ON AIR NOW

LISTEN NOW

Weather

cloudy-day
50°
Mostly Cloudy
H 75° L 61°
  • cloudy-day
    50°
    Current Conditions
    Mostly Cloudy. H 75° L 61°
  • cloudy-day
    66°
    Evening
    Mostly Cloudy. H 75° L 61°
  • cloudy-day
    62°
    Morning
    Partly Cloudy. H 82° L 64°
LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

The latest top stories

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

The latest traffic report

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

The latest forecast

00:00 | 00:00

Three Big Things
 you need to know
1
2
3
Suicide bomber kills 7 in Pakistani church

Suicide bomber kills 7 in Pakistani church

Seven people were killed and more than two dozen were injured Sunday when a suicide bomber attacked a church packed with more than 400 worshippers during a service in Pakistan, CNN reported. >> Read more trending news A Methodist church in Quetta was targeted by two attackers, but only one was able to denonate his vest, according to Sarfaraz Bugti, the interior minister of the Balochistan province. The second attacker was shot by a church security guard before he could detonate his explosives, Bugti said. The civilians were killed during the blast and in the intense firefight that followed, according to Moazzam Jah Ansari, the provincial police chief. 

CSX CEO Hunter Harrison dies

CSX CEO Hunter Harrison dies

The head of CSX railroad, Hunter Harrison, has died. The Jacksonville-based company released a statement Saturday attributing his death to 'unexpectedly severe complications from a recent illness.' Harrison recently took medical leave from his position as CEO and president of CSX. He died in Wellington, Florida. Jim Foote was appointed to serve as acting CEO. CSX issued the following statement: “It is with great sadness that we announce that E. Hunter Harrison, President and Chief Executive Officer of CSX, died today in Wellington, Fla., due to unexpectedly severe complications from a recent illness.  The entire CSX family mourns this loss.  On behalf of our Board of Directors, management team and employees, we extend our deepest sympathies to Hunter’s family.   Hunter was a larger-than-life figure who brought his remarkable passion, experience and energy in railroading to CSX.” Edward J. Kelly III, Chairman of the CSX Board of Directors, issued the following statement on behalf of the Board of Directors: “With the passing of Hunter Harrison, CSX has suffered a major loss.  Notwithstanding that loss, the Board is confident that Jim Foote, as acting Chief Executive Officer, and the rest of the CSX team will capitalize on the changes that Hunter has made.  The Board will continue to consider in a deliberative way how best to maximize CSX’s performance over the long term.” The head of @CSX railroad Hunter Harrison’s death comes just two days after the transportation company announced that he had been placed on medical leave due to an unspecified illness. @ActionNewsJax has more at 10. pic.twitter.com/0vH04ENtZ9 — Kaitlyn Chana (@KaitlynANjax) December 17, 2017 The #Jacksonville-based company released a statement Saturday attributing his death to 'unexpectedly severe complications from a recent illness.' @ActionNewsJax pic.twitter.com/Z3l4v7s6s2 — Kaitlyn Chana (@KaitlynANjax) December 17, 2017 .@CSX says “Hunter was a larger-than-life figure who brought his remarkable passion, experience, and energy in railroading to CSX.” @ActionNewsJax pic.twitter.com/bBsv92KZoB — Kaitlyn Chana (@KaitlynANjax) December 17, 2017 Earlier this year, @ActionNewsJax told you when the workforce trimmed about 2,300 employees and the fleet was cut by at least 900 locomotives. pic.twitter.com/HPiIWlicbN — Kaitlyn Chana (@KaitlynANjax) December 17, 2017 Harrison had promised to turn around CSX after taking the position less than a year ago. In their statement, the board says they’re confident that Jim Foote, acting Chief Executive Officer will capitalize on the changes that Harrison has made. @ActionNewsJax pic.twitter.com/ChqvmEkAXB — Kaitlyn Chana (@KaitlynANjax) December 17, 2017

Some highlights from the final Republican tax reform bill

Some highlights from the final Republican tax reform bill

After officially releasing the final details, Republicans in Congress set votes for next week in the House and Senate on a sweeping overhaul of the federal tax code, as GOP leaders expressed confidence that they would have the votes to pass the first major tax reform package since 1986. “This is what the American people have been waiting for: more jobs, fairer taxes, and bigger paychecks,” said House Speaker Paul Ryan. “The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act is now only two votes and a signature away from becoming the law of the land,” Ryan added, as Republicans said a vote would take place on Tuesday in the House. “I’m very excited about this moment,” said Rep. Kevin Brady (R-TX), the lead tax-writer as Chairman of the House Ways and Means Committee. The Tax Cuts & Jobs Act lets you keep more of your hard-earned money, meaning less of your paycheck will go to Washington. Period. pic.twitter.com/eBI303t0Ar — Paul Ryan (@SpeakerRyan) December 16, 2017 If you want to read through the bill, and the basic explanation of what the provisions would do, then click here, and take a look at the final version of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017. The first 500-plus pages is the bill text, followed by another almost 600 pages of explanation and financial charts about the legislation. Here’s some of the high points: 1. Final tax brackets more tax cuts than tax reform. The House plan envisioned just four tax brackets, instead of the current seven. But the final deal left the current system in place, and focused mainly on cutting the income tax rates. The current tax brackets are 10%, 15%, 25%, 28%, 33%, 35% and 39.6%. This GOP plan trims that to 0%, 10%, 12%, 22%, 24%, 32%, 35%, and 37%. Here’s a graphic from the bill on what the new system looks like: 2. Individual tax changes are temporary, most business tax changes are permanent. In order to hold down on the cost of this bill, Republicans set the plan so that almost all of the individual tax changes for individuals expire after 2025, in eight years. So, for example, the tax brackets listed above – if Congress does not act by the start of 2026, those tax cuts would then increase back to the previous 2017 level – this is exactly what happened with the Bush tax cuts of 2001/2003 and the “fiscal cliff” at the end of 2012. 3. Individual mandate tax penalty ends – but not in 2018. Added by the Senate, the provision that ends the tax penalty for not buying health insurance coverage under the Obama health law will be zeroed out, but not immediately. The final GOP plan allows the individual mandate to stay in effect in 2018 – so if you were thinking about rolling the dice and not getting insurance for next year, that would put you in the crosshairs of a tax penalty from the IRS. Share of Individual Mandate Penalty Payments by Income Level: •Under $50,000: 58% •$50,000 to $99,999: 28% •$100,000 or more: 14% (IRS, 2015) — Will Little (@Willy_fr_Philly) December 16, 2017 4. Some notable things that are NOT happening in the GOP bill. Some issues went away in the House-Senate negotiations. The final bill does not include provisions that would make tuition awards for graduate students into taxable income. The bill will not force people to pay taxes on employer provided tuition aid for people working at colleges and universities. The bill will not increase the amount of time that you need to own and occupy a principal residence in order to qualify for certain tax free gains on the sale of that home. And the deduction for teachers who buy school supplies, that was preserved at $250 (the Senate wanted to double it to $500, but that was not included in the final deal). Just in! #ReworkTheReform worked! #TaxCutsandJobsAct final text in: No tuition waiver tax. Student loan interest deduction, Lifetime Learning Tax Credit, and Employer Education Assistance are all preserved! #NAGPS4U #TaxReform #SaveGradEd @cmugsa @WSU_GPSA @Mizzou_GPC — NAGPS (@NAGPS) December 15, 2017 5. If you closed on your expensive home Friday, you’re in luck. The final GOP tax reform bill makes changes in how people can deduct mortgage interest payments. Current law states that such a mortgage deduction is limited to no more than a mortgage of $1,000,000 – this plan drops the upper limit to $750,000 (the House had proposed a $500,000 cap). Unlike other provisions, this $750,000 change has a retroactive component to it, as it plainly states that you had to have purchased your home by December 15, 2017 to qualify for the old $1 million limit. So, if you closed on your house on Friday with a mortgage of over $750,000, you will fare better on your tax return than someone who closes on that same home a day later.

The Federal Communications Commission voted 3-2 on Thursday to repeal Obama-era net neutrality rules meant to stop broadband companies from exercising more control over what people watch and see on the internet. >> Read more trending news FCC Chairman Ajit Pai, who put forth the planned repeal and voted in favor of it Thursday, said it “certainly wasn’t heavy-handed government regulation” that made the internet the “greatest free-market innovation in history.”  >> Related: State attorneys general ask FCC to delay net neutrality vote “Quite simply, we are restoring the light-touch framework that has governed the internet for most of its existence,” he said.
The Federal Communications Commission voted 3-2 on Thursday to repeal Obama-era net neutrality rules meant to stop broadband companies from exercising more control over what people watch and see on the internet. >> Read more trending news FCC Chairman Ajit Pai, who put forth the planned repeal and voted in favor of it Thursday, said it “certainly wasn’t heavy-handed government regulation” that made the internet the “greatest free-market innovation in history.”  >> Related: State attorneys general ask FCC to delay net neutrality vote “Quite simply, we are restoring the light-touch framework that has governed the internet for most of its existence,” he said.
The Federal Communications Commission voted 3-2 on Thursday to repeal Obama-era net neutrality rules meant to stop broadband companies from exercising more control over what people watch and see on the internet. >> Read more trending news FCC Chairman Ajit Pai, who put forth the planned repeal and voted in favor of it Thursday, said it “certainly wasn’t heavy-handed government regulation” that made the internet the “greatest free-market innovation in history.”  >> Related: State attorneys general ask FCC to delay net neutrality vote “Quite simply, we are restoring the light-touch framework that has governed the internet for most of its existence,” he said.
The Federal Communications Commission voted 3-2 on Thursday to repeal Obama-era net neutrality rules meant to stop broadband companies from exercising more control over what people watch and see on the internet. >> Read more trending news FCC Chairman Ajit Pai, who put forth the planned repeal and voted in favor of it Thursday, said it “certainly wasn’t heavy-handed government regulation” that made the internet the “greatest free-market innovation in history.”  >> Related: State attorneys general ask FCC to delay net neutrality vote “Quite simply, we are restoring the light-touch framework that has governed the internet for most of its existence,” he said.
Some highlights from the final Republican tax reform bill

After officially releasing the final details on Friday night, Republicans in Congress set votes for next week in the House and Senate on a sweeping overhaul of the federal tax code, as GOP leaders expressed confidence that they would have the votes to pass the first major tax reform package since 1986.

“This is what the American people have been waiting for: more jobs, fairer taxes, and bigger paychecks,” said House Speaker Paul Ryan.

“The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act is now only two votes and a signature away from becoming the law of the land,” Ryan added, as Republicans said a [More]