ON AIR NOW

LISTEN NOW

Weather

cloudy-day
60°
Sunny
H 71° L 48°
  • cloudy-day
    60°
    Current Conditions
    Sunny. H 71° L 48°
  • clear-day
    49°
    Morning
    Sunny. H 71° L 48°
  • cloudy-day
    69°
    Afternoon
    Partly Cloudy. H 71° L 61°
LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

The latest top stories

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

The latest traffic report

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

The latest forecast

00:00 | 00:00

Three Big Things
 you need to know
1
2
3
Zimbabwe’s Robert Mugabe addresses nation, defies resignation expectations

Zimbabwe’s Robert Mugabe addresses nation, defies resignation expectations

In an address on state television Sunday, Zimbabwe President Robert Mugabe  defied expectations he would resign, Reuters reported. The 93-year-old, who has led the country since it gained independence in 1980 from Great Britain, pledged to preside over a ZANU-PF congress next month even though the ruling party had removed him as its leader hours earlier. >> Read more trending news ZANU-PF had given Mugabe less than 24 hours to quit as head of state or face impeachment, Reuters reported.  During his address on state television, Mugabe acknowledged criticism against him from ZANU-PF, the military and the public, but did not speak about resigning, Reuters reported. Earlier, Mugabe was replaced as party leader by Emmerson Mnangagwa, the deputy he fired this month,  Reuters reported.“He has been expelled,” one of the delegates said. “Mnangagwa is our new leader.” Mugabe’s wife, Grace, who had harbored ambitions of succeeding the 93-year-old leader, was also expelled from the party, Reuters reported.

Suspect named in Pennsylvania police officer's shooting death

Suspect named in Pennsylvania police officer's shooting death

Here’s what we know about the fatal shooting of a New Kensington, Pennsylvania, police officer: >> Visit WPXI.com for complete coverage >> Click here or scroll down for more >> Read more trending news

Documents: Montana congressman misled investigators after assaulting reporter

Documents: Montana congressman misled investigators after assaulting reporter

A Montana congressman misled investigators about his assault on a reporter the day before he was elected in May, claiming that “liberal media” were “trying to make a story,” the Bozeman Daily Chronicle reported Saturday, citing audio and documents. >> Read more trending news U.S. Rep. Greg Gianforte, a Republican, told an officer in an audio interview after the attack that reporter Ben Jacobs of The Guardian newspaper had grabbed him by the wrist and pulled both of them to the floor. Audio of Gianforte’s interview with Gallatin County Sheriff’s Office Sgt. Scott Secor was released along with documents requested by the Chronicle and other news organizations after Gianforte was cited for assaulting Jacobs on May 24. Gianforte later pleaded guilty to misdemeanor assault.  The Chronicle requested the documents in June. After Gianforte, Jacobs and Gallatin County Attorney Marty Lambert did not object to the release, Gallatin County District Court Judge Holly Brown ruled this week that the documents could be released. \The audio of the interview with Gianforte comes from a recording made by Sgt. Scott Secor outside of Gianforte’s headquarters shortly after the 5:07 p.m. call Jacobs made to 911, a minute after he posted on Twitter, “Greg Gianforte just body slammed me and broke my glasses.” Once at the scene, Secor spoke with Jacobs first. “This is the weirdest day,” Jacobs told Secor.  The documents include interviews with members of a Fox News crew who were in the room with Gianforte and Jacobs at the politician’s Bozeman campaign office.  Gianforte told Secor that he was preparing for an interview with Fox News when “this man broke into a private room in the back and stuck a microphone in my face and started asking me obnoxious questions.” Gianforte said he tried to explain to him that he was in the middle of an interview, but that Jacobs kept “waving” the microphone in his face, the Chronicle reported. “I probably shouldn’t do it but I reached out for his phone ... he grabbed my wrist, he spun and we ended up on the floor ... so he pulled me down on top of him,” Secor quoted Gianforte as saying. After the incident Gianforte’s campaign spokesman, Shane Scanlon, issued a statement that also blamed the attack on Jacobs, saying the reporter had grabbed the candidate’s wrist.  Gianforte publicly apologized to Jacobs and told supporters he wasn’t proud of his actions. His spokesman, Travis Hall, insisted on Friday that the documents contained “nothing new.” “No one was misled, and anyone who says otherwise is mistaken. Greg took responsibility for his actions and is focused on serving the people of Montana,” Hall said in an emailed statement to The Associated Press.

Thank you to everybody who joined us at Books & Brews with Brian Kilmeade and on November 10th at Bold City Brewery! See the pictures of the event, q&a, and meet & greets inside. Click the link above!
Thank you to everybody who joined us at Books & Brews with Brian Kilmeade and on November 10th at Bold City Brewery! See the pictures of the event, q&a, and meet & greets inside. Click the link above!
Thank you to everybody who joined us at Books & Brews with Brian Kilmeade and on November 10th at Bold City Brewery! See the pictures of the event, q&a, and meet & greets inside. Click the link above!
Thank you to everybody who joined us at Books & Brews with Brian Kilmeade and on November 10th at Bold City Brewery! See the pictures of the event, q&a, and meet & greets inside. Click the link above!
House Republicans voted for tax reform, but asked for changes in the bill as well

As the House voted along party lines on Thursday to approve a sweeping package of GOP tax reforms, one peculiar part of the floor debate came when a number of Republicans – who voted for the bill – took to the floor to request changes in the their party’s plan, as some highlighted unintended consequences, while others objected to the basics of the measure.

Known in parliamentary parlance as a “colloquy,” the scripted exchanges between lawmakers are often done to clarify the legislative intent of a bill, or in this case, to urge action in a specific way in House-Senate negotiations.

And [More]