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Three Big Things
 you need to know
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2
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Trump to propose massive tax cuts for businesses

Trump to propose massive tax cuts for businesses

President Donald Trump plans to propose massive tax cuts for businesses big and small as part of an overhaul that he says will provide the biggest tax cuts in U.S. history. In addition to big tax cuts for corporations, Trump also wants to cut taxes for small business owners from a top tax rate of 39.6 percent to a top rate of 15 percent, said an official with knowledge of the plan. The top tax rate for individuals would be cut from 39.6 percent to the 'mid-30s,' the official said. The official, who spoke on condition of anonymity, was not authorized to discuss the plan publicly ahead of Trump's announcement, scheduled for Wednesday. White House officials had already revealed that Trump's plan would reduce the top corporate income tax rate from 35 percent to 15 percent. The plan will also include child-care benefits, a cause promoted by Trump's daughter Ivanka. Republicans who slammed the growing national debt under Democrat Barack Obama said Tuesday they are open to Trump's tax plan, even though it could add trillions of dollars to the deficit over the next decade. Echoing the White House, Republicans on Capitol Hill argued that tax cuts would spur economic growth, reducing or even eliminating any drop in tax revenue. 'I'm not convinced that cutting taxes is necessarily going to blow a hole in the deficit,' said Sen. Orrin Hatch, R-Utah, chairman of the Finance Committee. 'I actually believe it could stimulate the economy and get the economy moving,' Hatch added. 'Now, whether 15 percent is the right figure or not, that's a matter to be determined.' The argument that tax cuts pay for themselves has been debunked by economists from across the political spectrum. On Tuesday, the official scorekeeper for Congress dealt the argument — and Trump's plan — another blow. The nonpartisan Joint Committee on Taxation said Tuesday that a big cut in corporate taxes — even if it is temporary — would add to long-term budget deficits. This is a problem for Republicans because it means they would need Democratic support in the Senate to pass a tax overhaul that significantly cuts corporate taxes. The assessment was requested by House Speaker Paul Ryan, R-Wis., who has been pushing a new tax on imports to fund lower overall tax rates. Senate Republicans have panned the idea, and officials in the Trump administration have sent mixed signals about it. The import tax is not expected to be part of Trump's plan. Trump dispatched his top lieutenants to Capitol Hill Tuesday to discuss his plan with Republican leaders. They met for about half an hour. No Democrat was invited. Afterward, Hatch called it, 'a preliminary meeting.' 'They went into some suggestions that are mere suggestions, and we'll go from there.' Republicans have been working under a budget maneuver that would allow them to pass a tax bill without Democratic support in the Senate — but only if it didn't add to long-term deficits. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., said the Senate was sticking to that strategy. 'Regretfully we don't expect to have any Democratic involvement in' a tax overhaul, McConnell said. 'So we'll have to reach an agreement among ourselves.' Democrats said they smell hypocrisy over the growing national debt, which stands at nearly $20 trillion. For decades, Republican lawmakers railed against saddling future generations with trillions in debt. But with Republicans controlling Congress and the White House, there is no appetite at either end of Pennsylvania Avenue to tackle the long-term drivers of debt — Social Security and Medicare. Instead, Republicans are pushing for tax cuts and increased defense spending. 'I'm particularly struck by how some of this seems to be turning on its head Republican economic theory,' said Sen. Ron Wyden of Oregon, the top Democrat on the Senate Finance Committee. Sen. Bob Casey, D-Pa., said, 'On a lot of fronts, both the administration and Republicans have been contradictory, to say the least.' 'There's no question we should try to reduce (the corporate tax rate), but I don't see how you pay for getting it down that low,' Casey said. 'Fifteen percent, that's a huge hole if you can't make the math work.' The Trump administration on Tuesday stuck with its assertion that tax reform could push economic growth above 3 percent. Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross said that the combination of changes on taxes, trade and regulations being pushed by the administration would accelerate the pace of economic gains. 'There is no reason that we should not be able to hit that — if not beat it,' Ross said at the White House news briefing. Many economists are skeptical that growth could consistently eclipse 3 percent. The flow of workers into the U.S. economy has slowed because of retirements by an aging baby boomer population, while improvements in productivity have been sluggish. Officials with the Federal Reserve estimate that the economy will grow at a 2.1 percent clip this year and at 1.8 percent in the longer run. ___ Associated Press writers Alan Fram and Matthew Daly contributed to this report. ___ Follow Stephen Ohlemacher on Twitter at: http://twitter.com/stephenatap

Clay County Sheriff's Office hosting 'Tip a Cop' event to support Special Olympics Florida

Clay County Sheriff's Office hosting 'Tip a Cop' event to support Special Olympics Florida

This may change your lunch or dinner plans.   Through this Thursday, the Clay County Sheriff's Office is hosting a 'Tip a Cop' event.   Spokesperson Angela Spears explains, 'You'll see our deputies, the detention deputies, command staff, and even our civilian employees, don those aprons, wait tables, go to tables, take the orders, bring the food out and get tips, is what we're asking.'   The Sheriff's Office says all of the proceeds will go toward Special Olympics Florida.   'They [the athletes] train year-round and excel in sports such as track and field, volleyball, and soccer, and with the community's help we're going to make sure we raise funds to help them travel to the upcoming state and world games,' says Spears.   Everyone's invited to stop by Longhorn Steakhouse on County Road 220 in Fleming Island and grab a bite to eat, from 11 am to 10 pm.   It's the 9th year Clay deputies have held the fundraiser.

Jury selection for federal fraud trial of former Rep. Corrine Brown will spill in to third day

Jury selection for federal fraud trial of former Rep. Corrine Brown will spill in to third day

The opening statements in the federal fraud trial of now-former Congresswoman Corrine Brown have been pushed back, after jury selection fails to wrap up in two long days. The court had hoped to have the 12 person jury and two alternates selected by the end of the day Tuesday. All of the questioning is done, but the attorneys have not yet had the chance to exercise all of their challenges to prospective panelists- with several dozen people still being held. Around 5:45 PM, Magistrate Judge James R. Klindt told the courtroom “some complications for jurors” that he wasn’t previously aware of prevented him from holding them any later in to the evening. Because of that, he decided to end for the night, and resume Wednesday to finalize the jury. Opening statements, which had been scheduled for 9:30AM, will now take place at 1PM. The first day of jury questioning focused specifically on this case, with Klindt asking prospective jurors whether they were previously aware of the charges, if they have any feelings toward former and- ultimately- if the information and pre-conceived notions could be set aside in order to consider only the evidence presented at trial. Prospective jurors were also able to raise issues of “extreme hardship”. In all, that led to 21 people being excused from the pool, while 44 rolled over to today.  Klindt wanted to have around 50 prospective jurors before moving to the second phase of questioning, so more were summoned to report for jury duty Tuesday morning. The day started with those new jurors facing the same hardship and case knowledge questions as those who first reported Monday. Of the 30 questioned as a group, 17 said they have some knowledge of the case and six said they have strong feelings toward Brown one way or the other. While 19 were flagged for further questioning, the court only needed to vet a few in order to reach a threshold where they were comfortable moving forward- 53 total prospective jurors, including the ones who rolled over from yesterday. The second round of questioning included looking at areas which are more broad and standard for jury selection- employment, prior experience in the legal or criminal systems, and more. Ultimately, 20 people were singled out for individual questioning following group responses. Many of them indicated they knew someone or had themselves been involved in either an arrest or some kind of legal filing. The majority of those who were questioned told he judge those legal proceedings would influence their ability to listen to evidence and render a fair and impartial verdict. Unlike Monday, when prospective jurors were being challenged “for cause” as they were being individually questioned, Klindt allowed for a few strikes and then determined the rest should be done at the conclusion of the questioning. Those cause challenges will be the first thing tackled Wednesday. After that, prospective jurors will be “sat” in the order of their randomly selected number, and the first 12 designated as the possible panel. From there, both prosecutors and the defense have a specific number of “peremptory” strikes- or strikes without cause- which they can exercise. As prospective jurors are removed from the box for those strikes, the next in line by number will fill in.  Once the 12 person jury is chosen, a similar process takes place for the two alternates. Once that is done, the jury is set.  It’s hoped that the jury will be seated by 11AM, at which point US District Judge Timothy Corrigan- who will preside over the trial itself- will come in an instruct the jury. There will then be a break, and opening statements will formally kick off the trial Wednesday at 1PM. This jury will not be sequestered for this trial, which is currently scheduled for three weeks. Klindt has given the pool specific and repeated instruction that they’re not allowed to consume any news or social media about the trial, that they’re not allowed to communicate with anyone about the case, and that if someone speaks about the case in their presence they’re supposed to leave.  Brown and two others are accused of soliciting more than $800,000 in donations to “One Door For Education”- a group she represented as a charity- but using the money for personal expenses instead, including travel, luxury events, and more. Her two alleged co-conspirators- former Chief of Staff Ronnie Simmons and the head of One Door Carla Wiley- both previously pleaded guilty. Brown has been indicted on 22 charges.  WOKV is in the federal courthouse as these proceedings move forward. Check back frequently to WOKV.com for updates, and follow our reporter Stephanie Brown on Twitter for updates during court recesses.

Sign up to see Herman Cain live, as he hosts his show in the Harrell & Harrell Performance Studio at the News 104.5 WOKV studios on Thursday April 27th from 10AM to Noon. Food provided, courtesy of Gilbert's Social!
Sign up to see Herman Cain live, as he hosts his show in the Harrell & Harrell Performance Studio at the News 104.5 WOKV studios on Thursday April 27th from 10AM to Noon. Food provided, courtesy of Gilbert's Social!
Deputies are looking for 71-year-old Robert Maitland Dawson. The elderly man suffers from dementia and was reportedly in low spirits following a recent dispute.  Officials with the Sheriff’s Office says Dawson left his home in a 2013 Red Lincoln MKX with Florida tag IDY 701. He was last seen at the Speedway at Roberts Road and SR 13 N. Dawson is described as a white man, 6’01 tall, 200 lbs, with gray hair, green eyes and normally wears glasses.  He was last seen wearing dark colored pants and a long sleeve shirt.  If you have any information about Dawson’s whereabouts or if you have seen him, you are asked to call police or the St. Johns County Sheriff’s Office at 904.824.8304
This may change your lunch or dinner plans.   Through this Thursday, the Clay County Sheriff's Office is hosting a 'Tip a Cop' event.   Spokesperson Angela Spears explains, 'You'll see our deputies, the detention deputies, command staff, and even our civilian employees, don those aprons, wait tables, go to tables, take the orders, bring the food out and get tips, is what we're asking.'   The Sheriff's Office says all of the proceeds will go toward Special Olympics Florida.   'They [the athletes] train year-round and excel in sports such as track and field, volleyball, and soccer, and with the community's help we're going to make sure we raise funds to help them travel to the upcoming state and world games,' says Spears.   Everyone's invited to stop by Longhorn Steakhouse on County Road 220 in Fleming Island and grab a bite to eat, from 11 am to 10 pm.   It's the 9th year Clay deputies have held the fundraiser.
A JEA inspector is now on administrative leave and under investigation after detectives tie him to thousands of dollars' worth of questionable paysheet entries. Hugh James 'Jim' Popell is now at Duval County Jail, charged with employee theft and falsifying official documents following his booking on Monday. His arrest report shows the 66-year-old allegedly made 116 hours worth of questionable time entries from last November to this January. That adds up to just over $4,500 in salary. Detectives think he was doing a variety of personal items - including visiting family and shopping - while on the clock. He also had no explanation for not regularly completing eight hours during his shift or for charging overtime when asked by JSO just prior to his arrest. Investigators used GPS data from his company truck, badge entry records and emails to verify inconsistencies in the hours he clocked. Popell disputed some of the findings, saying that there was one case where he was given permission by a supervisor to visit his sick mother-in-law at a nursing home. He also offered to 'write a check' to JEA if the charges were dropped. He also asked at one point if he could 'retire right now', according to the report. Popell's name came up while JSO was investigating another JEA employee for the same reason. That employee wasn't identified in the report, but it did note that employee was also arrested. Popell is due in court next on May 17th. No bond number was available on the Duval County Jail website.
The man responsible for a 700 acre wildfire in Bryceville has been charged with two misdemeanors.  According to the Florida Department of Agriculture, Brian Sparks was charged with Reckless Landing Burning and Failure to Comply with a Department of Environmental Rule.  Sparks told investigators he was burning books and paper at his property in Hilliard on March 22nd.  The fire initially was three acres but grew to more than 700 due to gusty winds.    It destroyed two homes and other out buildings.   Investigators observed evidence of debris burning at the origin of the fire which included illegal materials, including papers which appeared to be from books.  The fire ultimately destroyed at least two homes and several out buildings.  Sparks made a first court appearance on April 17th, and according to the Nassau County Clerk of Courts, is due back in court on May 9th.   The Florida Forest Service says Sparks is also facing a bill for fire suppression costs, which we’re told will be the thousands of dollars.   FFS crew continue to monitor the Bryceville fire, which is now 100% contained.  It’s not clear when the suppression costs will be finalized.  
Controversial Brunswick pastor Ken Adkins was sentenced to 35 years in prison Tuesday for child molestation. Adkins, 57, will serve life on probation, upon his release.  Earlier this month, Adkins was found guilty on all eight counts, including aggravated child molestation, child molestation, enticing a child for indecent purposes, and more.  Prosecutors said that Adkins watched two 15-year-olds have sex and that he engaged in sexual acts with one of the teens. Adkins was initially arrested in August 2016. He turned himself in, and has been in the Glynn County, Georgia Jail since. 
Police are searching for three suspects after a man is beaten, robbed and shot near Edward Waters College following a night of drinking with friends. The Jacksonville Sheriff's Office says the attack happened around 2 a.m. in a parking lot near Sassy's Wings on Kings Road, but it was the man's roommate who actually called for help around five hours later. 'The victim was beaten severely, so he might have not known how bad he was,' said a JSO lieutenant briefing reporters at the scene. The victim - a 35-year-old white man - told JSO he caught a cab and the driver dropped him off on the 1500 block of Kings Road after missing a turn. According to the arrest report, he was walking through the area when he passed by two black men sitting at some picnic tables and they asked him to stop. That was when another black man came up from behind with a black handgun and ordered him to the ground. From there, the suspects took the man’s cell phone, shoes and cash, then kicked and pistol-whipped him before one of them fired a round into the victim’s right hip. The victim told JSO he must have lost consciousness at that point, waking up some time later to see the suspects gone. That’s when he walked home. The report notes that all three suspects were wearing long-sleeve shirts and winter clothing. The victim went to UF Health for injuries to his face as well as the bullet wound. JSO is actively investigating the area, including gathering any video footage and speaking to potential witnesses. Anyone with information is asked to call JSO at 904-630-0500 or email JSOCrimeTips@jaxsheriff.org. Those who wish to remain anonymous and possibly qualify for a cash reward can call Crime Stoppers at 866-845-TIPS (8477). 
Sign up to see Herman Cain live, as he hosts his show in the Harrell & Harrell Performance Studio at the News 104.5 WOKV studios on Thursday April 27th from 10AM to Noon. Food provided, courtesy of Gilbert's Social!
Sign up to see Herman Cain live, as he hosts his show in the Harrell & Harrell Performance Studio at the News 104.5 WOKV studios on Thursday April 27th from 10AM to Noon. Food provided, courtesy of Gilbert's Social!
Federal judge blocks Trump executive order holding back funds to sanctuary cities

In a blow to efforts by President Donald Trump to crack down on jurisdictions that protect immigrants illegally in the United States, a federal judge in California has issued a nationwide injunction against a plan to withhold federal dollars going to sanctuary cities, dealing the White House another legal setback on a Trump executive action.

“The threat is unconstitutionally coercive,” wrote federal judge William Orrick, who ruled that the Executive had overstepped his authority with this order.

“The Constitution vests the spending powers in Congress, not the President, so the Order cannot constitutionally place new conditions on federal [More]

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