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Three Big Things
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Clay Sheriff has 'zero tolerance' for those behind false school threats

Clay Sheriff has 'zero tolerance' for those behind false school threats

Clay County is dealing with a surge of school threats since the Stoneman Douglas High School shooting last Wednesday. Many of them are copycat threats, none have turned out to be credible.  Since the school massacre in South Florida, the Clay County Sheriff’s Office has investigated 11 threats. This school year alone, it’s gotten 17 threats. Two of those, came from the same student who made a verbal and social media threat.  “It sickens me to think that somebody would think it’s a game to put out a post an email, an Instagram post or any other kind of social media platform,” said Sheriff Darryl Daniels.  Oakleaf High School was the latest target of a threat that while false caused a real scare prompting 40 percent of students to be absent Thursday.  “Definitely worries me, makes me very concerned sending my son to school every day,” said Dana Lovoi.  Because of the increase in threats Sheriff Daniels called a news conference Thursday to address the issue.  “We vet every threat and take every threat seriously there’s is no idle threat,” said Daniels.  So far this school year, a 14-year-old was arrested for making bomb threats and another arrest is still pending. Both incidents happened before the mass shooting at Stoneman Douglas.  Even though none of the threats have been credible, Sheriff Daniels said they were all investigated even at the detriment of his agency’s budget.  “If I’m going to blow the budget on any one item it’s certainly going to be for the safety and welfare of our children,” said Daniels.  Superintendent Addison Davis said students who make threats can expect serious consequences.  “The consequences could lead to out of school suspension up to expulsion and that would be the determination of a hearing to the board” said Davis.  “If your kid or you or somebody in this viewing audience thinks it’s cute to do that we’ll arrest you if we find out it’s you,” said Daniels.  Sheriff Daniels said it costs $12,000 of taxpayer money to have a dedicated deputy at each school last Friday when someone again made a threat. He said that’s money that could’ve been used elsewhere.  The sheriff also addressed another hot button issue at today’s news conference and that’s the debate over whether teachers should be armed.  Sheriff Daniels said the Florida Sheriff’s Association is looking into whether law enforcement can help train teachers and administrators in the use of firearms.  “There may be a time during the very near future, very near future, when state funding is made available for us to do that and teachers and administrators will be carrying guns in school,” said Daniels.  Some parents don’t want to see that happen.  “I’m not sure that that’s the best idea either. I don’t know that it’s the right place for a gun,” said Lovoi.  But one thing they can agree on is tighter security.  “Definitely more security at the schools and just a lock down campus in general to ensure that no people that shouldn’t be there are there,” said Lovoi.  Sheriff Daniels said his agency has applied for a grant in the past to help increase the number of school resource deputies on campuses. The Clay County Sheriff’s Office will apply for that same grant again this year. WATCH: CLAY COUNTY SHERIFF DARRYL DANIELS ADDRESSES SCHOOL SAFETY, FOLLOWING SHOOTNG IN PARKLAND

Armed Stoneman Douglas resource officer 'never went in' during Florida shooting

Armed Stoneman Douglas resource officer 'never went in' during Florida shooting

The school resource officer at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School has resigned, according to Broward County Sheriff Scott Israel. [View the story 'Stoneman Douglas resource officer resigns after investigation' on Storify] >> Read more trending news  Follow along with our live updates as we learn more

NRA opposes raising minimum age to buy rifles

NRA opposes raising minimum age to buy rifles

Officials with the National Rifle Association on Wednesday voiced opposition to any legislation aimed at raising the minimum age needed to buy certain rifles amid a renewed gun debate following last week’s deadly school shooting in Florida. >> Read more trending news In a statement obtained by The Hill, NRA spokeswoman Jennifer Baker said the focus should be on keeping guns out of the hands of “violent criminals and the dangerously mentally ill.” “Passing a law that makes it illegal for a 20-year-old to purchase a shotgun for hunting or adult single mother from purchasing the most effective self-defense rifle on the market punishes law-abiding citizens for the evil acts of criminals,” she said. The group argued that raising the minimum age would deprive people between the ages of 18 and 20 of “their constitutional right to self-protection.” Authorities said Nikolas Cruz, the 19-year-old identified by police as the gunman in last week’s shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, legally bought the AR-15 rifle he used to gun down 14 students and three teachers. He has been charged with 17 counts of premeditated murder. >> Related: Florida school shooting: How difficult is it to purchase a gun in Florida? The current federal minimum age for buying or possessing handguns is 21, but the limit is 18 for rifles, including assault-type weapons such as the AR-15. Officials with the NRA did not address the possibility of raising the minimum age Thursday while speaking at the Conservative Political Action Conference. However, President Donald Trump endorsed the idea during a school safety discussion Thursday with state and local leaders from across the nation, The Associated Press reported. >> Related: Who is NRA head Wayne LaPierre and what did he say at the CPAC meeting? 'We're going to work on getting the age up to 21 instead of 18,' Trump said. 'The NRA will back it and so will Congress.” Sen. Jeff Flake, R-Arizona, said in a tweet Wednesday that he was working with Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-California, on a bipartisan bill to raise the minimum gun purchase age for most Americans to 21 years old. “A kid too young (to) buy a handgun should be too young to buy an #AR15,” he wrote. The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Donald Smith has been found guilty of the 2013 abduction, rape, and murder of 8-year-old Cherish Perrywinkle in Jacksonville. Click the link above to see the latest from the trial.
Donald Smith has been found guilty of the 2013 abduction, rape, and murder of 8-year-old Cherish Perrywinkle in Jacksonville. Click the link above to see the latest from the trial.
Donald Smith has been found guilty of the 2013 abduction, rape, and murder of 8-year-old Cherish Perrywinkle in Jacksonville. Click the link above to see the latest from the trial.
Donald Smith has been found guilty of the 2013 abduction, rape, and murder of 8-year-old Cherish Perrywinkle in Jacksonville. Click the link above to see the latest from the trial.
Trump presses for teachers to carry concealed weapons as part of plans to deter school shootings

With political pressure for action in the wake of last week’s mass school shooting in Florida, President Donald Trump on Thursday said he supports the idea of allowing some teachers to carry concealed weapons in schools, proposing that those teachers get bonuses for helping with security improvements to deter school shootings in the future.

“What I would recommend doing, is that the people who do carry (a weapon), we give them a bonus,” the President said in a round table meeting at the White House with state and local officials, arguing that is a much less expensive option than hiring thousands [More]