pump or spray, apply it to your hands first and then wipe it on your skin.      Avoid products that contain retinyl palmitate, a form of Vitamin A.   Select a sunscreen with an SPF greater than fifteen but less than 50.   Don’t forget to wear sunglasses to protect your eyes from harmful UVA and UVB rays.
  • For daily updates on the tropics: 'Talking the Tropics With Mike'.... The 'Buresh Blog' will not be updated again until the first week of July. After about a month of hot temps. & generally dry weather, our wet season 'switched' on about the 2nd week of June.  So temps. have not been as extreme & rainfall has become much more plentiful. Fri., June 21 is the summer solstice.  It's when the N. Hemisphere has its longest days of the year which will equate to more than 14 hours of daylight for Jacksonville/NE Fl./SE Ga.  Remember that the seasons are a result of the earth's tilt toward or away from the sun.  The sun's rays on the summer solstice are over the Tropic of Cancer - 23.5 degrees N. - the fartherst north with respect to the equator of the year.  For Jacksonville, it equates to our avg. high temp. at or above 90 degrees through mid August. Speaking of the sun.... there will be a full solar eclipse BUT NOT visible from the U.S. on July 2nd.  It's the S. Pacific's turn including Chile & Argentina.  The U.S. countdown is to April 8, 2024! Maps below from the 'Great Amerian Eclipse': The next U.S. total solar eclipse in 2024 (only about 60% of the sun will be blocked for Jacksonville & surrounding areas): The American GFS (global forecast system) forecast model has been upgraded to the 'FV3' (finite-volume cubed-sphere).  This is the first major overhaul of the GFS model since 2003.  Of course, the goal is more accurate forecast models but - remember - any forecast model is just that - a model & cannot nor will not be perfect.  A couple of the keys to better forecast models include better input (analysis) & higher resolution in 3-D of the earth's atmosphere.  More info. * here *..... a more technical explanation * here *. One of the unique - & potentially critical - aspects of the FV3 model is the ability to zoom in on critical weather events such as hurricanes.  The image below shows an example. The left is the zoomed in area - the right is where the model will then be more coarse away from the area of concern so as to not slow the model's output or compromise the overall model output.
  • May turned dry on us.... & hot.  Jacksonville finally broke - on Mon., June 10th - a streak of 17 straight days 90+ with 23 for the year already (annual avg. is 82 days). The drought monitor map (updated weekly every Thu.) shows a dramatic increase in the 'abnormally' dry area. The 'wet season' usually kicks in during June but can range anywhere from mid May to mid to late June as indicated by the last 10 years. The wet season accounts - on avg. - for more than half of Jacksonville's annual rainfall. If & when the clouds part enough, enjoy a good show put on by Jupiter.  Due to its 'close' proximity, you will even be able to make out 4 of the larger moons by simply using  binoculars or, of course, a telescope. Night skies below + Jupiter nfo: 'SkyandTelescope'   June 10 (all night): Jupiter arrives at opposition, rising in the east at sunset (“opposite” the Sun) and staying up all night. Throughout the month, the majestic planet will be somewhat brighter than in the past five years.   June 15 (night): The waxing gibbous Moon, Jupiter, and Antares form a triangle in the southeast shortly after sunset.   June 17 (dusk): Look low toward the west-northwest after sunset and tease Mercury and Mars out of the gloaming. The two planets, a mere ½° apart, stay less than 2° apart for a couple of evenings prior and several evenings afterward.   June 18 (evening): The Moon, one day past full, and Saturn rise in tandem 1° apart. The Moon actually covers Saturn from some locations in the Southern Hemisphere.   June 21 : Northern summer begins at the solstice, 11:54 a.m. EDT. It’s the shortest night of the year in this hemisphere.   June 23 (dusk): Mercury appears its farthest from the Sun, 25° away. Look for it low in the west about 45 minutes after sunset. Pollux and Castor, in Gemini, are to its right.   June 30 (dawn): A thin crescent Moon rises shortly before sunrise, cradled in the Hyades and below the Pleiades.   July 2 (day): A total solar eclipse occurs along a narrow band crossing parts of the Pacific Ocean, northern Chile, and central Argentina. It’s the first since the “Great American Eclipse” in 2017. Much of the rest of South America, a small section of Central America, and some Pacific islands will see a partial solar eclipse — but not anywhere in North America.   July 4 : Earth is at aphelion, its farthest from the Sun for 2019, at a distance of 94,513,221 miles (2% more than average).   July 9 (all night): Saturn arrives at opposition, meaning it’s opposite the Sun in the sky. It rises at sunset and sets at sunrise. The magnificent ringed planet is upper left of the Teapot in Sagittarius and just below the Teaspoon asterism.   Moon Phases New Moon: June 2, 6:02 a.m. EDT First Quarter: June 10, 1:59 a.m. EDT Full Moon: June 17, 4:31 a.m. EDT (Strawberry Moon; called Rose Moon in Europe) Last Quarter: June 25, 5:46 a.m. EDT
  • Talking the Tropics With Mike' updated every day through the hurricane season... watch 'Surviving the Storm'.... A dry last 3 weeks of May has made for a parched start to June for NE Fl./SE Ga.  The period from May 7th through June 3rd for Jacksonville was the driest such stretch on record with only 0.07' of rain compared to the avg. of 3.55'. Combine the lack of rain with hot temps. - longest stretch of 97+ degrees at 10 days - 2nd only to a July, 1875 heat wave!, & you have the ingredients for sudden drought conditions.  100 degrees on Memorial Day tied our all-time May record high. May rainfall courtesy our Jax N.W.S.: FL   JASPER                      3.60                    FL   BEAUCLERC                             2.41 FL   JACKSONVILLE BEACH                    1.52 FL   FERNANDINA BEACH              1.71 FL   LAKE CITY                     1.39                  FL   LAKE CITY 2 E                    0.82        FL   GLEN ST MARY 1 W                2.49                 FL   CRESCENT CITY                         3.45             FL   GAINESVILLE RGNL AP             2.65          FL   HASTINGS 4NE              3.63                    FL   OCALA                    5.56                                                FL   WHITE SPRINGS 7N               3.09           FL   JACKSONVILLE CRAIG MUNI AP      1.76     FL   JACKSONVILLE INTL AP        1.74              FL   FEDERAL POINT                3.64                                        FL   NE PALM COAST                         1.82     GA   PRIDGEN                              1.12 GA   ALMA BACON CO AP        1.21                                               GA   NAHUNTA 6 NE            2.20                   GA   BRUNSWICK MALCOLM MCKINNON AP       1.72 GA   WOODBINE                     4.00    But June typically starts our 'wet season' & all indications are that wetter is the direction were heading as we move toward the 2nd full week of June.  More than half our annual rainfall typically occurs from June through Sept. thanks to a combination of active sea breezes/high humidity & the occasional tropical disturbance.
  • The hurricane season begins June 1st.  Daily updates on the tropics can be found at 'Talking the Tropics With Mike'. May has suddenly turned stormy across the Lower 48 of the U.S.  The stormy part is not unusual - it's the peak of the tornado season for tornado alley.  But the incessant & violent nature of the storms has been something to behold.  One of the primary factors has been a stout & stubborn upper level (at about 30,000 feet) ridge centered over or near Jacksonville.  The jet stream dives southward over the western U.S. creating the perfect combination for severe weather from Texas to the Midwest, Ohio Valley & Northeast.  The Western U.S. has been unseasonably cold & some Sierra ski resorts in Nevada & California are expected to remain open into August!..... & at least into June in Colorado. The result for Jacksonville has been an early season heat wave.  Memorial Day weekend was the hottest of at least the last 15 years & the 100 degree high on Memorial Day tied the record for the hottest May temp. going back to 1871.  We've 'officially' hit 100 in Jacksonville 95 times since 1871.  Very little local rainfall has been another byproduct of the pattern, so our 'wet season' looks to be delayed unfortunately. Back to the severe weather..... 2019 has been the most active year - so far - for tornadoes since 2011 & 2008 respectively. Tornado warnings issued by individual N.W.S. offices during just one week period from May 23 - 29 - 400+!: N.W.S. tornado warnings issued office by office since Jan. 1 through May 29th - #1: Tulsa, Ok.! Caution note: while this year's late spring has been violent, there's virtually no trend indicating more EF-3/4/5 tornadoes than in the past.  Better observational & reporting methods, amended post storm surveys, (too) many storm chasers & smart devices that can be used to quickly snap pictures or take video all add up to more tornado reports. As of May 27th, there had been more than 500 tornado reports in just 30 days.  That's only happened four other times: 2003, 2004, 2008 & 2011. Texas tornado: ,p> Iowa tornado: Photos below are from a friend of a local (John Peters) viewer who took photos from his ultralight showing the scoured ground from an EF-3 tornado north of Dayton, Oh.: 0 Storm surveys will be ongoing for a long time but a few prelimanry NWS offices that have started the process: * Kansas City, Mo. - including massive EF-4 * Wilmington, Oh. - large EF-3 tornadoes at night * Quad Cities, Iowa * Lincoln, Illinois * St. Louis, Mo. - including overnight Jefferson City EF-3 * Springfield, Mo. * Northern Indiana * Indianapolis The dip in the jet stream has allowed cold air to dominate the Rockies & Western U.S. Arapahoe Basin in Colorado is still going strong & will ski into June - 6 out of 9 lifts are operating with nearly 900 acres of skiable terrain :). And snow skiing is still going strong on Mammoth Mountain, California! 1 And so we move the calendars forward to June.  Averages at JIA: Low / High - 1st: 67 / 88 degrees.... 30th: 72 / 91 degrees Rainfall: 6.45' Sunrise / Sunset - 1st - 6:25am / 8:24pm..... 30th: 6:28am / 8:33pm - +6 min. of daylight
  • The wildfire season looks to be peaking rather deep into spring this year as we're stuck in a long stretch of dry & increasingly hot weather.  The upper level (500 mb) forecast (GFS) map below is for Memorial Day & shows a strong high pressure area near the Southeast U.S.  Such a pattern causes sinking air which is not conducive to producing much in the way of widespread or heavy rain. I mentioned in the May 13th post a pulse in the MJO (Madden-Julian Oscillation) that might try to spur tropical development over the Atlantic Basin (including Gulf &/or Caribbean).  The 'upward motion' - 2nd map below - is still spreading eastward but the upper level high will likely keep any tropical development away from Florida.  At this point it does not look like our 'wet season' will begin before the first week of June. Map below shows moisture anomaly (plus or minus): First Alert CBM Corey Simma found an interesting stat.  The number of wet days through 2019 so far in which Sunday has been the wettest: Late season snows are still occurring(!) for parts of the Rockies & even Minnesota but for the most part the Lower 48 is done with accumulating snow.  For the season: May 18 - 24 is 'National Safe Boating Week'.  Make sure to be careful & smart as we move into the Memorial Day weekend & the summer beyond.  It all begins with a life jacket for everyone on the boat!
  • April & May are peak of the dry &, therefore, wildfire season for Jacksonville/NE Fl./SE Ga.  Since Feb. 1, not only typically dry but nearly 2.5' below avg.  There are signs of the 'wet season' getting underway across S. Florida which is typically followed by a northward trend so hopefully our local wet season will at least start on time if not a bit early. An interesting 'pulse' in the MJO - Madden-Julian Oscillation - has been detected over the Pacific.  In its simplest terms, such a pulse corellates with 'upward' motion (green lines) which leads to increased convection.  During the tropical season, it can also point to general development of tropical cyclones.  Such a pulse is spreading east from the Pacific into the Atlantic Basin - all the blue & even red is strong convection (t'storms).  So we would expect to see an active (wet) weather pattern over the Lower 48 through the better part of May & MIGHT point to some early season tropical development over the SW Atlantic, Carribbean &/or Gulf of Mexico.  No hype(!) - just something to keep an eye on. May/early June night skies as we head for the summer solstice (SkyandTelescope.com): May 15 (dusk): The waxing gibbous Moon, in Virgo, is about 8° above Spica. May 19–20 (all night): The Moon, a day past full, forms a wide triangle with Jupiter and Antares in the southeast. Follow the trio as it glides across the sky through the night.   May 21 (morning): Look toward the south-southwest well before sunrise to see the Moon some 5° right of Jupiter.   May 22–23 (morning): The thinning Moon approaches and then overtakes Saturn, ending up about 5° left of the ringed planet.   June 1 (dawn): Look toward the east-northeast before sunrise to see Venus. Can you spot the slim sliver of the waning lunar crescent some 6° right of the planet?   June 10 (all night): Jupiter arrives at opposition, rising in the east at sunset and staying up all night. Throughout the month, the majestic planet will be somewhat brighter than in the past five years.   Moon Phases New Moon May 4, 6:46 p.m. EDT First Quarter May 11, 9:12 p.m. EDT Full Moon May 18, 5:11 p.m. EDT (Flower Moon) Last Quarter May 26, 12:34 p.m. EDT
  • Miami air Boeing 737 ended up at the end of the runway nosing into the St. Johns River Fri. evening, May 3rd. It is not known for certain why the plane skidded off the runway as of this writing but the plane was landing during a heavy thunderstorm - winds were gusting to 18 mph out of the W/NW (tailwind) but could have been much stronger with a change in direction at higher altitudes due to the storms... visibility was as low as 2 miles in heavy rain... cloud ceiling (base of clouds) was near 1,500 feet and there was frequent lightning.  The 'nerdy' METAR (Meteorological Aerodrome Report) observation near the time of the incident: KNIP 040145Z 29008G16KT 3SM +TSRA BR SCT008 BKN015CB OVC032 24/22 A2999 RMK AO2 TSB04 FRQ LTGIC OHD TS OHD MOV E T1 SET P0063 T02440222 The cloud tops on these storms were as high as 30,000-40,000 feet as measured on First Alert Doppler HD: First Alert Doppler HD imagery as the Boeing 737 was landing - lightning rainfall rates of 2'+ per hour: Velocity data on First Alert Doppler HD does not show any extreme wind at the surface as was indicated by the weather ob of a wind out of 290 degrees (W/NW) at 8 knots (7 mph) gusting to 16 knots (18 mph): At first light early Saturday, 05/04 from the First Alert Skycam Network at Riverside (~ 8 miles): Air speed at landing was 163 knots (188 mph) ... landing speed was 178 knots (205 mph). This week - through Sat., May 11th - is 'Hurricane Preparedness Week'.  There are daily themes & safety tips * here * - * determining your risk, * develop an evacuation plan, * assemble disaster supplies, * get an insurance checkup, * strengthen your home, * help your neighbor &.... * complete a written plan .   Always prepare for storm season & hurricanes far in advance.  In conjuction with messaging preparation, the NHC will conduct their annual 'awareness tour' with the last stop in our own 'backyard' - Brunswick, Ga.  We hope to see you there.  We'll have the First Alert Storm Tracker & will be talking with the new hurricane center director, Ken Graham as well as several hurricane center forecasters. 0 NHC media / public announcement: What: 2019 Hurricane Awareness Tour Where: Brunswick Golden Isles Airport 295 Aviation Pkwy, Brunswick, GA 31525 When: Friday May 10, 2019 Open to the Public: 2:00 PM – 5:00 PM Mark your calendars! The Hurricane Hunter aircraft and pilots will be visiting Brunswick, GA on Friday May 10th, 2019.  The 2019 Hurricane Awareness Tour will make a stop Brunswick Golden Isles Airport on May 10, 2019. Public tours will occur from 2 – 5pm with all ages welcome to join us! This opportunity will allow the public to tour inside the aircraft, meet and talk with crew members and pilots, and speak with the National Hurricane Center Director Ken Graham. Additionally, local first responders will be on site displaying their helicopters, firetrucks, and other emergency response vehicles. We invite you to learn more about all the hazards associated with hurricanes from National Weather Service meteorologists and Georgia Emergency Management. This will be the first visit near the Jacksonville, FL area since 2015 when it was hosted in St Augustine, FL. If you’re interested in the opportunity to meet a hurricane hunter or hurricane specialist, this is your chance to visit them in person to learn more about their exciting mission. Overview Have you ever been fascinated by hurricanes or wondered how it is possible for people to fly safely into them? If the answer is yes, then mark your calendar for the 2019 Hurricane Awareness Tour in Brunswick, Georgia on May 10th! Here’s a quick video of what it’s like to be a Hurricane Hunter Hurricane specialists representing the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and members of the USAF Reserve will visit five U.S. East Coast cities. Together, they will be showcasing aircraft they use for tropical cyclone interrogation, a WC-130J Hurricane Hunter aircraft along with the NOAA Lockheed WP-3D Orion aircraft. Their visit is intended to raise awareness of the impacts from tropical cyclone threats and why it’s dangerous to face a land falling storm without a hurricane plan in place. The National Hurricane Director, Ken Graham, and Hurricane Specialist Daniel Brown will also be present to help educate those in vulnerable communities about hurricane preparedness and will be available for interviews. Staff from Emergency Management offices, non-profit organizations including the American Red Cross, Federal Alliance for Safe Homes (FLASH), and Meteorologists from the National Weather Service will be part of the tour at each stop. Among those invited to participate and tour include community groups, media, local elected officials and select local schools (by invitation only) as well as the general public. Public tours will be given from 2:00 to 5:00 pm. Registration is not required for public tours. However, due to the schedule of the aircraft crew, public tours will promptly end at 5:00 pm. 1 The NHC has completed its post storm report on historic hurricane Florence - click * here *.  The tropical cyclone dumped record breaking rainfall on parts of the Carolina's in mid September, 2018 & was one of two names retired (Michael was the other name retired).

The Latest News Headlines

  • Today will be hot and humid with highs in the lower to mid 90’s inland and near 90 at the coast. There will be scattered afternoon thunderstorms today. Feels-like temps will once again be 100-103 inland and 100+ at the coast.  Showers and storms may dampen some early tailgaters for The Rolling Stones concert (2-5 pm).  Showers and any thunderstorms should either be out of Duval County or loosing steam by 6 pm.  CONTEST:  Pick what song you want to hear The Stones play This weekend the heat and humidity stick around with highs in the mid 90’s with only a few widely scattered showers and storms. The mid 90’s hang around on Monday.  INDEPTH:  What you need to know if you are going to the concert
  • An airman was reportedly shot in the leg Thursday night at Nellis Air Force Base. >>Read more trending news The airman was taken to a hospital with survivable injuries, Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department Lt. Adrian Beas told The Las Vegas Review-Journal. The circumstances surrounding the incident are unclear. Police were called shortly after 9:30 p.m. and found the injured airman near the O’Callaghan Federal Hospital, Beas said. Police and base personnel are investigating how the shooting happened, KVVU-TV reported.
  • UPDATE:  Jacksonville Police has found the missing girls who were the center of a Missing Child Alert activated late Thursday night. Police say the two girls were found safe together in Clay County. According to JSO, the case is being worked as a recovery of runaways. The Clay County Sheriff’s Office says both girls are being spoken with.    ===ORIGINAL STORY:  The Florida Department of Law Enforcement has issued a Missing Child Alert 11-year-old  Addison Terry.  JSO had reported the young girl was missing on Thursday after she ran away from the Youth Crisis Center on Parental Road on the Southside Wednesday night. YCC is not commenting on the specifics on how the child ran off or why she was with them, to begin with. According to the FDLE, Terry maybe with 16-year-old Jade Seidel. JSO says Seidel is another missing teen. The two were last seen in the area of Argyle Forest Boulevard but added they could be headed to Clay County. Anyone with information about their whereabouts is asked to call the FDLE, JSO, or dial 911.
  • The uncle of missing 16-year-old Iyana Sawyer has now been indicted for two counts of first degree murder, and our partner Action News Jax reports the counts relate to Sawyer and her unborn baby. 16-year-old Sawyer was last seen leaving Terry Parker High School in December. Since that time, her uncle, Johnathan Quiles, has been identified as a suspect in her disappearance. Quiles has been in jail since January, on a separate sexual battery charge. Now, the State Attorney’s Office confirms Quiles has been indicted for two counts of first degree murder and one count of sexual battery. Our partner Action News Jax reports Sawyer’s family’s attorney tells them the murder charges are for the teen and her unborn baby. WOKV is working to get court and police records to confirm and learn more about what led to these charges being filed.
  • A toddler has drowned in a pool, in a residential area of Lakeshore South on Jacksonville’s Westside. The Jacksonville Sheriff’s Office responded to the home on San Juan Avenue around 2:20PM. Jacksonville Fire and Rescue was also dispatched, and when emergency responders got on scene, they found witnesses performing CPR on the toddler. Rescue personnel took over CPR and transported the toddler to the hospital, where it died. At this time, JSO is not saying if anyone else was in the pool at the time, but foul play is not suspected in the drowning. They’re also not releasing any additional information about the victim, including the age and gender, but police confirmed in a tweet that this involved a toddler. Police are currently speaking with witnesses at the home, as their investigation continues. The Florida Department of Children and Families is also investigating.

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